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  1. #391
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antichrist
    is this a common scoring method? thnks btw
    It's not that common but it is now used in some major super-GM round robins now. I think it is fairly rare in Open Swisses but it is certainly allowed. An import from soccer in an attempt to discourage draws.

  2. #392
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    It's not that common but it is now used in some major super-GM round robins now. I think it is fairly rare in Open Swisses but it is certainly allowed. An import from soccer in an attempt to discourage draws.
    but if genuine draws a bit unfair

  3. #393
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Moved post above to the old Notes and Queries thread as it was completely off-topic for the thread it was on.

    Quote Originally Posted by ER View Post
    To the topic now, say that a player whose language is not English or any of the other FIDE accepted languages
    records his/her moves on their own mother language. A dispute arises as for a position, or a particular irregularity.
    How do you go about it? taking the other person's scoresheet as evidence? try to reconstruct the game? restart game?
    For abbreviating the pieces, the player can use the name commonly in use in their own country, whether it is a FIDE language or not. However there is no provision for using different letters or numbers for the squares.

    Even if language difficulties prevented the arbiter from finding out which letter the player was using for which piece, there is a good chance they could work it out from the opponent's scoresheet and by elimination. If this proved futile I'd be inclined to rely on the opponent's scoresheet (and possibly input from the players during reconstruction). One would often have to play through and try to reconstruct the game if there was a dispute about the position anyway. It's extremely unlikely the game would need to be restarted.

    Another question. A player falls asleep during the game. We know that you as an arbiter, or his/her opponent, or a
    spectator aren't allowed to interfere and wake him/her up.
    We do not know this as the Laws do not say it. The Laws say "The arbiter must not intervene in a game except in cases described by the Laws of Chess." However because the player is snoring and disturbing other players, this is a case described by the Laws of Chess - the arbiter shall:

    12.2.2 act in the best interest of the competition,

    12.2.3 ensure that a good playing environment is maintained,

    12.2.4 ensure that the players are not disturbed,

    The arbiter must prevent the snoring player from snoring, waking them up if necessary to do so. The arbiter could warn the player that future snoring will result in a penalty, and could (for instance) compensate any players in critical time trouble for the disturbance.
    Last edited by Kevin Bonham; 28-01-2018 at 05:00 PM.

  4. #394
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    An Arbiter's Notebook By Geurt Gijssen:

    Question Dear Geurt, A situation occurred in a match I had recently. My opponent fell asleep. I was looking at the position, with my opponent to move, and suddenly heard him snoring. One of his teammates poked him, he woke up and continued the game. As a matter of interest, (I raised no complaint during the match), does the waking of a player by a teammate amount to interference such as when a teammate points out an illegal move or that a flag has fallen etc? Dave Burtonshaw (London, England) P.S. I know that I play solid openings, but I didn't think the position was boring enough for my opponent to fall asleep!

    Answer Article 13.6 says: "The arbiter shall refrain from informing a player that his opponent has made a move, or that he has failed to press the clock." Article 13.7 says: "Spectators and players in other games are not to speak about or otherwise interfere in a game." The question is whether waking up a sleeping player is interfering in a game? I can imagine that some people have this opinion. But I can also imagine that a snoring player disturbs his opponent. The only way to stop this is to wake up the player. But to be serious, I believe it is not a problem to wake up a sleeping player. I, for sure, would never blame someone who woke up a sleeping player.

  5. #395
    CC Grandmaster ER's Avatar
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    Hi, I know this has been discussed in the past but I have forgotten. Does the clock stop at toilet breaks?
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  6. #396
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ER View Post
    Hi, I know this has been discussed in the past but I have forgotten. Does the clock stop at toilet breaks?
    No. Players are responsible for managing their own time and do not have any entitlement under the Laws to stop the clock to go to the toilet.

    The implied exception is where a player has a disability - for instance they have limited mobility and as such will take much longer to go to the toilet than other players. The arbiter is required to "take special measures in the interests of disabled players and those who need medical attention". (12.2.6). That is up to the arbiter to interpret but pausing the clock would be a likely solution.

    In some tournaments I have seen players stop the clock by agreement between them for toilet breaks and even smoking breaks. The arbiter might well turn a blind eye if the progress of the competition is not affected, but the arbiter is not required to allow such stoppages.

  7. #397
    CC Grandmaster ER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham View Post
    No. Players are responsible for managing their own time and do not have any entitlement under the Laws to stop the clock to go to the toilet.
    Good, thank you!

    In some tournaments I have seen players stop the clock by agreement between them for toilet breaks and even smoking breaks. The arbiter might well turn a blind eye if the progress of the competition is not affected, but the arbiter is not required to allow such stoppages.
    Actually, I was part of such an agreement circa 2005 or so. I was playing in Adelaide vs some prominent personality of this forum destroying his Caro-Kann defense and enjoying every move in the process! Well we stopped the clocks, George didn't say anything or didn't notice anyway, we went out for a coffee and came back to complete the mayhem. Believe it or not he won that tournament meritoriously earning the title of commander of the patzer division!
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  8. #398
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Posts moved

    Arbiter seminars discussions moved to new thread.

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