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  1. #31
    CC Grandmaster road runner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ER View Post
    Or at the Crown Casino exclusive gambling rooms clientele …
    Wait, Chinese high rollers - that can't be right? Aren't these the desperate ubereats drivers living one meal to the next? Maybe you should let Mo Baron know about this.
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by road runner View Post
    Wait, Chinese high rollers - that can't be right? Aren't these the desperate ubereats drivers living one meal to the next? Maybe you should let Mo Baron know about this.
    Some are rich some are poor...but overall - Chinese who settle in Australia eventually prosper. Why? Because they belong to a culture that values education and hard work.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    Some are rich some are poor...but overall - Chinese who settle in Australia eventually prosper. Why? Because they belong to a culture that values education and hard work.
    The Sudanese who have come to Australia seem to have done very well for themselves also - it must be their culture!

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    Some are rich some are poor...but overall - Chinese who settle in Australia eventually prosper. Why? Because they belong to a culture that values education and hard work.
    Overall the poor do not send their children for abroad education. That's just for the wealthy.
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    Some are rich some are poor...but overall - Chinese who settle in Australia eventually prosper. Why? Because they belong to a culture that values education and hard work.
    Ironically, the Chinese in Australia were historically attacked for having a high crime rate - exactly as the Sudanese are today!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    Ironically, the Chinese in Australia were historically attacked for having a high crime rate - exactly as the Sudanese are today!
    You must be referring to those who came here to ''dig for gold'' centuries ago. Majority of Chinese come now via Professional Migration or by the means of studying here. Some are also ''Business Migrants'' and obtain citizenship by investing substantial amount in Australian economy.
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by road runner View Post
    Overall the poor do not send their children for abroad education. That's just for the wealthy.
    The numbers of people who can afford to send kids overseas are going up! Re ''just for wealthy'' - upper middle class can also afford international study. Another positive factor, the so called ''wealthy'' mostly belong to educated well to do families - don't we want such people into our country ?
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  8. #38
    CC Grandmaster Ian Murray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    You must be referring to those who came here to ''dig for gold'' centuries ago. Majority of Chinese come now via Professional Migration or by the means of studying here. Some are also ''Business Migrants'' and obtain citizenship by investing substantial amount in Australian economy.
    What about the 100,000 Chinese refugees admitted after the Tiananmen Square massacre?

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    You must be referring to those who came here to ''dig for gold'' centuries ago. Majority of Chinese come now via Professional Migration or by the means of studying here. Some are also ''Business Migrants'' and obtain citizenship by investing substantial amount in Australian economy.
    It's nowhere need as bad as it was in the 19th and early 20th centuries, but even much more recently there has been claims that Asian immigration leads to crime.

  10. #40
    CC Grandmaster Ian Murray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    You must be referring to those who came here to ''dig for gold'' centuries ago. Majority of Chinese come now via Professional Migration or by the means of studying here. Some are also ''Business Migrants'' and obtain citizenship by investing substantial amount in Australian economy.
    Interesting to note also that one-third of our asylum seekers are Chinese

    Number of Chinese citizens seeking asylum in Australia triples
    news.com.au
    11.12.18

    More and more Chinese citizens are flocking to Australia, with the number of people from China applying for asylum tripling in just one year.

    New figures from the Department of Home Affairs show the number of people arriving from China and applying for onshore protection visas jumped a massive 311 per cent from 2269 in 2016-2017 to 9315 in 2017-2018....

    Chinese nationals made up a third of all asylum claims from 2014 to now, with the applicants from all nationalities increasing from 8587 to 27,931 over that time period.

    Among the Chinese people seeking asylum, the majority of them arrived by plane, with many entering the country on temporary tourism or study visas....

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  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    The numbers of people who can afford to send kids overseas are going up! Re ''just for wealthy'' - upper middle class can also afford international study.
    Upper middle class = wealthy.

    Another positive factor, the so called ''wealthy'' mostly belong to educated well to do families - don't we want such people into our country ?
    Sure, if they want to send their kids here with fat allowances to spend on Australian goods and services, fine. But don't pretend that they're all working.
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  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by road runner View Post
    Upper middle class = wealthy.

    Sure, if they want to send their kids here with fat allowances to spend on Australian goods and services, fine. But don't pretend that they're all working.
    You really think people with money do not work? People with money want more money! And mostly (not all of course) have strong work ethic. Re ''fatness of allowances'' it varies
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    You really think people with money do not work? People with money want more money! And mostly (not all of course) have strong work ethic. Re ''fatness of allowances'' it varies
    I think a number of Chinese students are here with independent means and do not need to work, i.e. yes it varies. You're the one who disagrees.
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  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    So how can so many of them have no problem with the Chinese government...despite deciding to live overseas?

    Every country has problems and every government has issues to deal with. But I am surprised how one-sided the Western approach is. for example, the so called ''social credit scores'' - lots of effort goes into explaining what people do not get and can not access if their social rating is poor...but little effort goes into discussing the benefits for those who have a high rating.. ...
    Maybe China has a bad reputation because it does things like this:
    The form of detention Yang is under is known as “residential surveillance at a designated location”, or RSDL. “RSDL is so concerning precisely because it institutionalises enforced disappearances and raises the risk of torture, both gross human rights violations and crimes under international law,” said Michael Castor, a human rights advocate focusing on RSDL. “This likely means Yang Hengjun may face up to six months of secret detention, denied any access to a lawyer, no contact with his family, and at high risk of abuse, and quite likely a forced confession at the end.”
    This is an Australian citizen we're talking about, being held in China against his will. No wonder Chinese people living in Australian don't criticise the government!

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