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  1. #1516
    CC Grandmaster road runner's Avatar
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    About time. If if were employees stealing $8m from the employer, you better believe they would be in jail.


    Jail time for wage theft: Government moves ahead with plans to criminalise worker exploitation

    The federal government will move ahead with plans to criminalise serious worker exploitation within the “next month or so”, as argument rages on about how to deal with Australia’s wage theft crisis.

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison yesterday confirmed Industrial Relations Minister Christian Porter is drafting legislation which would criminalise worker exploitation, amid a push for broader reforms to Australia’s workplace laws.

    The new laws could introduce the penalty of jail time for business owners who engage in wage theft and will give effect to recommendations made by Allan Fells’ Migrant Worker Taskforce earlier this year. ...
    meep meep

  2. #1517
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    I've moved this from the Australian State Politics thread, as the decision clearly has larger ramifications.

    Quote Originally Posted by idledim View Post
    As to what disciplinary action might be available in this and similar cases, including the matter of Angela Williamson, and the matter of Israel Folau, and the matter of Madeline, the only clear thing is that the rest of Australia knows less about this than one Patrick Byrom - and can not know until (at the shortest) the High Court rules in the matter of Michaela Banerji. The Court might overturn the decision of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal which overturned the 2013 decision of the Federal Court. If it does so, then workers will most likely be more tightly bound by their organisation's Social Media policies. If the High Court upholds the Appeal, then it may well say (and I hope it does) that the implied freedom of speech it 'discovered' in the constitution in 1992 should also properly inform the Law of Contract.
    The High Court ruled on the Banerji case today:
    The high court has unanimously upheld a decision to sack a public servant, Michaela Banerji, for anonymous social media posts that criticised the government’s immigration policy. The court delivered its judgment in the landmark freedom of speech test case on Wednesday, upholding an appeal from the workers’ compensation agency Comcare which argued it was reasonable for the immigration department to sack Banerji. The case has implications for 2 million federal, state and local public servants, as the court declined to use the constitutional implied freedom of communication to rule that the sacking was unreasonable. Banerji was sacked for breaching the public service code of conduct – which requires public servants to be apolitical “at all times” – for anonymous tweets from her LaLegale Twitter account.

  3. #1518
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    Any public servants on Chess Chat should bear this part of the decision in mind:
    They noted that public service rules that anyone who posts on social media should assume their identity and public employment will be revealed, an “obvious” risk that means even “so-called anonymous tweets” can damage the public service.

  4. #1519
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
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    When I worked in the Commonwealth Centre in Chifley Square, Sydney, from 1966 onwards there were anti-Vietnam protests against the Dept of Defence that had offices about floor 6. I joined them a few times at lunch time and then was warned it was not permitted. I don't know if was not permitted by law or only a directive. Luckily I did not take the case to the High Court.
    Zionism is racism as defined by the UN, Israel by every dirty means available steals land and water, kill Palestinian freedom fighters and civilians, and operates an apartheid system to drive more Palestinians off their land

  5. #1520
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Sorry, Bernie: America's Poorest Are Richer Than 60 Percent of Developed Countries
    BY TYLER O'NEIL, PJ Media, 26 AUGUST 2019

    On average, a person among the poorest 20 percent of Americans consumes more goods and services than the average person in Canada, Greece, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Australia, Spain, Portugal, Japan, Denmark, Iceland, New Zealand, Slovenia, Slovakia, Israel, South Korea, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Poland, Chile, Hungary, Turkey, and Mexico.

