Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    22

    When two pawns down is an advantage - how I swindled a win.

    PGN Viewer
     

    I just finished playing the game above. For most of it I was certain I had no chance to win and yet I somehow found a way. I took a lot from it not least of which is to never give up.

    I've only recently begun to play again so I can't say much for my opening play against his sicilian defence, which I new nothing about and still don't really, although I've heard it's good for black.

    After turn 9 I was looking at Ba3, followed by Qd6, followed by checkmate. He had blocked my castling on both sides, and my position was starting to open up around my king but I wasn't too concerned as his position was closed effectively disabling his a8 rook and c8 bishop. I considered my position better than his despite my doubled pawns on the c file.

    9. e5 stopped his e pawn from advancing stuffing my mating attack.

    11. Qd3 I was happy with, centilizing my queen and covering many squares and possible attacks.

    Then his knight started to meander into my territory. I was sure I could guarantee taking it without loss as it was unprotected with only one flight square that I could cut off.

    Alas, my next move, 13. f5 was a huge blunder. I was concentrating so hard on my back door that I forgot the front, and who would happen to walk through than the black queen, a short step to c5 and he was in. This move allowed his knight and queen to combine removing the need for his knight to have a flight square. I made one last desperate lunge to open a whole in his pawn wall 14. fxe6 then I felt the full force of a queen/knight combo around an open king - ouch! With just two pieces he was holding off my whole army while decimating my pawns.

    On turn 18 he had a chance to finish me but to my surprise and relief he did not take it. 18...Nf3+ followed by Ne5 would have secured him an extra minor piece whether I'd moved to c1 (trying to get into cover) or d1.

    After this near miss I immediately threw my queen in front of my king offering the queen exchange. He took it. It was the first of a long line of minor blunders that in the end cost him the game.

    Going into the end-game I could not see much of a plan although I new my position wasn't as bad as material suggested as I still had the initiative and all his minor pieces were inactive, except for his dangerously centralised knight, which I quickly exchanged, and at the same time exposed his king (25. Bxf5 - he shouldn't have allowed this, besides, I thought he might have some sentimental attachement to it after all the damage it did for him - callous bastard. Also he should have castled but looks like he was eager to support the queening of all those extra pawns.)

    Anyway, I got to turn 26. Bb2. I had just read Chess Fundamentals by Capablanca, who was an endgame master. He recommended (in relation to end-game strategy) "keep harrassing the enemy: force him to use his big pieces to defend pawns. If he has a weak point, try to make it weaker, or create another weakness somewhere else and his position will collapse sooner or later. If he has a weakness, and he can get rid of it, make sure that you create another weakness somewhere else." I duly followed his advice.

    I was tentative to begin with, executing my turns slowly, looking for some flashy attack, but then I reached turn 28. And here's where the swindling began.

    Up until now I had played carefully, taking my time for each move, whereas my apponent had played briskly. I surmised that perhaps he was feeling a bit chuffed with himself having taken little effort to reach the current position, whereas I had appeared to struggle (I have no idea if he was actually chuffed, let's assume he was for the sake of the story ). Before I played turn 28. I took a long time, the most time I had taken thus far. In that time I came up with a plan. For the plan to work I needed him to make some mistakes. In order encourage him to make some mistakes I started to play fast! I guessed he might not want to appear to take his time compared to the likes of a slow poke like me, so he played fast also, matching my speed...and his mistakes started to flow

    28. Rg3. It was important that this move come before Re1+ as I wanted him to over commit. 28. Rae1+ may have spooked him.

    The zigzagging diagonal progress of my rooks from turn 32. onwards made me feel like some Kung-Fu master facing off against a gunman at 50 metres. I started to advance, with some rapid criss-crossing hand chopping movements (woooah, whah! whoah! Woooyaaaahhh! - Bruse Lee style) which evidently bamboozled him into stunned inactity. All he had to do was pull out his gun and shoot (Rab8, threatening my bishop, which I would have had to move, opening the b file from which he could have swept down to the 1st rank to support the queening of a pawn. Or even just to move his c8 bishop so his two rooks could see each other).

