View Poll Results: After each game do you annotate it at home?

Voters
16. You may not vote on this poll
  • Always and I give it to the opponent

    1 6.25%
  • Never, I couldn't be stuffed doing it

    3 18.75%
  • Never, I don't think it helps my chess

    0 0%
  • Always but I don't share my annotations with the opponent

    4 25.00%
  • Sometimes, if the game was exceptionally interesting.

    8 50.00%
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Thread: annotations

  1. #1
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    annotations

    Do you think that it is useful for your chess development to give annotations to your opponent the week after you have played him or her? Or do you regard it as a waste time?

    Here is the poll...

  2. #2
    CC International Master Carl Gorka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qpawn
    Do you think that it is useful for your chess development to give annotations to your opponent the week after you have played him or her? Or do you regard it as a waste time?

    Here is the poll...
    I analyse and annotate my games, sometimes in great depth and sometimes in not such great depth. If my opponent wants then I would be happy to share some of my notes with them. But mostly I analyse for my own benefit, and I don't think sharing my analysis would be of benefit to me unless it produced some meaningful discussion with my opponent...ie, feedback.

    I think the most useful is analysing with an opponent immediately after the game.
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  3. #3
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    I usually analyse my games, but rarely put a formal annotation

  4. #4
    CC Grandmaster Spiny Norman's Avatar
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    I analyze and annotate, then work through the game with my coach (who has also analyzed it himself) ... and we compare notes.
    “As you perhaps know, I haven't always been a Christian. I didn't go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don't recommend Christianity.” -- C.S.Lewis

  5. #5
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    I always analyse but only annotate if the game is of interest and I intend to publish it. I am retrospectively annotating all my old games that I have scores of (currently up to #344 of 806 but the latter number grows almost as fast as the first).

    I'd never give an annotation to an opponent without pre-arranging to do this. I might however say "hey remember last week on move 64 I could have played Rxa3? (opponent replies) Well I looked at it at home and it only draws after all" etc.

    I find that the postmortem reveals much of the thinking behind the game but only about half the objective reality. Analysis using (but not blindly following) a computer at home is much more useful.
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  6. #6
    CC International Master WhiteElephant's Avatar
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    Do people really annotate their own games? Wow, that is dedication!

    Oh and if my opponent came up to me a week later and told me he'd annotated our game (particularly if it was a game that he had won) I would think he was being arrogant. A friendly analysis after the game is the way to go.
    Last edited by WhiteElephant; 27-03-2006 at 01:57 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    I find that the postmortem reveals much of the thinking behind the game but only about half the objective reality. Analysis using (but not blindly following) a computer at home is much more useful.
    You'd be amazed how many things I found using computer that went uncovered not only during the game, but even during the after-game analysis with some very strong opponents.

    In my game against Eddy Levi in last Vic championship we had 4 (four!) international masters looking at the game (as well as yours truly and Eddy) and nobody noticed simple (but quite elegant and unusual) combination that would finish the game in a couple of moves.

  8. #8
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    there are hardcore players on this forum!

    White elephant:

    Do people really annotate their own games? Wow, that is dedication!

    Oh and if my opponent came up to me a week later and told me he'd annotated our game (particularly if it was a game that he had won) I would think he was being arrogant. A friendly analysis after the game is the way to go.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I don't agree that there is an arrogance about giving annotations to an opponent you defeated. I would be happy to receive annotations from someone who had beaten me. "Arrogance" would seem to be reflected more by the attention paid to the annotator's own errors; a lack of attention would be arrogant.

    I have issues with "friendly analysis" after the game being sufficient. Just after the heat of the moment, when the clock has just been ticking, doesn't seem to me to be a time of objectivity. I like to go home, put the game onto Fritz, and work through it all in the light of day.

    White Elephant should already know that there are some real hardcore chessnuts on this board! I am one of them whatever my measly rating shows

  9. #9
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Igor_Goldenberg
    You'd be amazed how many things I found using computer that went uncovered not only during the game, but even during the after-game analysis with some very strong opponents.

    In my game against Eddy Levi in last Vic championship we had 4 (four!) international masters looking at the game (as well as yours truly and Eddy) and nobody noticed simple (but quite elegant and unusual) combination that would finish the game in a couple of moves.
    I've often found in cases like this that both players miss the same idea. Intuition is all well and good but in positions that are counter-intuitive there is no substitute for blind number-crunching.

    Another thing I've noticed about human analysis is that it's easier to perceive that someone has a very large advantage when it's actually quite even. Computers show that many games are closer than they look (although sometimes when the computer claims it's even, one side actually has a very strong position and the computer hasn't seen the storm because it is too many moves in the future.)
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  10. #10
    CC International Master WhiteElephant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qpawn
    White elephant:

    Do people really annotate their own games? Wow, that is dedication!

    Oh and if my opponent came up to me a week later and told me he'd annotated our game (particularly if it was a game that he had won) I would think he was being arrogant. A friendly analysis after the game is the way to go.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I don't agree that there is an arrogance about giving annotations to an opponent you defeated. I would be happy to receive annotations from someone who had beaten me. "Arrogance" would seem to be reflected more by the attention paid to the annotator's own errors; a lack of attention would be arrogant.

    I have issues with "friendly analysis" after the game being sufficient. Just after the heat of the moment, when the clock has just been ticking, doesn't seem to me to be a time of objectivity. I like to go home, put the game onto Fritz, and work through it all in the light of day.

    White Elephant should already know that there are some real hardcore chessnuts on this board! I am one of them whatever my measly rating shows
    I have never used Fritz or any other engine to analyse any of my games. Which probably explains the standard of my chess

  11. #11
    CC International Master Carl Gorka's Avatar
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    Analysis engines are great for discovering tricks and forced variations that were missed during the game and post-mortem analysis. But the post-mortem will teach you at least as much as you are being forced to use your own mind and not just checking things through with a computer. It depends on whether you want to improve as a player practically, or are looking for the most objective truth about the game you played.
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  12. #12
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    I can't agree

    I don't agree that a post-mortem with a COMPUTER IS A bad thing. I often diagree with Fritz and say so in my annotations.

  13. #13
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    other benefits

    There are other benefits to annotating one's own games. But I will leave it to the perceptive among you to nut those out

  14. #14
    CC International Master Carl Gorka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qpawn
    I don't agree that a post-mortem with a COMPUTER IS A bad thing. I often diagree with Fritz and say so in my annotations.
    It can be a bad thing if the computer is doing the work for you. Computers are great tools and can often correct players in their analysis. But it is all too easy to get lazy and let the computer do all the work. That is why I believe that an immediate post game analysis is of most benefit to a player. Sure, then go home and check your ideas on your computer, but make sure you have some ideas before touching the thing.
    I've never been so broke that I couldn't leave town

    I'm trying out a new blog site...
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  15. #15
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    Unhappy

    Never, I couldn't be stuffed doing it - thus, I don't think it helps my chess. Better to learn from getting beaten too many times in the same ways during friendly matches than to write it down and clot the mind with things that are hard to remember

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