View Poll Results: Who will win the 2022 Candidates Tournament?

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  • Fabiano Caruana

    4 33.33%
  • Ding Liren

    3 25.00%
  • Jan-Krzystof Duda

    0 0%
  • Alireza Firouzja

    4 33.33%
  • Hikaru Nakamura

    1 8.33%
  • Ian Nepomniachtchi

    0 0%
  • Teimour Radjabov

    0 0%
  • Richard Rapport

    0 0%
  • Sergey Karjakin

    0 0%
  • Other (late substitute)

    0 0%
  • No winner / event abandoned or cancelled

    0 0%
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  1. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    Amazing luck. Everything keep's going Nepo's way.
    Many of them are a bit out of practice at this format. It's been lashings of blitz and Armageddon (often online), knockout mini-matches, and novelty formats and scoring systems designed to randomise the outcome.

    Of course they're professionals and they get what it's about, but in practice it must be disorienting. Not surprising if they occasionally seem to have the concentration span of a goldfish.

  2. #107
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    Nepo - Radjabov: an Open Catalan in which Nepo was content to liquidate down to a dead drawn endgame. Duda - Caruana: I am just looking at the position after 25. gxh4, and Caruana seems to be in big trouble with both of his minor pieces out of play. White has a simple plan: Rg1 and Ng5.
    FA Andrew Hardegen
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  3. #108
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    A bunch of queen moves from Duda, who seems to be losing his way a little. 31. Nxe6 would have killed it.
    FA Andrew Hardegen
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  4. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hardegen View Post
    A bunch of queen moves from Duda, who seems to be losing his way a little. 31. Nxe6 would have killed it.
    But he then redeems himself somewhat with 39. f4!!
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  5. #110
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    Caruana lost, Nakamura and Ding won meaning all three are tied for second 1.5 points behind Nepo
    Ding has won 2 in a row
    Caruana has 0.5/3
    Nakamura is +3 with white and -2 with black

  6. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hardegen View Post
    But can he equal Topalov's 10/14 in 2005?
    I do not think this is his goal. In the current scenario, he will try to hold on to his +4.
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
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  7. #112
    CC Grandmaster Desmond's Avatar
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    Some comments on the standard of play from Kramnik, translation via reddit:

    Disclaimer:
    I have never seen so many bad games in a top-level tournament. I am very interested to know as to why this is. Blunders happen time to time in top level chess, but in this tournament they aren't episodic. The sheer amount of unreasonable mistakes of all types is stunning, and I want to you [the youtube audience] to discuss with me as to what exactly changed in the chess world in the last few years. I hope I have earned my right to be critical of the players in question and i want you to know that I am not trying to humiliate any of them, rather, I'm just being honest in analyzing their games. These players are capable of some really high-quality chess, but this exact tournament does seem to have more bad games than ever...

    Ding Liren vs Ian Nepomniachtchi, Round 1:
    Despite Ding Liren's spot as the second highest rated player, white's level of play seemed to be around 2300 elo. Ian played the game good enough, although not ideal. It really doesn't matter if your opponent is Ding Liren if he plays like a 2300 rated player.

    Duda vs Rapport, Round 1:
    What can I even say about this game? Terrible game with the white pieces in the endgame. Rapport played a good game despite being worse in the opening until he played c5 and Rd8. The level of play is still around 2300, as it seems to me.

    Rapport vs Firouzja, Round 2:
    The amount of easily findable missed wins despite having enough time on the clock puts this game as my favourite worst game of the tournament. The fact that this game ends in a draw is deserving for both of the players.

    Firouzja vs Nakamura, Round 3:
    Again, these types mistakes can happen a few times in a tournament, but when they happen basically every round it feels like there is something more to the player's level of play suddenly dropping.

    Radjabov vs Ding, Round 5:
    We start to see a pattern here: the most logical and natural move for some reason gets declined, instead choosing a strange, illogical and a bad move. Why is it like this? My idea is that this new generation of players is strongly influenced by computer-style play: they tend to calculate as far as possible and try to force the issue, choosing to not operate with the most general principles and not use their intuition as much. I really do not understand why they keep making these counter-intuitive moves that also happen to be obviously bad. I am perplexed not by the quantity of the mistakes, but by their quality. I would probably make the same amount of mistakes if I was playing, but my mistakes would at least be reasonable and explainable.

    Conclusion:
    First of all, some of you will probably try to say that there were other top-level tournaments with this poor level of chess, to which I say: no, there was none, not even close. Second, most of the mistakes have some logic behind them, and yet I see no logic in most of the bad moves made, and that is something that puzzles me the most. It seems like 6 out of 8 participants are obviously out of shape. But why exactly? What could have possibly happened in the span of the last few years that dropped the level of play so hard?I thought that there might an explanation not related to chess: maybe the pandemic and the lockdown somehow changed people's view of the world? Obviously the time of the pandemic wasn't easy for the players, so that might be a part of the problem to them making these illogical moves.A chess-related explanation would be that all these pandemic-related rapid and blitz events, in Botvinnik-esque style, damaged their skill in classical chess. I love playing blitz myself, but i could see that playing fast time controls constantly could change your approach to chess, because in blitz you can slack and still win, and that exact slacking is what we see in the Candidates today.
    So what's your excuse? For running like the devil's chasing you?

    See you in another life, brotha.

  8. #113
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    Nepo wins again to go to 8 points after Firouzja tried to attack him but it was poor and Nepo convincingly won

  9. #114
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    Nepo wins easily with Black against Firouzja.

    Nakamura - Rapport should be a straightforward draw.

    Caruana has some slight initiative in an opposite-colour bishop middlegame against Ding, though it remains to be seen whether it will produce anything concrete.
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  10. #115
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    Ding eventually wins a game that swung back and forth but in the end Ding held it together while Caruana faltered.

    Nepo has a big lead but Ding is on the charge.

  11. #116
    CC Grandmaster Desmond's Avatar
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    Impressive tournament comeback by Ding. Have to wonder how this would have been if he hadn't arrived jetlagged in Rd1 and lost to Nepo.
    Alireza playing 300 bullet games over night seems to have not had the desired effect.

    1. Nepo 8/11 +5
    2. Ding 6.5/11 +2
    3. Nakamura 6/11 +1
    4. Caruana 5.5/11 +0
    5. Radjabov 5/11 -1
    6-7. Duda, Rapport 4.5/11 -2
    8. Firouzja 4/11 -3.
    So what's your excuse? For running like the devil's chasing you?

    See you in another life, brotha.

  12. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desmond View Post
    Impressive tournament comeback by Ding. Have to wonder how this would have been if he hadn't arrived jetlagged in Rd1 and lost to Nepo.
    He should have got to the host city a day earlier, then.
    FA Andrew Hardegen
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  13. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    I do not think this is his goal. In the current scenario, he will try to hold on to his +4.
    You mean +5

  14. #119
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    Nepo and Hikaru play a quick known draw.

  15. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desmond View Post
    Impressive tournament comeback by Ding.
    You haven't just jinxed him, I hope.
    FA Andrew Hardegen
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