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Carl Gorka
29-03-2009, 06:06 PM
Melbourne Chess Club Endgame Group

We welcome all players to join our group and discuss and learn endgames from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Interesting endgames from recent Grandmaster practice are examined and then players may try out the endgames themselves. Or members are invited to bring their own endgames in to be analysed.

Recent Endgames that have been discussed include:

Rook versus Knight, a theoretical draw though not as easy when put into a practical setting.

Queen versus Rook, a theoretical win but again, not so easy to implement in practice.

Rook and 4 pawns v Rook and 3 pawns on one wing, a drawing haven for a lot of players, but not as straightforward as you might think.

The group meets every second Wednesday, the next meeting being Wednesday 8th April 2008. Meeting time is 7.30pm at the Melbourne Chess Club.

Cost: Free to members of the Melbourne Chess Club
$20 to non members for a year’s membership to the group.
$5 for an occasional visitor’s fee for any who attend on a one off basis.

D Dragicevic
20-04-2009, 11:24 PM
If I am not wrong, the endgame group is back on this Wednesday, so I encourage anyone to come and have a look.

BennyG
22-04-2009, 08:41 PM
Yeah will come check this out when i can sounds like fun

Alana
28-04-2009, 11:06 AM
Damn that'd be great for me to join as I suck at endgames, but it's in the wrong state!

ER
28-04-2009, 11:11 AM
Damn that'd be great for me to join as I suck at endgames, but it's in the wrong state!
Yes, but in the right club!:clap: :clap: :clap:

Carl Gorka
19-05-2009, 09:38 AM
The Endgame Group has continued to meet every second Wednesday and now has a small core group of interested members. We welcome players of all strengths to the group to discuss endgames and to try to improve our endgame technique.

Next meeting, this Wednesday 20th May with a look at 2 endgame greats Rubinstein and Capablanca and whether either could have been said to have been the greater endgame player.

Carl Gorka
20-05-2009, 10:45 PM
Another interesting night at the Endgame Group tonight, and welcome to Elliott Renzies at his first session.:)

A look at classic games of 2 of the all time greats, Rubinstein and Capablanca was followed by some practical experience trying to follow in the great Rubinstein's steps in his amazing victory against Matisons from Karlsbad 1929.

Event: Karlsbad
Site: Karlsbad
Date: 1929.08.04
Round: 4
White: Matisons, Hermanis
Black: Rubinstein, Akiba
Result: 0-1
ECO: C68
PlyCount: 76
EventDate: 1929.07.31
EventType: tourn
EventRounds: 21
EventCountry: CZE
Source: ChessBase
SourceDate: 1999.07.01

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. d4 exd4 6. Qxd4 Qxd4 7. Nxd4 Bd6
8. Be3 c5 9. Ne2 f6 10. Bf4 Be6 11. Bxd6 cxd6 12. Nf4 Bf7 13. Nc3 Ne7 14. O-O-O
O-O-O 15. Ncd5 Rhe8 16. f3 Nxd5 17. Nxd5 Bxd5 18. Rxd5 Re5 19. Rhd1 Rxd5 20.
Rxd5 Kd7 {The starting position for our practice games} 21. c4 g6 22. Kc2 Ke6
23. Kc3 f5 24. exf5+ gxf5 25. Rd2 b5 26. b3 h5 27. g3 f4 28. Re2+ Kf5 29. Re4
fxg3 30. hxg3 Rg8 31. Rf4+ Ke6 32. Re4+ Kd7 33. g4 Rf8 34. Re3 h4 35. a4 bxa4
36. bxa4 Re8 37. Kd2 Rxe3 38. Kxe3 d5 0-1

ER
20-05-2009, 11:02 PM
Knowing Carl Gorka and the man's strive for excellence I was expecting quality!
What I witnessed for first time tonight was amazing!
The lecturer's approach in explaining the positions, underlying the concepts and encouraging participation by the audience was a new, rewarding and enjoyable experience!:clap: :clap: :clap:
I was paired with Sarah for the practice which involved playing both colours in the main studied position. After enjoying her magnificent home made chocolate brownies I also enjoyed her sound endgame technique since she convincingly beat me with White as well as Black! :clap: :clap:
Thank God during the game her mobile phone rang and I claimed the forfeit! :owned: Didn't help me much though!!! :( :lol:
Looking forward to next Wednesday!

Carl Gorka
25-05-2009, 11:44 AM
Looking forward to next Wednesday!

Just to confirm, the Endgame Group meets every second Wednesday so the next meeting will be on :

Wednesday 3rd June 7.30pm

All levels of player are welcome, from complete novices to Grandmasters. And if you are a member of MCC it is free, if not it costs $20 for a year!!

Next meeting we will be looking at some great endgames of Rubinstein.

MichaelBaron
25-05-2009, 05:54 PM
Just to confirm, the Endgame Group meets every second Wednesday so the next meeting will be on :

Wednesday 3rd June 7.30pm

All levels of player are welcome, from complete novices to Grandmasters. And if you are a member of MCC it is free, if not it costs $20 for a year!!

Next meeting we will be looking at some great endgames of Rubinstein.

Not sure if i am free but if i am - i might pop in!~

ElevatorEscapee
25-05-2009, 09:01 PM
(@Michael: ... so said Mr Humphries to Mr Peacock... :lol: )

Sadly, I'll probably never be able to make it to these lectures myself, but they sound extremely interesting. Given the vast nature of the endgame, I would imagine it will take a long while before the lectures need to be repeated. (Although, if my own chess learning is anything to go by, I suspect that certain lessons will need to be repeated! ;) )

As someone who might want something similar presented at my club (albeit at a much lower level) I am just wondering how the practical side of things is structured in such a teaching/learning environment.

For instance, are players given a set position and a time limit (eg 15 minutes each on the clock), with the lower rated player getting the "theoretically won" position, (which all players have just learned about from analogous examples) with the higher rated player getting the "theoretically lost" position and trying to hold them off? (I would quite enjoy that from both perspectives!)

Also, do you have set lesson plans? (eg themes to be covered each week, followed by a complementing theme the next week, etc... )

I am not actually asking you for such plans (indeed, these should be considered your intellectual property!), just whether or not such plans are relevant in teaching the subject matter. :)

Carl Gorka
25-05-2009, 10:09 PM
Not sure if i am free but if i am - i might pop in!~

It would be good to see you there....the more the merrier:)

Carl Gorka
25-05-2009, 10:27 PM
Thanks for the reply EE, I'll try to answer some of your questions.

First the group was never envisaged by me to be a lecturer/students type of thing. It is more of a mutual help group. I am nothing more than a group leader providing information to the group to be discussed, analysed, and practised upon. I suppose the success of the group will depend on how interesting the information is that is presented.

The aims of the group are simple. To improve the endgame play of all our members and to add to each members confidence in playing and studying endgames. This includes me, as the leader and I'm sure there are plenty out there who know my style of play wondering what I'm doing as a leader of an endgame group:lol:

The format varies depending on what is being looked at. For instance, one session was mostly playing a K+QvK+R endgame, after a very short look at some basic positions to aim for, and some very good players who were unable to find winning plans. While this endgame is very easy to understand, it is very difficult to practically win in the given time, so we all had quite a few goes at trying to win or thwart other members of the group.

The last session was much more practical or less theoretical perhaps. We looked at a couple of classic rook and pawn endgames and then chose a starting position from one of them and played some games. The endings were first examined with some basic guidance of the typical ideas that were being employed so we all had some idea of the things we should be trying to do, even if we couldn't always get things right.

Although the sessions have now been structured to look at some classic endgames, to get material I have been looking at a recent TWIC, sorting the games by 'number of moves' and then looked at the endgames and chosen some that I find interesting to show to the group. For instance, recently I have seen a number of endings of K+RvK+N, so I found a little theory and showed it to the group. We then played some positions for practice. This is perhaps the most important thing as practicing endgames in anything other than a real tournament game is rare for most players. The members of this endgame group are testing practical endings every second week and hopefully it will inspire at least some of us to examine the endgame on our own as well.

If you would like some material, I could send you a few ideas. Just message me, though I only come online a couple of times a wekk nowadays.

Carl Gorka
31-05-2009, 02:07 PM
This Wednesday 3rd June, MCC Endgame Study Group will meet looking at some endgames of the great Rubinstein.

Whether endgames interest you, you are a great endgame player/theorist who may have some things to add to the group, or your endgames need some work, come along and discuss with like minded people.

The group meets at 7.30pm every second Wednesday, everyone welcome:)

ER
03-06-2009, 06:54 PM
Sorry Carl
I can't make it tonight I got held back at work! I have already sent you PM! my apologies to the others as well. If Sarah brought her magnificent choc brownies tonight, well that's another reason for me to kick myself for missing out!
See you all next time!

Carl Gorka
04-06-2009, 11:18 AM
Sorry you missed it too Elliott as you would have brought the group to double figures tonight.

We were lucky to have the presence of Stephen Solomon for a time, and he was very open with his comments about the endgames we were looking at. Also it was good to see strong players such as Michael Baron and Bill Jordan taking an interest and passing on their experience and judgement, so that the rest of us can learn from them.

