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  1. #1
    CC Candidate Master michael.mcguirk's Avatar
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    Interesting win a piece down

    Just to clarify although it's in the game notes below, I didn't win this game, blundering the move before the final combination. Though technically the game was still a winning game, very interesting how the two pieces control the outcome of the game so well.

    [Event "Ryde/Eastwood Open"]
    [Site "Ryde/Eastwood Leagues Club"]
    [Date "2009.10.4"]
    [Round "5"]
    [White "Biljana Dekic"]
    [Black "Michael McGuirk"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [WhiteELO "1947"]
    [BlackELO "1643"]

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    Last edited by michael.mcguirk; 04-11-2009 at 10:58 AM.
    Destroying Robinson's Grob, one Compaq computer at a time.

  2. #2
    Monster of the deep Kevin Bonham's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting that; I found it interesting too.

    It seems that the correct route to the kingside for the white knight for defence is via b1 and d2, not via c2. Because the bishop has to move before the N can go to c2, that path takes three moves compared to two. If white can implement a plan starting 31.Nb1 and including Nd2, Rd1, Bf2, Ke2 with Nf3 coming to round up the h-pawn then she appears to have some winning chances, although there is a risk of running out of pawns.

    Also in the game line white has the option 33.Nd4 and after Rh1+ 34.Bg1 h2 35.Kf2 it does not appear that black has better than winning back the piece for the h-pawn with a likely draw.

    The missed promotion combination is a neat one, well worth knowing.
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  3. #3
    CC Grandmaster
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    It seems to me that the final position is very difficult for black to win, draw is the likely outcome.

    In the game white had many chances to untangle. Playing Rc1 and Nc2 or playing b4 and then c4, or moving rook to d1 or e1 and then bringing the knight back through b1.
    All those scenarios require a pawn sacrifice, but the freedom worth it ; white would still have enough material to win, especially if they did not exchange h2 pawn.


    On the other hand, excellent struggle by black by causing opponent most problems and exploiting white's lack of action. Path of the most resistance saved many resignable positions and won numerious unwinnable.
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  4. #4
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    Nice game Micheal, shame you lost

    BTW- This is Alex Mehan, from Junior Chess Club. Glad to see you here

  5. #5
    CC International Master Jesper Norgaard's Avatar
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    This shows with all clarity that control is everything in chess, and material is nothing. However, often an extra pawn and a little consolidation (from a slightly disorganized position) can bring a player back on track of winning the game, but only because control is gained in the end. White's entangled pieces, where one piece has to protect this pawn, the other piece has to protect that pawn etc. ... was just a recipe for disaster. It only became real with yet another blunder Ne1. A single extra pawn with good control is much much better than a piece extra for a pawn and a position in discoordination.

    White should have thought about coordination way before, which she never really gained until the final little point Kg1. When I saw 18.gxf3?? Rxf3 19.Rh4 Rd3 I almost threw up. Surely white should think of development so that 18.Nd2! is the right thing. Maybe she was afraid of 18...fxg2 19.Bh4 Bb7 but that doesn't look so scary even allowing this, but white has much stronger 19.Re1+ Kd7 20.Be3 so probably 18...Bxf2+ 19.Kxf2 fxg2+ 20.Kxg2 is necessary with an easily winning game for white, all the pieces are out, no entry points for black's pieces, and there is only a pawn for the piece.

    Cute way to get a queen in the end by the way! (although it didn't happen). Great fighting spirit all along.

  6. #6
    CC Candidate Master michael.mcguirk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Bonham
    Thanks for posting that; I found it interesting too.

    It seems that the correct route to the kingside for the white knight for defence is via b1 and d2, not via c2. Because the bishop has to move before the N can go to c2, that path takes three moves compared to two. If white can implement a plan starting 31.Nb1 and including Nd2, Rd1, Bf2, Ke2 with Nf3 coming to round up the h-pawn then she appears to have some winning chances, although there is a risk of running out of pawns.

    Also in the game line white has the option 33.Nd4 and after Rh1+ 34.Bg1 h2 35.Kf2 it does not appear that black has better than winning back the piece for the h-pawn with a likely draw.

    The missed promotion combination is a neat one, well worth knowing.
    Yes this is the correct path for the white knight to take, but it also brings down points too. Namely, that the rook can then invade the back rank and pin it down to the rook, followed by doubling up with the bishop on it.

    As for 33.Nd4, that was my intention actually all along was to just win the piece back for the pawn and go for the end-game. It was only about 15 minutes after my game that I realised I had the promotion. By no means do I think I was 'winning' this game, nor do I think I had the better position. I just find it entertaining to see how the two pieces coordinate so well to lock up white's position so thoroughly.

    I suppose it's more the psychological strain of having to deal with such a position for my opponent that I find, I dare say, fun Playing such a 'cramped' position with me only having 2 pieces? As well as there being such space on the kingside. Not usual and quite entertaining I found
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  7. #7
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesper Norgaard
    White should have thought about coordination way before, which she never really gained until the final little point Kg1. When I saw 18.gxf3?? Rxf3 19.Rh4 Rd3 I almost threw up. Surely white should think of development so that 18.Nd2! is the right thing. Maybe she was afraid of 18...fxg2 19.Bh4 Bb7 but that doesn't look so scary even allowing this, but white has much stronger 19.Re1+ Kd7 20.Be3 so probably 18...Bxf2+ 19.Kxf2 fxg2+ 20.Kxg2 is necessary with an easily winning game for white, all the pieces are out, no entry points for black's pieces, and there is only a pawn for the piece.
    Very good suggestion; simple coordinating moves like 18.Nd2 (along with the Zwischenschach 19. Re1+) would be worth a pawn to avoid the bind, and here it would not even cost material compared with the game continuation.
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