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Rincewind
21-05-2017, 01:39 PM
Stephen Hawkins finally ratifies what I've been saying for years https://youtu.be/t7F2dueX58w

Unlikely to be able to get everyone off the planet but we could colonise other planets/moons which could be useful.

Capablanca-Fan
17-06-2017, 02:29 PM
10+ Of The Oldest Color Photos Showing What The World Looked Like 100 Years Ago (http://www.boredpanda.com/first-color-photos-vintage-old-autochrome-lumiere-auguste-louis)

Another source is Russia: Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky took hundreds of colour photographs around pre-Communist Russia over a century ago (http://twistedsifter.com/2015/04/rare-color-photos-of-the-russian-empire-from-100-years-ago/).

Capablanca-Fan
08-07-2017, 07:07 AM
New studies of ancient concrete could teach us to do as the Romans did (https://phys.org/news/2017-07-ancient-concrete-romans.html)
phys.org, 3 July 2017

Around A.D. 79, Roman author Pliny the Elder wrote in his Naturalis Historia that concrete structures in harbors, exposed to the constant assault of the saltwater waves, become "a single stone mass, impregnable to the waves and every day stronger."

He wasn't exaggerating. While modern marine concrete structures crumble within decades, 2,000-year-old Roman piers and breakwaters endure to this day, and are stronger now than when they were first constructed. University of Utah geologist Marie Jackson studies the minerals and microscale structures of Roman concrete as she would a volcanic rock. She and her colleagues have found that seawater filtering through the concrete leads to the growth of interlocking minerals that lend the concrete added cohesion. The results are published today in American Mineralogist [Phillipsite and Al-tobermorite mineral cements produced through low-temperature water-rock reactions in Roman marine concrete (http://ammin.geoscienceworld.org/content/102/7/1435), which even used my favorite technique of Raman spectroscopy].

Roman concrete vs. Portland cement

Romans made concrete by mixing volcanic ash with lime and seawater to make a mortar, and then incorporating into that mortar chunks of volcanic rock, the "aggregate" in the concrete. The combination of ash, water, and quicklime produces what is called a pozzolanic reaction, named after the city of Pozzuoli in the Bay of Naples. The Romans may have gotten the idea for this mixture from naturally cemented volcanic ash deposits called tuff that are common in the area, as Pliny described.

Modern Portland cement concrete also uses rock aggregate, but with an important difference: the sand and gravel particles are intended to be inert. Any reaction with the cement paste could form gels that expand and crack the concrete. "This alkali-silica reaction occurs throughout the world and it's one of the main causes of destruction of Portland cement concrete structures," Jackson says.

The team concluded that when seawater percolated through the concrete in breakwaters and in piers, it dissolved components of the volcanic ash and allowed new minerals to grow from the highly alkaline leached fluids, particularly Al-tobermorite and phillipsite. This Al-tobermorite has silica-rich compositions, similar to crystals that form in volcanic rocks. The crystals have platy shapes that reinforce the cementing matrix. The interlocking plates increase the concrete's resistance to brittle fracture.

Rincewind
08-07-2017, 08:24 AM
Deeply divergent archaic mitochondrial genome provides lower time boundary for African gene flow into Neanderthals (https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms16046)


Ancient DNA is revealing new insights into the genetic relationship between Pleistocene hominins and modern humans. Nuclear DNA indicated Neanderthals as a sister group of Denisovans after diverging from modern humans. However, the closer affinity of the Neanderthal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to modern humans than Denisovans has recently been suggested as the result of gene flow from an African source into Neanderthals before 100,000 years ago. Here we report the complete mtDNA of an archaic femur from the Hohlenstein–Stadel (HST) cave in southwestern Germany. HST carries the deepest divergent mtDNA lineage that splits from other Neanderthals ∼270,000 years ago, providing a lower boundary for the time of the putative mtDNA introgression event. We demonstrate that a complete Neanderthal mtDNA replacement is feasible over this time interval even with minimal hominin introgression. The highly divergent HST branch is indicative of greater mtDNA diversity during the Middle Pleistocene than in later periods.

Capablanca-Fan
31-08-2017, 08:04 AM
On the trail of dragons with blood that can save people’s lives (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23531382-300-on-the-trail-of-dragons-with-blood-that-can-save-peoples-lives/)
New Scientist, 9 August 2017

The dragon watches me with cold, dark eyes, tasting the air with a hissing yellow tongue that conceals rows of needle-sharp teeth and bacteria-strewn saliva. It’s hard to imagine these lizards as anything but a significant threat to human life – and they do occasionally kill people.

Yet in a strange twist, dragon blood is now emerging as a valuable resource that may be one of our best hopes for curing diseases we can’t seem to beat.

Komodos generally eat carrion, which may be tainted with disease, but they rarely succumb to illness. Investigations showed that this is because the lizards’ blood is loaded with antimicrobial peptides, or AMPs – an all-purpose immune defence.

The hope is that those AMPs could be used as antibiotics to beat the growing number of resistant bacteria threatening hundreds of thousands of human lives around the world.

A world away from Komodo, Barney Bishop at Virginia’s George Mason University and his colleagues have spent the past five years studying dragon blood—along with blood extracted from alligators and other reptiles. He’s confident that his research could lead to a new generation of powerful antibiotics. So far, the researchers have identified nearly 50 AMPs with drug potential.

Ian Murray
30-10-2017, 09:25 PM
Oldest recorded solar eclipse helps date the Egyptian pharaohs (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171029220104.htm)
Science Daily
29.10.17

Researchers have pinpointed the date of what could be the oldest solar eclipse yet recorded. The event, which occurred on 30 October 1207 BC, is mentioned in the Bible, and could have consequences for the chronology of the ancient world.

Using a combination of the biblical text and an ancient Egyptian text, the researchers were then able to refine the dates of the Egyptian pharaohs, in particular the dates of the reign of Ramesses the Great. The results are published in the Royal Astronomical Society journal Astronomy & Geophysics....

Rincewind
31-10-2017, 01:06 PM
Sounds interesting if accepted by historians. The dating is certainly not outlandish and within a few years of the most commonly quoted dates for the reign of Ramesses.

Capablanca-Fan
22-06-2019, 12:05 AM
Another hybrid between different genera: Belugas, or white whales (Delphinapterus leucas); and narwhals (Monodon monoceros).

DNA confirms a weird Greenland whale was a narwhal-beluga hybrid (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/dna-confirms-greenland-whale-narwhal-beluga-hybrid)
Genetic analysis of the animal’s skull shows it had a narwhal mom and beluga dad
BY TINA HESMAN SAEY, Science News, 20 June 2019


Still, the pairing is unusual, even shocking, to some researchers who have studied the species for years with hardly an inkling of such intermingling. The beluga and narwhal branches of the whale family tree split off about 5 million years ago — about the same time human and chimpanzee ancestors went their separate ways. Lorenzen’s team also detected no evidence of hybridization within the last 1.5 million years in the DNA of other belugas and narwhals So when the team presented the findings at a conference of beluga researchers held in Mystic, Conn., in March, “you could hear a pin drop when we said it was a first-generation hybrid,” Lorenzen says. “They were so surprised.”

Kevin Bonham
22-06-2019, 12:15 PM
^^^
Interesting.

Also here's a rebuttal of the current wave of media reporting about mobile phones causing people to grow horns in their heads:

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/06/debunked-the-absurd-story-about-smartphones-causing-kids-to-sprout-horns/

antichrist
22-06-2019, 12:54 PM
Recently when Donald Trump was justifying USA's response to Iran downing one of their drones he stated that the position of the drone in international air space was based on real science not just on what people said - but he will not accept real science concerning climate change. And even this week in Oregon the Republicans all deserted the state government rather than fulfil a quorum (needing two Republicans) in a Democratically-controlled government so that climate change prevention legislation could be passed. So now the Demo government has ordered the sheriffs to bring the Republicans, in handcuffs if necessary, to fulfil the quorum. It would be shocking if the Republicans had to hear a lecture on real science in the state chamber. It would be like having to bake a gay wedding cake.

antichrist
22-06-2019, 12:56 PM
^^^
Interesting.

Also here's a rebuttal of the current wave of media reporting about mobile phones causing people to grow horns in their heads:

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/06/debunked-the-absurd-story-about-smartphones-causing-kids-to-sprout-horns/

I heard yesterday, maybe on RN, that the greatest radiation is being emitted from AM radio stations??? so that is where you get it...