We examined 2 of Rubinstein's classic endgames from the St Petersburg tournament of 1909. His great victory versus Lasker, and an exemplary king and pawn endgame against E Cohn. Both examples showed the importance of piece activity (including king activity) in the endgame, and we finished things off by setting up a position from the rook endgame that Rubinstein played against Spielmann, and trying to play the position in practice games. The position was set up after White's 41st move and we tried to win the position as Black a la Rubinstein:)

Event: St Petersburg
Site: St Petersburg
Date: 1909.??.??
Round: ?
White: Spielmann, Rudolf
Black: Rubinstein, Akiba
Result: 0-1
ECO: C90
PlyCount: 150
EventDate: 1909.??.??
EventRounds: 20
EventCountry: RUS
Source: ChessBase
SourceDate: 1999.07.01

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3
Bg4 9. h3 Bh5 10. d3 O-O 11. Nbd2 d5 12. exd5 Nxd5 13. Nf1 Bf6 14. g4 Bg6 15.
g5 Be7 16. Nxe5 Nxe5 17. Rxe5 Nb6 18. d4 Nd7 19. Re1 Bxg5 20. Bxg5 Qxg5+ 21.
Qg4 Qd8 22. Ng3 Nf6 23. Qf3 Qd7 24. Kh2 a5 25. a3 Rab8 26. Re5 Rfe8 27. Rg1 b4
28. Rxa5 bxc3 29. Qxc3 Ne4 30. Nxe4 Rxe4 31. Rd5 Qe7 32. Rc5 Re2 33. Qg3 Qd6
34. Qxd6 cxd6 35. Rc7 Rxb2 36. Rgc1 Kf8 37. Bc2 Ra2 38. Bxg6 hxg6 39. R1c2 Rxc2
40. Rxc2 Ra8 41. Rc3 Ra4 42. Rd3 Ke7 43. Kg3 Ke6 44. Kf3 Kd5 45.
Ke2 g5 46. Rb3 f6 47. Ke3 Kc4 48. Rd3 d5 49. Kd2 Ra8 50. Kc2 Ra7 51. Kd2 Re7
52. Rc3+ Kxd4 53. a4 Ra7 54. Ra3 Ra5 55. Ra1 Kc4 56. Ke3 d4+ 57. Kd2 Rf5 58.
Ke1 Kb4 59. Ke2 Ka5 60. Ra3 Rf4 61. Ra2 Rh4 62. Kd3 Rxh3+ 63. Kxd4 Rh4+ 64. Kd3
Rxa4 65. Re2 Rf4 66. Ke3 Kb6 67. Rc2 Kb7 68. Rc1 Ra4 69. Rh1 Kc6 70. Rh7 Ra7
71. Ke4 Kd6 72. Kf5 g6+ 73. Kxg6 Rxh7 74. Kxh7 Ke5 75. Kg6 g4 0-1

MichaelBaron
04-06-2009, 12:28 PM
As a first time participant, i would like to thank Carl for his efforts and to say how interesting the endgame session was. Be there for the next session or be square!

On a negative side, Sarah did not bring any chocolates (or cake for this matter).

ER
04-06-2009, 01:04 PM
On a negative side, Sarah did not bring any chocolates (or cake for this matter).
Well you wouldn't expect the girl to cater for an army of hungry yobos :) flocking in without warning! :P

ER
04-06-2009, 01:06 PM
(...) presence of Stephen Solomon for a time, and he was very open with his comments about the endgames we were looking at. Also it was good to see strong players such as Michael Baron and Bill Jordan taking an interest
FANTASTIC! SIMPLY FANTASTIC!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Carl Gorka
21-06-2009, 09:46 PM
The MCC Endgame Group met again on Wednesday, examining 2 of Capablanca’s classic endgame. First his victory in a double rook endgame against Kan from Moscow 1936. Then we tried to win a position from the game Nimzovich-Capablanca Riga 1913, an opposite bishop ending that Capablanca claimed was ‘won by force’. We tried and failed or succeeded, but now have a much better idea of these types of endings than before. My thanks go to Bill Jordan who helped a great deal, explaining a number of principles which helped us all.

Next meeting is on Wednesday 1st July at 7.30pm, all welcome.

Event: Riga
Site: Riga
Date: 1913.??.??
Round: ?
White: Nimzowitsch, Aaron
Black: Capablanca, Jose Raul
Result: 0-1
ECO: C50
PlyCount: 128
EventDate: 1913.??.??
EventRounds: 1
EventCountry: RUS
Source: ChessBase
SourceDate: 2000.11.22

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. d3 d6 6. Bg5 Be6 7. Bb5 h6 8. Bh4
Bb4 9. d4 Bd7 10. O-O Bxc3 11. bxc3 g5 12. Bg3 Nxe4 13. Bxc6 Bxc6 14. dxe5 dxe5
15. Bxe5 Qxd1 16. Raxd1 f6 17. Bd4 Kf7 18. Nd2 Rhe8 19. f3 Nxd2 20. Rxd2 Rad8
21. g4 Bb5 22. Rb1 Ba6 23. Rbd1 Re2 24. Rxe2 Bxe2 25. Re1 Bxf3 26. Rf1 c5 27.
Bxf6 Rd1 28. Be5 Rxf1+ 29. Kxf1 Bxg4 {This is the position we used as our
starting position, according to Capablanca it is won by force} 30. a4 Ke6 31.
Bb8 a5 $1 32. Ke1 Kd5 33. Kd2 Bd7 34. Bc7 Kc6 35. Bd8 b6 36. c4 Kb7 37. Kc3
Bxa4 38. Kb2 Bd7 39. Kb3 Be6 40. Kc3 a4 41. Kd3 Kc6 42. Kc3 g4 43. Bh4 h5 44.
Bg3 a3 45. Kb3 Bxc4+ $1 46. Kxa3 b5 47. c3 Kd5 48. Bf2 Be2 49. Kb3 Bd1+ 50. Kb2
Kc4 51. Kc1 Bf3 52. Kd2 b4 53. cxb4 cxb4 54. Bh4 Be4 55. Bf6 Bg6 56. Bh4 b3 57.
Bf6 h4 58. Ke3 g3 59. hxg3 h3 60. Kf2 Bf5 61. g4 Bxg4 62. Kg3 Kd3 63. Kh2 Kc2
64. Kg3 b2 0-1

Carl Gorka
01-07-2009, 11:46 AM
Sorry for the late notice, but don't forget we're on again tonight:)

7.30 start and we'll be looking at some endgames of some players closer to home this week.

MichaelBaron
01-07-2009, 12:03 PM
It will be fun as always!
See you there, everyone!

Carl Gorka
02-07-2009, 11:09 AM
I am very happy with the way this group is going. We have an active core of people turning up willing to put an effort into studying a difficult aspect of the game. The group interaction and dynamics is increasing as everyone is becoming more knowledgable about the endgame, and all are realising that some of the stronger players are struggling just as much and having to work just as hard as the less experienced players:D

Last night we briefly looked at some more opposite coloured bishops endings following up on the last session. The main bulk of the session was devoted to looking at an endgame provided by Bill Jordan, where we split into groups as if the game had been adjourned. Coming back together after about 30 minutes of analysis showed us that a lot had been discovered by both groups, but lots had been missed as well.

Finally, we are looking at the position after White's 51st move and trying to work out whether White is winning from this position. Bill Jordan thinks that White probably is.

Event: corr
Site: ?
Date: 1995.??.??
Round: ?
White: Jordan
Black: Kempen
Result: 1-0
ECO: C43
PlyCount: 163
EventDate: 1913.??.??

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d4 exd4 4. e5 Ne4 5. Qxd4 d5 6. exd6 Nxd6 7. Nc3 Nc6 8.
Qf4 g6 9. Nb5 Bg7 10. Nxd6+ cxd6 11. Bd3 O-O 12. O-O Ne5 13. Nxe5 dxe5 14. Qb4
Qc7 15. Bg5 a5 16. Qc4 Qb8 17. Rfd1 Be6 18. Qb5 Qc7 19. Be4 Rab8 20. a4 Rfc8
21. Rd2 Bc4 22. Qd7 Qxd7 23. Rxd7 Be6 24. Rd6 Bf8 25. Rd2 f5 26. Bd3 Kf7 27. f3
Bc5+ 28. Kf1 h6 29. Bh4 Be3 30. Re2 f4 31. Rd1 b6 32. Be4 g5 33. Bf2 Bxf2 34.
Kxf2 Rd8 35. Bd3 Kf6 36. Rde1 Rd5 37. Bc4 Rc5 38. Bxe6 Kxe6 39. h4 b5 40. axb5
Rbxb5 41. c3 Rb3 42. Rd1 Rd5 43. Rxd5 Kxd5 {Starting position. From now on,
comment on the players moves, analysing what you think is correct, or
incorrect in their play.} 44. Rd2+ Kc4 45. h5 a4 46. Ke1 Rb7 47. Kd1 g4 48. Kc2
Rg7 49. Re2 gxf3 50. gxf3 Rg5 51. Re4+ {This position is close to winning or
perhaps it even is winning for White according to Bill Jordan} Kb5 52. Kd3 Rxh5
53. Rb4+ Ka5 54. Ke4 Rg5 55. b3 axb3 56. Rxb3 h5 57. Rb8 h4 58. Rh8 Kb5 59.
Rxh4 Kc4 60. Rh8 Kxc3 {Assess this postion} 61. Rd8 Kc4 62. Re8 Rg7 63. Rxe5
Rf7 64. Rf5 Re7+ 65. Kxf4 Kd4 66. Ra5 Rf7+ 67. Kg4 Rg7+ 68. Rg5 Rf7 69. f4 Rf8
70. Rg6 Kd5 71. Kg5 Ke4 72. Re6+ Kd5 73. f5 Rg8+ 74. Kf6 Rf8+ 75. Kg6 Rg8+ 76.
Kf7 Rh8 77. Re1 Kd6 78. f6 Rh2 79. Rd1+ Kc7 80. Kf8 Rg2 81. f7 Rg3 82. Rd4 1-0

Carl Gorka
07-07-2009, 05:12 PM
Hi everyone, there was talk at the last session of making this a weekly event.

This week I have a committee meeting on Wednesday, but from next week we will make it weekly:)

So the next session will be on Wednesday 15th July and from then it will be weekly:)

Watto
13-07-2009, 05:01 PM
Hi everyone, there was talk at the last session of making this a weekly event.

This week I have a committee meeting on Wednesday, but from next week we will make it weekly:)

So the next session will be on Wednesday 15th July and from then it will be weekly:)
Hi fireeater. :) Just a couple of questions. How long, roughly, does the endgame group meet for? It still starts at 7:30 pm?

Carl Gorka
13-07-2009, 09:36 PM
Hi fireeater. :) Just a couple of questions. How long, roughly, does the endgame group meet for? It still starts at 7:30 pm?

We start about 7.30pm and the sessions usually last through till about 9pm. Once or twice they've overrun a bit as we got carried away with the endings:oops:

Watto
14-07-2009, 12:08 PM
We start about 7.30pm and the sessions usually last through till about 9pm. Once or twice they've overrun a bit as we got carried away with the endings:oops:
Thanks for that. Much appreciated.

Carl Gorka
19-07-2009, 01:32 PM
Another good session and a big welcome to Laurence Matheson who came to the group for the first time and contributed, showing that young players can have a good feel for endgames.

We are now moving this group to weekly sot he next meeting will be this coming Wednesday 22nd July at about 7.30pm

And here is some analysis of the ending we looked at last time between Bill Jordan and Leon Kempen. I think Leon was too interested in keeping his pawns whereas he should have activated his king and rook. This would have given him good chances to keep a small advantage.Event: corr
Site: ?
Date: 1995.??.??
Round: ?
White: Jordan
Black: Kempen
Result: 1-0
ECO: C43
PlyCount: 163
EventDate: 1913.??.??

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d4 exd4 4. e5 Ne4 5. Qxd4 d5 6. exd6 Nxd6 7. Nc3 Nc6 8.
Qf4 g6 9. Nb5 Bg7 10. Nxd6+ cxd6 11. Bd3 O-O 12. O-O Ne5 13. Nxe5 dxe5 14. Qb4
Qc7 15. Bg5 a5 16. Qc4 Qb8 17. Rfd1 Be6 18. Qb5 Qc7 19. Be4 Rab8 20. a4 Rfc8
21. Rd2 Bc4 22. Qd7 Qxd7 23. Rxd7 Be6 24. Rd6 Bf8 25. Rd2 f5 26. Bd3 Kf7 27. f3
Bc5+ 28. Kf1 h6 29. Bh4 Be3 30. Re2 f4 31. Rd1 b6 32. Be4 g5 33. Bf2 Bxf2 34.
Kxf2 Rd8 35. Bd3 Kf6 36. Rde1 Rd5 37. Bc4 Rc5 38. Bxe6 Kxe6 39. h4 b5 40. axb5
Rbxb5 41. c3 Rb3 42. Rd1 Rd5 43. Rxd5 Kxd5 {Starting position. From now on,
comment on the players moves, analysing what you think is correct, or
incorrect in their play.} 44. Rd2+ Kc4 45. h5 a4 46. Ke1 Rb7 47. Kd1 g4 48. Kc2
Rg7 49. Re2 gxf3 50. gxf3 Rg5 51. Re4+ {Diagram # This position is close to
winning or perhaps it even is winning for White according to Bill Jordan} Kb5 (
{Perhaps recentralising the king is a better choice. White's chances are on
the king side so losing the a-pawn may not be fatal.} 51... Kd5 52. Rxa4 (52.
Kd3 Rg3 53. Rxa4 (53. Ke2 Rg2+ 54. Ke1 Rh2 55. Rxa4 Rxh5 {Black's more active
king should mean that he is certainly not worse.}) (53. c4+ $2 Ke6 {White has
blocked his own rook}) 53... Rxf3+ 54. Ke2 Rh3 55. Ra5+ Ke6 (55... Ke4 56. Ra4+
Kf5 {White will have to fight to draw here}) 56. Ra6+ Kf5 57. Rxh6 Rh2+ {Black
is certainly not worse here, and may have winning chances}) 52... Rxh5 (52...
Rg3 $5 53. Ra5+ Ke6 54. Ra6+ Kf5 55. Rxh6 Rxf3 56. c4 {White is a pawn ahead,
but Black's connected central passed pawns give him excellent counter chances})
53. Kd3 Rh1 {Black's rook clears the way for the h-pawn and also prepares to
attack White's position from the rear.}) 52. Kd3 Rxh5 53. Rb4+ Ka5 54. Ke4 Rg5
(54... Rh3 55. b3 axb3 56. Rxb3 Ka4 57. Rb4+ Ka5 58. Rb8 {White's passed
c-pawn is a real worry and to stop it, Black will have to leave his
counterattack against White's f-pawn when White's king will likely take all of
Black's pawns}) 55. b3 axb3 56. Rxb3 h5 57. Rb8 h4 (57... Ka4 {a small nuance
as Black's king will save a tempo, but is it enough?} 58. c4 h4 59. c5 $1 {Now
it is Black's rook that will have to stop the White pawn} (59. Rh8 $2 Kb4 60.
Rxh4 Kxc4 61. Rh8 Kc5 62. Rd8 Kc6 63. Rd5 Rg8 (63... Rf5 $5 64. Rxe5 Rf8 65.
Rf5 Ra8 66. Rxf4 Kd7 67. Kf5 Ke7 $11) 64. Rxe5 Kd6 65. Kxf4 Rf8+ 66. Rf5 Rg8 {
How will White win this position?}) 59... h3 60. c6 h2 61. Rh8 Rg6 62. Rxh2
Rxc6 63. Kxe5) 58. Rh8 Kb5 59. Rxh4 Kc4 60. Rh8 Kxc3 {Assess this postion} 61.
Rd8 (61. Re8 $2 Kd2 {Now Black's e-pawn cannot be taken} 62. Rxe5 $4 Rxe5+ 63.
Kxe5 Ke3) 61... Kc4 62. Re8 (62. Rc8+ Kb5 63. Re8 Kc6 64. Rxe5 Rg8 65. Kxf4 Kd6
) 62... Rg7 63. Rxe5 Rf7 64. Rf5 Re7+ 65. Kxf4 Kd4 66. Ra5 {Black's king is
cut off by both rank and file, but is this enough?} Rf7+ 67. Kg4 Rg7+ (67...
Rf8 68. f4 Ke4 (68... Rg8+ 69. Rg5 Rf8 {happened in the game after 69 moves})
69. f5 Rg8+ 70. Kh5 $18) 68. Rg5 Rf7 (68... Re7 69. f4 Ke4 70. Rg6 Re8 71. f5
Ke5 72. Kg5 Kd5 73. Ra6 $18) 69. f4 Rf8 70. Rg6 $1 Kd5 71. Kg5 Ke4 (71... Rf7
72. f5) 72. Re6+ Kd5 73. f5 {This is now a theoretical win for White} Rg8+ 74.
Kf6 Rf8+ 75. Kg6 Rg8+ 76. Kf7 Rh8 77. Re1 Kd6 78. f6 Rh2 79. Rd1+ Kc7 80. Kf8
Rg2 81. f7 Rg3 82. Rd4 1-0

Carl Gorka
23-07-2009, 10:17 PM
This group is going from strength to strength.:)

More people, more ideas, more challenges.

After some discussion over endgames with rook and 2 pawns vs rook and 1 pawn, we had some practical play from the following position:


Event: FSGM July
Site: Budapest HUN
Date: 2009.07.11
Round: 8
White: Flumbort, A.
Black: Varga, Zo
Result: 1-0
ECO: D15
WhiteElo: 2507
BlackElo: 2473
PlyCount: 153
EventDate: 2009.07.04
EventRounds: 11
EventCountry: HUN
EventCategory: 8
Source: Mark Crowther
SourceDate: 2009.07.20

