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Ian Murray
24-06-2021, 07:59 PM
I am no expert on the scientific matters in the field. But he is a recognized scholar - surely he deserves to be heard!

He once deserved to be heard, but such a glaring volte-face on matters of established science left him beyond the pale.

Blunderbuss
25-06-2021, 01:32 PM
When I think of David Bellamy I’m remined of Lenny Henry impersonating him on Tiswas (Saturday morning children’s TV) in the 70s.

I was surprised to read in his obituary (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/12/david-bellamy-obituary) that he spent his 50th birthday in prison in Tasmania.


"Bellamy was not reluctant to use his body as well as his brain in defence of the environment. In the 1980s, his growing celebrity in Australia and New Zealand led him to offer his support to groups protesting about the planned damming of the Gordon River in Tasmania for an unnecessary hydroelectric scheme."

"Receiving little response in the UK to his appeals (apart from a donation from Spike Milligan), Bellamy went to Tasmania and stood on the picket lines himself, with 1,200 other protesters. Arrested and refusing to accept bail, he spent his 50th birthday in jail and enamoured himself to a generation of protesters."

Ian Murray
30-06-2021, 02:37 PM
It’s the climate change, stupid (https://www.washingtonpost.com//world/2021/06/30/climate-change-heat-politics/?utm_campaign=wp_todays_worldview&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_todayworld&carta-url=https%3A%2F%2Fs2.washingtonpost.com%2Fcar-ln-tr%2F340b628%2F60dbeb649d2fda8060ef4f9a%2F5dcc9605 9bbc0f414f77de6a%2F10%2F76%2F60dbeb649d2fda8060ef4 f9a)

In only the first month of summer in much of the Northern Hemisphere, the records are already tumbling. The Pacific Northwest and Canada are in the grip of an unprecedented heat wave. Major cities such as Portland, Ore., and Seattle broke their all-time records for hottest days by wide margins. Thousands lost power; roads buckled as their asphalt cracked amid the heat.

On Monday, the temperature in Lytton, British Columbia, soared to 120 degrees Fahrenheit — a degree higher than the city record posted by Las Vegas far to the south. The BC Coroners Service said Tuesday that it has seen "a significant increase in deaths reported” in recent days that appear to be linked to the heat. "It’s warmer in parts of western Canada than in Dubai. I mean, it’s just not something that seems Canadian,” Environment Canada senior climatologist David Phillips told CTV News on Saturday. ...

Blunderbuss
30-06-2021, 03:57 PM
Climate origins massive lumber shortage (https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/04/climate-origins-massive-lumber-shortage/618727/)

In 2017, British Columbia recorded the worst wildfire season in its history. Fires cleared 1.2 million hectares of land, or more than 1 percent of the province’s area, and forced 65,000 people to evacuate. That record was surpassed the following year, when 1.3 million hectares burned. Worst of all, the fires struck with awful efficiency, consuming exactly the forest that the salvage plan had saved for last. They “burnt the last-standing dead supply,” Cooke said. British Columbia’s lean time had arrived early.

The fires were made more likely by climate change, but—in an ugly feedback loop—the beetle outbreak also contributed. When conifers are attacked by pests, they secrete more pitch in self-defense, Cooke said. Pitch is extremely flammable. When trees are drought-prone and filled with pitch, it’s like “fire starter on the landscape,” she said. (Nor is wildfire the only risk of pitch: British Columbia sawmills and pulp mills have exploded while processing pitch-loaded wood, Cooke said.)

Ian Murray
30-06-2021, 05:49 PM
... The fires were made more likely by climate change, but—in an ugly feedback loop—the beetle outbreak also contributed. ...

The mountain pine beetle plague is a direct result of climate change. Once killed off each winter by cold temperatures, the warmer summers and winters of the past 20+ years have allowed them to thrive.

https://www.climatehotmap.org/global-warming-locations/british-columbia-canada.html

antichrist
30-06-2021, 07:05 PM
Climate origins massive lumber shortage (https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/04/climate-origins-massive-lumber-shortage/618727/)

In 2017, British Columbia recorded the worst wildfire season in its history. Fires cleared 1.2 million hectares of land, or more than 1 percent of the province’s area, and forced 65,000 people to evacuate. That record was surpassed the following year, when 1.3 million hectares burned. Worst of all, the fires struck with awful efficiency, consuming exactly the forest that the salvage plan had saved for last. They “burnt the last-standing dead supply,” Cooke said. British Columbia’s lean time had arrived early.

The fires were made more likely by climate change, but—in an ugly feedback loop—the beetle outbreak also contributed. When conifers are attacked by pests, they secrete more pitch in self-defense, Cooke said. Pitch is extremely flammable. When trees are drought-prone and filled with pitch, it’s like “fire starter on the landscape,” she said. (Nor is wildfire the only risk of pitch: British Columbia sawmills and pulp mills have exploded while processing pitch-loaded wood, Cooke said.)

