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  1. #76
    CC Grandmaster ER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham View Post
    Cramling-Kosteniuk will be an interesting round 3 matchup.
    Go Alexandra Konstantinovna!!!! I predict a 2-0 clean sheet!
    which dad is your mum?

    Zero trollerance!


    ACF 3118316
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  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elliott Renzies View Post
    Go Alexandra Konstantinovna!!!! I predict a 2-0 clean sheet!
    Its possible...but I hope not. She is not one of my favorite people in the chess world...but..she has been playing good chess recently.
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  3. #78
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Kosteniuk is obviously stronger on paper at the moment but Cramling is very capable of rolling back the clock. As she did last time, and the 2016 olympiad, and the 2014 olympiad ... Probably can't keep doing it every time though.

  4. #79
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    Right now waiting to see if Cramling plays 14...Ne8. If she does - her position will be very promising.
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  5. #80
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Stefanova demonstrates KBN against Khurtsidze:

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  6. #81
    CC FIDE Master Jesper Norgaard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham View Post
    Stefanova demonstrates KBN against Khurtsidze:
    Indeed, I added some comments, indicating the optimal move whenever they made suboptimal moves. -1 means 1 move was lost compared to the optimal move(s) that are mentioned right after.
    This game developed from an easy technical win towards a position with white knight and bishop and 2 pawns against
    rook and one pawn, that was difficult to win without converting to N+B checkmate, to in fact landing in that ending,
    and then Stefanova making several quick waiting moves in the wrong corner to gain time on the clock for making the checkmate
    (if any doubts would occur).

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    All in all Stefanova lost 10 moves compared to optimal play, but a lot of it was sacrificing moves for time on the clock. Nino lost 5 moves compared to optimal play.

    You really have to know that rushing the defending king towards the mating corner is the best defence and prolongs the game with 3 moves.
    Chess well played is imagination, calculation, observation, experience and memorization in order of importance.

  7. #82
    CC FIDE Master Jesper Norgaard's Avatar
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    A funny detail is that official commentator Evgenij Miroshnichenko showed a variation that forced queen promotion:
    84.Be3 Ra3 85.Kg7 Rxe3 86.f7 Rxe5 87.f8=Q but then this ending Q vs. R can sometimes take up to 33 moves to mate with perfect play, hardly a big improvement unless White has no clue how to mate with N+B.
    Chess well played is imagination, calculation, observation, experience and memorization in order of importance.

  8. #83
    CC FIDE Master Jesper Norgaard's Avatar
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    In fact I took more moves to mate with Q vs. R in a test game with Komodo 64:

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    So 5 moves slower than Stefanova who would have reached mate in move 117
    Chess well played is imagination, calculation, observation, experience and memorization in order of importance.

  9. #84
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Oh dear, White lost with KR v KRN. What should she have done instead of 123. Kxe3??

    [Event "Women's World Championship"]
    [Site "Tehran IRI"]
    [Date "2017.02.16"]
    [EventDate "2017.02.11"]
    [Round "2.6"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [White "Nataliya Buksa"]
    [Black "Sopiko Guramishvili"]
    [ECO "B09"]
    [WhiteElo "2302"]
    [BlackElo "2357"]
    [PlyCount "252"]

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    “A society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.”—Milton Friedman

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  10. #85
    CC Grandmaster Garvinator's Avatar
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    126. Ke1 playing for stalemate

  11. #86
    CC Grandmaster ER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elliott Renzies View Post
    Go Alexandra Konstantinovna!!!! I predict a 2-0 clean sheet!
    Alexandra Konstantinovna it seems we failed re the clean sheet bit, but never lose hope! We will prevail in the end!
    which dad is your mum?

    Zero trollerance!


    ACF 3118316
    FIDE 3201457

  12. #87
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Dzagnidze, Stefanova, A Muzychuk and Ni Shiqun are through, the other four matches to playoffs.

    Ni Shiqun - Pogonina

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  13. #88
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    With faster time controls -drama always unfolds - this time it is Girya who blundered a piece aganinst Ju Wenjun. Lets wait and see - could be more drama coming from other games.
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  14. #89
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Very impressive effort by Girya to bounce back and win the second rapid.

    All matches 2-2 and on they go.
    Last edited by Kevin Bonham; 20-02-2017 at 12:12 AM.

  15. #90
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Ju Wenjun, Tan Zhongyi, Harika and Kosteniuk are through. Cramling blundered against Kosteniuk in a favourable (but I suspect likely to be drawn) position in game 5.

    Ju - Tan
    Harika - Dzagnidze
    Muzychuk - Stefanova
    Kosteniuk - Ni

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