1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. Nf3 c6 4. e3 Bf5 5. Bxc4 e6 6. O-O Nf6 7. Nc3 Nbd7 8.
Qe2 b5 9. e4 Bg6 10. Bd3 b4 11. Na4 Be7 12. Bf4 Qa5 13. b3 O-O 14. Rac1 c5 15.
dxc5 Nxc5 16. Nxc5 Bxc5 17. Ne5 Qb6 18. Rc4 Nh5 19. Bd2 Qd6 20. Nxg6 fxg6 21.
e5 Qd5 22. Be4 Qxe5 23. Rxc5 Qxc5 24. Bxa8 Rxa8 25. Qxe6+ Kh8 26. Rc1 Qf5 27.
Qxf5 gxf5 28. Bxb4 Nf4 29. Rc4 Rd8 30. h4 Ne6 31. Rc6 Nd4 32. Rc7 a6 33. Kh2
Kg8 34. Bc3 g6 35. Bxd4 Rxd4 36. Ra7 Rxh4+ 37. Kg3 Rg4+ 38. Kf3 Rb4 39. Rxa6
Kg7 40. Ra4 Rb6 41. b4 Kf6 42. a3 h5 43. Ra5 Rd6 44. b5 Rd3+ 45. Ke2 Rb3 46. a4
g5 47. Kd2 h4 48. Kc2 Rb4 49. Kc3 Rb1 50. Ra6+ Kg7 {Our starting position} 51.
Rd6 g4 52. Rd4 Kf6 53. Kc2 Ke5 54. Kxb1 Kxd4 55. b6 h3 56. gxh3 gxh3 57. b7 h2
58. b8=Q h1=Q+ 59. Kb2 Qh5 60. Qb6+ Kd5 61. Qb5+ Kd6 62. a5 Qh8+ 63. Ka2 Qd4
64. Qxf5 Qc4+ 65. Kb2 Qe2+ 66. Kc3 Qe1+ 67. Kc4 Qc1+ 68. Kb5 Qc6+ 69. Kb4 Qb7+
70. Ka3 Qe7 71. Qf4+ Kd5+ 72. Qb4 Qe2 73. Qb3+ Kc6 74. Qc3+ Kd7 75. Qd4+ Kc8
76. Kb4 Qf1 77. Qc4+ 1-0

Carl Gorka
30-07-2009, 10:18 PM
Another active Endgame Group and most pleasing for me is the young players attending. We were looking at Knight Endgames tonight. Knight Endgames have been described as the most similar to pawn endgames so we tried to win a position with N+4 v N+3.

I think everyone in the group found knights very frustrating pieces in the endgame, whether they were defending or trying to win.

Event: Najdorf Mem Open
Site: Warsaw POL
Date: 2009.07.18
Round: 1
White: Solnicki, M.
Black: Couso, L.
Result: 1/2-1/2
ECO: D11
WhiteElo: 2031
BlackElo: 2284
PlyCount: 227
EventDate: 2009.07.18
EventRounds: 9
EventCountry: POL
Source: Mark Crowther
SourceDate: 2009.07.27

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Qc2 Nf6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Nbd2 e6 6. g3 Nbd7 7. Bg2 Be7 8. O-O
O-O 9. a3 a5 10. Rd1 a4 11. b4 axb3 12. Qxb3 Ra7 13. Bb2 Qb6 14. Qc2 Bf5 15.
Qc3 Ne4 16. Nxe4 Bxe4 17. Nd2 Bxg2 18. Kxg2 Ra4 19. c5 Qa6 20. e3 f5 21. Nf3 g5
22. Qd3 g4 23. Ng1 b6 24. cxb6 Nxb6 25. Qxa6 Rxa6 26. Rd3 Nc4 27. Rb3 Rfa8 28.
Ne2 Bd6 29. Bc1 R8a7 30. Rab1 Kf7 31. h3 h5 32. hxg4 hxg4 33. Rb7+ Kf6 34. Rxa7
Rxa7 35. Rb3 Bxa3 36. Bxa3 Rxa3 37. Rb1 Ra2 38. Re1 Nd2 39. Rc1 Ne4 40. Kf1
Nd2+ 41. Kg2 Nb3 42. Re1 Ra1 43. Rxa1 Nxa1 44. Nc1 Ke7 45. Kf1 Nc2 46. Ke2 Na3
47. Kd3 Nc4 48. Nb3 Nd6 49. Na5 Kd7 50. Nb3 Ne4 51. Ke2 Kd6 52. Ke1 c5 53.
dxc5+ Nxc5 54. Nd4 Ne4 55. Ke2 Ke5 56. Nc6+ Kf6 57. Nb4 Ke7 58. Nc6+ Kd7 59.
Nd4 Nd6 60. Nb3 e5 61. Nc5+ Ke7 62. Nd3 Kf6 63. Nb4 Ke6 64. Nc6 Ne4 65. Nd8+
Kf6 66. Nc6 Ng5 67. Nb4 {Try winning from this position first without the
knights and then with the knights.} Ke6 68. Nc6 Kd6 69. Nb4 Nf3 70. Nd3 Kc6 71.
Nb4+ Kc5 72. Nd3+ Kc4 73. Nc1 d4 74. Nd3 e4 75. Nf4 d3+ 76. Kd1 Ne5 77. Ne6 Kc3
78. Nd4 Nc4 79. Nb5+ Kb2 80. Nd4 Kc3 81. Nb5+ Kb4 82. Nd4 Nd6 83. Kd2 Kc4 84.
Nc6 Kd5 85. Nb4+ Ke5 86. Nc6+ Kf6 87. Nd4 Nc4+ 88. Kd1 Ne5 89. Nb3 Nf3 90. Na5
Ng1 91. Nb3 Nh3 92. Ke1 Ke5 93. Nd4 f4 94. gxf4+ Nxf4 95. Nc6+ Kd6 96. Nd4 Nd5
97. Kd2 Ke5 98. Nc6+ Kf5 99. Nd4+ Kg5 100. Ke1 Kh4 101. Nb3 Kh3 102. Nd2 Nc3
103. Kf1 Kh2 104. Nb3 Ne2 105. Nd2 g3 106. fxg3 Nxg3+ 107. Kf2 Kh3 108. Nb3
Nh1+ 109. Ke1 Kg2 110. Nc5 Kf3 111. Kd2 Ng3 112. Nxd3 Nf1+ 113. Kc3 Nxe3 114.
Nc5 1/2-1/2


Next meeting is next Wednesday August 5th about 7.30pm and Bill Jordan will be presenting some ideas about rook endgames:)

Carl Gorka
19-08-2009, 11:14 PM
First, apologies for not posting more regularly, I've been busy and not too well:(

Not too many at the endgame group tonight, but thanks to those who tried their arm at breaking through the blockade that Ivanchuk set up against Kamsky in the current GP tournament in Jermuk.

Check it out here, it is better coverage than anything I could give, and interesting not only about endgames, but those who are concerned with rules:)

http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=5679

Carl Gorka
16-09-2009, 10:16 PM
In another interesting session this evening, we looked at the excellent online endgame resource at the chesscafe.com website, written by Karsten Mueller. This series of articles are an exellent inspiration for players seeking to widen their endgame knowledge, and players of all qualities can gain something from these.

We used a recent article as a basis for the session working through the various examples. The Ivanchuk-Anand endgame is very pretty and instructive:)

http://www.chesscafe.com/mueller/mueller101.htm

Mischa
16-09-2009, 10:21 PM
and I hear you won an end game
the other night that was recently discussed in your end game group...group obviously working well!!

Carl Gorka
16-09-2009, 10:29 PM
and I hear you won an end game
the other night that was recently discussed in your end game group...group obviously working well!!

Yes, amazingly I won an ending which 6 months ago, I'd have been playing with no guidelines in my head, R+B v R with no pawns. So yes, I suppose things are working, although it would be good to hear how some of the others who attend the group are faring:)

Carl Gorka
21-09-2009, 07:00 PM
Hi all, this Wednesday I won't be in Melbourne but I have left some positions to be discussed on the noticeboard in the tournament hall at the MCC. The game continuations are in the MCC office.

Have fun:)

MichaelBaron
21-09-2009, 07:42 PM
I strongly recomment endgame group to everyone!

Carl Gorka
30-09-2009, 10:58 PM
Once again, thanks to all who turned up again tonight, the endgame group seems to be going strong and appealing to players of all strengths.

We spent most of the session looking at some rook endings and then played an awkward endgame to finish:D

Event: 18th TCh-CRO b
Site: Sibenik CRO
Date: 2009.09.22
Round: 2
White: Grgurevic, B.
Black: Tomerlin, S.
Result: 0-1
ECO: B06
WhiteElo: 2228
BlackElo: 2313
PlyCount: 162
EventDate: 2009.09.21
EventType: team
EventRounds: 9
EventCountry: CRO
Source: Mark Crowther
SourceDate: 2009.09.28

1. e4 c6 2. d4 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. Be2 Nf6 5. e5 Nd5 6. c4 Nc7 7. Nc3 d5 8. exd6
Qxd6 9. O-O Bf5 10. Be3 Nba6 11. a3 O-O 12. Qd2 Rfd8 13. Rad1 Ne6 14. h3 h5 15.
Rfe1 Nac7 16. Bf1 a6 17. Qc1 b5 18. d5 cxd5 19. Nxd5 Nxd5 20. cxd5 Rdc8 21. Qd2
Rc2 22. Qb4 Nd8 23. Nd4 Qxb4 24. axb4 Rxb2 25. Nxf5 gxf5 26. Bc5 e6 27. Bd3 Bc3
28. Re2 Rc8 29. Rxb2 Bxb2 30. Be2 h4 31. Bf3 e5 32. Rd2 Bc3 33. Rd3 Bxb4 34.
Bxb4 e4 35. Re3 exf3 36. Rxf3 Rc1+ 37. Kh2 Rc4 38. Be7 Nb7 39. Rxf5 b4 40. Rg5+
Kh7 41. Rh5+ Kg6 42. Rg5+ Kh6 43. Rf5 Re4 44. Rxf7 Kg6 45. Rf6+ Kg7 46. Rxa6
Rxe7 47. Rb6 b3 48. Rxb3 {This was the position we used as the starting
position for our games} Nd6 49. Rb6 Nf5 50. Rc6 Re2 51. Kg1 Rd2 52. Rc5 Kf6 53.
Ra5 Nd6 54. Ra4 Nf5 55. Ra5 Kg5 56. Rb5 Kf4 57. Ra5 Nd6 58. Ra4+ Ne4 59. g3+
hxg3 60. fxg3+ Kxg3 61. Ra3+ Kf4 62. Rb3 Rxd5 63. Rb7 Rd3 64. Kh2 Ng5 65. Rb4+
Kf3 66. Rb2 Ne4 67. Ra2 Ng3 68. Rb2 Nf1+ 69. Kg1 Ne3 70. Kh2 Rd1 71. Rb3 Rd2+
72. Kg1 Re2 73. h4 Kg3 74. Rb1 Kh3 75. Rb3 Rg2+ 76. Kh1 Rg3 77. h5 Rf3 78. Rb1
Nf5 79. h6 Ng3+ 80. Kg1 Ne2+ 81. Kh1 Rf2 0-1

mikesguns
01-10-2009, 09:13 PM
Yes it was quite interesting to see that a rook, knight and pawn are very powerful against a rook and 4 pawns
The rook and knight clean up the pawns and then win the position of rook and knight vs rook

Carl Gorka
06-10-2009, 10:44 PM
I have some endgames from Domagoj Dragicevic to look through tomorrow, so feel free to come along and learn from the games one of our state's promising young adults:)

Carl Gorka
07-10-2009, 09:38 PM
Thanks to Domagoj Dragicevic for sharing some of his endgames with us tonight. There were some interesting knight endgames, and if the group learnt anything it was that the best practical tries virtually all involved greater piece activity, though this is not easily achieved, especially in real game situations, with time pressure etc.

Next week, another Domagoj endgame will be the basis of the session, but this time the focus will be on Q+P v Q .....:eek: :eek:

Carl Gorka
15-10-2009, 09:29 AM
Thanks again to all who came along to the endgame group last night. It was a little embarassing to be standing in front of a group of players talking about an endgame which I don't really feel comfortable with myself:lol:

But the session seemed to be quite good with a great deal of analysis unearthed in an ending between Dragicevic and Schon, which finally boiled down to Q+P v Q.

Event: Noble Park Grades
Site: TOSHIBA
Date: 2009.09.06
Round: 7
White: Schon, Eugene
Black: Dragicevic, Domagoj
Result: 0-1
ECO: C41
PlyCount: 258
EventDate: 2009.??.??

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nd7 4. Bc4 c6 5. O-O Be7 6. Nc3 Ngf6 7. dxe5 dxe5 8.
Qe2 O-O 9. a4 Qc7 10. h3 Nc5 11. Kh2 Ne6 12. Be3 Rd8 13. g3 Nd4 14. Bxd4 exd4
15. e5 dxc3 16. exf6 Bxf6 17. bxc3 Bf5 18. Rad1 Bxc3 19. Ng5 Bg6 20. h4 Qe5 21.
Qg4 Rd4 22. Rxd4 Qxd4 23. Qxd4 Bxd4 24. Rd1 Rd8 25. f4 Bf6 26. Rxd8+ Bxd8 27.
f5 Bh5 28. Kh3 Bxg5 29. hxg5 Bf3 30. g6 hxg6 31. fxg6 {This is the position we
picked up the game from} Bd5 32. Bxd5 cxd5 33. Kg4 fxg6 34. Kf4 Kf7 35. Ke5 d4
36. Kd6 b6 37. Kc6 Ke6 38. Kb7 Kd6 39. Kxa7 Kc5 40. Kb7 g5 41. Kc7 g4 42. Kb7
b5 43. a5 d3 44. cxd3 b4 45. a6 b3 46. a7 b2 47. a8=Q b1=Q+ 48. Kc8 Qxd3 49.
Qa7+ Kb4 50. Qb7+ Kc4 51. Qf7+ Kc3 52. Qxg7+ Qd4 53. Qg5 Kd3 54. Qe7 Qe4 55.
Qh4 Ke3 56. Qh2 Qf3 57. Qg1+ Qf2 58. Qd1 Qxg3 59. Qc1+ Kf2 60. Qd2+ Kg1 61.
Qd4+ Kh2 62. Qd2+ Qg2 63. Qh6+ Kg1 64. Qc1+ Qf1 65. Qe3+ Qf2 66. Qc1+ Kg2 67.
Qc6+ Qf3 68. Qc2+ Kh3 69. Qh7+ Kg3 70. Qc7+ Qf4 71. Qc3+ Kh2 72. Qc2+ Kg1 73.
Qd1+ Kg2 74. Qe2+ Kh3 75. Qe6 Qd4 76. Qf5 Kh4 77. Qh7+ Kg3 78. Qc7+ Qf4 79.
Qc3+ Qf3 80. Qe1+ Kg2 81. Qd2+ Qf2 82. Qd5+ Kh2 83. Qh5+ Kg3 84. Qe5+ Qf4 85.
Qe1+ Kg2 86. Qe2+ Kh3 87. Qe6 Qd2 88. Qf5 Qc3+ 89. Kd7 Qd4+ 90. Kc8 Qc4+ 91.
Kd7 Kg2 92. Qg5 g3 93. Qd2+ Kh3 94. Qh6+ Qh4 95. Qe3 Kh2 96. Qe5 Qg4+ 97. Kc7
Qf3 98. Qd6 Kg1 99. Qd4+ Qf2 100. Qd1+ Kh2 101. Qh5+ Kg2 102. Qd5+ Kf1 103.
Qh1+ Ke2 104. Qe4+ Qe3 105. Qg2+ Ke1 106. Qh1+ Kf2 107. Qh4 Kg1 108. Kb7 g2
109. Qh5 Kf2 110. Qh4+ Ke2 111. Qc4+ Qd3 112. Qe6+ Kf2 113. Qb6+ Qe3 114. Qb2+
Kf1 115. Qb1+ Kf2 116. Qc2+ Kg3 117. Qg6+ Kh2 118. Qh5+ Qh3 119. Qe5+ Kh1 120.
Qe4 Qh5 121. Ka8 Qh6 122. Kb7 Qd2 123. Ka8 Kg1 124. Qf3 Qa5+ 125. Kb7 Qb4+ 126.
Ka8 Kh2 127. Qe2 Qa5+ 128. Kb7 Qd5+ 129. Ka7 Kh1 0-1

Kevin Bonham
15-10-2009, 04:31 PM
Had a look at this using tablebases. These QP v Q endings are often beyond more than approximate human comprehension.

Strangely, white's position becomes lost with best play after either 89.Kd7 (played) or Kd8 whereas moving the king to the b-file and further out of play maintains the draw.

89...Qd4+ instead of ...Kg2 returns the position to drawn. Black gets it right at the second attempt.

96...Qg4 is again a draw. 96...Qc4 is the only move to win by force, presumably because it blocks the king from running away out of play to the b-file.

There is some strange bug in the Shredder online tablebases that stops it returning a readout for white's 105th move, but whatever, after 105.Qh1+ black is again winning. I am not sure what draws.

107...Kg1 is a draw again. Queen to any of the following wins: b3, e5, c3, c5, c1, a7 as does Ke2.

109.Qh5 is a loss. Only Qc4 and Qf6 draw.

113...Qe3 is a draw. Kg3 and Kf1 win.

127.Qe2 loses. Only Qh5+ draws

So the best-play outcome of the position changes nine times in total during the ending. This is not unusual no matter how strong the players.

Mischa
15-10-2009, 09:35 PM
shame you can't join them on Wednesday nights.

Kevin Bonham
15-10-2009, 09:39 PM
Would learn much more of practical value by actually being there instead of just shoving positions into tablebases!

Mischa
15-10-2009, 09:46 PM
They seem to be learning heaps...and with practical results.
I know James is getting a lot out of it.
Well done for Carl for getting this underway
he has been suggesting this idea for a few years now, we even tried it at my place...:)
Hope it keeps going!!

Grant Szuveges
18-10-2009, 11:55 PM
This endgame group is becoming a real success, and the players who regularly participate are all rapidly improving. I will use Domagoi as an example:

Approx 4? months ago, I played some blitz with Domagoi and beat him 2.5-.5, however last Wednesday night before the endgame group, he cleaned me up 4-0.... He has gone from 16.5% to 100% - thats an 83.5% turnaround!!!!

I know that its only some meaningless blitz games, and that I must look like Im just promoting my club through a very thin disguise, but I really was impressed with one of the games in particular where he completely outplayed me in a totally equal rook endgame......

It does seem to be some food for thought.... An 83.5% turnaround is big by any standards, and I dont lose too many totally equal rook endings (though I dont play much chess - particularly with strong players).....

I also remember talking to David Flude at the 1997-1998 Australian Champs at the Melbourne Town Hall - he told me that in preparation for that event, he left the openings alone and just studied endgames - he ended up having a great tournament, beating many higher rated players....

My conclusion is that if you want an 83.5% turnaround, come down to the MCC on Wednesday evenings.... Even if your endgames dont improve by 83.5%, they definitely wont get worse....

Spiny Norman
19-10-2009, 04:23 AM
I wish I could come down to MCC for these sessions ... I l-o-v-e endgame study ... MCC are to be congratulated for supporting such an excellent and practical study group.

Carl Gorka
19-10-2009, 10:25 AM
This endgame group is becoming a real success, and the players who regularly participate are all rapidly improving. I will use Domagoi as an example:

Approx 4? months ago, I played some blitz with Domagoi and beat him 2.5-.5, however last Wednesday night before the endgame group, he cleaned me up 4-0.... He has gone from 16.5% to 100% - thats an 83.5% turnaround!!!!

I know that its only some meaningless blitz games, and that I must look like Im just promoting my club through a very thin disguise, but I really was impressed with one of the games in particular where he completely outplayed me in a totally equal rook endgame......

It does seem to be some food for thought.... An 83.5% turnaround is big by any standards, and I dont lose too many totally equal rook endings (though I dont play much chess - particularly with strong players).....

I also remember talking to David Flude at the 1997-1998 Australian Champs at the Melbourne Town Hall - he told me that in preparation for that event, he left the openings alone and just studied endgames - he ended up having a great tournament, beating many higher rated players....

My conclusion is that if you want an 83.5% turnaround, come down to the MCC on Wednesday evenings.... Even if your endgames dont improve by 83.5%, they definitely wont get worse....

Thanks for the plug Grant.:D Domagoj isn't the only one that seems to be getting good results from these endgame sessions, but it just goes to show that players of all strengths, from beginners to 2200+ players will improve their results from dedicated, regular endgame study and practice.

And studying endgames is good for a number of different aspects of the game, planning, calculation, developing technique etc.

This week we will be going back to an endgame that we've looked at before, though early on so some of the newer members might not have seen it. RvN without pawns:)

that Caesar guy
19-10-2009, 04:47 PM
Thanks for the plug Grant.:D Domagoj isn't the only one that seems to be getting good results from these endgame sessions, but it just goes to show that players of all strengths, from beginners to 2200+ players will improve their results from dedicated, regular endgame study and practice.

And studying endgames is good for a number of different aspects of the game, planning, calculation, developing technique etc.

This week we will be going back to an endgame that we've looked at before, though early on so some of the newer members might not have seen it. RvN without pawns:)
Definately: I managed to hold a difficult ending on Saturday against Wang Sheng Lee, in a very unusual ending (i had queen vs rook bishop and 2 connected.)

J.M.

MichaelBaron
19-10-2009, 06:34 PM
If I do not have to work this wednesday, I will try to come

Carl Gorka
28-10-2009, 09:40 PM
Once again, it was good to see a small but very interested group attending tonight. I'm sure no one will now assume that opposite coloured bishop endings are always drawn, while the rook may be a different matter, and actively placed behind a pawn can be a great defensive piece.

As for queen and knight versus queen, with or without a pawn, it was fun, but I'm not sure I'm any clearer on the main themes. I suppose just play on and hope that your opponent walks into a mating net.

And don't forget the Nalimov Tablebase, it is a great tool......

:)

Carl Gorka
05-11-2009, 10:27 AM
Another good night of ending study last night saw new and old faces trying to work out whether David Hacche could have beaten Bobby Cheng from a position with very limited material. I must admit at the time I thought it a win for David, no problems, but further analysis has shown that White needs to be accurate as there are quite a few drawing possibilities.

Some rook endgames were then looked at and we finally played some games from a position with R+4 v R+3 on one side of the board, but the 3 didn't have the best defensive structure.

All very interesting:)

The Hacche-Cheng position was (I'm not sure how to load fens here or I would post the position):

w: Ke3, Bd1, Nh5, Pa4, g3, g6
b: Kf8, Be5, Ng7, Pa6

Carl Gorka
12-11-2009, 09:39 AM
Last night we had a more detailed look at rook endgames where there is 4v3 on the kingside. Although these endings tend to be drawish, there are great winning chances as well, shown by the games Capablanca-Yates Hastings 1930, and Gligoric-Euwe Zurich 1953.

ER
16-11-2009, 08:34 PM
Hi Fireeater
I just got hold of a rather old Chess Endings book, by Eugene Znosko-Borovsky called How To Play Chess Endings A Dover Edition. May I have your (and/or other experts) opinion of this book please.
Also, I don't know if you have already done it in this thread, but is it possible to provide a list of useful endgame books in order of difficulty, ie from beginner to strong player?
Thanks in advance!

morebeer
17-11-2009, 07:53 AM
Hi Fireeater
I just got hold of a rather old Chess Endings book, by Eugene Znosko-Borovsky called How To Play Chess Endings A Dover Edition. May I have your (and/or other experts) opinion of this book please.
Also, I don't know if you have already done it in this thread, but is it possible to provide a list of useful endgame books in order of difficulty, ie from beginner to strong player?
Thanks in advance!

JAK, I found the Jeremy Silman book "Silman's Complete Endgame Course: From Beginner To Master" very useful.

Book details and Amazon customer reviews here:

http://www.amazon.com/Silmans-Complete-Endgame-Course-Beginner/dp/1890085103/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1258408016&sr=1-1

Paul Cavezza
17-11-2009, 08:30 AM
Best I've read (started with) is fundamental chess endings/secrets of pawn endings by Lamprecht and Mueller.

For someone who is a visual learner/visual memory the way he explains things was far far far more useful for me than Silman's was. I understood what Silman was on about at the time but I couldn't vary the knowledge from position to position and I forgot some of it- the other one has actually drilled some key concepts into my brain.

they both go from beginner to master.

ps. I especially liked in L & M the "key/critical squares" explanation. In Silman the explanations are very textual: "If your pawn is on the sixth rank or the king can't move backwards" and la la la you've won. L & M will highlight the 3/6 "winning squares" in various endgame positions with visual markers and for me it helped to understand really why the end games were winning and also helped take away a lot of nerves when playing endings.

ER
17-11-2009, 09:51 AM
Thank you both Morebeer


JAK, I found the Jeremy Silman book "Silman's Complete Endgame Course: From Beginner To Master" very useful.

and Pablito


For someone who is a visual learner/visual memory the way he explains things was far far far more useful for me than Silman's was. I understood what Silman was on about at the time but I couldn't vary the knowledge from position to position and I forgot some of it- the other one has actually drilled some key concepts into my brain.

they both go from beginner to master.

and Michael!


For advanced players (1700 + or rapidly improving juniors) I would strongly recommend Dvoretsky's and Shereshevsky's endgame books. For lower level players - Nunn's of Averbakh's

MichaelBaron
17-11-2009, 10:48 AM
For advanced players (1700 + or rapidly improving juniors) I would strongly recommend Dvoretsky's and Shereshevsky's endgame books. For lower level players - Nunn's of Averbakh's

Carl Gorka
17-11-2009, 07:26 PM
Hi Fireeater
I just got hold of a rather old Chess Endings book, by Eugene Znosko-Borovsky called How To Play Chess Endings A Dover Edition. May I have your (and/or other experts) opinion of this book please.
Also, I don't know if you have already done it in this thread, but is it possible to provide a list of useful endgame books in order of difficulty, ie from beginner to strong player?
Thanks in advance!

This is just my opinion, but I think most endgame books are pretty boring, more like textbooks. They are great to refer to, like Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual, or Fundamental Chess Endings by Mueller and Lamprecht, but I find these books difficult to learn from.

I first used Keres "Practical Chess Endings", which is a great book, but written in a pretty dry style, and I found myself unable to get into it deeply.

The first book to grab my attention on the endgame was Chernev's "Capablanca's Best Chess Endgames". This book is written from a more practical view, not going so deeply into specific endgames themselves, but almost whetting the appetite. After going through this book, I was able to go back to Keres and get into some of the heavier analysis of some endgames that Chernev had just touched upon.

So I looked for more "practical" type endgame books which could get me more into the endgame, which then could be followed up from the textbooks. Books by Edmar Mednis I found extremely useful, though some people think they're a bit basic. And I have recently bought "Anatoly Karpov Endgame Virtuoso" by Karolyi, which is very deep and quite advanced but very instructive.

I have never had Shereshevsky's endgame books, but believe they are excellent, and another light tome which I've never owned but looked at deeply is "Smyslov: Endgame Virtuoso".

I suppose at the end of the day, the usefulness of an endgame book will depend on the user, but I have preferred the practical volumes. I also look at actual games and try to analyse some endgames myself, and studies are also great as an educational tool. Check out Mueller's endgame articles on chesscafe.com as well:)

ER
17-11-2009, 11:51 PM
This is just my opinion, but I think most endgame books are pretty boring, more like textbooks. They are great to refer to, like Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual, or Fundamental Chess Endings by Mueller and Lamprecht, but I find these books difficult to learn from.

I first used Keres "Practical Chess Endings", which is a great book, but written in a pretty dry style, and I found myself unable to get into it deeply.

The first book to grab my attention on the endgame was Chernev's "Capablanca's Best Chess Endgames". This book is written from a more practical view, not going so deeply into specific endgames themselves, but almost whetting the appetite. After going through this book, I was able to go back to Keres and get into some of the heavier analysis of some endgames that Chernev had just touched upon.

So I looked for more "practical" type endgame books which could get me more into the endgame, which then could be followed up from the textbooks. Books by Edmar Mednis I found extremely useful, though some people think they're a bit basic. And I have recently bought "Anatoly Karpov Endgame Virtuoso" by Karolyi, which is very deep and quite advanced but very instructive.

I have never had Shereshevsky's endgame books, but believe they are excellent, and another light tome which I've never owned but looked at deeply is "Smyslov: Endgame Virtuoso".

I suppose at the end of the day, the usefulness of an endgame book will depend on the user, but I have preferred the practical volumes. I also look at actual games and try to analyse some endgames myself, and studies are also great as an educational tool. Check out Mueller's endgame articles on chesscafe.com as well:)

An exclellent response Carl and thanks for your time in providing such a thorough and clear set of advice for myself and other players who undoubtly will benefit from it!

MichaelBaron
19-11-2009, 08:17 AM
Big thank you to Carl for the endgame group:clap: Yesterday session was really instructive with Kramnik-Ponomarev ending being particular facinating to analyse.

Carl Gorka
19-11-2009, 09:57 AM
Yes, there was a big group for the endgame gruop last night where we looked basically at rook endings, and especially from the recently concluded Tal Memorial.

The Kramnik-Ponamariov with rook and rook's pawn versus bishop and rook's pawn is a great example of creating a zugzwang. Funnily enough, when you see the final position it is patently obvious, but trying to find the zugzwang beforehand is a bit nightmarish.:)

Carl Gorka
25-11-2009, 09:34 PM
Tonight was a smaller group probably due to exams taking a lot of our juniors away. But it was good to see Bill Jordan here again:)

We looked at pawn endgames from the recent chess cafe article by Karsten Mueller http://www.chesscafe.com/mueller/mueller.htm and Bill threw in some other interesting related positions from his vast knowledge:)

Carl Gorka
03-12-2009, 09:07 AM
Once again a smaller group tonight, but it meant that a lot of examples were looked at. The main theme of the night was rook versus pawns after I'd seen the following endgame played in TWIC.

Event: Arco Open A
Site: Arco ITA
Date: 2009.10.24
Round: 8
White: Karl, H.
Black: Ricci, Alf
Result: 1/2-1/2
ECO: B26
WhiteElo: 2229
BlackElo: 1993
PlyCount: 168
EventDate: 2009.10.17
EventRounds: 9
EventCountry: ITA
Source: Mark Crowther
SourceDate: 2009.11.30

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 e6 3. d3 Nc6 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. Be3 d6 7. f4 Nge7 8. Bf2
Rb8 9. a4 O-O 10. Nge2 a6 11. O-O b5 12. axb5 axb5 13. e5 dxe5 14. Bxc5 exf4
15. Nxf4 b4 16. Na4 e5 17. Ne2 Be6 18. c3 Re8 19. c4 Qc7 20. Qc2 Red8 21. Rad1
Nf5 22. g4 Nh4 23. h3 Nxg2 24. Kxg2 b3 25. Qd2 Bxc4 26. Qe3 Be6 27. Bb6 Qb7 28.
Bxd8 Rxd8 29. Nc5 Bd5+ 30. Ne4 Ne7 31. Kg1 f5 32. N4c3 Bc6 33. Ra1 f4 34. Qa7
Qxa7+ 35. Rxa7 Bf8 36. Rd1 Nf5 37. Rc7 Ne7 38. Kh2 Ba8 39. Ra1 Bf3 40. Raa7 Re8
41. Ng1 Ba8 42. Ne4 Bxe4 43. dxe4 Nc8 44. Ra8 Nd6 45. Rxe8 Nxe8 46. Rb7 Nf6 47.
Nf3 Nxe4 48. Nxe5 Nc5 49. Rb5 Kg7 50. Kg2 g5 51. Kf3 Bd6 52. Nc4 Be7 53. Nd2
Ne6 54. Nxb3 Bf6 55. Rb7+ Kg6 56. Nd2 Bd4 57. b4 Be3 58. Nb3 Nd8 59. Rd7 Nf7
60. Ke4 Kf6 61. Nd4 Bxd4 62. Rxd4 Ke6 63. Rd3 Nd6+ 64. Kd4 Nb5+ 65. Kc5 Nc7 66.
b5 Nxb5 67. Kxb5 Ke5 {I found it hard to believe that a 2200 strength player
could not win this endgame} 68. Rd7 h6 69. Kc4 Ke4 70. Re7+ Kf3 71. Kd3 Kg2 72.
Re1 Kxh3 73. Rh1+ Kxg4 74. Rxh6 Kf3 75. Kd2 g4 76. Ke1 Kg2 77. Rb6 f3 78. Rb2+
Kg3 79. Kf1 Kf4 80. Ra2 g3 81. Ra3 Kg4 82. Kg1 Kf4 83. Rc3 Ke4 84. Kf1 Kf4 {
Even now it a win for White, check out any textbook if you don't know the
technique} 1/2-1/2

MichaelBaron
03-12-2009, 09:36 AM
H. Karl is nearly 80 years old (he was 2400 rated player at his best) may be he fell asleep at the board or was worried he will miss his potty time if he plays on

Igor_Goldenberg
03-12-2009, 02:14 PM
Solution in white
Rook goes to 8th rank, on f8 or g8 and black is zugzwanged into giving up a pawn or pushing it ahead
I once had rook vs 3 pawns endgame against I.Rogers

Carl Gorka
03-12-2009, 06:14 PM
I once had rook vs 3 pawns endgame against I.Rogers

I remember Vlad Smirnov analysing a rook versus 3 pawns ending....maybe a game of Bobby Cheng's? Really interesting stuff, and at the time I knew little about it.

Carl Gorka
14-12-2009, 09:59 AM
Last Wednesday the Endgame Group met and discussed a couple of endings played by our members in the Australasian Masters.

There was the interesting knight ending between Cheng and Morris, and Domagoj's draw with GM Johansen.

Carl Gorka
16-12-2009, 09:23 PM
Tonight we looked at some endgames with queen and knight v queen and bishop. My game with Frank Lekkas from last night could have resulted in this ending, and coincidentally, the Short-Carlsen ending from the London Classic did as well.

A classic example whih shows the queen and knight working together to attack an undefended king is the game Miles-Korchnoi Buenos Aires 1979.

Carl Gorka
16-12-2009, 09:27 PM
This will be the last endgame group that I will be attending this year. Anyone is welcome to come along to the MCC to play some games or talk about endgames or anything else to do with chess:)

But I won't be around until the end of January so I wish anyone who has turned up at the endgame group a merry Christmas and a great new year, and thanks for making Wednesday's at the MCC a stimulating and engaging night:clap:

Carl Gorka
09-03-2010, 09:32 PM
The endgame group has been running strong already in 2010.

Tomorrow I'll take a look at a few endgames from Ballarat.

Everyone is welcome, it is free to MCC members, and if you're not a member of the MCC, then you can pay $20 for a full year of Wednesday nights, or $5 visitors fee for the night.

Thanks, Carl:)

Carl Gorka
09-03-2010, 09:44 PM
And a big thankyou to the endgame group for keeping things going while I sat through a committee meeting last Wednesday, especially Michael Baron, who I believe led the group.

Carl Gorka
08-09-2010, 11:59 PM
The Endgame Group looked at Shirov's fantastic win in the Shanghai Masters against Wang Yue. Bill Jordan will be running the group for the next 3 weeks while I'm in England.

http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2010/09/mcc-endgame-group-892010.html

Carl Gorka
17-10-2010, 10:47 PM
MCC Endgame Group will be on this Wednesday from 7.30pm, but will be moving to fortnightly for the rest of the year to accomodate a new openings group:)

Carl Gorka
21-10-2010, 07:25 PM
Decent turn out last night, good to see newbies Laurie Dalton and Sylvester Urban there :)

We looked at a number of recent fairly simple rook endgames (:eek: ) just to get back in the mood.

Check it out here (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2010/10/mcc-endgame-group.html).

McTaggart
22-10-2010, 03:31 PM
Solution in white
Rook goes to 8th rank, on f8 or g8 and black is zugzwanged into giving up a pawn or pushing it ahead
I once had rook vs 3 pawns endgame against I.Rogers




Did you win? and if so, how?
regards,
McTaggart.

McTaggart
22-10-2010, 03:32 PM
Did you win? and if so, how?
regards,
McTaggart.


Cancel that question,just saw the solution.
Thanks,
McTaggart

Igor_Goldenberg
27-10-2010, 12:47 PM
Did you win? and if so, how?
regards,
McTaggart.
You were present at the game and reassuring my wife that I was winning!

Carl Gorka
17-11-2010, 10:19 AM
The endgame is all about promoting pawns: discuss....

....like we will be tonight at the MCC Endgame Group :)

Garrett
17-11-2010, 10:41 AM
The endgame is all about promoting pawns: discuss....

....like we will be tonight at the MCC Endgame Group :)

Good question !

I'd say a major theme but not the only thing.

A lot of the basic positions/ ideas I can think of right at the moment (Lucena, Philidor, Vancura, Ponziana, Del Rio, Steinitz princlie, Bahr rule, square, king on short side, floating square, interference, shouldering) are to do with promoting or stopping the promotion of a pawn...

have a good discussion while I am stuck in Brisbane.

cheers
Garrett.

Carl Gorka
22-12-2010, 10:22 PM
Tonight we had the last session of the Endgame Group for 2010.

The subject was rook and rook's pawn versus rook and hopefully everybody learned something from this, especially not to give when there is still some play in the position. For anyone who needs inspiration, check out Stephen Solomon's games in the 2010 Australasian Masters.

The Endgame Group, and study groups at the MCC on Wednesday's are on summer shut down, so a big thankyou to everyone who attended and helped to make these evenings a success, have a great Christmas and I'll see you all in February 2011. :)

Paul Cavezza
24-12-2010, 10:20 PM
Good work Carl- I'm sure it'll get even better next year as some of us stragglers gain more knowledge.

For anyone interested (Carl incuded!) Frank and I will probably keep going on Wednesday nights in January to look through some Sicilians, and maybe some slightly more simple (~1800) end game stuff too. Anyway- i'll post here to let people know if we'll be there on the first Weds in January.

Carl Gorka
26-12-2010, 08:45 PM
Thanks guys, it's good to know there'll be some presence in the club. And the study groups were always intended to be the joint work of a number of MCC members. I was in fact hoping to learn to play endings better from all you guys;)

Anyway, I've posted about the last session on my blog (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/).

Carl Gorka
29-01-2011, 07:28 PM
The MCC Endgame Group will be resuming its Wednesday evening sessions this week, Wednesday 2nd February at 7.45pm until about 9.30pm.

The group is free to MCC members, or $5 to visitors (that is the visitor fee for the MCC anyway;) )

Carl Gorka
02-02-2011, 10:19 PM
MCC Endgame Group met tonight and a lively discussion (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/) was had.

Next week the endgame group will meet again, and from then it will be fortnightly with openings group meeting the weeks in between.

Feel free to come along and improve a part of the game that all players struggle with.

Carl Gorka
09-02-2011, 08:21 AM
MCC Endgame Group meets tonight to discuss an interesting pawnless endgame, and some interesting pieceless endgames :)

Group meets at 7.45pm at MCC

Carl Gorka
09-02-2011, 09:49 PM
Thanks mainly to the attendance of Ascaro Pecori, there were very active discussions at the endgame group tonight. :D We were calculating pawn endgames without moving pieces which is an excellent exercise for improving the skill of looking ahead. Sometimes calculations were 15 moves deep.

Besides Ascaro, Jesse Jager was a welcome addition to the group along with the regulars such as Frank Lekkas, Elizabeth Warren, Tony Tosevski and Elie Beranjia.

You can check out what we looked at tonight here (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/), while the next meeting of the Endgame Group will be in 2 weeks on February 23rd at 7.45pm.

Carl Gorka
22-02-2011, 09:01 PM
At the recent Wijk aan Zee event, Magnus Carlsen won an endgame (or more to the point, his opponent lost) a pawnless endgame with rook and knight v rook. The position is a theoretical draw, although there are great practical chances if the defending king is near a corner.

Could you confidently defend this endgame? If so, come and share your technique with the MCC Endgame Group tomorrow night. And if you have little, or no idea about this ending, come along to find out some things.

MCC Endgame Group meets Wednesday 23rd February (tomorrow) at 7.45pm. It is free to all MCC members, and $5 for visitors :)

Carl Gorka
23-02-2011, 09:41 PM
Well that was one of the most enjoyable MCC Endgame group sessions I've been to. :)

We looked at some positions with rook and knight versus rook with no pawns. Check some of these out here (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2011/02/mcc-endgame-group-23211.html).

The MCC Endgame Group meets every 2 weeks so the next meeting will be on Wednesday 9th March at 7.45pm. :)

Carl Gorka
09-03-2011, 09:19 AM
Tonight the subject of the MCC Endgame Group will be Zugzwang.

Group starts at 7.45pm at the Melbourne Chess Club, free to members, and just $5 to non members :)

MichaelBaron
09-03-2011, 01:28 PM
Tonight the subject of the MCC Endgame Group will be Zugzwang.

Group starts at 7.45pm at the Melbourne Chess Club, free to members, and just $5 to non members :)

Sounds very interesting (as always!) If i am done with work I will come for sure!

antichrist
09-03-2011, 02:51 PM
Sounds very interesting (as always!) If i am done with work I will come for sure!

Zugzwang - with that title you would want to be there before smoko, it should be over in 5 minutes

Carl Gorka
10-03-2011, 06:56 PM
Thanks to everyone who turned up last night, and especially to Kerry Stead for bringing in some of his own games with zugzwang examples.

And congratulations to Frank Lekkas for winning $50 for the best played endgame by an MCC member in an MCC tournament in 2010 for his win against Victor Kildisas.

You can check out some zugzwang (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2011/03/mcc-endgame-group-9311-zugzwang.html) issues on my blog.

Carl Gorka
22-03-2011, 09:35 PM
The MCC Endgame Group will be meeting tomorrow, Wednesday 23rd March at 7.45pm. Unfortunately, I won't be able to attend because of a work commitment, but the group is being led by FM Bill Jordan tomorrow night:clap:

The endgame group is free to all MCC members, and costs $5 to visitors:)

FM_Bill
22-03-2011, 11:03 PM
I'll do my best to make it interesting.

Carl Gorka
07-04-2011, 10:07 PM
The most important part of any club is its members, so we had a look (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2011/04/mcc-endgame-group-6411.html)at some endgames played by MCC members.

John Beckman offered a very interesting endgame that he played against Victor Kildisas at Ballarat, and we also took a look at some endgames that have occurred in the early rounds of the club championship.

Carl Gorka
19-04-2011, 08:57 PM
Tomorrow, Wednesday 20th April the MCC Endgame Group will meet at 7.45pm, free to MCC members, and just $5 visitor's fee to non members.

The subject matter for the night will be how pieces cope with pawns, with special emphasis on rook v pawns:)

Carl Gorka
25-04-2011, 11:43 AM
I have been lax over Easter, but the discussion about the Endgame group from last Wednesday is now posted (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2011/04/mcc-endgame-group-2042011.html).

Carl Gorka
04-05-2011, 11:07 AM
Tonight at the MCC Endgame Group, the emphasis will be on practical endgame analysis. I will be using some positions that have been heavily analysed already from Karolyi and Aplin's book "Endgame Virtuoso Anatoly Karpov".

The group meets at 7.45pm at the Melbourne Chess Club and is free to MCC members and just $5 to non members.

Carl Gorka
01-06-2011, 11:29 PM
A good night of analysis of endgames from the MCC Open, with the star of the show, the game between James Morris and David Beaumont which started with an opposite coloured bishop ending but where neither side felt like drawing:clap:

Thanks to all who attended and especially to David himself for offering his own analysis of the endgame :)

Carl Gorka
14-06-2011, 10:34 PM
The Endgame Group will meet tomorrow night (Wednesday 15th June) at 7.45pm where I have a couple of minor piece endings to look at.

The group is free to all MCC members and just $5 to non members :)

Carl Gorka
15-06-2011, 09:57 PM
For the first time I can remember, there was a no show for the Endgame group.....actually, I'm doing Bill Jordan an injustice as he turned up, though a bit late.

But there are always positives:

1. I have a ready made subject for the next session in 2 weeks time :D

2. I spent some time with the regular MCC kibitzers, and now have the subject of next week's Opening's group :D

Carl Gorka
29-06-2011, 11:27 AM
The MCC Endgame Group will meet tonight at 7.45pm.

All are welcome. Free to MCC members and just $5 to visitors :)

Carl Gorka
20-07-2011, 12:41 PM
The MCC Endgame Group will meet tonight at 7.45pm.

All are welcome. Free to MCC members and just $5 to visitors :)

Carl Gorka
20-07-2011, 11:44 PM
A tough subject and interesting discussion (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2011/07/mcc-endgame-group-2072011.html).

Carl Gorka
03-08-2011, 10:47 AM
The board 1 game in the Malitis Memorial on Monday night became the main kibitzing point in the club for a while. The Endgame Group will look at this endgame and some theoretical endgames that could possibly have arisen.

Group meets at the Melbourne Chess Club at 7.45pm, free to members, and $5 visitors fee to non-members.

Carl Gorka
17-08-2011, 10:42 AM
Tonight we will be looking at the ever common topic of rook endings.

The group meets at 7.45pm at the MCC, free to all MCC members, and $5 visitor's fee to non-members. :)

Adamski
17-08-2011, 09:38 PM
I have just realised that (it seems) whatever Wed one is in Melbourne one can go to an MCC study group. Endings and openings on alternate weeks. Is that correct?

Carl Gorka
17-08-2011, 10:30 PM
I have just realised that (it seems) whatever Wed one is in Melbourne one can go to an MCC study group. Endings and openings on alternate weeks. Is that correct?

Yep, they alternate. Next week will be openings, and they alternate weekly.

Tonight there were only a few of us in the club and we looked at frank Lekkas endgame against Roger Beattie from last night in the Victorian reserves, as well as some other rook endgames.:)

Carl Gorka
17-08-2011, 11:01 PM
Our discussion tonight (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2011/08/mcc-endgame-group-17082011.html)

Carl Gorka
27-09-2011, 09:32 PM
The Melbourne Chess Club Endgame Group will meet again tomorrow night at 7.45pm. Free to all MCC members, and $5 visitor's fee to non members.

Carl Gorka
28-09-2011, 10:39 PM
Thanks to all who turned up in the middle of a storm tonight :D

Hopefully, the ideas were stimulating (http://gorkachc.blogspot.com/2011/09/mcc-endgame-group-28092011.html).:)

Lekko
24-12-2011, 03:58 AM
Any news on the endgame prize? I could really use that prize money :D

(I think I entered 2 games, Lekkas - Hose 1-0 and Ly-Lekkas 0-1)

MichaelBaron
24-12-2011, 10:29 AM
Any news on the endgame prize? I could really use that prize money :D

(I think I entered 2 games, Lekkas - Hose 1-0 and Ly-Lekkas 0-1)
where to enter the games? ;)

Lekko
24-12-2011, 11:02 AM
where to enter the games? ;)
Send them to Carl,they have to be played in 2011 at an MCC event