Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25
  1. #1
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    21,327

    Psychology of Chess

    I have noticed some players, who I have boxed around the ears once too often (and taken too much money from), lose the confidence at the vital moment when everything is going their way (unless they do not recognise it). They back off when the world is at their feet.

    Has anyone else found this?

  2. #2
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    151
    many times

  3. #3
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    40,705
    I've found that some players just seem to be totally punch-drunk. You beat them enough times in a row and they start playing like they know they're going to lose from the start.

    I don't know about the exact scenario antichrist describes. I suspect the causality's the other way around - eg the fact that they are prone to back off at crucial moments is the reason I beat them so often, rather than a result of me doing so.
    Moderation Requests: All requests for, comments about, or questions about moderation of any kind including thread changes must be posted in the Help and Feedback section and not on the thread in question. (Or by private message for routine changes or sensitive matters.)

    ACF Newsletter Information - All Australian players and administrators should subscribe and check each issue for relevant notices

    My psephology/politics site (token chess references only) : http://kevinbonham.blogspot.com.au/ Politics twitter feed https://twitter.com/kevinbonham

  4. #4
    CC Rookie Thunderstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    13
    Tal use to regularly lose to Korchnoi so one day he said to himself that in order to beat him he would first have to stop losing to him! Next time they played Tal was white and headed straight for a draw.

    Perhaps Tal's best unknown attempt at beating Korchnoi was in the game Karpov v Korchnoi from the WC 1978!
    Tal was Karpov's second and it's believe the novelty 11.Ng5!? was his work.

    [Event "World Championship 29th"]
    [Site "Baguio City"]
    [Date "1978.08.08"]
    [Round "10"]
    [White "Karpov, Anatoly"]
    [Black "Kortschnoj, Viktor"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [ECO "C80"]
    [WhiteElo "2725"]
    [BlackElo "2665"]
    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. Nbd2 Nc5 10. c3 d4 11. Ng5 dxc3 12. Nxe6 fxe6 13. bxc3 Qd3 14. Nf3 Qxd1 15. Bxd1 Be7 16. Be3 Nd3 17. Bb3 Kf7 18. Rad1 Ndxe5 19. Nxe5+ Nxe5 20. Bf4 Nc4 21. Bxc4 bxc4 22. Rd4 Bd6 23. Be3 Rhb8 24. Rxc4 Rb2 25. a4 Ra2 26. g3 Rb8 27. Rd1 Rbb2 28. Rdd4 Rb1+ 29. Kg2 Rba1 30. Rh4 h6 31. Bc5 e5 32. Ba7 Ke6 33. Rcg4 Be7 34. Rh5 Bf6 35. Rc4 Kd7 36. Bb8 c6 37. Re4 Rxa4 38. c4 Ra5 39. Bxe5 Bxe5 40. Rhxe5 Rxe5 41. Rxe5 Ra4 42. Re4 Ra5 43. h4 h5 44. Rf4 1/2-1/2

  5. #5
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by Thunderstone
    Tal use to regularly lose to Korchnoi so one day he said to himself that in order to beat him he would first have to stop losing to him! Next time they played Tal was white and headed straight for a draw.

    Perhaps Tal's best unknown attempt at beating Korchnoi was in the game Karpov v Korchnoi from the WC 1978!
    Tal was Karpov's second and it's believe the novelty 11.Ng5!? was his work.

    [Event "World Championship 29th"]
    [Site "Baguio City"]
    [Date "1978.08.08"]
    [Round "10"]
    [White "Karpov, Anatoly"]
    [Black "Kortschnoj, Viktor"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [ECO "C80"]
    [WhiteElo "2725"]
    [BlackElo "2665"]
    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. Nbd2 Nc5 10. c3 d4 11. Ng5 dxc3 12. Nxe6 fxe6 13. bxc3 Qd3 14. Nf3 Qxd1 15. Bxd1 Be7 16. Be3 Nd3 17. Bb3 Kf7 18. Rad1 Ndxe5 19. Nxe5+ Nxe5 20. Bf4 Nc4 21. Bxc4 bxc4 22. Rd4 Bd6 23. Be3 Rhb8 24. Rxc4 Rb2 25. a4 Ra2 26. g3 Rb8 27. Rd1 Rbb2 28. Rdd4 Rb1+ 29. Kg2 Rba1 30. Rh4 h6 31. Bc5 e5 32. Ba7 Ke6 33. Rcg4 Be7 34. Rh5 Bf6 35. Rc4 Kd7 36. Bb8 c6 37. Re4 Rxa4 38. c4 Ra5 39. Bxe5 Bxe5 40. Rhxe5 Rxe5 41. Rxe5 Ra4 42. Re4 Ra5 43. h4 h5 44. Rf4 1/2-1/2
    According to Karpov (and Kortschoj) the idea (like many other attributed to Tal in Bagio) belongs to Zaitsev.

  6. #6
    CC Rookie Thunderstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Igor_Goldenberg
    According to Karpov (and Kortschoj) the idea (like many other attributed to Tal in Bagio) belongs to Zaitsev.
    I'm sure I read in a book or chess magazine that it was Tal's move.
    But if Karpov and Kortchnoi say it was Zaitsev then it must be Zaitsev's move.
    11.Ng5!? has such a "Tal feel" about it then it's easy to understand why people would think it was his move.

