Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    CC Grandmaster Redmond Barry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Westside
    Posts
    3,118

    "Thought and choice in chess" - Adrian De Groot, Mounton and Co, 1965

    Thought and choice in chess - Adrian De Groot, Mounton and Co, 1965

    I was just wondering if anybody has ever read this book or could recommend a similar title as amazon lists it between $100.38 - $276.31 and I cant see myself buying it.

    A brief synopsis - "What does a chessmaster think when he prepares his next move? How are his thoughts organized? Which methods and strategies does he use by solving his problem of choice? To answer these questions, the author did an experimental study in 1938, to which famous chessmasters participated (Alekhine, Max Euwe and Flohr). This book is still usefull for everybody who studies cognition and artificial intelligence."

    Cheers,
    Bubbles.
    Ruin is formal, devil's work,
    Consecutive and slow -
    Fail in an instance no man did,
    Slipping - is Crash's law,

  2. #2
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,715
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles View Post
    Thought and choice in chess - Adrian De Groot, Mounton and Co, 1965

    I was just wondering if anybody has ever read this book or could recommend a similar title as amazon lists it between $100.38 - $276.31 and I cant see myself buying it.

    A brief synopsis - "What does a chessmaster think when he prepares his next move? How are his thoughts organized? Which methods and strategies does he use by solving his problem of choice? To answer these questions, the author did an experimental study in 1938, to which famous chessmasters participated (Alekhine, Max Euwe and Flohr). This book is still usefull for everybody who studies cognition and artificial intelligence."

    Cheers,
    Bubbles.
    I have a second-hand copy of the book, but I've only had a brief look through it. It is interesting, but fairly dry.

    I'd recommend researching this on the web, where there is plenty of free information - this website, or this one, for example.

  3. #3
    CC Grandmaster Redmond Barry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Westside
    Posts
    3,118
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Byrom View Post
    I have a second-hand copy of the book, but I've only had a brief look through it. It is interesting, but fairly dry.

    I'd recommend researching this on the web, where there is plenty of free information - this website, or this one, for example.
    Hi Patrick,

    Thanks for the informative chess.com link. Im not quite sure what type of subtle instruction I am looking for, but it would seem that the most important point from the information you have referenced and that which I have been browsing recently is that efficiency of calculation is increased with ones ability to memorise an adequate body of patterns to minimise the strain of calculating lengthy and accurate sequences.

    Hardly a revelation, but an interesting subject to have browsed.

    BTW, looks like my haste has resulted in myself overlooking this particular google result which has the entire book in e-format - http://dare.uva.nl/cgi/arno/show.cgi?fid=131466
    Ruin is formal, devil's work,
    Consecutive and slow -
    Fail in an instance no man did,
    Slipping - is Crash's law,

  4. #4
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,715
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles View Post
    Hi Patrick,
    Thanks for the informative chess.com link. Im not quite sure what type of subtle instruction I am looking for, but it would seem that the most important point from the information you have referenced and that which I have been browsing recently is that efficiency of calculation is increased with ones ability to memorise an adequate body of patterns to minimise the strain of calculating lengthy and accurate sequences.
    Hardly a revelation, but an interesting subject to have browsed.
    BTW, looks like my haste has resulted in myself overlooking this particular google result which has the entire book in e-format - http://dare.uva.nl/cgi/arno/show.cgi?fid=131466
    I'm glad it was helpful - although I didn't think of looking for de Groot's work as an e-book.

    I think pattern recognition mainly helps you realise what calculations to actually carry out. For example, if you recognise a pattern (like a possible 'Greek Gift' sacrifice), you know to focus your calculations on that.

  5. #5
    CC International Master Kerry Stead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,118
    I'm not at home, so don't have an immediate reference to my books, but the De Groot method & positions are referenced in a number of other chess books.
    The ones that come to mind immediately are:
    The Improving Chess Thinker by Dan Heisman
    Inside the Chess Mind by Jacob Aagaard
    De Groot also gets mentioned in the following books:
    Move First, Think Later by Willy Hendricks
    I'm also pretty sure that Andrew Soltis mentions de Groot's work in a few places, but I'm not sure where these are exactly.

  6. #6
    CC Grandmaster Redmond Barry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Westside
    Posts
    3,118
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Stead View Post
    I'm not at home, so don't have an immediate reference to my books, but the De Groot method & positions are referenced in a number of other chess books.
    The ones that come to mind immediately are:
    The Improving Chess Thinker by Dan Heisman
    Inside the Chess Mind by Jacob Aagaard
    De Groot also gets mentioned in the following books:
    Move First, Think Later by Willy Hendricks
    I'm also pretty sure that Andrew Soltis mentions de Groot's work in a few places, but I'm not sure where these are exactly.
    Thanks for that Kerry.

    The reason why I am interested in the De Groot book is because it is mentioned in a "Blindfold Chess" section at Chesspublishing.com. I am not interested in the blindfold aspect so much, more so using it as a tool to create more accuracy and speed in visualisation whilst calculating.

    I will check out those titles mentioned.

    Cheers.
    Ruin is formal, devil's work,
    Consecutive and slow -
    Fail in an instance no man did,
    Slipping - is Crash's law,

  7. #7
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,570
    Should not forget good old ''Think like a Grandmaster'' by Kotov
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  8. #8
    CC Grandmaster Adamski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Penrith, NSW
    Posts
    8,673
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles View Post
    Hi Patrick,

    Thanks for the informative chess.com link. Im not quite sure what type of subtle instruction I am looking for, but it would seem that the most important point from the information you have referenced and that which I have been browsing recently is that efficiency of calculation is increased with ones ability to memorise an adequate body of patterns to minimise the strain of calculating lengthy and accurate sequences.

    Hardly a revelation, but an interesting subject to have browsed.

    BTW, looks like my haste has resulted in myself overlooking this particular google result which has the entire book in e-format - http://dare.uva.nl/cgi/arno/show.cgi?fid=131466
    Thanks for the link, Bubbles. I have downloaded the e-book.
    God exists. Short and to the point.

    Secretary of, and regularly arbiter at, Rooty Hill RSL Chess Club. See www.rootyhillchessclub.org.

    Psephological insight. "Controversial will only lose you votes. Courageous will lose you the election." Sir Humphrey Appleby on Yes Minister.

    Favorite movie line: Girl friend Cathy to Jack Ryan in "Sum of all Fears". "What kind of emergency does an historian have?".

  9. #9
    CC Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    12,570
    De Groot book is an interesting read (was looking at extracts from it today)...but certainly would not buy it at this price
    Interested in Chess Lessons?
    Email webbaron!@gmail.com for more Info!

  10. #10
    CC International Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Wynyard,Tas
    Posts
    2,191
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelBaron View Post
    De Groot book is an interesting read (was looking at extracts from it today)...but certainly would not buy it at this price
    Amazon seems to have some algorithm along the lines that if a book was published some time ago and isn't selling much (and possibly stocks are low) they imagine it to have become rare and collectible and hike the price. Hence a 2001 book on an opening will have a higher price than a recent work on the same opening. For instance, "Beating the Anti-Sicilians" by Gallagher, published 1994, is listed at $39.24 (US) while the more substantial "Experts on the Anti-Sicilians" (various authors) from 2011 is $24.25.

    I would guess the curator of their chess collection is not a chess player, or is a computer.

  11. #11
    CC Candidate Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    335
    The is a review of some software inspired by De Groots experiment here.

    http://www.chess-tuition.com/chessmemory.html
    For coaching contact Bill Jordan at swneerava@gmail.com
    my Chess ebooks can be found at Amazon Author Central
    and my YouTube channel is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsd...-HNla3kQdhTleQ

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. A dialectic on Scientific thought.
    By firegoat7 in forum Non-Chess
    Replies: 52
    Last Post: 04-09-2011, 09:08 PM
  2. Choice of Sets
    By Allan Menham in forum Arbiters' Corner
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-12-2008, 10:53 PM
  3. Chess Puzzles by AO - The choice of exquisite gentlemen
    By Arrogant-One in forum Chess Training
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 27-12-2006, 05:43 PM
  4. Just a thought for the juniors here
    By Jason Hu in forum Australian Chess
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 05-06-2005, 10:20 PM
  5. Chess Thought Process
    By timeggers in forum General Chess Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 28-01-2004, 12:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •