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  1. #1
    Account Permanently Banned Axiom's Avatar
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    Whilst we are off topic, and discussing maeanings of words, could someone please give me the derivation of the word 'hebrew' ?

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    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axiom
    Whilst we are off topic, and discussing maeanings of words, could someone please give me the derivation of the word 'hebrew' ?
    I covered that a while back in A brief history of the Jews:

    Hebrews: Abraham himself is called a Hebrew in Genesis 14:13, the first use of the term. Joseph is also called a Hebrew in Genesis 39:14, 17 and 41:12. The people whom God (through Moses) rescued from Egypt were called ‘Hebrews’. The word ‘Hebrew’ may be derived from the name of one of Abraham’s ancestors, the patriarch Eber (Genesis 10:21–25, 11:14–17).

    Israelites: means a descendant of Jacob, who in later life was given the name ‘Israel’ by God (Genesis 32:28).

    Jews: this word derives from Judah (Hebrew Yehudah), one of Jacob’s 12 sons, and the one who was the ancestor of Jesus Christ (Mat. 1:3, Luke 3:33). Thus Jesus is Jewish, and the Hebrew version of His name is Yeshua Hamashiach = Jesus the Messiah. However the term ‘Jew’ became used for all descendants of Israel. So the term ‘Jew’ was used interchangeably with ‘Hebrew’ and ‘Israelite’. Thus a Jew is biblically defined as a descendant of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

    For example, ‘Jew’ is used synonymously with ‘Hebrew’ in Jeremiah 34:9. Mordecai was called a ‘Jew’ although he was from the tribe of Benjamin (Esther 2:5). Christ’s apostle Paul/Saul (Hebrew Sha’ul) calls himself a ‘Jew’ (Acts 21:39), and he also calls himself an ‘Israelite’ from the tribe of Benjamin (Romans 11:1, Philippians 3:4–5).

    Another usage in the NT of the word Ιουδαίος (Ioudaios), usually translated ‘Jew’, should be noted. It probably mainly means ‘Jew’ in the widest sense (descendant of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob) when used by or to gentiles. When used among Jews, it was probably mainly a sectional term meaning ‘Judean’. This reflected the mutual dislike between Judeans and Galileans. The latter included Christ and his disciples who were most strongly opposed by Judeans. To illustrate the difference, the Roman Pontius Pilate had Jesus labeled: ‘King of the Jews’ (Mat. 27:37) while the Jewish leaders said: ‘If He be the King of Israel …’ [including Galilee and the Diaspora] (Mat. 27:42).

    In the Bible, Jewishness was determined through the father’s line, as is clear from the genealogies. Modern Orthodox Judaism, which dates from about AD 70, and is not the same as biblical Judaism, has declared from about the time of the Crusades that Jewishness is determined through the mother’s line, but the scriptural teaching is all that matters. After all, King David himself had both a gentile great grandmother and great-great grandmother (Matthew 1:5, Ruth 4:21–22).
    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
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    Account Permanently Banned Axiom's Avatar
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    Thankyou Jono, but i was really looking for the original meaning of the term 'hebrew' ie. its original definition.
    Was it a term coined by the Eygptians ?

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    Account Permanently Banned Axiom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axiom
    Thankyou Jono, but i was really looking for the original meaning of the term 'hebrew' ie. its original definition.
    Was it a term coined by the Eygptians ?
    Jono ?

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    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    I thought I explained the likely origin of "Hebrew", from Eber.
    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
    “There’s no point blaming the tragedies of socialism on the flaws or corruption of particular leaders. Any system which allows some people to exercise unbridled power over others is an open invitation to abuse, whether that system is called slavery or socialism or something else.”—Thomas Sowell

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    Account Permanently Banned Axiom's Avatar
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    Thankyou Jono

    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    I thought I explained the likely origin of "Hebrew", from Eber.
    So , no original meaning other than as a derivative of Eber ?

    Eustace Mullins said that it came from the Eygptians, meaning ' bandits from across the river '

    It seems the etymology is uncertain however http://www.bible.ca/d-christians-are...-etymology.htm

    "The first time the word "Hebrew" is used in the Bible is in Gen 14:13. Just as Abraham is first called a "Hebrew" in Gen 14:13, so also the disciples first called Christians in Acts 11:26.
    The etymological origin of "Hebrew" is uncertain. The most likely origin of word "ibri" [Hebrew] is derived from "br" which means "to cross over a boundary". (ISBE, revised, Hebrew) Included in this thought is that a "Hebrew" would be one "who crossed over" or one who went from place to place, a nomad, a wanderer, an alien. This designation that would fit some aspects of patriarchal behavior. If this is correct, then a Hebrew is one who travels into another land as a nomad and resides as an alien. It also means that the term has origins outside of Palestine and is a common expression that was etymologically modified from a nomad to specific ethnic group (Jews) whose origin was nomadic through Abram.
    The likely fact that the word Hebrew means "sojourner" underscores the importance of the land promise. Further, while possessing the land, they would always be reminded by the root meaning of their name, "Hebrew" that the land was a gift given to their forefathers who, for 500 years, were literally "Hebrews" in the "alien" sense of the word. This means that calling Palestine "the land of the Hebrews" in Gen 40:15 was a deliberate paradox, for sojourners don’t have a land! Notice the powerful history of the Jewish people as sojourners: (Hebrews) "
    Last edited by Axiom; 08-01-2008 at 11:57 AM.

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    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Sharon and Arafat finally agreed to negotiate. But Sharon requested that they should follow Jewish tradition by starting off with a story, and Arafat grudgingly agreed.

    Sharon:
    "Once, while the Israelites were wandering the desert for 40 years, Moses took a swim in an oasis. But when he got out of the water, he found his clothes missing. He demanded to know what had happened, and the rest of the children of Israel said,
    'That's obvious — the Palestinians stole them.'"

    At that point Arafat furiously interupted and said:
    "Just wait a minute here — there were no Palestinians there at that time!".

    Sharon responded:
    "I rest my case!"
    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
    “There’s no point blaming the tragedies of socialism on the flaws or corruption of particular leaders. Any system which allows some people to exercise unbridled power over others is an open invitation to abuse, whether that system is called slavery or socialism or something else.”—Thomas Sowell

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    CC Grandmaster ER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axiom
    ... i was really looking for the original meaning of the term 'hebrew' ie. its original definition.
    Was it a term coined by the Eygptians ?
    Ax, correct me if I am wrong but I always thought "Hebrew" meant "a descendant of Abraham", that's what we were taught at school anyway!
    Cheers and good luck!
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  9. #9
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by justaknight
    Ax, correct me if I am wrong but I always thought "Hebrew" meant "a descendant of Abraham", that's what we were taught at school anyway!
    Cheers and good luck!
    It means that, but the etymology is likely to be Abraham's ancestor, Eber.
    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
    “There’s no point blaming the tragedies of socialism on the flaws or corruption of particular leaders. Any system which allows some people to exercise unbridled power over others is an open invitation to abuse, whether that system is called slavery or socialism or something else.”—Thomas Sowell

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