    "Our study shows that because of unreported income, charity, and non-cash government benefits like Medicaid and food stamps, consumption by America’s poorest 20 percent exceeds the national averages even in developed nations like Japan, New Zealand and Denmark," James Agresti, president of Just Facts, said in a statement on the report.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  6. #1521
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    Sorry, Bernie: America's Poorest Are Richer Than 60 Percent of Developed Countries
    BY TYLER O'NEIL, PJ Media, 26 AUGUST 2019

    On average, a person among the poorest 20 percent of Americans consumes more goods and services than the average person in Canada, Greece, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Australia, Spain, Portugal, Japan, Denmark, Iceland, New Zealand, Slovenia, Slovakia, Israel, South Korea, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Poland, Chile, Hungary, Turkey, and Mexico. …
    They seem to have conveniently ignored the cost of healthcare in the US

  7. #1522
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    They seem to have conveniently ignored the cost of healthcare in the US
    Thanks to decades of government meddling. Some more ideas not expressed on this site that would help: enforce price transparency in hospital billing so no surprise bills, allow right-to-try for any drug approved in an overseas developed country (e.g. insulin from Canada).
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  8. #1523
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    Thanks to decades of government meddling. Some more ideas not expressed on this site that would help: enforce price transparency in hospital billing so no surprise bills, allow right-to-try for any drug approved in an overseas developed country (e.g. insulin from Canada).
    Those ideas might help, but Australia and the UK clearly show that only the government can provide decent healthcare that people can actually afford at the lowest cost to society.

  9. #1524
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    Those ideas might help, but Australia and the UK clearly show that only the government can provide decent healthcare that people can actually afford at the lowest cost to society.
    Australia isn't too bad, because there is also private health insurance with a catastrophic (hospital) option allowed, not streng verboten by the government as it is in the USA. The Australian insurance is also decoupled from employment. The UK is not so great, with long waiting times, poor quality, and rationing. For example, the BBC, hardly a right-wing outlet, published NHS 'rationing leaves patients in pain'. As usual, the USA health system is attacked as a market failure, when in reality it's a government failure.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  10. #1525
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Refutung leftist myths about the free market

    4 Common Capitalism Myths Debunked
    The term Marx coined stuck and has led to some confusion about why markets actually work.
    James Davenport, FEE, 9 January 2018

    One of the most disappointing things I face as a college professor is the lack of understanding most students have regarding capitalism. The simple fact is, despite its importance to our daily lives, relatively few people have a strong grasp of what causes economic growth and why markets are so central to continuously rising standards of living.

    In my teaching, I have encountered several myths or misperceptions about capitalism from students as well as individuals outside the classroom. Dispelling these myths has become a focus of much of my teaching.

    Myth #1: Capitalism Was “Created”

    Myth #2: Capitalism Creates Poverty

    Myth #3: Capitalism Is about Capital

    Myth #4: Capitalism Creates “Winners” and “Losers”

    Markets also produce products and services that improve our lives in ways that our ancestors could never have dreamed. Just consider all the things that exist today, that didn’t a mere thirty years ago. The simple fact is that today even the poorest modern Americans have more goods and services at their disposal than kings and queens did just two hundred years ago.

    So, although individual firms may fail, and individual people may not gain great wealth, the fact is that, over the long-run, we all win by enjoying better living standards than previous generations.

    We Need Better Education

    If the United States is going to continue to see its economy grow and the living standards of its citizens improve, it is important that students are taught the basics of the economic system that has allowed them to experience Adam Smith’s “universal opulence.” Without this basic knowledge, they're easily led to believe the myths I’ve mentioned and to vote for politicians and policies that will ultimately undermine the very system that has made their lives significantly better than their ancestors, as well as better than most of their contemporaries across the globe.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  11. #1526
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    Australia isn't too bad, because there is also private health insurance with a catastrophic (hospital) option allowed, not streng verboten by the government as it is in the USA. The Australian insurance is also decoupled from employment. The UK is not so great, with long waiting times, poor quality, and rationing. For example, the BBC, hardly a right-wing outlet, published NHS 'rationing leaves patients in pain'. As usual, the USA health system is attacked as a market failure, when in reality it's a government failure.
    Both the UK and Australian systems have much better outcomes than the US, which depends on the market to a much greater degree.

  12. #1527
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    Australia isn't too bad, because there is also private health insurance with a catastrophic (hospital) option allowed, not streng verboten by the government as it is in the USA. ... As usual, the USA health system is attacked as a market failure, when in reality it's a government failure.
    I'm not sure what you're talking about - catastrophic health insurance is also legal in the US.

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