View Poll Results: WHO WILL WIN? (THIS POLL ASKS WHO WILL WIN, NOT WHO DO YOU WANT TO WIN)

Voters
12. You may not vote on this poll
  • Coalition by >30 seats

    0 0%
  • Coalition by 16-30 seats

    0 0%
  • Coalition by 15 or fewer seats [CORRECT]

    4 33.33%
  • Hung parliament

    0 0%
  • Labor by 15 or fewer seats

    6 50.00%
  • Labor by 16-30 seats

    1 8.33%
  • Labor by >30 seats

    1 8.33%
Page 31 of 35 FirstFirst ... 212930313233 ... LastLast
Results 451 to 465 of 512
  1. #451
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    19,359

    Leftist elites have paid the price for publicly sneering at voters

    At Australian Ballot Boxes, the Left’s Empathy Deficit Came Home to Roost
    Claire Lehmann, Quilette, 20 May 2019

    Progressive politicians like to assume that, on election day at least, blue-collar workers and urban progressives will bridge their differences, and make common cause to support leftist economic policies. This assumption might once have been warranted. But it certainly isn’t now—in large part because the intellectuals, activists and media pundits who present the most visible face of modern leftism are the same people openly attacking the values and cultural tastes of working and middle-class voters. And thanks to social media (and the caustic news-media culture that social media has encouraged and normalized), these attacks are no longer confined to dinner-party titterings and university lecture halls. Brigid Delaney, a senior writer for Guardian Australia, responded to Saturday’s election result with a column about how Australia has shown itself to be “rotten.” One well-known Australian feminist and op-ed writer, Clementine Ford, has been fond of Tweeting sentiments such as “All men are scum and must die.” Former Australian Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane, who also has served as a high-profile newspaper columnist, argues that even many mainstream political positions—such as expressing concern about the Chinese government’s rising regional influence—are a smokescreen for racism.

    In an interview conducted on Sunday morning, Deputy Labor leader Tanya Plibersek opined that if only her party had more time to explain to the various groups how much they’d all benefit from Labor’s plans, Australians would have realized how fortunate they’d be with a Labor government, and Shorten would’ve become Prime Minister. Such attitudes are patronizing, for they implicitly serve to place blame at the feet of voters, who apparently are too ignorant to know what’s good for them.

    What the election actually shows us is that the so-called quiet Australians, whether they are tradies (to use the Australian term) in Penrith, retirees in Bundaberg, or small business owners in Newcastle, are tired of incessant scolding from their purported superiors. Condescension isn’t a good look for a political movement.

    Taking stock of real voters’ needs would require elites to exhibit a spirit of empathic understanding—such as by way of acknowledging that blue-collar workers have good reason to vote down parties whose policies would destroy blue-collar jobs; or that legal immigrants might oppose opening up a nation’s border to migrants who arrive illegally. More broadly, the modern progressive left has lost touch with the fact that what ordinary people want from their government is a spirit of respect, dignity and hope for the future. While the fetish for hectoring and moral puritanism has become popular in rarefied corners of arts and academia, it is deeply off-putting to voters whose sense of self extends beyond cultish ideological tribalism.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  2. #452
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,630
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    With some universities I accept jobs that they offer, with some I do not, with some we negotiate number of hours, tasks included etc. If I am not happy with the pay offered - I simply walk away or remain in my job with the university but refuse contracts for particular tasks. If University offers me less money than I am willing to accept - I will not complain. I will simply reject the offer. I do not understand what that's got to do with unions. If people refuse to pay me well...its a good call for me to have a good long think about what I should do to increase my market value.
    Do you negotiate your hourly/weekly pay rate with the University? Or do you accept the rate negotiated by the union? And if there is an increase in the pay rate negotiated by the union with the university, do you accept it?

  3. #453
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,630
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    I am not sure about the role of unions in the history of the universe/Australia...but as of now...they are nothing but nuisance.
    Workers are much better off in countries with strong unions - compare Australia with the US, for example.

  4. #454
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,630
    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    Australia’s Voters Reject Leftist Ideas A stunning conservative win has lessons for the U.S. By JOHN FUND National Review, 19 May 2019
    Hell hath no fury greater than left-wingers who lose an election in a surprise upset. Think Brexit in 2016. Think Trump’s victory the same year. Now add Australia.
    Conservative prime minister Scott Morrison shocked pollsters and pundits alike with his victory on Saturday, and the reaction has been brutal from supporters of the opposition Labor party. They can’t seem to decide whether Australia’s electorate is stupid, evil, or both.
    Actually the Coalition has accepted almost all of Labor's 'left-wing' policies, and is far to the left of Trump.

  5. #455
    CC Candidate Master Blunderbuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by Capablanca-Fan View Post
    Brigid Delaney, a senior writer for Guardian Australia, responded to Saturday’s election result with a column about how Australia has shown itself to be “rotten.”
    If you take the time to read Brigid Delaney's article you’ll find that Clarie Lehmann has completely miss-represented her:-

    The call [of rotten] from the floor chilled me to the core. This is it, I thought. This is the hardening of the arteries, the cleaving of the country in two, the thing that Australia has largely avoided so far.

    Sunday morning and I’m talking to my dad about Hawkie and this country.

    “Are we doomed? Are we just like all the other countries where one half hates the other half’s guts?” I asked my dad.

    Dad said no way, and quoted Bob Hawke at me: “I want to be remembered as a bloke who loved his country and still does.”
    Last edited by Blunderbuss; 23-05-2019 at 12:29 PM.
    "I am not saying they love each other. Oh, no. Football is not a matter of life and death … it’s much more important than that." - Bill Shankly

  6. #456
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,630
    Quote Originally Posted by idledim View Post
    Christians help hold the centre
    Although not directly related to the election campaign, Israel Folau’s unjust and shameful treatment for having the courage to defend his faith and to put his commitment to God above personal gain signalled religious freedom as a vital issue. It can hardly surprise that, when a survey carried out by The Australian asked: “Should Rugby Australia sack Israel Folau over his social media posts?”, out of 21,700 respondents 89 per cent stated the player should not have his contract terminated. For the more than 12 million Christians across Australia, Folau being victimised demonstrated that religious freedom was threatened as things stood; under any Labor-Greens coalition those freedoms would cease to exist.
    What specific Labor policies (there's no "Labor-Greens coalition") would destroy religious freedom?

  7. #457
    CC Candidate Master Blunderbuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by Blunderbuss View Post
    Are we just like all the other countries where one half hates the other half’s guts?” I asked my dad.
    If you'd like to see a good example from Brexit land of two sides hating the others guts - take a look at this twitter.com/JamieJBartlett

    Although I say two sides in this case both MP and heckler claim to be supporting Brexit

    Also, this lady puts all our debating here on Chess Chat into perspective: twitter.com/andthomsydney
    Last edited by Blunderbuss; 23-05-2019 at 02:04 PM.
    "I am not saying they love each other. Oh, no. Football is not a matter of life and death … it’s much more important than that." - Bill Shankly

  8. #458
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,311
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    Do you negotiate your hourly/weekly pay rate with the University? Or do you accept the rate negotiated by the union? And if there is an increase in the pay rate negotiated by the union with the university, do you accept it?
    I choose to accept or not to accept. Also can choose what tasks/ jobs I accept based on pay rate and conditions. If pay is not enough, I can refuse the job any time
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  9. #459
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,311
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    Workers are much better off in countries with strong unions - compare Australia with the US, for example.
    I bet some workers are...if their pay is greater than what they are capable of producing .
    But is it good for economy? Is it good for business? For Economic Growth?
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  10. #460
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,630
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    I bet some workers are...if their pay is greater than what they are capable of producing . But is it good for economy? Is it good for business? For Economic Growth?
    Australia has been growing steadily since 1991.

  11. #461
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,630
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    I choose to accept or not to accept. Also can choose what tasks/ jobs I accept based on pay rate and conditions. If pay is not enough, I can refuse the job any time
    We can all refuse jobs. But as a self-employed person I can also negotiate my own pay rate, while your rate of pay seems to be fixed at the amount negotiated by the union with your employer, plus any negotiated increases. So the union has done all the hard work for you.

    Since you don't like unions, have you asked your employer if you can negotiate an individual contract with them with negotiated rates of pay - as I have?

  12. #462
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,311
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    We can all refuse jobs. But as a self-employed person I can also negotiate my own pay rate, while your rate of pay seems to be fixed at the amount negotiated by the union with your employer, plus any negotiated increases. So the union has done all the hard work for you.

    Since you don't like unions, have you asked your employer if you can negotiate an individual contract with them with negotiated rates of pay - as I have?
    www.baronconsulting.com.au - ''part of me is self employed'' .
    RE negotiating with employers, I am doing it all the time. Even with universities, some things can be negotiated .

    And if not for Union...why would pay be less for me..i would simply do something else...or get paid more by having more scope for individual negotiations.
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  13. #463
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,311
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    Australia has been growing steadily since 1991.
    Australia would grow much faster if we would not interfere with the market economy principles and would not spend so much on giving fish to people who should be taught how to finish instead.
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  14. #464
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    19,359
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham View Post
    Looks like Gladys Liu is up in Chisholm! Another win for the Chess Party.
    Very good. Evidently she was an outstanding president of the Box Hill Chess Club, and her daughter Sally Yu was Australian U-18 Girls champ. See also ER's five-part interview with her.

    Edit: see also ER's post about Gladys earlier on this thread.
    Last edited by Capablanca-Fan; 24-05-2019 at 07:53 AM.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

  15. #465
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    19,359
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    Australia would grow much faster if we would not interfere with the market economy principles and would not spend so much on giving fish to people who should be taught how to finish instead.
    Exactly. Unfortunately, this poster has a point:

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    Actually the Coalition has accepted almost all of Labor's 'left-wing' policies, and is far to the left of Trump.
    Compare:

    The Sun Is Setting On Three Decades Of Free Market Economics
    John Roskam, 17 May 2019

    You can also notice the change by comparing Labor’s and the Coalition’s election policies from this campaign. In 2019 while there’s certainly differences between the two, most notably on tax, the difference between the parties policies is nowhere near as big as it should be.

    In essence, Labor and the Coalition accept an ever-increasing role for the government in the economy and in people’s lives. While Labor is proposing the part-nationalisation of the salaries of childcare workers, the Coalition wants to part-nationalise lending for residential property.

    Significantly, at this election neither Labor or the Coalition are suggesting there’s any area of public or private activity in which there should be less government intervention. Similarly, the idea the role and responsibililities of federal, state and local government should be clearly delineated has gone out the window. All politics might be local, but when federal politicians start promising the replacement of cricket pitches on local council sports grounds its time to ask whether the concept of federalism needs to be reconceived.

    As has been proved since 2013, the Coalition is not against raising taxes, after all it’s increased lots of taxes of its own.
    “The destructive capacity of the individual, however vicious, is small; of the state, however well-intentioned, almost limitless. Expand the state and that destructive capacity necessarily expands, too, pari passu.”—Paul Johnson, Modern Times, 1983.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. 2016 Australian Federal Election [COALITION WINS]
    By Kevin Bonham in forum Politics
    Replies: 322
    Last Post: 24-09-2016, 08:25 PM
  2. Who will you vote for in the federal election?
    By Kevin Bonham in forum Politics
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 19-06-2016, 01:18 AM
  3. Australian Federal Election 2013 [Coalition Wins]
    By Kevin Bonham in forum Politics
    Replies: 380
    Last Post: 29-11-2013, 02:21 AM
  4. Federal Election 2004 (Coalition Wins)
    By Kevin Bonham in forum Politics
    Replies: 185
    Last Post: 27-07-2010, 12:25 PM
  5. Federal Election 2007 (Labor Wins)
    By Kevin Bonham in forum Politics
    Replies: 347
    Last Post: 07-07-2008, 02:51 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •