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View Full Version : Will Chess Make the Olympics/ Commonwealth Games?



Intuition
28-08-2007, 10:10 AM
I know there has been a fair bit of discussion about this, there was some suggestion India consider whether it could get it into the commonwealth games but it looks unlikey. However, given the increasing number of weird sports entering the olympics (like that sport where u rub a broom really fast inf ront of a puck- kinda like ice lawn bowls) there might be a slim chance chess might get in..however given that it doesnt have any physical elements(even though some people think is does...try running 42ks then ill ask u again..lol) the opposition can be understood. If it did get on and got TV coverage ect...it would obiously become alot more popular.. it wouldn't really help our medal chances tho..lol

frog
28-08-2007, 11:01 AM
Hi All,

To transplant the Chess Olympiad to the Olympic Games just would not work - its my understanding that the Olympic Organisers try to limit the inflow of new sports for a number of reasons one being maintaining or even reducing the overall number of competitors etc that have to be housed.

It may work to send one representative male and female from each country.

But we get back to thorny issue that previous ACF President Gardiner tried to resolve - getting Chess classified as a sport. GG did much work in this regard and he should perhaps comment on this issue if he so desires.

regards to ALL

Basil
28-08-2007, 11:50 AM
Just to really upset the apple cart ...

I don't believe chess is a sport. Graeme is aware of my position. I have previously advocated same while pres CAQ.

I support all efforts to improve the standing of chess in the community; including those relating to having chess recognised as a sport! :eek: And I certainly wouldn't do anything to dissuade those who hold a counter position.

Nonetheless, chess just ain't a sport, no matter how much we want it to be, and no matter how beneficial it would be to the game to have it ratified as such.

Everybody carry on! (without me on this one, thanks very much)

CameronD
28-08-2007, 12:37 PM
I heard on a BBC that at the "Africa Olympics" that chess was an event there as a sport.

The definition of what's a sport and game is complex. Shooting is an olympic sport, but is not physical in nature. A lot of the olympic events, I would define as a game and not a sport.

pax
28-08-2007, 01:52 PM
I have no problem with the view that chess is not a sport, but only if there is an alternative category such as "mind sport" under which elite chess players can be recognised as elite practitioners, worthy of support.

Calling chess a "game" or a "pastime" or a "recreation" is fine for Gunner and it's fine for me, but it's not fine for Kasparov, or Smerdon or Ian Rogers and other top players.

Rincewind
28-08-2007, 02:49 PM
(like that sport where u rub a broom really fast inf ront of a puck- kinda like ice lawn bowls)

I think you are referring to Curling. It is quite and old sport (dates back several 100s of years) and was included in the original 1924 winter olympics but was out of favour for a number of decades and has only relatively recently become a medal sport again.

Regarding chess, it is a worthy pursuit and regardless of whether you call it a sport or not I don't believe it belongs to either the Summer or Winter games. Perhaps FIDE could get some sort of IOC recognition of the current chess olympiad, perhaps extending to other similar activities like Bridge, etc.

ER
28-08-2007, 03:37 PM
Just to really upset the apple cart ...

I don't believe chess is a sport. Graeme is aware of my position. I have previously advocated same while pres CAQ.

I support all efforts to improve the standing of chess in the community; including those relating to having chess recognised as a sport! :eek: And I certainly wouldn't do anything to dissuade those who hold a counter position.

Nonetheless, chess just ain't a sport, no matter how much we want it to be, and no matter how beneficial it would be to the game to have it ratified as such.



Once again up to the point and years ahead of your time!
Cheers and good luck!

Zwischenzug
28-08-2007, 05:01 PM
I think, as much as we love our chess, the game isn't exactly spectator friendly (mainly chess players would take interest). I think that's the main reason why chess isn't in the Olympics.

littlesprout85
28-08-2007, 05:41 PM
Lets See here ,
Seeing since heavys has weigh in on this subject- it is Timez that sprouty got on the record here.

Chess doesnt fit into the requirements for being a Sport. In order to be a sport- the game has to have some physical element to it.(even after weighin da sprouts pea-brain shows no weight loss after chess match) :|


Skeet Shooting does require a physical part to the game.(Sprouts aim with da 12 gauge isnt steady . . . ) Eeeky :D


Also lets keep in mind that the countrys that sent the female reps. would have an un-fair advantage froggy. (Ribbit - Ribbit)

-Sprout :)

Aaron Guthrie
28-08-2007, 06:00 PM
Chess' chance was when behaviorism was the flavor of the day.

But today, when it matters that Pluto is not a planet, there is no chance.

ER
28-08-2007, 07:15 PM
Well second thoughts, let's not be so pessimistic, we have our own Olympics with huge international participation! As for here in Australia, let's face it: Cultural attitudes and luck of promotion will always be detrimental to the progress of Chess in this country, let alone assisting it for Olympics participation!
Cheers and good luck

Basil
28-08-2007, 07:17 PM
I'm not really posting here, but if I were, I'd note that the OG are about the games (of skill).

Everybody carry on!

Denis_Jessop
28-08-2007, 08:20 PM
Just a couple of observations.

1. Wasn't chess a sort of demonstration sport at the Sydney Olympics. (Digression: My big Mac has had a nervous breakdown and I am using the old one that refuses to recognise question marks. Who said Macs are not human QM)

Despite this my view is that chess will not be an Olympic sport.

2. The matter of physical aspects is interesting as there is no doubt in my mind that (paradoxically) blitz has such an element. This was brought home to me in Melbourne many years ago when I was watching (young) Doug Hamilton who was a top blitz player. Not only did he play good moves but he virtually never put his pieces out of place: in other words his hand/eye coordination was top class as in the case of a skeet shooter and more so than a synchronised swimmer or part thereof.

DJ