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Thread: Blunderbuster

  1. #1
    Account Permanently Banned PHAT's Avatar
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    Blunderbuster

    Success in chess requires several cognative abilities. The obvious ones are technique and recall. The question I wish to put to the BB is: Why/how do good players blunder? For example, the Kasparov Brain Explotions.

    We know that blunders are more frequent when fatigued or rushed. But what exactly has happened during the process of "move selection", that has allowed the blunder to be played?

    I know in my own case, that is as if something - a discovered attack, en pastant, et cetera - were first detected and then deleated from the lines of analysis. I play the move and instantly remember eliminating the move earlier as an clear loss of material. If only 1% of my moves are pure blunders, that means 99% are not pure blunders. 3-4 years ago, I used to have ~5% blunder rate. But they were because I didn't even see it in the first place. To me this suggests that the blunders I make now are not a result of a faulty system of move selection, but a lack of some fool proof quality control check.

    How are your blunders born?

  2. #2
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    Theres this theory of the blind spot.

    I dunno much about it, ive only heard of it.

    But basically if you have a blind spot, no matter how much you scan the board, you just wont see something you're supposed to see. Only for that particular blind spot though.

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    CC Candidate Master Gandalf's Avatar
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    Everyone has blind spots, where the optic nerve connects to the eye. This shouldn't matter if you simply move your head, and is another (small) reason large boards and pieces are important for proper games.

    If you're talking about Cognitive Blind Spots, that's another matter entirely. These occur when a player simply does not consider a possibility or area of possibilities. Ever.

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    Cognitive Blind Spots - thats the one. I think.

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    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Quite a few games I've played have had double blunders in them. A double blunder is when both players are so wrapped up in their assumptions about what is going on that they fail to notice something very relevant. For instance, both players are so absorbed in king-side play that one allows, and the other then misses, a devestating queen-side queen check. Or both players think a combination is sound when it isn't, or unsound when it's sound. An unsound move played confidently fools a lot of opponents. Or someone makes a catastrophic mistake like leaving their queen en prise, but the opponent fails to notice because they simply wouldn't expect a strong player to do something so silly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    Quite a few games I've played have had double blunders in them. A double blunder is when both players are so wrapped up in their assumptions about what is going on that they fail to notice something very relevant.
    I think we should call these a reciprical blunders - especially things like the "unseen queen enprise."

    There is also the case where you play a very weak move and then see how weak it is. This rattles your concentration and you follow it with an even worse move. Perhaps this is what should be called a double blunder.

  7. #7
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Sweeney
    I think we should call these a reciprical blunders - especially things like the "unseen queen enprise."
    Probably.

    There is also the case where you play a very weak move and then see how weak it is. This rattles your concentration and you follow it with an even worse move. Perhaps this is what should be called a double blunder.
    I'm not prone to this one except in a certain circumstance. Normally if I realise I have played a dud and my opponent fails to exploit it - or it wasn't catastrophic, I will wake up and play better from then on. Apparently my expressions of relief are super-obvious.

    The one case where I'll usually follow a bad move with a worse one is if I've had too much coffee. It's easy to get rattled then and play worse and worse if the opponent starts getting into the game. Since losing a game from a piece for two pawns up due to getting rattled in this manner, I have cut my caffeine intake during tournaments considerably. Normally in weekenders now I will not drink coffee during a game, only between rounds, if at all.

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