Years ago my Canadian friend told me that due to warmer climate the soil there was not so cold so that a southern worm could migrate and survive further north. Birds were hunting them and wrecking lawns.

Ian Murray
03-07-2021, 08:25 AM
Not something you see too often around coal-fired power plants

Victoria's first large-scale solar farm now home for 300 sheep (https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2021-06-30/sheep-at-home-among-gannawarra-solar-panels/100254256?fbclid=IwAR0V4oiHeYi3OWem3IIYJYjC95jzRmX kCEoHB8QR_bgmwA-1kCY3pKIXyWk)

Greg Fowler was a bit sceptical about how his 300 merino sheep would cope with the moving solar panels that track the sun at the Gannawarra Solar Farm in northern Victoria.

But the flock has settled into its new home very well.

Key points:

300 merino sheep were introduced to the solar farm in November
Land owner says the panels' shade has been beneficial, especially during summer
It's difficult for mowers to avoid the tracking infrastructure and sheep are a natural way to control vegetation

The sheep, which would normally huddle on a hot day to find shade beneath scattered trees, are now loving the shade created by the hundreds of panels. ...

Ian Murray
03-07-2021, 09:22 AM
The Miami Building Collapse and Humanity’s Tragic Fight for the Future (https://www.wired.com/story/the-miami-building-collapse-and-humanitys-tragic-fight-for-the-future/?bxid=5dc8833afbd29703760c4e3f&cndid=59131129&esrc=register-page&source=EDT_WIR_NEWSLETTER_0_DAILY_ZZ&utm_brand=wired&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_mailing=WIR_Daily_070221&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl&utm_term=list1_p4)

From the fallen Champlain Tower to climate change, humans haven’t yet learned to avoid catastrophes they know are coming. ...

Ian Murray
04-07-2021, 09:04 PM
Climate change is now a matter of life and death, but our leaders won't lead

Climate change has gotten deadly. It will get worse. (https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2021/07/03/climate-change-heat-dome-death/)

... “The system was overwhelmed,” said Mary Tanski, chair of OHSU’s department of emergency medicine, of the towering heat dome that toppled temperature records across the Northwest this week.

Some patients didn’t survive. In Oregon, Washington and western Canada, authorities are investigating more than 800 deaths potentially linked to the punishing heat. ...

Humans burning fossil fuels have caused the globe to warm roughly 1 degree Celsius, or 2 degrees Fahrenheit, since the preindustrial era. It’s a seemingly incremental change, but it has led to disproportionately frequent and severe natural disasters. ...

Studies show the chance of a given tropical storm becoming a hurricane that is Category 3 or greater has grown 8 percent every decade. The acreage of the West burned by wildfire is twice what it would otherwise be. The heat wave that struck the Northwest this week brought temperatures that were as much as 11 degrees above the previous all-time high. ...

The heat being so devastating should be a warning sign for all of us. The 2015 Paris Climate Agreement calls for humanity to limit global warming to “well below” 2 degrees Celsius. A subsequent report from United Nations scientists found that warming beyond 1.5 degrees Celsius would trigger catastrophic sea level rise, near-total loss of coral reefs and a calamitous increase in the frequency and intensity of natural disasters.

But the world is unlikely to meet either of those goals. Most countries have not reduced greenhouse gas emissions nearly enough to meet targets set in the Paris agreement. ...

If we continue to burn fossil fuels at the current rate, studies suggest, the Earth could be 3 to 4 degrees Celsius hotter by the end of the century. The Arctic will be free of ice in summertime. Hundreds of millions of people will suffer from food shortages and extreme drought. Huge numbers of species will be driven to extinction. Some regions will become so hot and disaster-prone they are uninhabitable. ...

Extreme heat is likely to be one of those things. Studies of heat waves suggest that a half a degree Celsius increase in summertime temperatures can lead to a 150 percent increase in the number of heat waves that kill 100 people or more. Research published last year in the journal Science found that the human body can’t tolerate temperatures higher than 95 degrees when combined with 100 percent humidity. ...

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said David Markel, an emergency physician at the Seattle hospital. During an overnight shift on Monday, he treated 12 patients for heat illness. Some were so sick their kidneys and livers were failing, their muscles starting to break down. ...

MichaelBaron
05-07-2021, 01:01 PM
Climate change is now a matter of life and death, but our leaders won't lead

Climate change has gotten deadly. It will get worse. (https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2021/07/03/climate-change-heat-dome-death/)

... “The system was overwhelmed,” said Mary Tanski, chair of OHSU’s department of emergency medicine, of the towering heat dome that toppled temperature records across the Northwest this week.

Some patients didn’t survive. In Oregon, Washington and western Canada, authorities are investigating more than 800 deaths potentially linked to the punishing heat. ...

Humans burning fossil fuels have caused the globe to warm roughly 1 degree Celsius, or 2 degrees Fahrenheit, since the preindustrial era. It’s a seemingly incremental change, but it has led to disproportionately frequent and severe natural disasters. ...

