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  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    Ironically, hybrid cars can be a hazard precisely because of the times the petrol engine stops, and the electric motor is almost silent, so pedestrians don't hear them. This is an especially serious problem for blind pedestrians.
    Ironically, the very simple solution to this problem (should it be properly demonstrated) would be for the Government to set minimum noise standards for road vehicles..

  2. #47
    CC Grandmaster Spiny Norman's Avatar
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    We could go hire some blokes, give them each a red flag to wave and a whistle to blow, and get them to walk in front of every hybrid car. That ought to solve the problem for all pedestrians, not just the blind ones!
    “As you perhaps know, I haven't always been a Christian. I didn't go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don't recommend Christianity.” -- C.S.Lewis

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidflude
    They are not just a hazard to pedestrians. They are a hazard to normal cars. I drove past an expensive primary school a few days ago and it was worse than a Ford Territory advertisement. There were dinosaurs lined up dropping off children
    in all directions.
    The old urban myth of private school mums driving 4x4.
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  4. #49
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    hybrid cars

    Nothing wrong with the concept of hybrid cars. But to view them as a panacea is a bit too much.
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  5. #50
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    Oil price

    Given the speed of exploration, oil price in the long term will probably go hand in hand with inflation. It might sit on a higher level then mid nineties, but there is a long term natural limit to the price. On the current level (or even half the current level) many oil reserves that used to be too expensive to develop suddenly become much more attractive.
    Synthetic oil from bitumen and coal also becomes a viable option, which will put downward pressure on the oil price.
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  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Igor_Goldenberg
    The old urban myth of private school mums driving 4x4.
    No myth about it. Have you driven past a private school at home time recently?

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Igor_Goldenberg
    Given the speed of exploration, oil price in the long term will probably go hand in hand with inflation.
    Do you really think so? Remember that the graph I posted is already inflation adjusted. Do you really expect that graph to go flat in the long term?

  8. #53
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pax
    Need a dictionary?
    Wanna borrow mine?
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  9. #54
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pax
    Do you really think so? Remember that the graph I posted is already inflation adjusted. Do you really expect that graph to go flat in the long term?
    If the envirofascists would allow Americans to drill for their own oil, the price would decrease markedly. E.g. There's enough natural gas beneath America (11.5 trillion cubic metres) to heat every home in America for the next 150 years, and more oil in the shale of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming than there is in the Middle East, as well as 16 billion barrels of oil in the Alaskan wilderness (worth $2 trillion at today's prices).
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by pax
    Do you really think so? Remember that the graph I posted is already inflation adjusted. Do you really expect that graph to go flat in the long term?
    In the absence of political manipulations, Yes
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  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    and more oil in the shale of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming than there is in the Middle East,
    Got a reference for that rather remarkable claim? Any idea of the cost of the shale oil extraction and refinement process?

    as well as 16 billion barrels of oil in the Alaskan wilderness (worth $2 trillion at today's prices).
    A drop in the ocean of worldwide demand.

  12. #57
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pax
    Got a reference for that rather remarkable claim? Any idea of the cost of the shale oil extraction and refinement process?
    If oil prices were not forbidden from rising according to supply and demand, it would become economical to extract and refine this.

    Oil Shale Development in the United States:
    Prospects and Policy Issues

    Prepared for the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, 2005

    The term oil shale generally refers to any sedimentary rock that contains solid bituminous materials that are released as petroleum-like liquids when the rock is heated.

    To obtain oil from oil shale, the shale must be heated and resultant liquid must be captured. This process is called retorting, and the vessel in which retorting takes place is known as a retort.

    The largest known oil shale deposits in the world are in the Green River Formation, which covers portions of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. Estimates of the oil resource in place within the Green River Formation range from 1.5 to 1.8 trillion barrels. Not all resources in place are recoverable. For potentially recoverable oil shale resources, we roughly derive an upper bound of 1.1 trillion barrels of oil and a lower bound of about 500 billion barrels. For policy planning purposes, it is enough to know that any amount in this range is very high. For example, the midpoint in our estimate range, 800 billion barrels, is more than triple the proven oil reserves of Saudi Arabia. Present U.S. demand for petroleum products is about 20 million barrels per day. If oil shale could be used to meet a quarter of that demand, 800 billion barrels of recoverable resources would last for more than 400 years.



    Cost information available from projects and design studies performed in the 1980s can be escalated to give a very rough estimate of the anticipated capital costs for mining and surface retorting plants. Using this approach, a first-of-a-kind commercial surface retorting complex (mine, retorting plant, upgrading plant, supporting utilities, and spent shale reclamation) is unlikely to be profitable unless real crude oil prices are at least $70 to $95 per barrel (2005 dollars).
    Last edited by Capablanca-Fan; 12-06-2008 at 03:02 PM.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  13. #58
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Foremost among them are the estimated 420 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 86 billion barrels of oil (worth more than $15 trillion at today’s prices) that geologists conservatively estimate lie beneath our Outer Continental Shelf or OCS. That’s enough natural gas to heat every home that currently uses this fuel as its primary energy source for more than a century, and enough oil to substantially reduce our dependence and spending on foreign imports.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  14. #59
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    why isn't the media telling us that much of the oil price rises are due to the devaluation of the american dollar ?

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    If oil prices were not forbidden from rising according to supply and demand
    I don't prices are forbidden from rising.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    it would become economical to extract and refine this.

    Oil Shale Development in the United States:
    Prospects and Policy Issues

    Prepared for the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, 2005

    [INDENT]The term oil shale generally refers to any sedimentary rock that contains solid bituminous materials that are released as petroleum-like liquids when the rock is heated.
    As I said recently, synthetic oil becoming more attractive will be a natural barrier to rising prices as it will lift supply to a very high level.
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