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  1. #1396
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    According to that über-left source Slate anyway.
    So what are the 'real' growth figures?

  2. #1397
    CC Grandmaster Ian Murray's Avatar
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    The indictment of journalist Aaron Cantú portends grim future for First Amendment

    Mondoweiss
    14.6.17

    ...Journalist Aaron Cantú has written about policing, propaganda, drugs, and politics for Mondoweiss, The Intercept, Al Jazeera, The Baffler, and many other publications. He was arrested while covering a protest on the morning of Donald Trump’s inauguration and now faces up to 70 years in jail on charges of felony rioting, conspiracy to riot and destruction of property. Julie Ann Grimm, Cantú's editor at the Santa Fe Reporter, says, "His arrest was scary, the threat of being imprisoned for the rest of your life for just doing your job and observing a protest is … I don’t even know how to finish that sentence. But we’re really not going to let this action by the federal government or by the prosecutors in Washington, D.C. slow him down or to put a muzzle on his voice as a journalist."...

  3. #1398
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    The First Amendment protects the right of a free press, freedom of peaeful assembly, freedom of religion (not "from religion"), freedom to protest,, and freedom to petition the government. It does not protect rioting, destruction of property, or physically attacking people who disagree with you. Another report says:

    Aaron Cantú, a staff writer at the Santa Fe Reporter, has been indicted by a federal grand jury on charges that he participated in a riot while working as a journalist during protests in Washington, DC on Inauguration Day.

    Cantú faces eight felony counts—including inciting a riot, rioting, conspiracy to riot and five counts of destruction of property. The grand jury handed up the indictment last week.

    On January 20, a collection of DC police and federal law enforcement officers arrested more than 200 people in connection with a rally that began as a protest, but turned destructive as several people broke the windows of businesses, damaged vehicles and allegedly caused a police officer to break his wrist.

    Cantú was not named specifically by prosecutors as the cause of any of the destruction, as some defendants were. Instead, the indictment named him as being present while the damage happened. The arrests have been criticized by the American Civil Liberties Union, other civil rights groups and newspapers as overly broad and lacking hard evidence.

    So it was hardly any sort of peaceful protest but a destructive riot. Cantú was charged with inciting this riot. Whether he did is another matter, and this case does raise hard questions about whether a journalist covering such a riot gets charged for being involved when he was merely present. It also raises more questions about the grand jury system in general, which can proverbially indict a ham sandwich.
    “The best part of adopting conservatism after years of leftism, by the way, is how much easier life becomes. If you’re a conservative, facts are generally all you need to establish a case or mount an argument. If you’re a leftist, however, you always have to find a way around the facts, which is why combative lefties always sound like lawyers knowingly representing a guilty client.”—Tim Blair

  4. #1399
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    From Michael Baron (elsewhere):

    The Fourth Industrial Revolution is about empowering people, not the rise of the machines
    Machines, rather than something to be feared, are the tools that will help us solve the world's biggest problems
    Brad Keywell, Co-founder and CEO, Uptake
    World Economic Forum, 14 June 2017

    In short, when the mechanic and the technology work together, the work gets done faster, with fewer errors and better results.

    Multiply this across all industries: aviation, energy, transportation, smart cities, manufacturing, natural resources, and construction.

    The productivity we unleash could be reminiscent of what the world saw at the advent of the first industrial revolution. But the impact of the Fourth Industrial Revolution will run much broader, and deeper, than the first.

    We’ll have the knowledge, the talent and the tools to solve some of the world’s biggest problems: hunger, climate change, disease.

    Machines will supply us with the insight and the perspective we need to reach those solutions. But they won’t supply the judgement or the ingenuity. People will.
    “The best part of adopting conservatism after years of leftism, by the way, is how much easier life becomes. If you’re a conservative, facts are generally all you need to establish a case or mount an argument. If you’re a leftist, however, you always have to find a way around the facts, which is why combative lefties always sound like lawyers knowingly representing a guilty client.”—Tim Blair

  5. #1400
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by road runner View Post
    Peter Martin picked up on this story as well:

    And partly because when workers are paid more, they stay more and become better workers, and even become better ambassadors for the businesses that employ them. And because, occasionally, wage increases are really big. When they are big enough, low wage workers become higher wage workers and spend more, especially in shops and food outlets, the kind of industries that are likely to employ them.
    That should be up to the employer, because it's his money. He may well find that higher wages and lower turnover is profitable. That is why the vast majority of jobs pay above the minimum.

    Quote Originally Posted by road runner View Post
    There's just a chance the [Fair Work] commission knows what it's doing.
    Only a tiny one that a third party bureaucracy that pays no price for being wrong knows better than the employer and employee concerned.

    And we still have the problem that the minimum is well over twice the dole. Allowing people full-time jobs that pay less than the minimum but much more than the dole is far better for everyone (except for competition-hating unions) than work-for-the-dole boondoggles.
    “The best part of adopting conservatism after years of leftism, by the way, is how much easier life becomes. If you’re a conservative, facts are generally all you need to establish a case or mount an argument. If you’re a leftist, however, you always have to find a way around the facts, which is why combative lefties always sound like lawyers knowingly representing a guilty client.”—Tim Blair

  6. #1401
    Batoutahelius road runner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    That should be up to the employer, because it's his money. He may well find that higher wages and lower turnover is profitable. That is why the vast majority of jobs pay above the minimum.
    Not only may he find that, but evidently according to the research he did. Yes in spite of that wages have stagnated. Good thing we have regulators to step in and lend him a hand.
    meep meep

  7. #1402
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    Restaurant die-off is first course of California’s $15 minimum wage
    BY JEREMY BAGOTT, 13 June 2017

    In a pair of affluent coastal California counties, the canary in the mineshaft has gotten splayed, spatchcocked and plated over a bed of unintended consequences, garnished with sprigs of locally sourced economic distortion and non-GMO, “What the heck were they thinking?”

    The result of one early experiment in a citywide $15 minimum wage is an ominous sign for the state’s poorer inland counties as the statewide wage floor creeps toward the mark.

    Consider San Francisco, an early adopter of the $15 wage. It’s now experiencing a restaurant die-off, minting jobless hash-slingers, cashiers, busboys, scullery engineers and line cooks as they get pink-slipped in increasing numbers. And the wage there hasn’t yet hit $15.

    As the East Bay Times reported in January, at least 60 restaurants around the Bay Area had closed since September alone.

    A recent study by Michael Luca at Harvard Business School and Dara Lee Luca at Mathematica Policy Research found that every $1 hike in the minimum wage brings a 14 percent increase in the likelihood of a 3.5-star restaurant on Yelp! closing.

    If what’s happening with one early adopter of the $15 wage progression is any indication, locally famous inland hash houses and burger joints from Calexico to the Cow Counties will disappear as mandated wages climb to $15 statewide. And that will only be the start of things.
    “The best part of adopting conservatism after years of leftism, by the way, is how much easier life becomes. If you’re a conservative, facts are generally all you need to establish a case or mount an argument. If you’re a leftist, however, you always have to find a way around the facts, which is why combative lefties always sound like lawyers knowingly representing a guilty client.”—Tim Blair

  8. #1403
    CC Grandmaster Ian Murray's Avatar
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    You gave us the same doom-and-gloom forebodings last time the min wage rose. Here is a list of the 138 new bars/restaurants which opened in San Francisco during Winter 2016/17: https://sf.eater.com/2016/12/5/13848...-bay-area-2016

    And another 52 since then: https://sf.eater.com/2017/3/6/148314...-bay-area-2017
    Last edited by Ian Murray; 20-06-2017 at 04:04 PM.

  9. #1404
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    None other than leftist Krugman points out that sweatshops are better than nothing

    In Praise of Cheap Labor
    Bad jobs at bad wages are better than no jobs at all.
    By Paul Krugman

    For many years a huge Manila garbage dump known as Smokey Mountain was a favorite media symbol of Third World poverty. Several thousand men, women, and children lived on that dump--enduring the stench, the flies, and the toxic waste in order to make a living combing the garbage for scrap metal and other recyclables. And they lived there voluntarily, because the $10 or so a squatter family could clear in a day was better than the alternatives.

    The squatters are gone now, forcibly removed by Philippine police last year as a cosmetic move in advance of a Pacific Rim summit. But I found myself thinking about Smokey Mountain recently, after reading my latest batch of hate mail.

    The occasion was an op-ed piece I had written for the New York Times, in which I had pointed out that while wages and working conditions in the new export industries of the Third World are appalling, they are a big improvement over the "previous, less visible rural poverty." I guess I should have expected that this comment would generate letters along the lines of, "Well, if you lose your comfortable position as an American professor you can always find another job--as long as you are 12 years old and willing to work for 40 cents an hour."

    Such moral outrage is common among the opponents of globalization--of the transfer of technology and capital from high-wage to low-wage countries and the resulting growth of labor-intensive Third World exports. These critics take it as a given that anyone with a good word for this process is naive or corrupt and, in either case, a de facto agent of global capital in its oppression of workers here and abroad.

    But matters are not that simple, and the moral lines are not that clear. In fact, let me make a counter-accusation: The lofty moral tone of the opponents of globalization is possible only because they have chosen not to think their position through. While fat-cat capitalists might benefit from globalization, the biggest beneficiaries are, yes, Third World workers.

    You may say that the wretched of the earth should not be forced to serve as hewers of wood, drawers of water, and sewers of sneakers for the affluent. But what is the alternative? Should they be helped with foreign aid? Maybe--although the historical record of regions like southern Italy suggests that such aid has a tendency to promote perpetual dependence. Anyway, there isn't the slightest prospect of significant aid materializing. Should their own governments provide more social justice? Of course--but they won't, or at least not because we tell them to. And as long as you have no realistic alternative to industrialization based on low wages, to oppose it means that you are willing to deny desperately poor people the best chance they have of progress for the sake of what amounts to an aesthetic standard--that is, the fact that you don't like the idea of workers being paid a pittance to supply rich Westerners with fashion items.

    In short, my correspondents are not entitled to their self-righteousness. They have not thought the matter through. And when the hopes of hundreds of millions are at stake, thinking things through is not just good intellectual practice. It is a moral duty.
    “The best part of adopting conservatism after years of leftism, by the way, is how much easier life becomes. If you’re a conservative, facts are generally all you need to establish a case or mount an argument. If you’re a leftist, however, you always have to find a way around the facts, which is why combative lefties always sound like lawyers knowingly representing a guilty client.”—Tim Blair

  10. #1405
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    Harvard, hardly a bastion of the right wing, shows that minimum wage laws kill jobs

    Harvard Study: Minimum Wage Hikes Cut Entry-Level Jobs, Harm Poor Minorities Most
    Researchers discovered that a $1 increase in the minimum wage leads to approximately a 4 to 10 percent increase in the likelihood of any given restaurant folding.
    Erielle Davidson By Erielle Davidson, 3 May 2017

    Harvard Business School recently released a working paper titled “Survival of the Fittest: The Impact of the Minimum Wage on Firm Exit”, discussing the effects of minimum wage policies on companies’ survival. For those with any shred of economic understanding, the results were predictably dismal.

    The paper focused specifically upon the restaurant industry in San Francisco, using data from the review platform Yelp to track the activity and performance of individual restaurants. Researchers Dara Lee Luca and Michael Luca discovered that a $1 increase in the minimum wage leads to approximately a 4 to 10 percent increase in the likelihood of any given restaurant exiting the industry entirely. In economic terms, minimum wage hikes quicken a restaurant’s “shutdown” point.

    Luca and Luca found this effect to be more pronounced among the restaurants with lower ratings while essentially nonexistent among five-star restaurants. A $1 increase in the minimum wage increased the likelihood of a 3.5-star exiting by roughly 14 percent, while having zero effects on the restaurants with five-star ratings. In other words, minimum wage hikes disproportionately affect the restaurants that are already struggling in popularity.