Studies show the chance of a given tropical storm becoming a hurricane that is Category 3 or greater has grown 8 percent every decade. The acreage of the West burned by wildfire is twice what it would otherwise be. The heat wave that struck the Northwest this week brought temperatures that were as much as 11 degrees above the previous all-time high. ...

The heat being so devastating should be a warning sign for all of us. The 2015 Paris Climate Agreement calls for humanity to limit global warming to “well below” 2 degrees Celsius. A subsequent report from United Nations scientists found that warming beyond 1.5 degrees Celsius would trigger catastrophic sea level rise, near-total loss of coral reefs and a calamitous increase in the frequency and intensity of natural disasters.

But the world is unlikely to meet either of those goals. Most countries have not reduced greenhouse gas emissions nearly enough to meet targets set in the Paris agreement. ...

If we continue to burn fossil fuels at the current rate, studies suggest, the Earth could be 3 to 4 degrees Celsius hotter by the end of the century. The Arctic will be free of ice in summertime. Hundreds of millions of people will suffer from food shortages and extreme drought. Huge numbers of species will be driven to extinction. Some regions will become so hot and disaster-prone they are uninhabitable. ...

Extreme heat is likely to be one of those things. Studies of heat waves suggest that a half a degree Celsius increase in summertime temperatures can lead to a 150 percent increase in the number of heat waves that kill 100 people or more. Research published last year in the journal Science found that the human body can’t tolerate temperatures higher than 95 degrees when combined with 100 percent humidity. ...

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said David Markel, an emergency physician at the Seattle hospital. During an overnight shift on Monday, he treated 12 patients for heat illness. Some were so sick their kidneys and livers were failing, their muscles starting to break down. ...

So shall we ''close'' all industries now? Btw ''not man-made'' but there was obviously climate change even in the Stone Age. Dinosaurs and Mammoths can confirm :).

Patrick Byrom
05-07-2021, 01:40 PM
So shall we ''close'' all industries now? Btw ''not man-made'' but there was obviously climate change even in the Stone Age. Dinosaurs and Mammoths can confirm :).You mean the "dinosaurs and mammoths" which are now extinct due to changes in the climate :)

Ian Murray
05-07-2021, 03:23 PM
So shall we ''close'' all industries now?

Which no-one at all has suggested. We have to stop burning fossil fuels - there are alternatives.


Btw ''not man-made'' but there was obviously climate change even in the Stone Age. Dinosaurs and Mammoths can confirm :).

Of course. The climate changes naturally, but it takes millenia (3 Bya there was no oxygen in the atmosphere). However we humans have heated the planet by 1°C in just 70 years, with disastrous results. People are dying now, and it will get much worse.

Ian Murray
05-07-2021, 04:04 PM
New Zealand experiences hottest June on record despite polar blast (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/05/new-zealand-experiences-hottest-june-on-record-despite-polar-blast)

‘Pure hell’: Cyprus hit by worst forest fire in decades (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/04/cyprus-says-deadly-forest-fire-close-to-being-under-control)

In Karachi, hot weather is normal … but 44C feels like you’re going to die (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/commentisfree/2021/jul/04/in-karachi-hot-weather-is-normal-but-44c-feels-like-youre-going-to-die)

Ian Murray
05-07-2021, 08:23 PM
You mean the "dinosaurs and mammoths" which are now extinct due to changes in the climate :)

While mammoths owe their extinction to cyclical climate change - the end of the last ice age - the dinosaur extinction event was an asteroid strike, which was also a climate changing event.

MichaelBaron
05-07-2021, 09:20 PM
While mammoths owe their extinction to cyclical climate change - the end of the last ice age - the dinosaur extinction event was an asteroid strike, which was also a climate changing event.

may be asteroid will strike again before climate...who knows :). In the meantime we could channel all the resources going towards ''fighting the climate'' towards other causes. btw. to make it clear: I am not denying that climate is changing. I just do not see how it should be something we should be so preoccupied about because we think its ''man-made'' and start undeveloping economy in response.

Ian Murray
06-07-2021, 09:43 AM
... to make it clear: I am not denying that climate is changing. I just do not see how it should be something we should be so preoccupied about because we think its ''man-made'' and start undeveloping economy in response.

Simply because most of the global warming is caused by human activity is absolutely not the reason it is regarded as such a pressing problem. It is the combined deleterious effects on the planet's geography, biosphere and human health and productivity.

A Degree of Concern: Why Global Temperatures Matter (https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2865/a-degree-of-concern-why-global-temperatures-matter/)

To quote an extract you will understand:


In the United States, economic damages from climate change are projected to be large, with one 2017 study concluding the United States could lose 2.3 percent of its Gross Domestic Product for each degree Celsius increase in global warming. To put that into perspective, that would amount to more than $446 billion based on U.S. Gross Domestic Product of $19.39 trillion in 2017.