  7. #7
    CC Rookie IM_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    From Peru to Japan.
    Posts
    22
    Zaitsev's theory features a lot in the Ruy Lopez openings of the Kasparov-Karpov Fide Championship matches of 1984 (the precise date escapes me at present).

  8. #8
    CC Candidate Master bill718's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Seattle- USA
    Posts
    29

    Psychology and Strong Moves...

    I've never liked Bobby Fischer, but I
    agree with him when he said. "I don't
    believe in psychology, I believe in
    playing strong moves" (Not an exact
    quote perhaps, but I think you'll get
    the idea)

  9. #9
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    40,705
    Quote Originally Posted by bill718
    I've never liked Bobby Fischer, but I
    agree with him when he said. "I don't
    believe in psychology, I believe in
    playing strong moves"
    Yes, it's quoted as "good moves" not "strong moves".

    Ironically psychology was significant in his victory over Spassky, eg his surprise choice of 1.c4 in game six of the match. But perhaps he was talking about the psychology of playing an inferior move to unsettle the opponent.

  10. #10
    CC International Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    1,977
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    But perhaps he was talking about the psychology of playing an inferior move to unsettle the opponent.
    Maybe his assertion of rejecting psychology was a psychological ploy.

  11. #11
    Account Permanently Banned Axiom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    4,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Mangafranga
    Maybe his assertion of rejecting psychology was a psychological ploy.


    not to mention ignoring the possibility that a good move may contain a psychological component

  12. #12
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    244
    Quote Originally Posted by Mangafranga
    Maybe his assertion of rejecting psychology was a psychological ploy.
    That's pretty much what Benko says in Winning with Chess Psychology.
    荒らしにエサを与えないで下さい。

  13. #13
    CC Grandmaster ER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne - Australia
    Posts
    13,635

    Chess players `are paranoid thrillseekers' (or are they?)

    Chess players `are paranoid thrillseekers'

    I found the following article online
    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...20/ai_n9669024
    under the heading above and I thought of sharing it with you...


    I know that the subject has been raised and discussed in this and other related threads, but I also believe that a new generation of players have their own way of functioning, thinking, expressing themselves etc and that way differs dramatically to that of previous generations which has been codified, stereotyped and put in the archives.
    Anyway, read it if you will and tell us what you think


    On the surface it appears a contemplative challenge of intellects across a chequered board, but beneath the surface, we are now told, chess is all about testosterone, arousal, paranoia, excitement, danger and domination.

    Psychologists who studied more than 100 chess players say the game attracts sensation-seekers with a thirst for action and adventure on a par with skydivers, scuba divers, mountaineers and skiers. When men win a game, the experts say, the rise of testosterone levels in the blood is just the same as that experienced by people who go in for risky sports.

    Chess, say the researchers, is less a game than a war where the winner experiences feelings of excitement, victory and domination. "Chess is a mimic battle fought upon a field of 64 squares with pieces moved according to an elaborate system having powers suggestive of a variety of fighting units," says a report of the study in the Journal of Personality and Individual Differences.

    The psychologists set out to see if people attracted to chess had a sensation- seeking nature. Using a personality test on players and non-players, they found that those who scored highest for sensation- seeking were those who played chess. "Winning a game of chess is associated with a rise in testosterone, especially when the game is close, suggesting that winning corresponds to an experience of excitement and dominance," the researchers report.

    They add: "More competitive chess players have been shown to score highly for unconventional thinking and paranoia, both of which have been shown to relate to sensation-seeking."

    Copyright 2002 Independent Newspapers UK Limited
    Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning Company. All rights Reserved.
    Last edited by ER; 23-01-2009 at 08:26 AM.
    https://www.nswca.org.au/index.php
    ACF 3118316
    FIDE 3201457

    From this day (13-11-20) onwards, I will only be posting, shouting and reading none other than chess related posts.
    Fully vaccinated since October, 21, 2021

  14. #14
    CC Grandmaster Ian Murray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,662
    Quote Originally Posted by justaknight
    Chess players `are paranoid thrillseekers'
    Just because I'm paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get me

  15. #15
    CC Grandmaster ER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne - Australia
    Posts
    13,635
    I am not paranoid, those who chase me are!
    https://www.nswca.org.au/index.php
    ACF 3118316
    FIDE 3201457

    From this day (13-11-20) onwards, I will only be posting, shouting and reading none other than chess related posts.
    Fully vaccinated since October, 21, 2021

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. 2006 Australian Internet Junior Chess Championships Discussion
    By AES in forum 2006 Australian Internet Junior Championships
    Replies: 240
    Last Post: 18-12-2007, 11:28 PM
  2. A $100,000 sponsorship of chess!
    By ChessGuru in forum Australian Chess
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 09-05-2006, 01:51 PM
  3. More material for learning chess?
    By forcelima in forum Chess Training
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 30-03-2006, 09:59 AM
  4. How to increase chess participation.
    By ursogr8 in forum Australian Chess
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 22-04-2005, 05:02 PM
  5. Mt Buller - Chess World letter to ACF
    By ChessGuru in forum Mt Buller Chess
    Replies: 210
    Last Post: 17-07-2004, 11:58 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •