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View Full Version : intellexual vs. tacodog - CC Member analysis herein.



Intellexual
23-01-2008, 10:11 AM
Greetings! :)

I don't speak or read chess, proficiently. I've yet to analyze my game(s) and this is the first one I've PvPed on a computer. I request and welcome feedback. Please communicate as best you can and I'll seek clarifications, should I find myself unable to understand. I was able to win this game, but am unaware of what I did well, to trained eyes, and where I should focus my studies.

Date: 2008.01.22 | White: intellexual | Black: tacodog | Game via GameKnot (http://gameknot.com/chess.pl?bd=8882751)
1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Qd6 5. d4 g6
6. Ne5 Nd5 7. Bc4 Nxc3 8. bxc3 e6 9. Bf4 Qe7 10. Qg4 f5
11. Bg5 Qa3 12. Qf3 Bg7 13. Rb1 Bxe5 14. dxe5 Nc6 15. Bb5 Bd7
16. Rb3 Qxa2 17. O-O Qxc2 18. Qd1 Qe4 19. Bf6 a6 20. Re1 Qf4
21. Bxh8 Nxe5 22. Bxe5 Qg5 23. Qxd7+ Kf8 24. Qg7# 1-0

pax
23-01-2008, 12:31 PM
This is just a very quick surface analysis by a relatively inexpert player. Others may be able to give you a more detailed analysis.

Overall, you need to focus on the basics. Look after your material, avoid giving away pieces for free. Always look out for captures and checks (for both sides). Develop your pieces and protect your king in the opening, and try to control the centre of the board.

Well done on winning, but be aware that you mainly won because your opponent made some terrible mistakes. Most games up to a fairly expert level are won because one player makes more mistakes, and the other player capitalises.




Date: 2008.01.22 | White: intellexual | Black: tacodog | Game via GameKnot (http://gameknot.com/chess.pl?bd=8882751)
1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nf3 {3.Nc3 is better, to immediately harrass the Queen} Nf6 4. Nc3 Qd6 5. d4 g6
6. Ne5 {better to develop your bishops before attempting to attack} Nd5 7. Bc4 Nxc3 8. bxc3 {you missed 8.Bxf7 with check!} e6 9. Bf4 Qe7 10. Qg4 {this is not a good square for your Queen. Better to castle so you can open the centre with d5} f5
11. Bg5? {this is a mistake, dropping a piece for nothing after 11... fxg4 12.Bxe7 Bxe7} Qa3? {lucky he missed it} 12. Qf3 Bg7 13. Rb1 Bxe5 14. dxe5 Nc6 15. Bb5 Bd7
16. Rb3 {your last two moves have just dropped two pawns for no compensation} Qxa2 17. O-O Qxc2 18. Qd1? {you are two pawns down for nothing, so offering to exchange queens is bad. If you are down in material, you should generally keep the pieces on the board if you can} Qe4 {and vice-versa - exchanging material is to the advantage of the person with more material} 19. Bf6 a6?? {he has just given you a free rook for a bishop} 20. Re1 Qf4
21. Bxh8 Nxe5?? {make that the whole game} 22. Bxe5 Qg5 23. Qxd7+ Kf8 24. Qg7# 1-0

Intellexual
23-01-2008, 01:17 PM
3. Nf3 ...
I didn't want to present an empty threat to the black queen. My idea was to support and reinforce 4. d4 .... Looking over things, my queen would have served that purpose. The black queen is imposing centre control, but lacks reinforcement so, Nc3 is something I'll try if someone pushes a Center Counter Opening on me again.
8. bxc3 ...
I saw that I could put my opponent in check. I was concerned that such an aggressive move, without a foreseen gain, would potentially compromise the effectiveness of that bishop and leave my Queen threatened. I still don't see how putting him in check would have allowed me an extra move or helped me further develop. I need more time and/or counsel with this one. heh
11. Bg5
I thank you for pointing this out to me. I will be mindful of your suggestion as it makes great sense, in hindsight. At the time, I was playing on what I felt would most threaten my opposition. It felt as though my opponent was very concerned with losing his Queen. With this in mind, I was always willing to follow through on an exchange for his. I feel as though trying to protect his Queen gave me extra moves. I see your point and will act upon it in future games.
21. Bxh8 Nxe5 "make that the whole game" - pax
I don't understand that comment.

I'm delighted you took time to help me. Thanks again. :)

Capablanca-Fan
23-01-2008, 02:05 PM
3. Nf3 ...
I didn't want to present an empty threat to the black queen. My idea was to support and reinforce 4. d4 .... Looking over things, my queen would have served that purpose. The black queen is imposing centre control, but lacks reinforcement so, Nc3 is something I'll try if someone pushes a Center Counter Opening on me again.
Yeah, Nf3 allows Bg4 which is annoying.


8. bxc3 ...
I saw that I could put my opponent in check. I was concerned that such an aggressive move, without a foreseen gain, would potentially compromise the effectiveness of that bishop and leave my Queen threatened. I still don't see how putting him in check would have allowed me an extra move or helped me further develop. I need more time and/or counsel with this one. heh
Putting him in check is not the end, but the means. It wins an important pawn and prevents Black from castling, ever. So he won't last very long. 8. Bxf7+ Kd8 9. bxc3 is winning. If Black tries to trap the B with 9... e6, then there is a cunning way out with more devastation: 10. Bxg6, and if hxg6? then Nf7+ wins the Q. Meanwhile White is threatening things like Bb3 threatening Nf7+.


11. Bg5
I thank you for pointing this out to me. I will be mindful of your suggestion as it makes great sense, in hindsight. At the time, I was playing on what I felt would most threaten my opposition. It felt as though my opponent was very concerned with losing his Queen. With this in mind, I was always willing to follow through on an exchange for his. I feel as though trying to protect his Queen gave me extra moves. I see your point and will act upon it in future games.
Be very careful of such 'desperado' moves. Here the refutation was the simple capture since you had to sell a B for the Q while he got yours for nowt. At other times, since both pieces are likely to be lost, anything it can get before it dies is pure gain. E.g. he attacks your Q, you attack his. But suppose his Q can take a protected, something that slipped your mind precisely because it was protected. Then you recapture, then he takes your Q, ending up a R ahead.
Here is a far more complex example of a desperado piece (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desperado_piece#Example_of_the_first_definition), but the principle is the same: trying to take as much as possible before it dies.


21. Bxh8 Nxe5 "make that the whole game" - pax
I don't understand that comment.
It follows from the previous comment, i.e. "he's given you a R for B; oh wait, he's given you the whole game now (since he is going to lose everything with that latest blunder).

Kevin Bonham
23-01-2008, 07:12 PM
3.Nf3 is actually OK at club level; I play it quite a lot and have had some strong wins with it. However there is a line 3...Bg4 4.Be2 Nc6! where it is hard for white to get any advantage, which is why 3.Nc3 is more popular (and more studied); if black doesn't do that white often gets a very good position (as in this case with Black's unwise ...g6, but you missed some chances to make him pay, as mentioned above).

One thing to add: in the position before your 21st move, you didn't need to play Bxh8 right away. Given that your other bishop was being attacked by a pawn, it was much stronger to play Bxc6 first. Black would have had to take your bishop as by you would have threatened Qxd7. After he recaptured on c6, then you would have taken the rook. As it happens Black was playing so badly that he didn't even see he could take your bishop.

Intellexual
24-01-2008, 02:22 AM
Putting him in check is not the end, but the means. It wins an important pawn and prevents Black from castling, ever. So he won't last very long. 8. Bxf7+ Kd8 9. bxc3 is winning. If Black tries to trap the B with 9... e6, then there is a cunning way out with more devastation: 10. Bxg6, and if hxg6? then Nf7+ wins the Q. Meanwhile White is threatening things like Bb3 threatening Nf7+.
:owned: That's brilliant. I will gain so much more if I'm mindful of this is future games.



Be very careful of such 'desperado' moves. Here the refutation was the simple capture since you had to sell a B for the Q while he got yours for nowt. At other times, since both pieces are likely to be lost, anything it can get before it dies is pure gain. E.g. he attacks your Q, you attack his. But suppose his Q can take a protected, something that slipped your mind precisely because it was protected. Then you recapture, then he takes your Q, ending up a R ahead.
Here is a far more complex example of a desperado piece (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desperado_piece#Example_of_the_first_definition), but the principle is the same: trying to take as much as possible before it dies.

I need to study this more. Thanks for introducing me to the given name of the tactic. :cool:


It follows from the previous comment, i.e. "he's given you a R for B; oh wait, he's given you the whole game now (since he is going to lose everything with that latest blunder).
Ah! :doh: Thanks for the clarification, as well. heh

Intellexual
24-01-2008, 02:29 AM
One thing to add: in the position before your 21st move, you didn't need to play Bxh8 right away. Given that your other bishop was being attacked by a pawn, it was much stronger to play Bxc6 first. Black would have had to take your bishop as by you would have threatened Qxd7. After he recaptured on c6, then you would have taken the rook. As it happens Black was playing so badly that he didn't even see he could take your bishop.
21. Bxc6 Bxc6 22. Bxh8 would have cleared the way without hoping my opponent would blunder (21. ... Nxe5??), it seems. Thanks. :)

Using BabasChess (http://www.babaschess.net/) freeware :owned: as my PGN editor, I've combined all of our annotations and the variants you guys have illustrated. I have a couple of games to finish. Afterward, I'll research more of what analysis has been presented. Thanks. :)