Ian Murray
15-09-2019, 09:58 AM
Water Discovered in the Atmosphere of an Exoplanet in the Habitable zone. It Might Be Rain (https://www.universetoday.com/143372/water-discovered-in-the-atmosphere-of-an-exoplanet-in-the-habitable-zone-it-might-be-rain/)

Astronomers using the Hubble space telescope have discovered water in the atmosphere of an exoplanet in its star’s habitable zone. If confirmed, it will be the first time we’ve detected water—a critical ingredient for life as we know it—on an exoplanet. The water was detected as vapour in the atmosphere, but the temperature of the planet means it could sustain liquid water on its surface, if it’s rocky.

The planet is called K2-18b, and it’s about 110 light years away. The planet is much different than Earth. It’s a Super-Earth, and it’s twice as large as Earth, and about 8 times as massive. K2-18b is orbiting a red dwarf star, and it was first discovered in 2015 by the Kepler Space Telescope. ...

antichrist
15-09-2019, 12:42 PM
Just as chess can be described as a brilliant waste of time space travel/exploration can be described as a brilliant waste of money.

Patrick Byrom
15-09-2019, 06:20 PM
Just as chess can be described as a brilliant waste of time space travel/exploration can be described as a brilliant waste of money.Speaking of wasting money (https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/politics/federal/nationals-back-welfare-system-increase-20190914-p52rbf.html?ref=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_source=rss_feed) - without the brilliance: "Other successful motions included support for a national watchdog to verify scientific papers that are used in government policy making. Queensland MP George Christensen, who sponsored the motion, said he was concerned by researchers pushing "left wing causes"."

Obviously this is not going to go anywhere, but the idea is just idiotic. Firstly, there is already a check on scientific papers - it's called peer review. Secondly, how exactly would papers be 'verified'? And who would do the 'verification'?

Ian Murray
15-09-2019, 10:16 PM
Just as chess can be described as a brilliant waste of time space travel/exploration can be described as a brilliant waste of money.

It's human nature, to go wherever man has never gone before

As Jodi Foster says in Contact, if there's nothing out there, it seems like an awful waste of space

antichrist
16-09-2019, 05:37 AM
It's human nature, to go wherever man has never gone before

As Jodi Foster says in Contact, if there's nothing out there, it seems like an awful waste of space

In earlier times man was driven by survival needs to explore but what possible use could water be a million miles away? We know that only a fraction of the expenditure on armaments and defence could "solve" the world's problems. Space expenditure fits into the same category. Of course there are side benefits but they are only minimal in comparison to the money spent. North Korean people are starving whilst their leaders cheer rockets and bombs - how sickening! That is WW2 mentality not Bertrand Russell post war enlightenment reaction.

Ian Murray
16-09-2019, 08:19 AM
In earlier times man was driven by survival needs to explore but what possible use could water be a million miles away? We know that only a fraction of the expenditure on armaments and defence could "solve" the world's problems. Space expenditure fits into the same category. Of course there are side benefits but they are only minimal in comparison to the money spent. North Korean people are starving whilst their leaders cheer rockets and bombs - how sickening! That is WW2 mentality not Bertrand Russell post war enlightenment reaction.

Columbus didn't sail across the Atlantic for survival. He was an explorer, for its own sake.

Finding an exoplanet in the habitable temperature-range distance from its sun (the Goldilocks zone) with atmospheric water vapour, and maybe surface water, is a major discovery. That's one of the prerequisites for life as we know it. It's not of any possible use 110 light years away, but that's not the point. It's adding to the store of human knowledge.

antichrist
16-09-2019, 10:23 AM
Columbus didn't sail across the Atlantic for survival. He was an explorer, for its own sake.

Finding an exoplanet in the habitable temperature-range distance from its sun (the Goldilocks zone) with atmospheric water vapour, and maybe surface water, is a major discovery. That's one of the prerequisites for life as we know it. It's not of any possible use 110 light years away, but that's not the point. It's adding to the store of human knowledge.

I know we can say that too many people should not have been born so it is not scientists' fault and their scientific funding should not be denied to feed the starving masses but it is callous and inhumane. I only seen on SBS program on Hitler last night how his exploits for WW2 was based on more land for Germans. Scientists were responsible for the vaccinations etc that kept too many children alive (terrible to say) and Capa Fan's argument is that that they are doing a fantastic job with science of feeding all those extra mouths (and souls) but we also know how the biosphere is virtually on it's last legs in trying to remain viable. The forests burning in Asia and south America etc etc. - all for more resources. Now super typhoons due to climate change probably, parts of the Bahamas wiped out. Central Philippines wiped out about 6 years ago in a similar fashion. Nothing has changed since Albert Einstein pronounced that the splitting of the atom has changed everything except our mode of thinking. That atom is a symbol of the whole industrialised and de-natured world. And just to prove the point that saying of Einstein is not included in his 30 greatest quotes.

Capablanca-Fan
02-11-2019, 12:26 PM
Measles wipes out immune system's memory, study finds (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/oct/31/measles-wipes-out-immune-systems-memory-study-finds)
Scientists say threat posed by measles is ‘much greater than we previously imagined’
Hannah Devlin, Science correspondent, Guardian, 31 Oct 2019

Measles causes long-term damage to the immune system, leaving children who have had it vulnerable to other infections long after the initial illness has passed, research has revealed.

Two studies of unvaccinated children in an Orthodox Protestant community in the Netherlands found that measles wipes out the immune system’s memory of previous illnesses, returning it to a more baby-like state, and also leaves the body less equipped to fight off new infections.

Measles eliminated between 11% and 73% of children’s protective antibodies, the research found.

“We’ve found really strong evidence that the measles virus is actually destroying the immune system,” said Prof Stephen Elledge, a geneticist at Harvard Medical School and co-author of one of the papers. “The threat measles poses to people is much greater than we previously imagined.”

Ian Murray
11-06-2020, 02:17 PM
Eastern Australian Humpback. 70 years ago there were 150 survivors, on the brink of extinction. Last September I was privileged to spend a week on the water off Airlie Beach working with scientists studying migrating EAH (https://blueplanetmarine.com/whale-dolphin-research-programme).

Most whales in 70 years but 40,000 humpbacks 'close to capacity' say experts (https://inqld.com.au/news/2020/06/11/most-whales-in-70-years-40000-humpbacks-close-to-capacity-say-experts/)

Capablanca-Fan
02-07-2020, 11:44 AM
Whale Sharks Have Eyeballs Covered in Tiny Teeth (https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2020/07/whale-sharks-have-eyeballs-covered-in-tiny-teeth/)
George Dvorsky, Gizmodo, 1 July 2020

Marine biologists from Japan say whale sharks have eyeballs coated in tiny teeth, in a discovery unique to this hulking but gentle aquatic species.

Eye teeth are typically used to describe our upper canines, but new research published in PLOS One describes eye teeth of a literal sort.

Marine biologists from Japan’s Okinawa Churashima Research Centre have found that whale sharks have eyes covered in dermal denticles, or modified teeth. These tiny structures represent a previously unknown form of eye protection, serving as a kind of armour to protect against the elements, according to the new research.

Whale sharks are the largest of the sharks, growing as long as 59 feet (18 meters).* These behemoths are harmless to humans, feeding primarily on plankton and the occasional fish.

Whale sharks, unlike some other shark species, don’t have eyelids. Also, their tiny eyes are located at the corners of their square heads, exposing their peepers to potential damage. That’s where the protective eye denticles come in.

[The extinct bony fish Leedsichthys was even larger and much faster (https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/8/130827-paleontology-leedsichthys-problematicus-fish-oceans-science/).—C.F.]

Capablanca-Fan
05-10-2020, 04:56 AM
Several things that are thought to be scientific common knowledge are not. One is that bacteria in our bodies outnumber the human cells 10:1. The right ratio is closer to 1:1.

Another one is that people should drink eight glasses of water every day. Size of glass and adjustment for body mass are not specified. But this came from a back-of-the-envelop calculation, and the original source said that most people get a lot of that daily water requirement from food.

Unfortunately, the legend travels faster and further than the refutation.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jijuG9tyoR0

Blunderbuss
05-10-2020, 04:38 PM
Interesting, as chance would have it, I started reading Bill Bryson’s book The Body: A Guide for Occupants this weekend. Chapter 2 Microbial Me covered the same topic and agreed with the 1:1 ratio as per the video.

Capablanca-Fan
23-10-2020, 08:27 AM
Cryo–electron microscopy breaks the atomic resolution barrier at last (https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/10/cryo-electron-microscopy-breaks-atomic-resolution-barrier-last)
By Robert F. Service, Science, 21 Oct 2020

If you want to map the tiniest parts of a protein, you only have a few options: You can coax millions of individual protein molecules to align into crystals and analyze them using x-ray crystallography. Or you can flash-freeze copies of the protein and bombard them with electrons, a lower resolution method called cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Now, for the first time, scientists have sharpened cryo-EM’s resolution to the atomic level, allowing them to pinpoint the positions of individual atoms in a variety of proteins at a resolution that rivals x-ray crystallography’s.

“This is just amazing,” says Melanie Ohi, a cryo-EM expert at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. “To see this level of detail, it’s just beautiful.” Because the heightened resolution reveals exactly how complex cellular machines carry out their jobs, improvements in cryo-EM should yield countless new insights into biology.

To map protein structures, scientists have been using x-ray crystallography since the late 1950s. By bombarding crystallized proteins with x-rays and analyzing the way the x-rays ricochet off, scientists can work out a protein’s likely makeup and shape. Decades of improvements to the x-ray beams, detectors, and computer power have made the approach fast and accurate. But the approach doesn’t work well when proteins are exceptionally large, work in complexes such as the ribosome, or can’t be crystallized, as is the case with many proteins that sit in cell membranes.

In contrast, researchers using cryo-EM fire electrons at copies of frozen proteins that need not be crystallized; detectors record the electrons’ deflections, and sophisticated software stitches the images together to work out the proteins’ makeup and shape. Researchers in Japan had previously shown they could narrow the resolution to 1.54 angstroms—not quite reaching the point where they could distinguish individual atoms—in a gut protein called apoferritin, which binds and stores iron. Now, with the help of improvements in electron beam technology, detectors, and software, two groups of researchers—from the United Kingdom and Germany—have narrowed that to 1.25 angstroms or better, sharp enough to work out the position of individual atoms, they report today in Nature.

Ian Murray
20-12-2020, 11:47 AM
The 'Star of Bethlehem' peaks with the Great Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the south-west sky shortly after sunset on Monday night, for the first time in 400 years. The pair are visible now to the naked eye as they approach their 'collision point'; even better with binoculars

The great conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn
(https://www.nasa.gov/feature/the-great-conjunction-of-jupiter-and-saturn)

Skywatchers are in for an end-of-year treat. What has become known popularly as the “Christmas Star” is an especially vibrant planetary conjunction easily visible in the evening sky over the next two weeks as the bright planets Jupiter and Saturn come together, culminating on the night of Dec. 21. ...

antichrist
20-12-2020, 12:28 PM
The 'Star of Bethlehem' peaks with the Great Conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the south-west sky shortly after sunset on Monday night, for the first time in 400 years. The pair are visible now to the naked eye as they approach their 'collision point'; even better with binoculars

The great conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn
(https://www.nasa.gov/feature/the-great-conjunction-of-jupiter-and-saturn)

Skywatchers are in for an end-of-year treat. What has become known popularly as the “Christmas Star” is an especially vibrant planetary conjunction easily visible in the evening sky over the next two weeks as the bright planets Jupiter and Saturn come together, culminating on the night of Dec. 21. ...

If you are in a cloudless sky of course. My Hungarian bro-in-law astronomer assured me that Star of Bethlehem and Star of David are different entities. Bethlehem is of 2 circles a larger and smaller. On his telescope on last clear Sydney sky they were a little finger apart. So not shape of overlapping triangles like David is.

Ian Murray
21-12-2020, 08:25 AM
If you are in a cloudless sky of course. My Hungarian bro-in-law astronomer assured me that Star of Bethlehem and Star of David are different entities. ...

Of course they are. The Star of Bethlehem is a New Testament story which may or may not be based on actual astronomical events. The Star of David is a 17th century Jewish symbol.

antichrist
21-12-2020, 09:17 AM
Spot on, I thought it went back to ancient times. It may have only been a response to emblem envy of the Christian cross. Historically it is not exclusively Hebrew at all so anyone can share.

I noticed in the Olympic swimming centre in Homebush that it.is incorporated into roof rafter design. I wonder if the engineer was taking advantage pulling a swift?

antichrist
21-12-2020, 11:20 PM
I was expecting the Star of David to be a configuration of stars.

Ian Murray
22-12-2020, 08:07 AM
We had clear skies last night, so I got to see the Great Conjunction. Just as well - I'll probably miss the next one.

antichrist
22-12-2020, 09:48 AM
We had clear skies last night, so I got to see the Great Conjunction. Just as well - I'll probably miss the next one.

I missed going across to the pub in 1969 to see man walking on the moon. I may miss the next one as well. But was in front row seeing Michael Jackson doing Moon Walk.

Kevin Bonham
10-02-2021, 07:34 AM
Posts moved

Climate change posts moved to climate change thread:

http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?6637-Man-Made-Climate-Change-Issues-and-debates

Any discussion of this move may occur in the Help and Feedback section only.

Kevin Bonham
26-02-2021, 08:50 AM
https://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/energy-and-environment/its-alive-black-browed-babbler-rediscovered-after-170-years/article33931044.ece

Black-browed babbler, a bird previously known from a single specimen collected in the mid-1840s, is rediscovered. (It hadn't been considered extinct, at least not by IUCN).

Scott Colliver
26-02-2021, 04:53 PM
https://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/energy-and-environment/its-alive-black-browed-babbler-rediscovered-after-170-years/article33931044.ece

Black-browed babbler, a bird previously known from a single specimen collected in the mid-1840s, is rediscovered. (It hadn't been considered extinct, at least not by IUCN).

A link not behind a paywall

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/feb/25/black-browed-babbler-found-in-borneo-180-years-after-last-sighting

Ian Murray
11-05-2021, 05:29 PM
How Science Shapes Science Fiction (https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/how-science-shapes-science-fiction?tn=Browse+new+&+Popular+Courses_0_0)

From rocket science and exoplanet ecology to time travel and alien encounters, dive into the real scientific principles that inspire and support great science fiction stories

b.nancarrow
11-05-2021, 07:38 PM
How Science Shapes Science Fiction (https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/how-science-shapes-science-fiction?tn=Browse+new+&+Popular+Courses_0_0)

From rocket science and exoplanet ecology to time travel and alien encounters, dive into the real scientific principles that inspire and support great science fiction stories

Some type of synergetic relationship for mutual benefit?

antichrist
11-05-2021, 07:50 PM
Some type of synergetic relationship for mutual benefit?

Decades ago when I queried the wisdom of space travel etc I was told the benefit here on this planet was non stick frying pans. Now fifty years later they are finding out that such chemical is making men sterile via low sperm count. That space rocket does opposite for the human rocket. Instead of being able to populate space we won't even be able to populate Earth come century's end.

Patrick Byrom
11-05-2021, 08:43 PM
How Science Shapes Science Fiction (https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/how-science-shapes-science-fiction?tn=Browse+new+&+Popular+Courses_0_0) From rocket science and exoplanet ecology to time travel and alien encounters, dive into the real scientific principles that inspire and support great science fiction storiesGame of Thrones is definitely not science fiction! They should have used Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey instead - although nobody remembers that now, I guess.

Ian Murray
12-05-2021, 09:09 PM
Decades ago when I queried the wisdom of space travel etc I was told the benefit here on this planet was non stick frying pans. Now fifty years later they are finding out that such chemical is making men sterile via low sperm count. That space rocket does opposite for the human rocket. Instead of being able to populate space we won't even be able to populate Earth come century's end.

Benefits Stemming from Space Exploration (https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/Benefits-Stemming-from-Space-Exploration-2013-TAGGED.pdf)

antichrist
17-05-2021, 10:13 AM
Benefits Stemming from Space Exploration (https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/Benefits-Stemming-from-Space-Exploration-2013-TAGGED.pdf)

You remind me of Jay Barbree, born 1933, similar vintage to yourself, who claimed we had to conquer an alternative home in space as one day earth will be inhabitable. what a pessimistic hero who probably contributed to a self fulfilling prophesy.

Back to your post, so if we become infertile in a hundred years time due to space travel necessary chemicals in our environment all your listed benefits are worth it? We would not need Barbree's new outer space home - he never thought the end game very well.

Ian Murray
22-05-2021, 02:31 PM
Some assembly required

4888

antichrist
12-07-2021, 08:37 AM
You remind me of Jay Barbree, born 1933, similar vintage to yourself, who claimed we had to conquer an alternative home in space as one day earth will be inhabitable. what a pessimistic hero who probably contributed to a self fulfilling prophesy.

Back to your post, so if we become infertile in a hundred years time due to space travel necessary chemicals in our environment all your listed benefits are worth it? We would not need Barbree's new outer space home - he never thought the end game very well.

In the same vein Branston has gone outter space - costing a fortune in bucks and pollution for a few minutes of thrills. All because he marvelled at man walking on the moon when he was a child. To me that walk was absolutely useless in the scheme of things. If Branston can do it so can everyone else completely wrecking the ozone layer probably. The world can survive without advanced science but advanced science cannot survive without the world.

Lorieas
08-09-2021, 04:36 PM
What came first the egg or the chicken?

Lorieas
08-09-2021, 04:37 PM
Do we think that there will be humanoid robots in the next 20 years that will take over human jobs?