    His last chance was on turn 38. If he'd played 38...Kg7 he still could escaped with equality or close to it (certainly better than ++) with the line 35... Kg7 36. Rfxd6+ Kf7 37. Rxd8 f2 38. Ke2 g3 39. Rxc8 Rxc8 40. Be5 Rg8 41. Bxg3 Rxg3 42. Kxf2 Ra3

    The game ends with his a8 rook never having moved - for shame! And with an open b file next door!

    A good win for me. In the end I was surprised how easy it was. Thankyou Capablanca. I will definately be persuing further end-game study.

    What I learned here was:
    - Never give up
    - Queen + Knight around open King is devastating
    - Watch your front door
    - The disadvantages of doubled pawns, but also the defensive attacking possibilities (ie defensive - gather around for defense, attacking - doubled pawns mean open file next door).
    - Castling is recommended
    - How to play end-games
    - Kung-fu and chess compliment each other. Kung-fu Chess, hmm, has a certain ring to it.

    The most important lesson I took from this game was that if you are a pawn or two down you can guarantee that your apponent will be working hard to keep his pawn advantage. Use this to your advantage; his moves may be pridictable. Can he really cover all those pawns. Look for, or set up positions where your two rooks can overlap and double up behind one of his weak pawns while his rooks can't because perhaps there's blockage on his 7th rank for example, or maybe they're just inactive on their original squares blocked by an undeveloped bishop ( Sorry, couldn't resist rubbing it in one last time.)

    If you're the one with the pawn advantage, just remember the game ain't over yet. If you can't cover your pawns don't be stubborn about keeping them all. If you lose one make sure your gain the intiative or develop.
    Last edited by b1_; 15-02-2005 at 02:02 AM.

  2. #2
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    18
    1. e4 c5

    Sicilian is a highly popular opening with many of the main lines explored well into what I consider middle game. I used it for many years myself, though these days I've been playing around with answering e4 with e5 daring white to do his worst (which often enough he does).

    Sicilian is desirable for players of black wishing to set their own agenda. White has two main options for dealing with the Sicilian. He can open up the position with d4 at some point or leave it closed. Depending on what white does black will either try to make use of the half open c file created by d4, or if white leaves the position closed he'll often fianchetto the king bishop and play d6 to form a choke hold on the black squares along the a1-h8 diagonal. This is known as the dragon Sicilian because of the vaguely dragon shape created by the pawns at c5, d6, e7, f7, g6, h7.

    2. Bc4

    Of the white responses this one - known as Bernetti's attack (I think - don't have a chess database in front of me) is the least successful. Black should expect to win 60% of the games played here. 2. Nf3 is popular, as is the highly agressive 2. f4 (Grand Prix assault). Personally I play d4 immediately and go to the Smith-Morra Gambit (2. d4 c5xd4 3. c3 d4xc3 4. Nxc3 ...)

    2. ... e6

    White creates all sorts of problems with 3. Qh5 after any other move. Of the moves to consider 2. ... d6 is sound, but uncomfortable for after 3. Qh5 g6 4. Qe5 f6 (to save the rook). After the queen retreats black must content with an airy King position - not something I'd recommend doing.

    2. ... e6 has it's own problems thoough. It makes the d pawn backward and the d6 square weak. White now needs to seek to open up the d file to start putting pressure on that square and look to getting a knight on it. Trading off the dark square bishops is also desireable.

    3. Nc3

    Nf3, preparing for d4, pxp Nxp is more accurate.

    3. ... Nc6 4. Nf3 Bd6?

    Better is Be7 or d6. Bd6 hems in the d7 pawn. The diagonal the bishop gains isn't worth the problems the bishop creates by being on this square.

    5. d4

    Note that the bishop will need to move again if white is allowed to play 5. pxp, wasting a move. Further, if black plays the natural 5. ... pxp after white recaptures with the knight his queen indirectly attacks the undefended bishop at d7. Never underestimate indirect attacks like this - if the knight can move off and generate a different threat black could suddenly be in over his head. This is again a reason against 4. ... Bd6

    5. ... cxd4
    6. Nxd4 Be5
    7. Nxc6


    The calm 7. Be3 is much stronger. The knight at d4 is strongly posted. If black exchanges down (7. ... NxN 8. BxN BxB 9. QxB) white will have a very strong queen on d4 that is free from harrasment by minor pieces, a queen that can immediately support the move of the queen knight to the d6 square and be supported by Rq1 (castling queen side probably isn't advisable due to the half open c-file).

    7. ... bxc6

    One of the problems with the knight exchange is that now white has surrendered the initiative. All tension in the center is resolved except for black's threat of BxN doubling and isolating the white pawns. White has little repayment since occupation of the d6 square by the knight is now all but impossible due to the pawn at c6 and in any event nothing is stopping black from closing the whole with an advance of the d pawn. This is an important consideration for black in trading off his black squared bishop - can he secure the black squares? The answer is yes so the exchange threat is very real.

    Important guideline: Backward pawns are only weak if the foe can stop their advance!! If they are free to advance, they are NOT weak.

    In many Sicillian games where the e pawn is played before the the d pawn the potential is there for the backward d pawn to become weak. This is a recurring theme of the Sicilian and something to watch for when playing it.

    The knight exchange is questionable because black can seize the initiative using the tension created by the bishop. Black threatens not only BxN doubling the pawns but also d5! swallowing the center. White has nothing better at this point than 8. Bd2 d5! 9. PxP P(c)xP 10. Bb5+ Bd7 and black has a solid center and a lasting initiative. White could also try 8. Ne7 but black still has solid answers in 8. ... Rb8 9. c3 d5 10. PxP P(c)xP 11. Bb3 and white's position is still passive before black's bulwark at d5 and, soon, e5.

    8. f4

    Accepting doubled pawns and a lost end game to salvage a tenuous hold on the initiative.

    8. ... BxN
    9. PxN Qb6


    The most likely goal is pausing white's ability to castle, but white can calmy respond Qf3, deploy his dark-square bishop to e3 attacking the queen gaining time and castling. The major drawback to this move is the d pawn can no longer advance.

    10. e5

    And white seeks to keep it that way, but white's position is getting a bit airy and hard to defend.

    10. ... Ne7

    Preparing to castle. The knight has several potential outposts from here. An especially strong one can be created with h5, followed by h4. This would allow the knight to go to f5 and any attempt to dismiss the knight from the square will be thwarted by the H pawn. (Castling can then be accomplished since the knight protects the h pawn once it reaches h4).

    Another outpost is at d5, but frankly black can't hold it after the bishop drops back to b3 and advances the forward c pawn. Of course, white will have to defend that pawn, before beginning the repositioning and attack to root out the knight. Black has loads of mischief potential while this goes on.

    So it really depends on black's mood. Personally I'd wait to see what white is going to do and go ahead and develop the queen bishop to it's only natural square at b7

    11. Qd3

    Qf3 is stronger because it allows the bishop to come to d3. There it and the queen and rook (after castling) can support an advance of the f-pawn in order to take apart the black center. Further, Qf3 supports advancing the g pawn. Further, if the black knight decides to roost on f5, a bishop on d3 can chop him down. The forward c pawn btw can be defended by Bd2

    11. ... Nf5

    Premature .. h4 needs to come first to prevent...

    12. g4 Nh4
    13. f5?


    Way, way too early. White has an advantage in space thanks to the black's inexactitude with the knight. White should now play 13. Qg3 forcing the knight to retreat to g7. 14. Be3 follows, attacking the queen, black replys Qa5 attacking the forward c-pawn and after 15. Bf2 white can safely castle and THEN play f5.

    13. ... Qc5

    Attacks the hanging pawn at e5 and leaving white with no defenses - the loss of at least a pawn is inevitable. 14. Qe2 is strongest, but it can't stop 14. ... PxP 15. PxP NxP and now the knight is nicely perched. White isn't lost though - he still has two bishops and an open position against an uncastled king - not to mention black's undeveloped queen side bishop. White has enough weaknesses that black has counterplay to resolve this problem and if he does he should win.

    Any other defense of the e pawn is a trap. Qd4 or Qe3 are both met with fatal Q-K knight forks, and Bf4 meets a similar fate. Qe4 is met with 14 ... PxP
    15. PxP NxP 16. QxP QxB and black can fly out his queen bishop to a6 with commanding threats all along the a6-f1 diagonal.

    14. PxP? QxP(e5)+

    White has nothing better than Qe2 forcing the exchange of the ladies and the loss of any hope to attack.

    15. Kf2 P(f7)xP!

    Black opens the f file completely to further harass the black king.

    16. Ba3

    So white tries to prevent this, but he can't. Black need only play c5!!, blasting White's defenses to smithereens. For after 18. ... c5!! White can either try to mitigate the coming castling by black, or try to stop the bishop from coming to b7 and joining in on the onslaught on the long diagonal. He can't do both.

    16. ... Qf4+
    17. Ke2 QxP(g4)+


    Rather than wake up the Queen side black prosecutes his attack with just a queen and a knight. There's definately potential in this, but it isn't as strong as the crushing attack that comes after c5.

    18. Kd2 Qg2+?
    19. Qe2 Qg5+
    20. Qe3 Qxe3+
    21. Kxe3 Nf5+
    22. Kd2 d6
    23. Bd3 Ke7 [/b]

    Better is Kd7 shoring up the center pawns and not pinning the d6 pawn. Further, the knight is free to move off in this case and should given the chance since opposite colored bishops give white too many opportunities to draw the game.

    24. c4 c5
    25. Bxf5 exf5
    26. Bb2 ...


    Having dropped the ball black settles into a won end game - if he watches what he's doing.

    26. ... Rg8
    27. Rhg1 g5?


    Too agressive. Up two pawns black should press to pick up all the isolated white pawns. They can't all be protected. Better is 27. ... g6 28. R(g1)-e1+ Kf7 29. Re2 Bb7 30. R(a)-e1 R(g)-e8. From here black tries to trade down pieces to make his pawn advantage felt. White's only hope ironically lies down the same path, hoping to exploit the opposite colored bishops situation for a draw.

    I won't analyze the rest - as it basically was a series of disasterous blunders by black for which there is no excuse and from which little to nothing can be learned.

    Lessons to be learned.

    Complete your development before prosecuting an attack.

    See to the safety of your king. Neither side castled even when they had the chance.

    Be wary of advancing pawns so far out that pieces cannot support them.
    Last edited by Michael Morris; 27-05-2005 at 05:32 PM.

  3. #3
    Account Permanently Banned firegoat7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    MCC
    Posts
    2,809
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris

    Lessons to be learned.

    Complete your development before prosecuting an attack.

    See to the safety of your king. Neither side castled even when they had the chance.

    Be wary of advancing pawns so far out that pieces cannot support them.
    Dogma to be de-programmed.

    Attacks can and should often be launched without complete development

    Castling does not necessarily make your king safer

    advance pawns without piece support when the moment is necessary.

    Cheers Fg7

  4. #4
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    18
    Now after analysis, a direct response to the post made by the player of white.

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    After turn 9 I was looking at Ba3, followed by Qd6, followed by checkmate.
    Black calmly responds to Ba3 with d5. After the pawn exchange you can't pentrate into the black camp. Why he didn't play this instead of Qb6 I don't know.

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    He had blocked my castling on both sides, and my position was starting to open up around my king but I wasn't too concerned as his position was closed effectively disabling his a8 rook and c8 bishop. I considered my position better than his despite my doubled pawns on the c file.
    Cramped positions are a temporary plus and only truly useful if you can get your attack together before he can reply. At move 9 though if Black plays d5 his position dramtically improves. While the queen move stifles castling, personally I don't think it's worth it - better for black to get his development done.

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    9. e5 stopped his e pawn from advancing stuffing my mating attack.
    It's not the e pawn you should be worried about - it's the d pawn.

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    11. Qd3 I was happy with, centilizing my queen and covering many squares and possible attacks.
    d3 was a weaker square for her than f3 for reasons I explained above. That bishop cried might tears when that square was taken from him.

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    Then his knight started to meander into my territory. I was sure I could guarantee taking it without loss as it was unprotected with only one flight square that I could cut off.
    The best way to deal with knights is to take away as many of their advanced posts as possible. Pawns are devilishly good at this. g4 would have shut this down before it could materialize.

    Once his knight was hanging though you could have used pressure on it to get yourself out of that pickle.

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    Alas, my next move, 13. f5 was a huge blunder. I was concentrating so hard on my back door that I forgot the front, and who would happen to walk through than the black queen, a short step to c5 and he was in. This move allowed his knight and queen to combine removing the need for his knight to have a flight square. I made one last desperate lunge to open a whole in his pawn wall 14. fxe6 then I felt the full force of a queen/knight combo around an open king - ouch! With just two pieces he was holding off my whole army while decimating my pawns.
    You had the right idea - you just did it before your castled rook could support the advance.

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    On turn 18 he had a chance to finish me but to my surprise and relief he did not take it. 18...Nf3+ followed by Ne5 would have secured him an extra minor piece whether I'd moved to c1 (trying to get into cover) or d1.
    d1 doesn't drop a minor piece. c1 does

    18. ... Nf3+
    19. Kd1 Ne5+
    20. Qe2 QxB
    21. QxN

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    After this near miss I immediately threw my queen in front of my king offering the queen exchange. He took it. It was the first of a long line of minor blunders that in the end cost him the game.

    Going into the end-game I could not see much of a plan although I new my position wasn't as bad as material suggested as I still had the initiative and all his minor pieces were inactive, except for his dangerously centralised knight, which I quickly exchanged, and at the same time exposed his king (25. Bxf5 - he shouldn't have allowed this, besides, I thought he might have some sentimental attachement to it after all the damage it did for him - callous bastard. Also he should have castled but looks like he was eager to support the queening of all those extra pawns.)
    You stumbled into the best thing you could have done. When down pawns and you hold the bishop pair, try to create an opposite colors bishops situation - those can often be drawn even if the opponent has 2, even 3 pawns up, depending on the board. I'm not sure it could be done in this game, but it's worth a shot.

    Quote Originally Posted by b1_
    Anyway, I got to turn 26. Bb2. I had just read Chess Fundamentals by Capablanca, who was an endgame master. He recommended (in relation to end-game strategy) "keep harrassing the enemy: force him to use his big pieces to defend pawns. If he has a weak point, try to make it weaker, or create another weakness somewhere else and his position will collapse sooner or later. If he has a weakness, and he can get rid of it, make sure that you create another weakness somewhere else." I duly followed his advice.

    I was tentative to begin with, executing my turns slowly, looking for some flashy attack, but then I reached turn 28. And here's where the swindling began.

    Up until now I had played carefully, taking my time for each move, whereas my apponent had played briskly. I surmised that perhaps he was feeling a bit chuffed with himself having taken little effort to reach the current position, whereas I had appeared to struggle (I have no idea if he was actually chuffed, let's assume he was for the sake of the story ). Before I played turn 28. I took a long time, the most time I had taken thus far. In that time I came up with a plan. For the plan to work I needed him to make some mistakes. In order encourage him to make some mistakes I started to play fast! I guessed he might not want to appear to take his time compared to the likes of a slow poke like me, so he played fast also, matching my speed...and his mistakes started to flow

    28. Rg3. It was important that this move come before Re1+ as I wanted him to over commit. 28. Rae1+ may have spooked him.

    The zigzagging diagonal progress of my rooks from turn 32. onwards made me feel like some Kung-Fu master facing off against a gunman at 50 metres. I started to advance, with some rapid criss-crossing hand chopping movements (woooah, whah! whoah! Woooyaaaahhh! - Bruse Lee style) which evidently bamboozled him into stunned inactity. All he had to do was pull out his gun and shoot (Rab8, threatening my bishop, which I would have had to move, opening the b file from which he could have swept down to the 1st rank to support the queening of a pawn. Or even just to move his c8 bishop so his two rooks could see each other).

    His last chance was on turn 38. If he'd played 38...Kg7
    He can't. You're forgetting your bishop on b2. Black's out of options. He can do nothing to stop Rh8#
    Last edited by Michael Morris; 27-05-2005 at 05:55 PM.

  5. #5
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by firegoat7
    Dogma to be de-programmed.

    Attacks can and should often be launched without complete development

    Castling does not necessarily make your king safer

    advance pawns without piece support when the moment is necessary.

    Cheers Fg7
    Exceptions exist when the position justifies them. This position doesn't justify discarding them, for either side. The position itself determines which guidelines should apply.

  6. #6
    CC Grandmaster antichrist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    16,863
    Mike, I don't know who you are or what your rating is, but it seems terrific what you have provided here. A few years back Gary Lane wrote a few articles on the Scicilian in our chess magazine.

    Then he beat Ian Rogers with it.

  7. #7
    Reader in Slood Dynamics Rincewind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    The multiverse
    Posts
    21,567
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    Exceptions exist when the position justifies them. This position doesn't justify discarding them, for either side. The position itself determines which guidelines should apply.
    Michael, your new here and not used to firegoat's debating 'style'. Suffice to say that 90% of the time he is a troll who can be safely ignored.
    So einfach wie möglich, aber nicht einfacher - Albert Einstein

  8. #8
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by antichrist
    Mike, I don't know who you are or what your rating is, but it seems terrific what you have provided here. A few years back Gary Lane wrote a few articles on the Scicilian in our chess magazine.

    Then he beat Ian Rogers with it.
    My blitz - last time I checked - was an abysmal 1300 on ICC. I'm not sure what it should be though - a lot of ICC players are known to use a computer or a moves database even though they shouldn't.

  9. #9
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Rincewind
    Michael, your new here and not used to firegoat's debating 'style'. Suffice to say that 90% of the time he is a troll who can be safely ignored.
    Heh heh - ok. Well, I'll worry about the last 10%. I'm not infallable.

  10. #10
    Illuminati Bill Gletsos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    16,544
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    2. ... e6

    White creates all sorts of problems with 3. Qh5 after any other move. Of the moves to consider 2. ... d6 is sound, but uncomfortable for after 3. Qh5 g6 4. Qe5 f6 (to save the rook). After the queen retreats black must content with an airy King position - not something I'd recommend doing.
    Unless I have misunderstood you after 2...d6 3.Qh5 g6 4.Qe5 doesnt Black just play 4...ed capturing the queen.
    Last edited by Bill Gletsos; 28-05-2005 at 01:30 AM. Reason: corrected quote

  11. #11
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Gletsos
    Unless I have misunderstood you after 2...d6 3.Qh5 g6 4.Qe5 doesnt Black just play 4...ed capturing the queen.
    yeah.

  12. #12
    CC Rookie
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    22
    Better a late reply than never.

    Thanks for this analysis Michael. Invaluably useful to have a stronger player go through your play in such detail. Deserves to be copied into my notes and has been.

    Pretty much all of what you've said is spot on. My comments to your comments below.


    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    1. e4 c5

    Sicilian is a highly popular opening with many of the main lines explored well into what I consider middle game. I used it for many years myself, though these days I've been playing around with answering e4 with e5 daring white to do his worst (which often enough he does).

    Sicilian is desirable for players of black wishing to set their own agenda. White has two main options for dealing with the Sicilian. He can open up the position with d4 at some point or leave it closed. Depending on what white does black will either try to make use of the half open c file created by d4, or if white leaves the position closed he'll often fianchetto the king bishop and play d6 to form a choke hold on the black squares along the a1-h8 diagonal. This is known as the dragon Sicilian because of the vaguely dragon shape created by the pawns at c5, d6, e7, f7, g6, h7.

