View Poll Results: Who will win? Tie for first decided by tiebreak for poll result

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  • Michael Adams

    0 0%
  • Viswanathan Anand

    3 25.00%
  • Levon Aronian

    1 8.33%
  • Magnus Carlsen

    1 8.33%
  • Pavel Eljanov

    0 0%
  • Boris Gelfand

    0 0%
  • Vassily Ivanchuk

    1 8.33%
  • Vladimir Kramnik

    1 8.33%
  • Peter Leko

    1 8.33%
  • Shakhryar Mamedyarov

    0 0%
  • Judit Polgar

    0 0%
  • Teimour Radjabov

    1 8.33%
  • Veselin Topalov

    3 25.00%
  • Loek van Wely

    0 0%
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Thread: 2008 Corus

  1. #46
    Illuminati Bill Gletsos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    Some very helpful comments by Marin. My own longest tournament game was having to defend this type of endgame. But back then we had adjournments to refresh our knowledge of the drawing technique Kramnik played a new plan, and Aronian went wrong.
    Actually Jono it appears your opponent missed a win after your 109...Ra7+ when he could have played 110. Kf8 and won.
    The Force can have a strong influence on the weak-minded.

  2. #47
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Gletsos
    Actually Jono it appears your opponent missed a win after your 109...Ra7+ when he could have played 110. Kf8 and won.
    I think you're right, Bill. So 109... Kh6, by analogy with Smyslov and Levenfish position #29 (where White has an e-pawn), and 109... Rb8 should be OK as well because there are still three files separating the R from the P. After White missed his chance, we reverted to the normal course of events, as per S&L #26 (again with the e-pawn).
    Last edited by Capablanca-Fan; 20-01-2008 at 06:52 PM.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  3. #48
    Illuminati Bill Gletsos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    I think you're right, Bill. So 109... Kh6, by analogy with Smyslov and Levenfish position #29 (where White has an e-pawn), and 109... Rb8 should be OK as well because there are still three files separating the R from the P. After White missed his chance, we reverted to the normal course of events, as per S&L #26 (again with the e-pawn).
    I assume you meant 109... Ra8 which would hold. If you opponent had realised he could in fact win via 109. Kf8 then after your 110... Ra8 he had a chance to get back to that position via 111. Re6 and hope you would again play 111... Ra7+.
    The Force can have a strong influence on the weak-minded.

  4. #49
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Topalov beats Kramnik with a scary novelty and even gets to give up his queen.

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    Carlsen lost as well so it's now Carlsen and Aronian +2, Kramnik Adams Radjabov Anand +1, Topalov Ivanchuk Mamedyarov Leko even, Van Wely and Polgar -1, Gelfand and Eljanov -3 with four games left.
    Last edited by Kevin Bonham; 23-01-2008 at 08:13 AM.

  5. #50
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Carlsen leads after giving a lesson in how not to play the Benko but winning anyway after van Wely ruined a completely won position.

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    Something just a tad familiar about this game from the Honorary Group

    Timman-Ljubojevic

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    ... haven't had time to analyse it yet.
    Last edited by Kevin Bonham; 24-01-2008 at 07:02 PM.

  6. #51
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    I think Topalov was saying in his post mortem that he felt that Rg8 was one of the best lines for black. I also think Nc7 is nice (key move?)

  7. #52
    CC Grandmaster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    Carlsen leads after giving a lesson in how not to play the Benko but winning anyway after van Wely ruined a completely won position.
    Unbelievable. I went to bed after about move 20, certain that black was losing..

  8. #53
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    Carlsen has a tough finish with Anand, Kramnik and Radjabov to play. But he does have two whites.

  9. #54
    CC Grandmaster Adamski's Avatar
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    Photo in New In Chess 2007/7

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    According to Marin, Aronian actually had a technical tablebase draw for much of the ending against Kramnik and only became lost from move 103, which given that it is the tricky f and h pawn ending (where the defender often draws with absolutely perfect play) does not surprise me greatly.

    Aronian bounced back yesterday, beating Radjabov to swap places with him, while Anand beat Polgar, also swapping places.
    Did you folks see the photo in New In Chess, 2007/7, of Aronian, his second and Filipino Aussie WIM Arianne Caoili, which Aronian allegedly "wanted to resemble the album cover of a modern band"? I think people (including both Super-GM's and ex-NZ Champion FM's) are entitled to make the odd mistake when a game goes for more than 100 moves....
    Last edited by Adamski; 24-01-2008 at 11:36 PM.
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  10. #55
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono2
    Did you folks see the photo in New In Chess, 2007/7, of Aronian, his second and Filipino Aussie WIM Arianne Caoili, which Aronian allegedly "wanted to resemble the album cover of a modern band"?
    Haven't seen it.

    I think people (including both Super-GM's and ex-NZ Champion FM's) are entitled to make the odd mistake when a game goes for more than 100 moves....
    Indeed and I don't think anyone would criticise Aronian for fluffing a database draw in a position that is a technical draw but very difficult to defend, just as no-one would criticise Shirov for failing to win the database win he had in the World Cup semi-finals.

    What Aronian was doing earlier in the game that caused him to get into such a bad position in the first place is rather more to the point. It is quite surprising to me that he was out of theory prematurely (by super-GM standards, not mine!) in such a sharp line that had been so topical lately and hence a very long way behind on the clock already when Kramnik uncorked the novelty Nc3. Kramnik's Nc3 is probably a very good move but Aronian would not have defended against it so badly had he not been so far behind on time.

    Recently Mig Greengard suggested that a record of the time on the clocks should be a part of the game record for these games. I agree because in this case it would tell a lot of the story that is not told by just the moves.

  11. #56
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Kramnik loses to Carlsen:

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    29.Qxa6 was apparently a very silly miscalculation. According to chessbase he did not realise that if 30.Qxb6 there follows ...Reb7 forcing 30.Qd4 when ...Bf6 wins either a piece or a queen for two pieces, which is really not that difficult to see.

  12. #57
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Eljanov-Topalov, in which Topalov plays a piece sac that is either very speculative or just plain silly and loses again. Despite his glorious win over Kramnik, Topa has had a poor tournament generally and now sits at minus-one.

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    ...and continuing the theme of bad play, Adams (who up til now has done well) exchanges off into what appears to be a lost pawn ending against Polgar and duly loses it.

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    +3 Aronian, Carlsen
    +2 Anand, Radjabov
    +1 Ivanchuk
    = Leko, Adams, Kramnik, Mamedyarov
    -1 Topalov, Polgar
    -2 Eljanov
    -3 Van Wely
    Tournament bunny on -4 Gelfand

    The pairings that matter for the final round (in terms of chance of affecting first or a tie for first) are Polgar-Aronian, Carlsen-Radjabov and Anand-Kramnik

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