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Intuition
25-10-2007, 09:31 PM
Is it common for chess players to want to quit chess but find it impossible???? Since i started playing 3 years ago I've tryed to quit a few times and focus on other things but find it too hard to go more than a few weeks without wanting to play a game. Its almost as if the game re-wires your head like a drug?? :wall:

eclectic
25-10-2007, 11:45 PM
to parody mark twain:

giving up chess is easy; i've done it many a time

:P

Aaron Guthrie
26-10-2007, 02:07 AM
The poll is somewhat ambiguous, in that people who have never tried to quit chess will be voting no. I presume that this might not be what was intended.

Aside from quitting chess altogether, I hear quitting fast chess can be a problem. At the moment I can only remember doing so successfully, but that may be selective memory.

Spiny Norman
26-10-2007, 07:09 AM
There's no timeframe for what "quitting" means. I quit successfully for about 15-20 years. But I started playing again when my son got interested. I don't think that qualifies me as a failed quitter.

Aaron Guthrie
26-10-2007, 07:31 AM
There's no timeframe for what "quitting" means.But presumably when one quits one has some sort of timeframe in mind.
I quit successfully for about 15-20 years. But I started playing again when my son got interested. I don't think that qualifies me as a failed quitter.If you intended to quit forever and a day then this would qualify as a failed quit attempt, wouldn't it?

Spiny Norman
26-10-2007, 11:50 AM
Maybe. But one usually takes actions based on a combination of (1) current circumstances; and (2) foreseeable circumstances. Back when I was in my early 20's, unmarried, heading off overseas on a one-way ticket to do volunteer work, it was not readily foreseeable (to me anyway) that I would one day return, get married, have children, and have one of my children display some talent and a desire to play chess. At the time I never thought about it in terms of "I'm quitting chess forever.", it was just "I'm quitting chess." ... so I did quit, just not forever.

frog
26-10-2007, 12:27 PM
Hi All,

Chess IS addictive! Some of the kids i coach turn into chess addicts through positive reinforcement - you take a drug you get high - you need more and more to get the same high - chess is exactly the same - you can become psychologically addicted to the buzz and adrenelin rush of chess so you play more and more and study more and more as the RUSH gets bigger and more profound.

Listen to Ian's farewell speech - he talks of too many adrenelin filled games forcing his retirement. If you adore the game and get heaps of happiness from it then game over your hooked.

But lets face it if you are going to be hooked on anything then in my humble opinion chess is my drug of choice.

Regards to ALL

Rincewind
26-10-2007, 12:31 PM
But lets face it if you are going to be hooked on anything then in my humble opinion chess is my drug of choice.

So in other words (and with apologies to Trent Reznor):

Chess is the perfect drug.

Capablanca-Fan
26-10-2007, 12:37 PM
Listen to Ian's farewell speech — he talks of too many adrenelin filled games forcing his retirement. If you adore the game and get heaps of happiness from it then game over your hooked.
About that, it's understandable that Ian would want to retire. I've just finished Sosonko's book The Reliable Past (http://www.amazon.com/Reliable-Past-Genna-Sosonko/dp/9056911147/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/105-1562438-5774813?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1193365919&sr=8-2). This has biographical sketches of a number of top players. A lot of them were leaders, but as their strength fell off with age, invitations to top tourneys dried up, so they were reduced to open tournaments held under poor conditions, with young players trying to pop them off. Formerly very strong ex Soviets Gipslis and Bagirov died of heart attacks suffered at a chess board. Miles likewise had to travel to opens when past his prime and went to an early grave. Sosonko paints a said picture of decline. It's good that Rogers retired when he was still at the top of his game.

frog
26-10-2007, 12:39 PM
Hi Rince,

Yes chess is the PERFECT drug and I do warn kids parents but they foolishly persist in encouraging their children to play chess - so they reap what they sow!!

Say Rince what ever happened to that game of Dip? Speaking of games of addiction!

Regards

Duff McKagan
26-10-2007, 12:42 PM
About that, it's understandable that Ian would want to retire. I've just finished Sosonko's book The Reliable Past (http://www.amazon.com/Reliable-Past-Genna-Sosonko/dp/9056911147/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/105-1562438-5774813?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1193365919&sr=8-2). This has biographical sketches of a number of top players. A lot of them were leaders, but as their strength fell off with age, invitations to top tourneys dried up, so they were reduced to open tournaments held under poor conditions, with young players trying to pop them off. Formerly very strong ex Soviets Gipslis and Bagirov died of heart attacks suffered at a chess board. Miles likewise had to travel to opens when past his prime and went to an early grave. Sosonko paints a said picture of decline. It's good that Rogers retired when he was still at the top of his game.

I was also reading that book the other day also at SAC and enjoyed the chapters on Miles and Bagirov.