    According to a 2014 report, only 17 percent of Seattle workers previously making under $15 per hour before the hike were white. The rest were Asian (20 percent), Black (28 percent), and Hispanic (22 percent). Undoubtedly, these folks were disproportionately hurt by the reduction in employment that followed the hikes.

    While “racial and economic justice” through forced minimum wage hikes sounds appealing, it just doesn’t work the way its supporters suppose. In fact, quite the opposite. Slapping a $15 minimum wage requirement on a large corporation might “feel good” to angry workers, but those very workers are ultimately the ones who will pay the price.

    No one ever said class warfare rhetoric made economic sense. San Francisco will soon relearn that this summer when it raises its minimum wage again.
    “The best part of adopting conservatism after years of leftism, by the way, is how much easier life becomes. If you’re a conservative, facts are generally all you need to establish a case or mount an argument. If you’re a leftist, however, you always have to find a way around the facts, which is why combative lefties always sound like lawyers knowingly representing a guilty client.”—Tim Blair

  11. #1406
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    In Praise of Cheap Labor
    Bad jobs at bad wages are better than no jobs at all.
    By Paul Krugman
    But the US isn't a Third World country.

  12. #1407
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    But the US isn't a Third World country.
    Many wouldn't know it, as the US has some of the worst scores for No Poverty, Zero Hunger, Good Health and Wellbeing etc in the OECD.
    meep meep

  13. #1408
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    Minimum Wage Laws are Destroying Jobs -- Just as Predicted
    Larry Elder, 27 June 2017

    In the '60s my parents opened a small diner near downtown Los Angeles. As a child, I watched my parents sitting at the kitchen table, discussing their plans for what they considered a huge expansion of the business -- hiring a dishwasher. But my parents kept putting off the decision, in large part because of a proposed minimum-wage hike. This would've made the additional employee, as I recall my parents concluding, "too expensive."

    This brings us to the impact of recent minimum wage hikes in California. The owner of a small restaurant told me that Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti invited several small business owners to city hall to discuss the impact of a proposed minimum wage hike. Several brought profit-and-loss statements. Each business person, the small restaurant owner said, tried to convince the Democratic mayor that their profit margins were too small to take the wage hike without laying people off, cutting hours or raising prices, which usually means a falloff in business.

    The now-defunct organization called the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now came to California years ago to gather signatures on a petition for a ballot measure to increase minimum wage. Incredibly, ACORN sued the state to exempt itself from the then-current minimum wage and overtime laws. In its filings, ACORN said, "The more ACORN must pay each individual outreach worker -- either because of minimum wage or overtime requirements -- the fewer outreach workers it will be able to hire." Can't make this stuff up.

    When George McGovern, the 1972 Democratic presidential candidate, left the Senate, he bought the Stratford Inn, a small Connecticut inn and restaurant. It went bust and he blamed, in part, the very kind regulations he passed as a politician devoid of business experience. "I wish I had known more firsthand about the concerns and problems of American businesspeople while I was a U.S. senator and later a presidential nominee," said McGovern. "... I learned by owning the Stratford Inn is that legislators and government regulators must more carefully consider the economic and management burdens we have been imposing on U.S. businesses. ... Many businesses, especially small independents such as the Stratford Inn, simply can't pass such costs on to their customers and remain competitive or profitable."

    As for the mayor of Los Angeles, it should be noted that he worked on a Ph.D.at the London School of Economics. But at this famed institute, Garcetti did not study economics. He studied "ethnicity and nationalism."

    Makes sense.
    “The best part of adopting conservatism after years of leftism, by the way, is how much easier life becomes. If you’re a conservative, facts are generally all you need to establish a case or mount an argument. If you’re a leftist, however, you always have to find a way around the facts, which is why combative lefties always sound like lawyers knowingly representing a guilty client.”—Tim Blair

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