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  1. #16
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    Helen Milligan drawing with Nic Croad must be a large upset

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Colliver View Post
    Helen Milligan drawing with Nic Croad must be a large upset
    Certainly a good result!

    NZ Junior and Age Group Championships are also being played in the mornings, top 12 boards will be live here: https://view.livechesscloud.com/#63f...f-812fa5866d91
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  3. #18
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    NZ Championship Round 7

    After finally dropping half a point in round 7, does Daniel Gong still have a firm grip on the Silver Rook? Yes, most definitely! He leads with 6.5 points, 1.5 points ahead of Russell Dive and Felix Xie. He will be challenged by 14 time winner, Anthony Ker in round 8. A win for Gong will capture the NZ title with a round to spare. For Ker, this is a must win game. Two points behind Gong, only a win is good enough. It is the same story for defending champion Nic Croad. Only a win vs Dive will suffice. Dive, however, will be looking for a win and hoping for a good result for his Wellington clubmate, Ker. Xie plays Stephen Lukey (4.5) and Matthew McNabb (4.5) plays Thomas van der Hoorn.
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  4. #19
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    Round 8

    Daniel Gong's draw with Anthony Ker means that he will be NZ Champion. Gong has 7 points, 1 point clear of Felix Xie. Xie won versus Stephen Lukey. A win or draw in the final round against Edward Rains (4.5) will secure an outright win for Gong. Xie must win versus Matthew McNabb (5.5) and hope for a slip up by Gong. Prediction is for two short draws. The other possible challengers in round 8 ell short once Gong had his draw, Nevertheless, here are these results: Russell Dive drew with Nic Croad and McNabb won versus Thomas van der Hoorn.
    Last edited by CivicChessMan; 09-01-2022 at 08:44 PM.
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  5. #20
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    Well done Daniel Gong, excellent tournament.

  6. #21
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    Round 9

    Congratulations to Daniel Gong, the winner of 129th New Zealand Championship and the new New Zealand Champion. Gong finishes on 7.5 points after a very short draw (6 moves) with Edward Rains. Quite some early birthday present with Gong turning 19 on the 12th. Felix Xie has just beaten Matthew McNabb to take outright second place on 7 points. Three players are still in contention for third: Russell Dive, Anthony Ker and Nic Croad.

    PS: Croad wins against Nick Cummings to move to 6 points. It's down to "The Big Rivalry" (see http://www.newzealandchess.co.nz/bul...g-rivalry.html). Outright third can be achieved by Dive with a win or draw. If Ker wins, he shares third with Croad.

    PPS: Dive gets in time trouble and his errors are ruthlessly punished by Ker. Third place to Ker and Croad on 6 points.
    Last edited by CivicChessMan; 10-01-2022 at 04:07 PM.
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  7. #22
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    NZ Rapid Championship

    No Daniel Gong chasing the double but still five previous champions in the 53 player field. These are defending champion Felix Xie, 8 time winner Russell Dive, 6 time winner Anthony Ker, Nic Croad and Stephen Lukey. After 7 rounds, it's been all Russell Dive. With 7 wins in a row, he is the only unbeaten player in the tournament with a one-point lead over Michael Sole. Dive and Sole meet in round 8. Ryan Winter is in clear third with 5.5 points. Xie has 5 points along with Ker, Isabelle Ning and Rikard Unelius.
    Last edited by CivicChessMan; 12-01-2022 at 10:29 AM.
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  8. #23
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    NZ Rapid Championship

    Round 8: There has been a major upset with Michael Sole defeating the previously unbeaten Russell Dive. Both players have 7 points with one round to play. Felix Xie wins versus Matthew McNabb to be one point behind the leaders. Isabelle Ning also scored a major upset with a win over Anthony Ker to move to 6 points. Joined by Rikard Unelius who beat Ryan Winter.
    Last edited by CivicChessMan; 12-01-2022 at 12:40 PM.
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  9. #24
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    NZ Rapid Championship

    Russell Dive plays Rikard Unelius and Isabelle Ning versus Michael Sole. Felix Xie is the leader in the clubhouse on 7 points after his win versus Tony Carpinter.

    Dive wins his 9th New Zealand Rapid Championship defeating Unelius. Congratulations! 8 points was enough to claim outright first after Micheal Sole's loss to Isabelle Ning. In second place are Xie, Sole and Ning 0n 7 points. Nic Croad beats Stephen Lukey to finish fifth 0n 6.5.

    Dive's previous win was in 2015 when first equal with Hans Gao. He won the inaugural tournament in 1993.
    Last edited by CivicChessMan; 12-01-2022 at 01:37 PM.
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  10. #25
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    IA Craig Hall

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  11. #26
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    Great to see these championships happened and congratulations to all prize-winners.
    God exists. Short and to the point.

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  12. #27
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    Looks like a great event. Running all of the events in a week or so Iooks like a winning formula.

    I see that there were 53 in the Rapid. Could we have a breakdown of how many played in each section.
    Could you compare the figures to how many played in recent years if they were conducted at different times during the year.
    Our Qld. Female participation rate is currently 12.6% since about 1979. What is yours for this event?

    How much other media response did you get. Which section got the more spectators etc.

    I saw the report by the Star News. Great stuff. Tell them that Australians are reading their newspaper for the chess results and also of course, the adds!
    They seem to have latched onto the speed side of things. 5 minute (lightning) with no increment gives cutthroat finishes that kids love.
    They yell and scream in your ear – “take the rook, take the rook!”
    No better feeling than winning on time with a lost position!

    With blitz increment, hard to get much interest from what I have seen at club level. Games go on forever and kids drift off to another board.
    Good for the Arbiters though.
    Try an experiment at your local club.
    Play some up-and-coming Junior who gives you a hard game some 5 minute lightning and then some 3 mins. with increment.
    The increment is for the Arbiter. You will see the difference immediately.

    Spectator interest pays for everything – tv, gate takings etc.

    Hard to get newspapers interested over here. Well done. Could be a future template.

    Cannot wait for the tournament book!

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Corker View Post
    Looks like a great event. Running all of the events in a week or so Iooks like a winning formula.

    I see that there were 53 in the Rapid. Could we have a breakdown of how many played in each section.
    Could you compare the figures to how many played in recent years if they were conducted at different times during the year.
    Our Qld. Female participation rate is currently 12.6% since about 1979. What is yours for this event?

    How much other media response did you get. Which section got the more spectators etc.

    I saw the report by the Star News. Great stuff. Tell them that Australians are reading their newspaper for the chess results and also of course, the adds!
    They seem to have latched onto the speed side of things. 5 minute (lightning) with no increment gives cutthroat finishes that kids love.
    They yell and scream in your ear – “take the rook, take the rook!”
    No better feeling than winning on time with a lost position!

    With blitz increment, hard to get much interest from what I have seen at club level. Games go on forever and kids drift off to another board.
    Good for the Arbiters though.
    Try an experiment at your local club.
    Play some up-and-coming Junior who gives you a hard game some 5 minute lightning and then some 3 mins. with increment.
    The increment is for the Arbiter. You will see the difference immediately.

    Spectator interest pays for everything – tv, gate takings etc.

    Hard to get newspapers interested over here. Well done. Could be a future template.

    Cannot wait for the tournament book!
    Tournament books are unlikely in NZ to say the least - even round by round bulletins are a thing of the past.

    Our local club still plays 5 minutes no increment for some events - the increment isn't for arbiters, it's for organisers to lessen clock abuse. My personal experience of running both at our club is that 3+2 is faster than 5+0 because players resign/agree draws faster. An odd phenomenon at Congress was a lot more players playing to mate than I would normally expect - even at our club, that's rare, but Congress had a lot of it even in the Major Open.

    The Rapid was open - no separate sections. That said, the rating breakdown was 11 each in 2000+, under 2000, under 1700, and 20 in the under 1400 (these were the prize categories).

    Congress is always conducted in January - in the more distant past, it started in late December, but has settled on January since the first Queenstown Classic in 2006. Dates in January are more variable, but are usually early January unless specifically following another event e.g. George Trundle Masters (RR IM norm events) or Aussie Championship to maximise Australian participation. The NZ Rapid Championship and Lightning Championship have both been part of Congress since their inception.

    Beyond that, the main factor for entry numbers is whether it is in Auckland. One new point since last year is the NZ Junior Championship being at Congress in the mornings of the NZ Championship - was previously usually in July. This led to more entries than previous events outside Auckland, but it's still early days for analysis. Covid was a negative factor - we had 8 entries who had to withdraw before the event due to Covid (including 4 from Australia due to border/MIQ restrictions), and I know of at least 3 more who didn't enter because vaccine passes were required, and at least 1 who didn't enter because masks were not required, and I've heard anecdotes of players not travelling/playing simply because of Covid, not the event protocols as such.

    Female/Total breakdown by event:
    Junior - 7/32 = 21.9%
    NZ Championship - 3/24 = 12.5%
    Major Open - 6/41 = 14.6%
    Lightning - 5/51 = 9.8%
    Rapid - 6/53 = 11.3%
    Canterbury Open - 0/6 = 0%
    Overall - 10/88 = 11.3% (of these 10, 8 are juniors)

    There were very few spectators who weren't related to the players, but when we did get any, they gravitated to the NZ Championship.
    Last edited by Craig_Hall; 16-01-2022 at 12:11 PM. Reason: Corrected % of female players overall
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  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig_Hall View Post
    Tournament books are unlikely in NZ to say the least - even round by round bulletins are a thing of the past.

    Our local club still plays 5 minutes no increment for some events - the increment isn't for arbiters, it's for organisers to lessen clock abuse. My personal experience of running both at our club is that 3+2 is faster than 5+0 because players resign/agree draws faster. An odd phenomenon at Congress was a lot more players playing to mate than I would normally expect - even at our club, that's rare, but Congress had a lot of it even in the Major Open.

    The Rapid was open - no separate sections. That said, the rating breakdown was 11 each in 2000+, under 2000, under 1700, and 20 in the under 1400 (these were the prize categories).

    Congress is always conducted in January - in the more distant past, it started in late December, but has settled on January since the first Queenstown Classic in 2006. Dates in January are more variable, but are usually early January unless specifically following another event e.g. George Trundle Masters (RR IM norm events) or Aussie Championship to maximise Australian participation. The NZ Rapid Championship and Lightning Championship have both been part of Congress since their inception.

    Beyond that, the main factor for entry numbers is whether it is in Auckland. One new point since last year is the NZ Junior Championship being at Congress in the mornings of the NZ Championship - was previously usually in July. This led to more entries than previous events outside Auckland, but it's still early days for analysis. Covid was a negative factor - we had 8 entries who had to withdraw before the event due to Covid (including 4 from Australia due to border/MIQ restrictions), and I know of at least 3 more who didn't enter because vaccine passes were required, and at least 1 who didn't enter because masks were not required, and I've heard anecdotes of players not travelling/playing simply because of Covid, not the event protocols as such.

    Female/Total breakdown by event:
    Junior - 7/32 = 21.9%
    NZ Championship - 3/24 = 12.5%
    Major Open - 6/41 = 14.6%
    Lightning - 5/51 = 9.8%
    Rapid - 6/53 = 11.3%
    Canterbury Open - 0/6 = 0%
    Overall - 10/88 = 10.2% (of these 10, 8 are juniors)

    There were very few spectators who weren't related to the players, but when we did get any, they gravitated to the NZ Championship.
    Thanks for the info.
    1.Re the book I meant that the event was such a success that it was worthy of a book.

    2.Schools I coach at use “DGT Game Timer”. They are about A$67 and are fairly indestructible.
    They don’t have increments because they are not designed for chess.
    They are designed for the bigger sports like scrabble or backgammon or any game where one side plays another.
    You can play 1 minute each to 9 hours 59 minutes each.
    Half the price of the usual DGT and don’t break.

    3.Good to hear the different experience you have had with 5 min. v 3 min. + 02.
    Personally, for coaching I will only use no increment because I want the kids to get used to managing time.
    I want them to understand that 300 secs. means that. It doesn’t mean 301 secs. If you lost on time in a winning position, go tell mum!

    4.Good to see you are still having Round Robins - George Trundle Masters (RR IM norm events).
    Not sure if we still have them. The events under the RR used to pay for the whole event back in the day when we ran them in Qld.
    Now I think we have to pay out rating prizes to the under sections so that may not work anymore.
    I don’t think the Russians had any Swiss events at the top level until the 60s. It was all hacking your way through the Categories.

    5.Having a few big events, such as your Congress in January may be a better way than having a lot of events all through the year.
    Maybe our club numbers decline is due to so much weekend chess available.

    6.The Australian Junior Championships has the Main event, always a Blitz event (3 mins. + 02), used to be 5 mins. no incr.,
    sometimes a Rapid, and sometimes a Problem-Solving Championship. I am guessing a few local kids would play in one or two of the events. Those who travel would probably play in most of them. The Australian Championship or Open is I think the same except for there being no Problem-Solving Comp.

    7.Covid. Most events all around Australia have been disrupted in some way.
    And yet online matches or events are almost non-existent in Australia – except through Chess.com, Lichess etc. where it is business as usual.
    And business is good!
    I don’t understand why we are not taking advantage of Covid and playing more club matches online.

    8.Female participation.

    Junior 7/32 = 21.9%
    Overall 10/88 = 10.2%

    Why does it drop from 21.9% at Junior level to 10.2% overall?

    I know in Australia, if you don’t put them into teams, they drop off.
    The more they drop off, the more they drop off.
    They want to play with their mates in mixed, social settings, not isolated school rooms.
    And we drop Teams after Year 12. They then have to play as Individuals without their team mates.
    Not sure if this applies to NZ.

    We are both missing out on 51% of the population.

    9.Spectators. Interesting that they were drawn to the NZ Championship.
    Apart from relatives, I don’t think we get many spectators here at all.

    In the 90s, as I think I remember, they used to have photo ops. for the media a couple of days before a
    Junior Speed event on the Gold Coast.
    I think they were called “Young Guns” events. Similar to “Young Masters” events but faster.
    The media would film kids playing speed chess as a taster for the main event a couple of days later.

    Thanks very much for your insights.

    I am trying to get Australian OTB players to have a good hard look at what we are doing with the MASSIVE, MASSIVE resources we have available.

    Kerry Corker
    Last edited by Kerry Corker; 16-01-2022 at 10:03 AM.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Corker View Post
    8.Female participation.

    Junior 7/32 = 21.9%
    Overall 10/88 = 10.2%

    Why does it drop from 21.9% at Junior level to 10.2% overall?

    I know in Australia, if you donít put them into teams, they drop off.
    The more they drop off, the more they drop off.
    They want to play with their mates in mixed, social settings, not isolated school rooms.
    And we drop Teams after Year 12. They then have to play as Individuals without their team mates.
    Not sure if this applies to NZ.

    We are both missing out on 51% of the population.

    Kerry Corker
    Just to touch on this, my calculations are slightly off, should be 11.3% rather than 10.2%. That correction aside, Sport NZ have been investigating this as it is not unique to chess in NZ by any means. There is generally a drop off at each stage as children move from primary (5-11) to intermediate (11-13) to high school (13-18) to tertiary study (18-22) to work (can be 16+ although commonly 18+ after finishing high school or 21+ after finishing a 3 year degree).

    This drop off is more pronounced in girls and women, but it does affect boys and men as well.

    The team/group/social factor is probably one factor as tournament chess is very anti-social during games with silence required for long periods of time, and the girls preferring to play in group/teams also matches SportNZ's findings.

    My own observation is also that chess is comparatively inexpensive to play competitively (a set and prep material is a lot cheaper than top quality golf or cricket gear, for example), but very time heavy with a club game being 3-4 hours each week, and then decent prep and training being another 5-10 hours potentially, and the sky's the limit if anyone wants to aim for a title.

    School and work requirements make that harder to justify as children and students get older, so chess eventually falls off the priority list for many.

    My suggestion based on that observation is to have decent social/casual opportunities that don't require the same time commitment, and go from there. A welcoming environment is obviously critical, so stamp down on sexist remarks, creepy behaviour and also keep the facilities clean, tidy, well-lit and safe including the car parking and getting from the venue to public transport.
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