View Poll Results: Favourite Fantasy Series

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  • Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien

    8 72.73%
  • Riftwar Saga - Raymond Feist

    4 36.36%
  • Wheel of Time - Robert Jordan

    1 9.09%
  • Discworld - Terry Pratchett

    3 27.27%
  • The Belgariad - David Eddings

    0 0%
  • Shannara Series - Terry Brooks

    0 0%
  • Dragonlance series - Weis and Hickman

    2 18.18%
  • Chronicles of Thomas Covenant - Stephen Donaldson

    1 9.09%
  • Thrawn trilogy - Timothy Zahn

    1 9.09%
  • The Farseer and Liveship Traders trilogies - Robin Hobb

    2 18.18%
  • The Chronicles of Narnia - CS Lewis

    0 0%
  • The Dark is Rising - Susan Cooper

    0 0%
  • Saga of the Exiles - Julian May

    1 9.09%
  • Gormenghast - Peake

    2 18.18%
  • Eternal Champion chronicles - Michael Moorcock

    0 0%
  • Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser stories - Fritz Leiber

    1 9.09%
  • Original Conan Stories - Robert E Howard

    1 9.09%
  • Books of the Cataclysm - Sean Williams

    0 0%
  • Song of Ice and Fire - George RR Martin

    3 27.27%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 61 to 75 of 129
  1. #61
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
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    why isn't Wizard of Oz on the list, one fantasy I have seen along with Mozes and the Bullrushes
    Zionism is racism as defined by the UN, Israel by every dirty means available steals land and water, kill Palestinian freedom fighters and civilians, and operates an apartheid system to drive more Palestinians off their land

  2. #62
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boris
    haha I'm half way through book 5 (A Dance with Dragons) now. Book 3 was my favourite so far. Book 4 I think he started to flounder around a fair bit, and jury out on 5 for now.
    Book 3 is also my favourite to date with book 4 the least impressive.

    It's surreal to me to see people, even teenagers and younger, reading his books everywhere. There was a time when George R R Martin was this obscure genre-crossing guy who hardly ever wrote anything of any real length and who people might have got around to reading if they were fans of Roger Zelazny. Some of his previous SOIAF books were so obscure I had to import second-hand copies from overseas to read them.

  3. #63
    CC Grandmaster Denis_Jessop's Avatar
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    Why were there no books by Milton Friedman in this poll?


    DJ
    ...I don't want to go among mad people Alice remarked, "Oh, you can't help that," said the Cat: we're all mad here. I am mad. You're mad." "How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice. "You must be," said the Cat ,"or you wouldn't have come here."

  4. #64
    CC Grandmaster road runner's Avatar
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    Word is Peter Jackson is going to make The Hobbit into 3 movies. Seriously, the book isn't even very long. I really do hope it's as epic as his LOTR movies but I fear he might be milking it too hard.

    Has anyone here read Eragon? I'm about 1/4 of the way into the first book and like it so far. I don't think it's particularly breaking much new ground in the (spoiler)boy finds dragon egg, raises dragon, goes on to fulfill his destiny genre but seems OK so far. I've not seen the movie yet. I was told by the friend who gave me the book that the movie was a pale imitation, but I guess I'll check it out when I'm finished reading.
    meep meep

  5. #65
    CC FIDE Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by road runner
    Word is Peter Jackson is going to make The Hobbit into 3 movies. Seriously, the book isn't even very long. I really do hope it's as epic as his LOTR movies but I fear he might be milking it too hard.
    Three??? Frankly, that makes me just want to wait until it comes to disc in a multi-pack.

    Has anyone here read Eragon?
    Yes, it was very good. I wasn't as enthused with Eldest, and as a result gave the other two a miss.

    I've not seen the movie yet. I was told by the friend who gave me the book that the movie was a pale imitation, but I guess I'll check it out when I'm finished reading.
    As is usually the case, but it's a good view nonetheless.
    In regione caecorum rex est luscus ~Erasmus

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  6. #66
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    We also played the Eragon video game.

    PS: have those who liked Song of Ice and Fire managed to catch the Game of Thrones TV series based on it?
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  7. #67
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    PS: have those who liked Song of Ice and Fire managed to catch the Game of Thrones TV series based on it?
    Yes though I have found the TV series rather patchy, especially the second season, in which things at times got rather silly. Book to TV adaptation is challenging when the books are so complex and when some things really cry out for a movie budget. Some necessary changes for the sake of economy or legality have been handled very well while at other times there has been unnecessary dumbing down or spicing up. Several of the actors are excellent including many of the child actors, but some parts have been miscast. The whole Jon Snow arc has been a bit of a flop.

  8. #68
    CC Grandmaster road runner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    We also played the Eragon video game.
    Do you mean this one? How was it? I generally stay away from any games based on movies.

    PS: have those who liked Song of Ice and Fire managed to catch the Game of Thrones TV series based on it?
    Having watched the first season I was so impressed I read the 5 books. I think in general the series is drawing out too much and the 4th and 5th books are weaker than previous ones. I think the first series of the tv show was stronger than the second. The second book I thought was a very slow starter and in some ways the tv series did treat that pretty well.
    meep meep

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    Yes though I have found the TV series rather patchy, especially the second season, in which things at times got rather silly. Book to TV adaptation is challenging when the books are so complex and when some things really cry out for a movie budget. Some necessary changes for the sake of economy or legality have been handled very well while at other times there has been unnecessary dumbing down or spicing up. Several of the actors are excellent including many of the child actors, but some parts have been miscast. The whole Jon Snow arc has been a bit of a flop.
    The cast is almost uniformly brilliant, especially the likes of Tyrion, Tywin, Theon and Arya. The writing is occasionally excellent, but I agree that they have made some poor plot decisions. They do need to significantly compress Martin's books, and especially cull down the number of significant characters (for budget reasons as much as anything). Some of the compromises have been pretty reasonable, but others seemingly defy belief. Jon Snow has gone from a great leader-in-waiting to something of a foolish wimp. Overall though, I still enjoy it a lot.

  10. #70
    CC Grandmaster road runner's Avatar
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    This article might be of interest to those who read fantasy.

    The evolutionary history of dragons, illustrated by a scientist

    This is possibly the greatest mashup of science and fantasy I have ever seen. University of British Columbia evolutionary ecologist Rob Colautti has created a dragon phylogeny, or evolutionary tree, and has turned it into a gorgeous design for t-shirts (see below). The best part is his elaborate explanation of how he came up with the evolutionary relationships between different species and families of mythical beasts.
    ...
    I collected images of 76 paintings, sketches, prints, and sculptures of dragons dating from the dark ages to the earliest 20th century, using images available on the internet. The most notable of these include prints of Asian dragons by Totoya Hokkei and Yashima Gakutei, Muslim depictions in Firdawsi's Shahnama, a sketch by Leonardo Da Vinci, and a diversity of dragon species evident in various works featuring St. George's dragon, the most famous of which are probably those by the Renaissance master Raphael.
    ...
    I identified 27 distinct traits that differentiated the 76 dragon art pieces (hereafter ‘species') used in the study. These traits were then encoded into numbers so that they could be analyzed using a ‘neighbour-joining cluster analysis'. Just as the nucleotides of DNA (A,T,G and C) can be encoded as a single number (0-3), traits like skin texture, wing structure, and number of appendages can be numerically encoded. The neighbour-joining cluster analysis is a mathematical way of measuring the differences between the numbers representing the traits of interest, so that species with the fewest differences are joined together by the shortest branch distances.
    ...
    To get to the common ancestor of Eurasian and Oriental dragons, we have to go way back to the time of the fish-like ancestors. If we follow the phylogeny down from Orientalia towards the center of the spiral we see three main branches. The first are the ancestral Actinopterygii, which include modern fish and are a distinct group from all of the land vertebrates. The second branch moving clockwise includes both mammals and lóng, indicating that they share the same tetrapod fish-like ancestor – something like the modern-day Coelacanth. In contrast, the Eurasian dragons must have shared an as yet unidentified hexapod fish-like ancestor, which gave rise to dragons with six appendages instead of four (i.e. four legs + two wings) – the Dracopteronidae and the Dracoverisidae. This assumes that complex appendages like wings or legs did not evolve out of nothing, which is probably a fair assumption. Continuing clockwise along the spiral we can see that the Wyvernidae gradually lost two legs and then two more legs in the Serpentidae ancestors, before losing wings in the more recently derived Serpentidae species at the top of the spiral.
    ...
    meep meep

  11. #71
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by road runner
    Do you mean this one? How was it? I generally stay away from any games based on movies.
    Yeah, I am not big on video games in general. Not too bad, this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by road runner
    Having watched the first season I was so impressed I read the 5 books. I think in general the series is drawing out too much and the 4th and 5th books are weaker than previous ones. I think the first series of the tv show was stronger than the second. The second book I thought was a very slow starter and in some ways the tv series did treat that pretty well.
    That's an unusual thing, seeing the series before reading the books. But that would be me too in this case. Mrs and I agree about the first TV series being better.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  12. #72
    CC Grandmaster road runner's Avatar
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    Has anyone read Neil Gaiman? I primarily know him from the collaborative projects he has done with Terry Pratchett, but I noticed his name come up as author of the brilliant movie Stardust.
    meep meep

  13. #73
    CC FIDE Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by road runner
    Do you mean this one? How was it? I generally stay away from any games based on movies.
    We played on the 360. It was merely 'okay', nothing really special, and the story was sorely lacking.

    I also found the dragon to be total pain to guide (although Jono did better with it), and making the character jump could sometimes be a bit sketchy.
    In regione caecorum rex est luscus ~Erasmus

    A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. ~Second Amendment to the United States Constitution

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    That's an unusual thing, seeing the series before reading the books. But that would be me too in this case.
    And me, oddly enough. I've enjoyed what I've read so far (it's another partial read in my book rotation, and I've yet to get back to it).

    Mrs and I agree about the first TV series being better.
    I hope the third (premieres on 31 March here) picks up.
    In regione caecorum rex est luscus ~Erasmus

    A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. ~Second Amendment to the United States Constitution

  15. #75
    CC Grandmaster Redmond Barry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by road runner
    Has anyone read Neil Gaiman? I primarily know him from the collaborative projects he has done with Terry Pratchett, but I noticed his name come up as author of the brilliant movie Stardust.
    i was recommended 'anansi boys' a while back but didnt get round to reading it.

    'good omens' was a good read.
    Ruin is formal, devil's work,
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