    2. Bc4

    Of the white responses this one - known as Bernetti's attack (I think - don't have a chess database in front of me) is the least successful. Black should expect to win 60% of the games played here. 2. Nf3 is popular, as is the highly agressive 2. f4 (Grand Prix assault). Personally I play d4 immediately and go to the Smith-Morra Gambit (2. d4 c5xd4 3. c3 d4xc3 4. Nxc3 ...)
    This is very helpful to someone who has yet to find his opening repertoire. That Smith-Morra Gambit looks like my kind of opening .

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    2. ... e6

    White creates all sorts of problems with 3. Qh5 after any other move. Of the moves to consider 2. ... d6 is sound, but uncomfortable for after 3. Qh5 g6 4. Qe5 f6 (to save the rook). After the queen retreats black must content with an airy King position - not something I'd recommend doing.

    2. ... e6 has it's own problems thoough. It makes the d pawn backward and the d6 square weak. White now needs to seek to open up the d file to start putting pressure on that square and look to getting a knight on it. Trading off the dark square bishops is also desireable.
    3. Qh5 is not something I would consider. Too easy for Black to attack it and gain a development advantage. You would have to explain this advice further to convince me.


    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    Lessons to be learned.

    Complete your development before prosecuting an attack.

    See to the safety of your king. Neither side castled even when they had the chance.

    Be wary of advancing pawns so far out that pieces cannot support them.
    The main lesson I learned from this game is that you must stop all counterplay before you prosecute your own attacks. Looking at my game here I should have at least stopped some counterplay. Allowing your apponent complete counterplay is seat of your pants chess that usually leads to disaster, as it almost did here if not for my apponents poor play.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    Black calmly responds to Ba3 with d5. After the pawn exchange you can't pentrate into the black camp. Why he didn't play this instead of Qb6 I don't know.
    I wasn't suggesting that was my next move, it was simply the threat I had in mind, and I wanted to make it come about.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    It's not the e pawn you should be worried about - it's the d pawn.
    A typo on my part. I meant the d-pawn of course.


    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    d3 was a weaker square for her than f3 for reasons I explained above. That bishop cried might tears when that square was taken from him.
    Agree for sure. I was blinded by my lust to be the attacker no matter what the position on the board, something I have now amputated from my game after some study. I still want to be the attacker, but I now will only attack when the position on the board allows it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    The best way to deal with knights is to take away as many of their advanced posts as possible. Pawns are devilishly good at this. g4 would have shut this down before it could materialize.

    Once his knight was hanging though you could have used pressure on it to get yourself out of that pickle.
    You have to understand that I played this game before I even knew what a pawn hole, or an advanced knight outpost was. This is glaringly obvious in the gung-ho manner in which I pushed my pawns.

    Looking back on this game six months later I cringe at some of my moves, but look with fondness on my ignorant enthusiasm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    d1 doesn't drop a minor piece. c1 does

    18. ... Nf3+
    19. Kd1 Ne5+
    20. Qe2 QxB
    21. QxN
    d1 does drop a minor piece
    18...Nf3+ 19.Kd1 Ne5+ 20.Qe2 NxB 21. QxQ Ne3+ (forked) - he had me by the balls no matter what I did.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Morris
    He can't. You're forgetting your bishop on b2. Black's out of options. He can do nothing to stop Rh8#
    Another typo on my part. I meant 35...Kg7, not 38. Of course I saw my Bishop on turn 38 as I used it next turn for the mate.

  13. #13
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    188
    Even though 1.e4 c5 2.Bc4 isn't the best, in the instance of 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6, 3.Bc4 is quite playable, and has been used by Leko, among others, mostly to try and achieve a kind of closed Ruy Lopez position (with bishop eventually on c2 or b3, and pawns on d4 and c3 etc. I used the line against Solomon once, and it worked just fine.

    Against reasonable play in your provided game, White is just dead lost after ....Qxe5+. But isn't bamboozling a win from a 'dead lost' game one of the highlights of playing? Damn straight.

    Cheers,
    Kevin Casey
    2010 QLD Blitz Champion

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Live at the BBQ (slow loading)
    By jeffrei in forum Games and Analysis
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 18-09-2004, 07:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •