Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 61
  1. #1
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    77

    The Secret of Chess

    hello everyone.

    just briefly about a possibly interesting/innovative book I released recently.

    it is called The Secret of Chess and encompasses all the most advanced chess knowledge,
    a wealth of new ideas, with almost all the parameters having been soundly checked on thousands of
    games with Stockfish and Komodo.

    more about the book and excerpts to read on my site: http://www.secretofchess.com/

    the book is also available on amazon as ebook and paperback edition: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074M85CVV

    maybe some of you will be interested in chess theory and new ideas along the lines of Nimzovich and Kmoch.

    best, Lyudmil

  2. #2
    CC International Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Wynyard,Tas
    Posts
    2,165
    Is this meant to be a guide for writing chess-playing programs, or for playing in the real world? I can see how it works for the former (whether it's better than other programs, or even any different, is not for me to say). But whipping out your notebook and totting up your 0.22 for the twice aligned pawn on c6, along with however many other factors in however many variations, will get you into some trouble, if you don't lose on time first.

  3. #3
    CC FIDE Master
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    953
    It certainly has just about the most comprehensive Table of Contents I've ever seen.

  4. #4
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,204
    Quote Originally Posted by LyudmilTsvetkov View Post
    hello everyone.

    just briefly about a possibly interesting/innovative book I released recently.

    it is called The Secret of Chess and encompasses all the most advanced chess knowledge,
    a wealth of new ideas, with almost all the parameters having been soundly checked on thousands of
    games with Stockfish and Komodo.

    more about the book and excerpts to read on my site: http://www.secretofchess.com/

    the book is also available on amazon as ebook and paperback edition: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074M85CVV

    maybe some of you will be interested in chess theory and new ideas along the lines of Nimzovich and Kmoch.

    best, Lyudmil
    All the ''most advanced chess knowledge'' in a single book...
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  5. #5
    CC Grandmaster road runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    on the skin of the pale blue dot
    Posts
    12,291
    What is the book like on Kindle? Can you play moves on a board or is it just static text/images?
    meep meep

  6. #6
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Rout View Post
    Is this meant to be a guide for writing chess-playing programs, or for playing in the real world? I can see how it works for the former (whether it's better than other programs, or even any different, is not for me to say). But whipping out your notebook and totting up your 0.22 for the twice aligned pawn on c6, along with however many other factors in however many variations, will get you into some trouble, if you don't lose on time first.
    thanks for the interest, Ian.

    it is meant as a transition from normal playing to more advanced, computer-influenced understanding and playing.
    once you get to understand the principles, you start playing like that.

    all the terms are diagrammed, so even a complete newbie might get what is good and what bad, such a pawn is good, and such one bad.
    concerning the specific board square values, the psqt(piece square table), when you know the general rule which squares get more bonus
    or penalty and which less, it is not that difficult to practically implement the term.

    for example, twice aligned pawn on e5 will be worth much more than twice aligned pawn on e3.

    in any case, there are things in there, no other author has written, maybe worth a browse only because of this.

  7. #7
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    All the ''most advanced chess knowledge'' in a single book...
    hi Michael.

    I am not certain what is the meaning of your quote, probably just derision, but what I have stated is more or less true.

    all meaning there are no loose ends in the evaluation framework, all or almost all, according to my knowledge,
    chess terms are covered, including king safety, pawn features, imbalances, mobility, etc.

    most advanced basically means that you will not find at least 1/3 of the ideas, but maybe even close to 1/2, in any other
    theoretical chess book.

    in order to write that book, I have played through, watched and analysed maybe some couple of billion high-quality
    top engine games in the span of 5 years or so.

    this book took 5 years of preparation, not less.

    I have contributed a whole lot of successful patches to Stockfish, certainly I have highest rate of successful
    evaluation patches within Stockfish code of all contributors.

  8. #8
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by road runner View Post
    What is the book like on Kindle? Can you play moves on a board or is it just static text/images?
    for the time being just static, of course with hyperlinked table of contents.

    I would recommend the paperback, though, this is more of a scientific book than anything else.

    If you have read Nimzovich's My System, and especially Kmoch's Pawn Power in Chess, you are going to like it.
    It resembles most Kmoch's Pawn Power, but there are at least 3 times more terms, and of course, all the terms are
    accompanied by specific values, psqt, if necessary.

    if you would like to know what would chess in 20 years' time be, this is the way to go...

  9. #9
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,204
    Quote Originally Posted by LyudmilTsvetkov View Post
    hi Michael.

    I am not certain what is the meaning of your quote, probably just derision, but what I have stated is more or less true.

    all meaning there are no loose ends in the evaluation framework, all or almost all, according to my knowledge,
    chess terms are covered, including king safety, pawn features, imbalances, mobility, etc.

    most advanced basically means that you will not find at least 1/3 of the ideas, but maybe even close to 1/2, in any other
    theoretical chess book.

    in order to write that book, I have played through, watched and analysed maybe some couple of billion high-quality
    top engine games in the span of 5 years or so.

    this book took 5 years of preparation, not less.

    I have contributed a whole lot of successful patches to Stockfish, certainly I have highest rate of successful
    evaluation patches within Stockfish code of all contributors.
    Hi, Lyudmil
    What I mean is: very ambitious title...but re presentation of ideas in my personal subject view (I may be wrong) - it appears to be just a collection of notes about different kinds of positions but without a clear logical linkage between the chapters.
    Re analyzing a couple of billion high-quality games....I am not great at maths ...but have some doubts it is possible to analyze that many .

    Re your claim that it is a ''scientific book'' I am a chess player of a reasonably advanced level (2300+) as well as a professional educator (uni lecturer) and I am pretty ''comfortable'' to state that I do not see anything particularly scientific about it.
    P.S. Sorry about harshness of the review.
    Last edited by MichaelBaron; 22-08-2017 at 04:53 PM.
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  10. #10
    CC International Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Wynyard,Tas
    Posts
    2,165
    Quote Originally Posted by LyudmilTsvetkov View Post
    thanks for the interest, Ian.

    it is meant as a transition from normal playing to more advanced, computer-influenced understanding and playing.
    once you get to understand the principles, you start playing like that.

    all the terms are diagrammed, so even a complete newbie might get what is good and what bad, such a pawn is good, and such one bad.
    concerning the specific board square values, the psqt(piece square table), when you know the general rule which squares get more bonus
    or penalty and which less, it is not that difficult to practically implement the term.

    for example, twice aligned pawn on e5 will be worth much more than twice aligned pawn on e3.

    in any case, there are things in there, no other author has written, maybe worth a browse only because of this.
    Thanks for the explanation.

    I'm still curious about how this is applied in a real game with limited time and recording equipment (noting that a player, like a computer, has to evaluate many potential future positions). Are techniques of doing this described, or any cases of its use in practice?

    As this is meant to be an improvement on existing theory/knowledge, I think it would be useful to apply it to re-evaluating a selection of openings (e.g how to beat the Berlin), or throwing new light on some well-known games.

  11. #11
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,204
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Rout View Post
    As this is meant to be an improvement on existing theory/knowledge, I think it would be useful to apply it to re-evaluating a selection of openings (e.g how to beat the Berlin), or throwing new light on some well-known games.
    If Candidate Masters could refute Berlin (even with computer's help) ...chess would be a different game from what it is now.
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  12. #12
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Rout View Post
    Thanks for the explanation.

    I'm still curious about how this is applied in a real game with limited time and recording equipment (noting that a player, like a computer, has to evaluate many potential future positions). Are techniques of doing this described, or any cases of its use in practice?

    As this is meant to be an improvement on existing theory/knowledge, I think it would be useful to apply it to re-evaluating a selection of openings (e.g how to beat the Berlin), or throwing new light on some well-known games.
    the book comprises some 300+ terms, all diagrammed.
    it is specified which terms are good and which bad.
    when you remember those 300 terms, whenever you encounter them in a real game, you will be able
    to assess your position much better.
    That is much easier way to learn than browsing through thousands of games, with unclear notions about
    what is going on.

    concerning theory, you are right, that would be interesting, but should be dealt separately.
    so far, greatly thanks to Stockfish and Komodo, I have ascertained that:
    - the Grob is lost
    - almost all black gambits are lost, for example the Budapest, Benko, etc.
    - mainline KID seems to be lost for black, but very good for black, on the other hand, if white does not play perfectly, allowing
    black to build a longer pointed chain
    - the Alekhine is almost certainly lost
    - the French Winaver is lost, if black castles short, etc., etc.

    that is based on thousands of hours of manual analysis with Stockfish and Komodo.

  13. #13
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    77
    I am a candidate master with way above average grandmaster strength, maybe at least 2600 elo, lowest possible estimate.
    I attained my candidate master title 20 years ago.
    Since then, I devoted myself to my diplomatic career, so was away from chess, very few competitions.
    12 years ago I played my last competitive game, and then my Bulgarian rating(same as FIDE) was over 2200.
    Even then, I used to beat players over 2400.
    I left my job 5 years ago and entirely concentrated on chess without playing officially.
    16 hours per day games and analysis with Stockfish and Komodo.

    I have over 200 winning games no-odds vs Stockfish and Komodo in my personal database.
    how many winning games against Stockfish and Komodo you have, Mr. Baron?

  14. #14
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    Hi, Lyudmil
    What I mean is: very ambitious title...but re presentation of ideas in my personal subject view (I may be wrong) - it appears to be just a collection of notes about different kinds of positions but without a clear logical linkage between the chapters.
    Re analyzing a couple of billion high-quality games....I am not great at maths ...but have some doubts it is possible to analyze that many .

    Re your claim that it is a ''scientific book'' I am a chess player of a reasonably advanced level (2300+) as well as a professional educator (uni lecturer) and I am pretty ''comfortable'' to state that I do not see anything particularly scientific about it.
    P.S. Sorry about harshness of the review.
    no collection of notes, Mr. Baron, this is an entirely original book.
    actually, it is the greatest chess book ever written, maybe one day you will understand that too.

    why it should be weak, when it has 5 times more terms than what Kmoch and Nimzovich have?
    why it should be weak, when most of them are fully checked on Stockfish and Komodo games
    and analysis sessions?

    it is easy to collect 1 billion games in your brain: start a match between 2 top engines, 1 minute for the game, game lasts 100
    moves on average, games are longer with top players, 2*100=200 positions each and every game.
    multiply that by 10 to account for the variations your mind is calculating subsonsciuosly, and you got to 2000 positions/nodes
    per game watched.
    play some 500 hundred of those daily, and you get to 1 000 000 positions brain-processed.
    a couple of years like this certainly make it close to 1 billion.

    capisce?

    I also have been a career diplomat for quite long, and hold a PhD in political science, so am not that simplistic as one
    might think.

    later

  15. #15
    CC FIDE Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    931
    Quote Originally Posted by LyudmilTsvetkov View Post
    no collection of notes, Mr. Baron, this is an entirely original book.
    actually, it is the greatest chess book ever written, maybe one day you will understand that too.
    Clearly the author is the greatest chess writer since Franklin K Young put pen to paper. A genius ahead of his time.
    Still searching for Bobby Fischer....
    and fighting against those humourless bureaucrats who are forever lost in the minutiae.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Gnostic Christian Mystery School Secret Truth #1.
    By Gnostic Bishop in forum Religion and Science
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 24-09-2014, 12:03 AM
  2. ACF - A secret society?
    By Brian_Jones in forum Australian Chess
    Replies: 148
    Last Post: 15-01-2008, 04:23 PM
  3. Obesity Secret Ignored
    By Axiom in forum Non-Chess
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 26-11-2007, 08:32 PM
  4. Secret Men's Business
    By antichrist in forum Non-Chess
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-07-2005, 05:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •