Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 36 of 36
  1. #31
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    5,535
    Comment on the opening:

    In QGD black tries to exchange light squared bishop and white tries to prevent it. After 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bg5 Be7 6.e3 white usually succeeds in at least delaying the exchange. White also has a plan with Ne2-g3 followed by f3-e4.
    To kill both plans black can play 3...Be7 instead of 3...Nf6 (not applicable to above game as black played Nf6 on move one!).

    In the game white should've been happy with the opening and simply play Nf3 followed by 0-0. Queen side castle, especially after f3-c5, is not a good idea.
    I also wouldn't play 8...h6, and not because of king side attack danger.
    After that move black can never play Bg4-h5-g6 (very useful manoeuvre to neutralise Bd3) or f6 to protect e5 square if necessary. h7 square is usually covered by playing Re8-Nf8.
    For private coaching (IM, four times VIC champion) call or SMS 0417519733
    Computer tells you what to play. Good coach explains why.

  2. #32
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Igor_Goldenberg View Post
    Comment on the opening:
    ...black can play 3...Be7 instead of 3...Nf6 ....
    after 3...Be7, there is a line fun for white. 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bf4 ...c6 6.e3 ...Bf5, 6.g4! and 7.h4! I hope for it every game.

  3. #33
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    15,112
    Its certainly playable...but i would not give g4 and h4 exclamation marks. If black is prepared, he will obtain good counterplay.
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  4. #34
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    39,303
    Went a long way to curing myself of my hatred of defending against this thing with a win today against an exchange-QGD setup. However it was far from mainline as white played the rather unambitious 8.Be2.

    While preparing for this game I discovered this interesting "fake fianchetto" idea that I had not known about before:

    PGN Viewer
     
    Moderation Requests: All requests for, comments about, or questions about moderation of any kind including thread changes must be posted in the Help and Feedback section and not on the thread in question. (Or by private message for routine changes or sensitive matters.)

    ACF Newsletter Information - All Australian players and administrators should subscribe and check each issue for relevant notices

    My psephology/politics site (token chess references only) : http://kevinbonham.blogspot.com.au/ Politics twitter feed https://twitter.com/kevinbonham

  5. #35
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    15,112
    I believe this is quite a standad move, the idea is to play Bf5 and to exchange white square bishops. In fact, this is possibly the main line these days. Black's black squares look weak but the weakness is really hard to exploit.
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  6. #36
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA (formerly Brisbane, and before that Wellington, NZ)
    Posts
    20,762
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    I believe this is quite a standad move, the idea is to play Bf5 and to exchange white square bishops. In fact, this is possibly the main line these days. Black's black squares look weak but the weakness is really hard to exploit.
    Yes, White normally chooses the move order 5.Bg5 Be7 6.e3 so White can get Bd3 in before Black plays ...Bf5.
    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
    “There’s no point blaming the tragedies of socialism on the flaws or corruption of particular leaders. Any system which allows some people to exercise unbridled power over others is an open invitation to abuse, whether that system is called slavery or socialism or something else.”—Thomas Sowell

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. ? v Boris' Exchange French
    By Desmond in forum Correspondence Matches
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 13-02-2007, 02:31 PM
  2. Baron Variation, Caro-Cann Defence
    By MichaelBaron in forum General Chess Chat
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 27-07-2006, 02:33 AM
  3. The wrong knight variation.
    By Davidflude in forum Chess Training
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-11-2005, 07:58 PM
  4. CHINA – AUSTRALIA Chess Exchange
    By ChessGuru in forum Australian Chess
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-03-2004, 05:03 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •