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  1. #1
    CC Candidate Master chesstash's Avatar
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    Whats better e4 or d4? (as a starting move for white)

    Can't decide if i should learn how to play e4 or improve in d4.......
    never say never
    (even when the position is hopeless)

  2. #2
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    well none of them is better it depends on ur playing style...if you like positional games go for d4 and if want more open, tactical brawls go for e4.

    or better still, learn and play both!

    it seems though that many players start out with e4 and switch to d4 or c4 once they get better...

  3. #3
    CC Candidate Master chesstash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aroniyang
    well none of them is better it depends on ur playing style...if you like positional games go for d4 and if want more open, tactical brawls go for e4.

    or better still, learn and play both!

    it seems though that many players start out with e4 and switch to d4 or c4 once they get better...

    I guess........
    never say never
    (even when the position is hopeless)

  4. #4
    CC International Master
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    1. d4 is in ways easier to learn because quite a few systems work, however positional/strategic chess plays a bigger role because the games are often closed. I personally find positional chess concepts harder to understand compared to tactical, so there is quite a few things to weigh up.

    My opinion that a strong tactical ability goes above everything else, but you will get this experience in 1.d4 games just not as violently as in 1.e4 games. Another importent thing is that usually a positionally better game leads to more tactical oppurtunities. So I reccomend that you learn 1.d4 it'll seem a little more boring at first but there are heaps of exciting variations (slav,KID, benoni etc).

    If you wanted to get good at Queens pawn games I seriously think you should study the games of Akiba Rubinstein he pretty much always played the queens gambit and has some really clear cut positional wins from them.

    But as stated before whichever feels more natural is always a good indicator of your style.
    And still, no one has satisfactorily proven, that it isn't opposite day.

  5. #5
    CC FIDE Master Hobbes's Avatar
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    1. d4 is of course the best first move.

    There, now that we have sorted that out to everyone's satisfaction, perhaps I should enter the 'Does God exist' thread and straighten everyone out there too!

    Leave the gun. Take the cannoli.

  6. #6
    CC Grandmaster Desmond's Avatar
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    I think e4 is the more aggressive choice, and d4 is if you prefer to be a bit safer. From the outset e4 opens diagonals for your queen and bishop but the pawn is not protected on e4. Whereas d4 opens a diagonal for the bishop only but the pawn is guarded by the queen. Depending on your temperament and playing style I would base your choice on that.
    So what's your excuse? To run like the devil's chasing you.

    See you in another life, brotha.

  7. #7
    CC Grandmaster
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    Start with 1.e4
    For private coaching (IM, four times VIC champion) call or SMS 0417519733
    Computer tells you what to play. Good coach explains why.

  8. #8
    CC Candidate Master chesstash's Avatar
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    I've learned d4 for 6 years and still i am not giving it up....
    Might learn e4 though......
    never say never
    (even when the position is hopeless)

  9. #9
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chesstash
    I've learned d4 for 6 years and still i am not giving it up....
    Might learn e4 though......
    That's fine. Concentrate on one, then gradually learn about the other.
    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
    “There’s no point blaming the tragedies of socialism on the flaws or corruption of particular leaders. Any system which allows some people to exercise unbridled power over others is an open invitation to abuse, whether that system is called slavery or socialism or something else.”—Thomas Sowell

  10. #10
    CC Candidate Master chesstash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jono
    That's fine. Concentrate on one, then gradually learn about the other.
    a good answer
    but everybody tells me that
    never say never
    (even when the position is hopeless)

  11. #11
    CC Candidate Master Nicholas D-C's Avatar
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    I believe e4 is better and leads to greater chances to win, as the positions are tactical. It is also probably easier to lean than d4 or c4. Many d4 players tend to learn one system to avoid theoretical lines, but these systems are not that great. However, d4 is not without its positive sides, if you like long positional struggles and are satisfied with equal positions.

  12. #12
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    I think e4 gives a greater short term advantage whereas d4 gives a smaller advantage that is long term.

  13. #13
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chesstash
    a good answer
    but everybody tells me that
    Maybe they're right

    So why are you asking? So that eventually someone might give you the answer you want?
    Last edited by Capablanca-Fan; 05-06-2009 at 01:44 AM.
    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
    “There’s no point blaming the tragedies of socialism on the flaws or corruption of particular leaders. Any system which allows some people to exercise unbridled power over others is an open invitation to abuse, whether that system is called slavery or socialism or something else.”—Thomas Sowell

  14. #14
    CC Grandmaster Capablanca-Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas D-C
    I believe e4 is better and leads to greater chances to win, as the positions are tactical. It is also probably easier to lean than d4 or c4. Many d4 players tend to learn one system to avoid theoretical lines, but these systems are not that great. However, d4 is not without its positive sides, if you like long positional struggles and are satisfied with equal positions.
    That's rather simplistic. Throughout his reign as World Champ, the supreme strategist Karpov played 1.e4. Dashing attacker and World Champ Challenger Frank Marshall was mainly a 1.d4 player.
    “The history of the 20th century is full of examples of countries that set out to redistribute wealth and ended up redistributing poverty.”
    “There’s no point blaming the tragedies of socialism on the flaws or corruption of particular leaders. Any system which allows some people to exercise unbridled power over others is an open invitation to abuse, whether that system is called slavery or socialism or something else.”—Thomas Sowell

  15. #15
    The Man in the Back that Caesar guy's Avatar
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    here's a thought

    Bobby Fischer nearly always played 1.e4 on the first move and he is considered as (one of) the best player(s) of all time, so that can't be toooo bad...
    Still, I think 1. Nf3 is the most flexible move that can enter lines from both 1. e4 and 1. d4.
    It all depends on your style.

    JM
    'And the man in the back said "Everyone attack!", and it turned into a ballroom blitz. And the girl in the corner said "Boy I wanna warn ya, it'll turn into a ballroom blitz." Brian Connolly

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