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  1. #16
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
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    thanks for the laugh

    My best effort could be 29/63 in God and Jews split. value of human life thead. Though admitting that I fumbled the ball badly in Biblical timetable.
    Last edited by antichrist; 24-08-2005 at 06:21 PM.

  2. #17
    Reader in Slood Dynamics Rincewind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antichrist
    Though admitting that I fumbled the ball badly in Biblical timetable.
    The bible can be a very long book and many of the characters having obscure names. Difficult for someone with concentration challenges. Actually I think a flamewar between you and macavity would be an interesting spectator event. Any chance of arranging one?
    So einfach wie möglich, aber nicht einfacher - Albert Einstein

  3. #18
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rincewind
    The bible can be a very long book and many of the characters having obscure names. Difficult for someone with concentration challenges. Actually I think a flamewar between you and macavity would be an interesting spectator event. Any chance of arranging one?
    I don't know about concentration challenged. I know that I have never read it and it is light years away me hearing any sermons. Only at the very end of that debate did I look it up, and then Frosty gave miles of references that I also did not read that it was all uncertain timescale-wise anyway. So I am lucky that I have never wasted my time on it.

  4. #19
    Reader in Slood Dynamics Rincewind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antichrist
    I don't know about concentration challenged. I know that I have never read it and it is light years away me hearing any sermons. Only at the very end of that debate did I look it up, and then Frosty gave miles of references that I also did not read that it was all uncertain timescale-wise anyway. So I am lucky that I have never wasted my time on it.
    Priceless!

    (and for everything else, there's Mastercard)
    So einfach wie möglich, aber nicht einfacher - Albert Einstein

  5. #20
    CC Grandmaster Spiny Norman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antichrist
    I don't know about concentration challenged. I know that I have never read it and it is light years away me hearing any sermons. Only at the very end of that debate did I look it up, and then Frosty gave miles of references that I also did not read that it was all uncertain timescale-wise anyway. So I am lucky that I have never wasted my time on it.
    Good on yer AC, you're a good sport ... don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
    “As you perhaps know, I haven't always been a Christian. I didn't go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don't recommend Christianity.” -- C.S.Lewis

  6. #21
    CC Grandmaster
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    I have 17/22 in the SA Chess Results thread.
    Scott

  7. #22
    CC International Master Bereaved's Avatar
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    What about longest individual post?

    Hi everyone,

    I am well aware that I write long posts, word count wise, is there a way of listing the longest individual posts? Would welcome an answer,

    Flame war, Hmm?

    Take care and God Bless, Macavity

  8. #23
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    I've often thought "word count" per poster would be an interesting stat but I'm not aware of a way to do it. Even if you could do word count by post it would need to be refined to strain out nongs who quote 30-line posts to add their 2 lines worth to the end.

  9. #24
    CC International Master ElevatorEscapee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    I've often thought "word count" per poster would be an interesting stat but I'm not aware of a way to do it. Even if you could do word count by post it would need to be refined to strain out nongs who quote 30-line posts to add their 2 lines worth to the end.
    I
    agree!
    "On my chess set, all the pawns are Hamburglers" ~ Homer Simpson.

  10. #25
    CC resident nutcase Trent Parker's Avatar
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    I reckon Libbys would be the longest per post. However all her long posts are quality, no puffery like some......
    GO THE DRAGONS!
    GO Western Sydney Wanderers!
    Quote Originally Posted by Adamski's signature
    God exists. Short and to the point.
    This is the reason I do not wade into religion threads.

  11. #26
    CC International Master Bereaved's Avatar
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    My longest, i think

    Hi everyone, here is what I think is my longest post, though I think when I first joined, I posted some long ones too.

    My coach vs me as a coach
    Hello everyone,

    It would seem that as an opening premise of this type of discussion, one would have to ascertain what type of outcome one desired for oneself or for one's child from an experience of chess coaching.

    If the purpose was to try out something, in a similiar manner to many children playing a variety of sports before settling on one specific sport that takes their fancy, it would seem to me that the coach is merely a motivator, who builds the childs enthusiasm for Chess, without in any way suggesting or even hinting that the development of a student into a strong player requires the student to do some extracurricular work. To the majority of students, the idea of spending a portion of their leisure time on the study of chess makes little sense. They would rather play.

    The difficulty with this is that often a child may have little opportunity to practice their skills if their parents are not that interested in the game themselves. This is not to say that the parent/s will not play with the child, but may often have other children and other real world concerns that hinder in the ability to set aside a specific time to play with the chess student. Alternatively, in the case of an adult, they may actually have very few people in their social circle who are willing to play with them, whether they are able to or not is not of pertinence here, more their willingness.

    When I commenced play, I had a teacher at high school who had played at club level chess, and before I left school, it seemed that I was taking more than just the occasional game from him. I later learnt that he was between 1300-1500 and was perhaps a bit more knowledgeable than his chess rating displayed.

    My peer group with whom I played at school did not to my mind spend much time, and possibly none at all, on studying games. I did and was soon finding myself in good positions regularly, which is not to say that I did not lose my share of them, as there are some forms of chess experience which seem to arise at the almost aversion therapy level, and once you have allowed enough knight forks winning any numbers of bags of mixed lollies ( Queens, Rooks, Bishops, even pawns ) you begin to have the sight to see someone angling for that sort of thing, though at times I recall still allowing them.( Even now! )

    The reason that I have reopened the discussions within this thread is that I felt that I would share some of the methods that my coach, a strong Russian player has shared with me.
    He has always made a point of asking for me to suggest motivations for making moves, and as such, if he points out that a move was likely to have been a mistake, he often then puts the question back on to me, and asks what I should have played. I like this in that he is not being the genie in the bottle, providing the wished for solution on demand, but rather engaging in an interactive fashion to aid me in finding it for myself.

    He often uses expressions that border on simplistic, which of course does not make them any less true, but perhaps just at a more absolutist level. The statement that is my favourite is ' Develop, Castle, and put your pieces in the centre, and then hold the centre, and then see what happens' . The last part with its openendedness, is particularly appealing to me, having now realised that there are often a lot of different ways to go down in any position, often conditional on one's mood.

    I guess these reflections on an environment of individual coaching are alike but definitely not to be in some ways considered to be in the same boat as group coaching, which is often within a school based environment or a junior group within a club. I have heard of some that are run on an independent basis outside of school hours in other contexts, but not that many.

    I am employed as a chess coach in Melbourne, and find that the methods that I find to be appealing for myself are in so many ways of no interest to students. I would find something moves me profoundly, but if it is of a subtle nature, the children I teach find the lesson uninteresting, or still worse, boring. Also the concept of resignation has to be approached in a rational manner if showing the children a complete game, usually a miniature. It is usually necessary to demonstrate a sequence of moves which are plausible, but not a forced line of play, where the winner of the game ends up with an immense material advantage. If not, the children are somewhat puzzled that one would give up when a piece down, whereas for them, the game is still very much alive, and the result of the game is in no way a sure thing, as they have found out within their own social play.

    Also, and somewhat more so of late, I have begun using an abundance of emotional terms within my lesson, suggesting that a given player really wants to have the queen that is up close to their king to buzz off. It seems to be having a good reception, and as such I am experimenting with new and different ways to implement this idea. The concept of anthropomorphising the pieces, ie is the bishop happy? where does the knight want to go? and others of this nature seem in many ways to provide more useful answers than simply, and in adult terms, is this the best square for the bishop, or how do we bring the knight to a more active square? It is true that these are both identical concepts, it's just in the delivery of the idea that it is communicated.

    As many of you can see by now, in this and in many other posts, I have a tendency to go about longwinded and somewhat complex explanations, and frequently use many multi syllabled words in one sentence, and that the said sentences are not short or punchy, but long winded and overly flowery.

    Ok, fair enough, that was my attempt at self mockery in this regard, but moving along. The issue of vocabulary with kids is essential. They will often find no relevance to anything of a literary nature to be appealing, unless it be along a Harry Potter vein, though this is treacherous territory, as it is likely to create a form of 'lesson drift' towards Wizard Chess, and that is best left sleeping.

    Other things that have been of great concern to me as a coach, is in the instance of giving the lesson,'This is how to not fall for the four-move checkmate' to see children in the same lesson fall for this particular attack. This dilemma is compounded when this situation is not remedied in some instances despite frequent repetition.

    My viewpoint on this matter is that when within our culture we have had to take active steps to ensure that people do not scrape through school with functional literacy, or sub-functional literacy, this being hoped to stop through intensive assistance to those children in need at this area, that we are expecting a particular miracle to occur in numbers of chess students within the school environment to become particularly strong given contact time available . As I previously suggested, many have no one in particular to play with. Worse still is the instance of learning that the child in between lessons has a nil involvement in any fashion with chess.

    It seems to me that within whatever frame of reference for chess improvement, self motivated work is a must. I do not think we would need to have a prize such as a Pulitzer if the learning of writing was a one hour a week activity for almost everyone. As it is, schools devote a large portion of time to promoting literacy and numeracy, and rightly so. It is however this time factor which gives me the impression that only children who attend coaching seminars of the type run in the ACT mentioned by Libby and Jenni, that have any chance of making a significant amount of progress. The groups that were mentioned within that program of 1 coach = 4-5 children at most is something that the school based learning scheme does not allow a lot of. This in turn raises the next dilemma.

    I have worked at a variety of schools over time, at some schools with other coaches running graded sections, but in the majority of cases, I am the solo coach at a school. When a solo coach at a school, the ideal would be that the children were in a reasonably close margin in as far as spread of ability. The reality of this is that the ideal is seldom present.

    This is often owing to a number of factors, ranging from time within a class, in effect chronological age in many cases, but chess chronology, not biological in this instance, although the other at times has some bearing, to whether the child has decided or asked to be there in the first place. Other facts may be of an individual nature such as a child maintains a defeatist attitude in the face of regular losses, and this one is a hard one to break for some children, as they seem to get some perverse satisfaction in their incompetentness in relation to their classmates, as they are then absolved from trying, as they were going to lose anyway, so why bother? My general approach in this matter is to concentrate on looking for ways to praise the things the child is doing well more than highlight their shortcomings. This is something that seems in a lot of ways to help in a less obtrusive way than telling the child with great regularity to stop giving away their pieces for nothing, this rapidly would produce the opposite of the desired outcome. I will also in some cases go out of my way to schedule such a child for a bye in a class with an odd number to ensure that they receive a mini one on one lesson with me, in the context of a game between us, where I will explain why I am making moves in simple terms, to highlight what should be played by example. I also will quite frequently play 1...e5 to their 1.e4 as that is what the majority of them will face from their classmates. The reason that I commment on this is because as far as my own play, I have trouble recalling the last time I played this move even infrequently. The point of this in my mind is that the child is having enough trouble at that point without adding any further complexity to their learning and in this case their confidence. To my mind, it is hardly likely to help these children if after having played a game against me in say a Sicilian, where I have clearly explained my thoughts and plans, for them to move back into the realm of Open games ( 1.e4 e5 ).

    This issue of spread of ability is perhaps also highlighted in the size of classes. To be an economically sound concern in classes that are funded solely by the students fees ( in effect the fees being paid by their parents ) a ratio of 1 coach = 15 students is desirable and quite common. Given that the time spent in the company of these students is generally an hour, or a large portion thereof, it doesn't leave a lot of margin for error. Should some of the children turn up late, even 5 minutes, this delays the part involving the lecture, which is often at the commencement of the session. As a slight digression, I have frequently had difficulties in groups where the lesson was at the end, as the children having started playing are often unwilling to stop and take it with remarkably little graciousness when it is suggested that the time has come to stop play and pay attention to something up front, when all they want to do is play. Ok it was a big digression. The point is that even with a bare bones 10 minute lesson, it is likely that 15 minutes has gone by before they sit at the board. So in the context of a full hour for a class, and 15 children in a group, the 3 minutes on average that each has available doesn't allow for a lot of depth in learning. I don't have a good answer for that one I admit.


    As many of the earlier posts discussed, the question of strength of a coach was raised, and leaving aside this whole poaching issue, which doesn't seem to be something I have had any involvement in, my coach who is over 2300, and who outrates me by about 300 points, suggested to me at a time when that gap was closer to 500 points that I was almost certain to be a better coach than he was. This assessment was based on my commuunication skills, not my playing ability. I do think there was a small suggestion of my patience with chidren vs his, but it was not a major concern.

    So in response to the many suggestions made, I have to side with Jenni in the regard of that players can benefit from someone who is perhaps below them, but better able to refine skills, or just above them, but more well versed in any area they lack as deep a knowledge of ( I think this was referred to with reference to particular aspects of AFL football ).

    Mischa also commented on her son being coached by someone who he outrated, but still gaining benefit and new insight into the game,

    In any case, my hands are a bit tired, so will write more later,
    so until then, take care all and God Bless, Macavity
    Word gives this as 2,388 words and as far as I can recall this is all my own work, does anyone have a longer post??

    Take care and God Bless, Macavity

    PS having previewed this, it seems to be that the text does not wrap; suggestions

  12. #27
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
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    You deserve .... whatever for that post as I have ready told you.

  13. #28
    CC resident nutcase Trent Parker's Avatar
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    Its a bloody short essay Mac!
    GO THE DRAGONS!
    GO Western Sydney Wanderers!
    Quote Originally Posted by Adamski's signature
    God exists. Short and to the point.
    This is the reason I do not wade into religion threads.

  14. #29
    CC Grandmaster Alan Shore's Avatar
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    Hmm, 92/126 are mine in the Pictures thread.
    Last edited by Alan Shore; 14-09-2005 at 05:47 PM.
    "I can't go back to yesterday because I was a different person then."
    - White Queen, Alice through the Looking-Glass

  15. #30
    CC Grandmaster Alan Shore's Avatar
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    edited
    Last edited by Alan Shore; 03-12-2005 at 11:58 PM.
    "I can't go back to yesterday because I was a different person then."
    - White Queen, Alice through the Looking-Glass

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