In Australia the increasing temperatures are already having an impact, with the highest category of bushfire risk increased from 'Extreme' to 'Catastrophic' and new colours introduced on weather maps for 50°+ temperatures.

Patrick Byrom
06-07-2021, 02:02 PM
... to make it clear: I am not denying that climate is changing. I just do not see how it should be something we should be so preoccupied about because we think its ''man-made'' and start undeveloping economy in response.We don't 'think' it's man-made - we know that the recent rapid global temperature increase is caused by human activities.

MichaelBaron
06-07-2021, 02:51 PM
We don't 'think' it's man-made - we know that the recent rapid global temperature increase is caused by human activities.

Do u think this matter should prioritized? Btw, as long as the costs are mitigated, I am all in favor

Patrick Byrom
06-07-2021, 03:11 PM
Do u think this matter should prioritized? Btw, as long as the costs are mitigated, I am all in favorOf course it should be a priority, for the reasons Ian listed - the costs of doing nothing will be horrific.

Ian Murray
06-07-2021, 04:44 PM
Of course it should be a priority, for the reasons Ian listed - the costs of doing nothing will be horrific.

The cost of inaction to the Australian economy has been calculated - $3.4 trillion in lost opportunities by 2070 and an economic shrinkage of 6%

Lack of climate action over 50 years will cost Australian economy $3.4tn and 880,000 jobs – report (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/nov/02/lack-of-climate-action-over-50-years-will-cost-the-economy-34tn-and-880000-jobs-report)

Ian Murray
06-07-2021, 06:51 PM
From the same Deloitte report:


Any structural adjustment to an economy has challenges as change occurs. But the technologies, policy options and ideas to create a new climate of growth in Australia that is resilient to future risks are available today – Australia needs to choose to change and get on with it.

Choosing net zero is an economic necessity

Australia pays a high price of a global failure to deliver new growth in recovery. Compared to this dismal future, Deloitte Access Economics estimates a new growth recovery could grow Australia’s economy by $680 billion (present value terms) and increase GDP by 2.6% in 2070 – adding over 250,000 jobs to the Australian economy by 2070.

MichaelBaron
08-07-2021, 12:53 PM
From the same Deloitte report:


Any structural adjustment to an economy has challenges as change occurs. But the technologies, policy options and ideas to create a new climate of growth in Australia that is resilient to future risks are available today – Australia needs to choose to change and get on with it.

Choosing net zero is an economic necessity

Australia pays a high price of a global failure to deliver new growth in recovery. Compared to this dismal future, Deloitte Access Economics estimates a new growth recovery could grow Australia’s economy by $680 billion (present value terms) and increase GDP by 2.6% in 2070 – adding over 250,000 jobs to the Australian economy by 2070.

Just like others Deloitte has to play the ''Planetary Health Goals'' games so no wonder they become part of economics reports :).

Ian Murray
09-07-2021, 10:48 AM
Just like others Deloitte has to play the ''Planetary Health Goals'' games so no wonder they become part of economics reports :).

Sorry, I didn't realise you were better informed on economics than Deloitte

Ian Murray
10-07-2021, 11:45 AM
We are entering uncharted territory (https://link.e.independent.co.uk/view/60ca9a087c26115f8a3a2613ej003.82r/532b856f)



North America’s deadly heatwave, which smashed temperature records across Canada and the western US, was made at least 150 times more likely by the climate crisis, a rapid analysis concludes. An international team of climate scientists have found that the recent record heat in cities including Vancouver, Seattle and Portland would have been “virtually impossible” without human-driven global heating. Last week, Canada saw a new record temperature of 49.6C (121F) – more than 4C above the previous record. Meanwhile, Seattle and Portland hit new highs of 42.8C (109F) and 46.7C (116F) respectively. Both records are several degrees above previous highs. The staggering new temperature records have left the scientists stunned. “We are entering uncharted territory,” said one of the study's authors, Prof Sonia Seneviratne, a climate scientist at ETH Zurich. The extreme heat has killed hundreds of people across Canada and the US, and the death toll continues to mount. ...

MichaelBaron
14-07-2021, 05:32 PM
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/goodbye-periodic-table-vce-chemistry-set-for-elemental-change-20210713-p58972.html
And this is the result!
Proper chemistry replaced by Green Chemistry. Now waiting for ''Green Maths'' and of course ''Very Green History''

Patrick Byrom
14-07-2021, 06:28 PM
https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/goodbye-periodic-table-vce-chemistry-set-for-elemental-change-20210713-p58972.html And this is the result! Proper chemistry replaced by Green Chemistry. Now waiting for ''Green Maths'' and of course ''Very Green History''The greenhouse effect is physics, of course, not chemistry. And waiting to study the periodic table until Years 11 and 12 is a bad idea - it should be part of the curriculum much earlier, as it's something everyone should know.

Ian Murray
14-07-2021, 06:47 PM
Reach for the Sun: The emerging market electricity leapfrog
(https://carbontracker.org/reports/reach-for-the-sun/)

The emerging markets are key to the global energy transition, with 88% of the growth in electricity demand between 2019 and 2040 is expected to come from the emerging markets. If they do not leapfrog to renewables, the report warns there will be no global energy transition.

Renewables are already the cheapest source of new electricity in 90% of the world which means emerging markets have no need to build up huge electricity infrastructure based on fossil fuels. ...

MichaelBaron
20-07-2021, 12:02 PM
The greenhouse effect is physics, of course, not chemistry. And waiting to study the periodic table until Years 11 and 12 is a bad idea - it should be part of the curriculum much earlier, as it's something everyone should know.

The question is...shall we all study ''green chemistry'' ?

Ian Murray
20-07-2021, 12:21 PM
The question is...shall we all study ''green chemistry'' ?

No, we won't all have to study green chemistry principles, only VCE students in Victoria from 2023. Personally I don't see much wrong with a teaching "emphasis on how chemistry can contribute to environmental sustainability".

Ian Murray
20-07-2021, 01:01 PM
Chevron finds CCS a bit too hard

‘A shocking failure’: Chevron criticised for missing carbon capture target at WA gas project (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jul/20/a-shocking-failure-chevron-criticised-for-missing-carbon-capture-target-at-wa-gas-project)

The energy giant Chevron has conceded its self-described world’s biggest carbon capture and storage (CCS) project has failed to meet a five-year target for burying carbon dioxide under an island off Western Australia. ...

Patrick Byrom
20-07-2021, 06:30 PM
No, we won't all have to study green chemistry principles, only VCE students in Victoria from 2023. Personally I don't see much wrong with a teaching "emphasis on how chemistry can contribute to environmental sustainability".Qld students in Year 12 have been studying green chemistry since 2019 (https://www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/downloads/senior-qce/syllabuses/snr_chemistry_19_syll.pdf), without apparently generating any controversy:

Green chemistry
• appreciate that green chemistry principles include the design of chemical synthesis processes that use renewable raw materials, limit the use of potentially harmful solvents and minimise the amount of unwanted products
• outline the principles of green chemistry and recognise that the higher the atom economy, the ‘greener’ the process
• calculate atom economy and draw conclusions about the economic and environmental impact of chemical synthesis processes.

It seems like a useful topic to me.

Hopefully they'll also learn that global warming wasn't invented by Al Gore, the UN, or Greta Thunberg (as some people seem to think)!

Ian Murray
20-07-2021, 07:36 PM
Qld students in Year 12 have been studying green chemistry since 2019 (https://www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/downloads/senior-qce/syllabuses/snr_chemistry_19_syll.pdf), without apparently generating any controversy:

Green chemistry
• appreciate that green chemistry principles include the design of chemical synthesis processes that use renewable raw materials, limit the use of potentially harmful solvents and minimise the amount of unwanted products
• outline the principles of green chemistry and recognise that the higher the atom economy, the ‘greener’ the process
• calculate atom economy and draw conclusions about the economic and environmental impact of chemical synthesis processes.

It seems like a useful topic to me.

Hopefully they'll also learn that global warming wasn't invented by Al Gore, the UN, or Greta Thunberg (as some people seem to think)!

Excellent. I also like the ATSI guidelines:


1.2.3 Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander
perspectives
The QCAA is committed to reconciliation in Australia. As part of its commitment, the QCAA
affirms that:
• Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples are the first Australians, and have the
oldest living cultures in human history
• Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples have strong cultural traditions and speak
diverse languages and dialects, other than Standard Australian English
• teaching and learning in Queensland schools should provide opportunities for students to
deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging with the perspectives of Aboriginal peoples
and Torres Strait Islander peoples
• positive outcomes for Aboriginal students and Torres Strait Islander students are supported by
successfully embedding Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives
across planning, teaching and assessing student achievement. Guidelines about Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and resources
for teaching are available at www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/k-12-policies/aboriginal-torres-strait-islander-
perspectives. Where appropriate, Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives have been
embedded in the subject matter

Desmond
20-07-2021, 08:29 PM
The greenhouse effect is physics, of course, not chemistry. And waiting to study the periodic table until Years 11 and 12 is a bad idea - it should be part of the curriculum much earlier, as it's something everyone should know.It is, as per TheAge's article:

"the periodic table will continue to be taught in year 9 and 10 science classes"

MichaelBaron
20-07-2021, 08:45 PM
Excellent. I also like the ATSI guidelines:


1.2.3 Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander
perspectives
The QCAA is committed to reconciliation in Australia. As part of its commitment, the QCAA
affirms that:
• Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples are the first Australians, and have the
oldest living cultures in human history
• Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples have strong cultural traditions and speak
diverse languages and dialects, other than Standard Australian English
• teaching and learning in Queensland schools should provide opportunities for students to
deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging with the perspectives of Aboriginal peoples
and Torres Strait Islander peoples
• positive outcomes for Aboriginal students and Torres Strait Islander students are supported by
successfully embedding Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives
across planning, teaching and assessing student achievement. Guidelines about Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and resources
for teaching are available at www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/k-12-policies/aboriginal-torres-strait-islander-
perspectives. Where appropriate, Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives have been
embedded in the subject matter

Would love to hear Aboriginal Perspectives on Nuclear Science, Blockchain and Interplanetary travel.

Patrick Byrom
20-07-2021, 09:46 PM
Would love to hear Aboriginal Perspectives on Nuclear Science, Blockchain and Interplanetary travel.So what is your perspective on Nuclear Science?

Blunderbuss
20-07-2021, 10:43 PM
Would love to hear Aboriginal Perspectives on Nuclear Science, Blockchain and Interplanetary travel.

Maybe you should try some studying. I suggest you start by reading Jared Diamond’s book Guns, Germs, and Steel. You never know it may help you think twice before spouting Eurasians are superior claptrap.

MichaelBaron
20-07-2021, 10:55 PM
So what is your perspective on Nuclear Science?

I have no perspective on Nuclear Science, but I do not claim to have :). Nor I insist on incorporating ''my physics''' or my ''chemistry'' into school programs.

MichaelBaron
20-07-2021, 10:57 PM
Maybe you should try some studying. I suggest you start by reading Jared Diamond’s book Guns, Germs, and Steel. You never know it may help you think twice before spouting Eurasians are superior claptrap.

I do not believe in Eurasian Physics either. I believe there is Universal body of knowledge that needs to be assessed based on value rather than political correctness.

Ian Murray
21-07-2021, 09:39 AM
I do not believe in Eurasian Physics either. I believe there is Universal body of knowledge that needs to be assessed based on value rather than political correctness.

Which is correct for pure science, but when it came to applied science different cultures followed different paths (e.g. https://australiancurriculum.edu.au/TeacherBackgroundInfo?id=56821 )

Patrick Byrom
21-07-2021, 09:44 AM
I have no perspective on Nuclear Science, but I do not claim to have :). Nor I insist on incorporating ''my physics''' or my ''chemistry'' into school programs.Neither do Aboriginal people.

MichaelBaron
21-07-2021, 10:08 AM
Which is correct for pure science, but when it came to applied science different cultures followed different paths (e.g. https://australiancurriculum.edu.au/TeacherBackgroundInfo?id=56821 )

May I suggest looking into non-cultural aspects of Physics & Maths? It may result in better knowledge of Maths. Those who want to study Indigenous culture should be able to do it through an appropriate elective if they are interested. Also it can be part of the Australian History subject.

Ian Murray
21-07-2021, 02:13 PM
May I suggest looking into non-cultural aspects of Physics & Maths? It may result in better knowledge of Maths. Those who want to study Indigenous culture should be able to do it through an appropriate elective if they are interested. Also it can be part of the Australian History subject.

Western science and indigenous science (Australian, Chinese, Indian etc) co-exist. We have much to learn from indigenous applications of science, notably in the fields of environmental protection and sustainability, where Western science has failed us (e.g. pesticide and fertiliser degradation, global heating, water diversion, introduced species, species loss)

MichaelBaron
21-07-2021, 05:50 PM
Western science and indigenous science (Australian, Chinese, Indian etc) co-exist. We have much to learn from indigenous applications of science, notably in the fields of environmental protection and sustainability, where Western science has failed us (e.g. pesticide and fertiliser degradation, global heating, water diversion, introduced species, species loss)

Why not learn Chinese science then? As long as the indigenous science as included as part of overall curriculum based on merit (along with Chinese science etc.) I do not mind. But merit should be the only measure!

Patrick Byrom
21-07-2021, 06:03 PM
... I believe there is Universal body of knowledge that needs to be assessed based on value rather than political correctness.I hope you will apply that principle to the physics of global warming, instead of rejecting the theory based on political bias.

Ian Murray
21-07-2021, 06:50 PM
Why not learn Chinese science then? As long as the indigenous science as included as part of overall curriculum based on merit (along with Chinese science etc.) I do not mind. But merit should be the only measure!

So no problem. Aboriginal chemistry clearly has merit.

Ian Murray
21-07-2021, 08:08 PM
BHP mulls oil exit in retreat from fossil fuels: reports (https://www.afr.com/companies/mining/bhp-mulls-oil-exit-in-retreat-from-fossil-fuels-reports-20210721-p58bio?fbclid=IwAR2kYvYhq1J4HbB1G0nY3rW7IjrW8I3lJe K7uiF2VdU4QD9v1BDMPf6_o0E)

BHP is considering getting out of oil and gas in a multibillion-dollar exit that would accelerate its retreat from fossil fuels, according to people familiar with the matter.

The world’s biggest miner is reviewing its petroleum business and considering options including a trade sale, said the people, who asked not to be identified as the talks are private. ...

BHP’s energy assets make it an outlier among the world’s biggest miners -- rival Anglo American has already exited thermal coal under investor pressure and BHP is trying to follow suit.

The company has long said the oil business was one of its strategic pillars and argued that it will make money for at least another decade. But as the world tries to shift away from fossil fuels, BHP wants to avoid getting stuck with assets that more become more difficult to sell, the people said. ...

MichaelBaron
21-07-2021, 08:20 PM
So no problem. Aboriginal chemistry clearly has merit.

so does Chinese? is it included? :) is the merit of Aboriginal greater than what it is substituted? if yes agreed, no problem!

MichaelBaron
21-07-2021, 08:21 PM
BHP mulls oil exit in retreat from fossil fuels: reports (https://www.afr.com/companies/mining/bhp-mulls-oil-exit-in-retreat-from-fossil-fuels-reports-20210721-p58bio?fbclid=IwAR2kYvYhq1J4HbB1G0nY3rW7IjrW8I3lJe K7uiF2VdU4QD9v1BDMPf6_o0E)

BHP is considering getting out of oil and gas in a multibillion-dollar exit that would accelerate its retreat from fossil fuels, according to people familiar with the matter.

The world’s biggest miner is reviewing its petroleum business and considering options including a trade sale, said the people, who asked not to be identified as the talks are private. ...

BHP’s energy assets make it an outlier among the world’s biggest miners -- rival Anglo American has already exited thermal coal under investor pressure and BHP is trying to follow suit.

The company has long said the oil business was one of its strategic pillars and argued that it will make money for at least another decade. But as the world tries to shift away from fossil fuels, BHP wants to avoid getting stuck with assets that more become more difficult to sell, the people said. ...

in other words....they are (due to pressure obviously) reviewing something economically efficient...

Ian Murray
21-07-2021, 09:00 PM
in other words....they are (due to pressure obviously) reviewing something economically efficient...

You think so? More likely, as reported, they are getting out while the going is good, like other carbon-intensive resource extractors. Another decade or so, and fossil fuel reserves will become stranded assets, impossible to offload.

PS. Just in:

https://www.marketforces.org.au/asic-investigation-requested-into-new-hope-statements/

Ian Murray
21-07-2021, 09:08 PM
so does Chinese? is it included?

I don't know. Feel free to check. Many scientific discoveries are of indigenous Chinese origin, of course.


:) is the merit of Aboriginal greater than what it is substituted? if yes agreed, no problem!

There is no substitution. The aboriginal perspective is taught as well as western science. And rightly so - it's our own home-grown branch of science.

MichaelBaron
21-07-2021, 09:41 PM
I don't know. Feel free to check. Many scientific discoveries are of indigenous Chinese origin, of course.



There is no substitution. The aboriginal perspective is taught as well as western science. And rightly so - it's our own home-grown branch of science.

science is not ''home-grown'' or not.. science is science. Likewise, you do not study chess games of players because they are Australian. we learn positional chess from Karpov and Petrosian, we do not include Australian players because they are local. However, if some local player plays good positional games, we include them into study.

Patrick Byrom
21-07-2021, 11:44 PM
science is not ''home-grown'' or not.. science is science. Likewise, you do not study chess games of players because they are Australian. we learn positional chess from Karpov and Petrosian, we do not include Australian players because they are local. However, if some local player plays good positional games, we include them into study.Your analogy doesn't work. Chess is analogous to mathematics - which is universal. But if you want to study Australian animals or plants, you need to use Australian examples, not European ones. And Aboriginal people will have many insights into Australian flora and fauna.

Ian Murray
22-07-2021, 09:45 AM
science is not ''home-grown'' or not.. science is science. Likewise, you do not study chess games of players because they are Australian. we learn positional chess from Karpov and Petrosian, we do not include Australian players because they are local. However, if some local player plays good positional games, we include them into study.

While all chess games have the same objective, there is a myriad of home-grown systems seeking ways to achieve the aim, hundreds of them identified by their geographical origin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chess_openings_named_after_places).

But, unlike chess, science is not immutable:

The Newtonian laws of physics have been overruled by Einstein and quantum physics.

Until the late 18th century, a maxim of European biology, based on countless observations, was that all swans are white. (Australian aborigines would have found that laughable)

Desmond
22-07-2021, 03:04 PM
so does Chinese? is it included? I'm sure chinese-grown discoveries feature quite nicely in biology classes, particularly the infectious diseases sections. Covid-19, SARS, bird flu ... etc

Ian Murray
22-07-2021, 04:07 PM
Japan’s new energy strategy exposes folly of Australia’s “gas led recovery” (https://reneweconomy.com.au/japans-new-energy-strategy-exposes-folly-of-australias-gas-led-recovery/)

Australian fossil fuel exporters have received a massive blow from one of their biggest customers, with Japan proposing a revised national energy strategy that massively ramps up investment in wind and solar and significantly reducing the role coal and gas will play in its energy system.

The proposed revisions to Japan’s ‘basic energy strategy’, published by the ministry for economy, trade and industry on Wednesday, would see Japan accelerate its transition away from coal and gas, and its shift towards renewables and hydrogen ...

The dramatic cuts to both coal and gas generation targets will have serious ramifications for Australian fossil fuel producers, with Japan ranking as Australia’s largest customer for both coal and gas exports. ...

Ian Murray
23-07-2021, 03:57 PM
While all chess games have the same objective, there is a myriad of home-grown systems seeking ways to achieve the aim, hundreds of them identified by their geographical origin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chess_openings_named_after_places).

But, unlike chess, science is not immutable:

The Newtonian laws of physics have been overruled by Einstein and quantum physics.

Until the late 18th century, a maxim of European biology, based on countless observations, was that all swans are white. (Australian aborigines would have found that laughable)

And evolution is ongoing:

Cockatoos in Australia Are Teaching Each Other How to Loot Trash Cans (https://www.sciencealert.com/clever-cockatoos-have-learnt-and-spread-a-culture-of-trash-bin-looting)

Ian Murray
02-08-2021, 09:39 AM
Earth's energy imbalance removes almost all doubt from human-made climate change (https://news.yahoo.com/earths-energy-imbalance-removes-almost-083014356.html)

For decades, Earth’s energy system has been out of whack.

Stability in Earth's climate hinges on a delicate balance between the amount of energy the planet absorbs from the sun and the amount of energy Earth emits back into space. But that equilibrium has been thrown off in recent years — and the imbalance is growing, according to a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications.

The changes to Earth's energy system have major ramifications for the planet's future climate and humanity's understanding of climate change. The Princeton University researchers behind the paper found that there's a less than 1 percent probability that the changes occurred naturally.

The findings undercut a key argument used by people who do not believe human activity is responsible for the bulk of climate change to explain trends in global warming, demonstrating that the planet's energy imbalance cannot be explained just by Earth's own natural variations.

The research also offers important insights into how greenhouse gas emissions and other consequences of human-caused climate change are upsetting the planet's equilibrium and driving global warming, sea-level rise and extreme weather events. ...

MichaelBaron
02-08-2021, 10:25 AM
Japan’s new energy strategy exposes folly of Australia’s “gas led recovery” (https://reneweconomy.com.au/japans-new-energy-strategy-exposes-folly-of-australias-gas-led-recovery/)

Australian fossil fuel exporters have received a massive blow from one of their biggest customers, with Japan proposing a revised national energy strategy that massively ramps up investment in wind and solar and significantly reducing the role coal and gas will play in its energy system.

The proposed revisions to Japan’s ‘basic energy strategy’, published by the ministry for economy, trade and industry on Wednesday, would see Japan accelerate its transition away from coal and gas, and its shift towards renewables and hydrogen ...

The dramatic cuts to both coal and gas generation targets will have serious ramifications for Australian fossil fuel producers, with Japan ranking as Australia’s largest customer for both coal and gas exports. ...

This is very bad news. Their energy strategy is clearly bad for our economy. Writing this just in case, this was shared with the aim of showing how nice it is that Japan is switching to green energy even though its bad for our economy since who cares about economy when we are dealing with planetary health :).

Patrick Byrom
02-08-2021, 01:35 PM
This is very bad news. Their energy strategy is clearly bad for our economy. Writing this just in case, this was shared with the aim of showing how nice it is that Japan is switching to green energy even though its bad for our economy since who cares about economy when we are dealing with planetary health :).Global warming will also damage our economy, of course - not to mention our health.

Ian Murray
02-08-2021, 01:52 PM
This is very bad news. Their energy strategy is clearly bad for our economy. Writing this just in case, this was shared with the aim of showing how nice it is that Japan is switching to green energy even though its bad for our economy since who cares about economy when we are dealing with planetary health :).

The rest of the world is ramping up the transition away from fossil fuels - Australia is lagging behind. It is our energy policy (such as it is), chasing a gas-led transition, which is bad for our economy. The global gas market is collapsing - there won't be any buyers for our very expensive gas by 2050.

Origin should get out of gas while it can, and shift to green hydrogen (https://reneweconomy.com.au/origin-should-get-out-of-gas-while-it-can-and-shift-to-green-hydrogen/)

Ian Murray
09-08-2021, 08:13 PM
This is the most sobering report card yet on climate change and Earth’s future. Here’s what you need to know (https://theconversation.com/this-is-the-most-sobering-report-card-yet-on-climate-change-and-earths-future-heres-what-you-need-to-know-165395)

.... It’s unequivocal: humans are warming the planet

... Higher concentrations of CO₂, growing faster

... Extreme weather on the rise

... Oceans: hotter, higher and more acidic

... Many changes are already irreversible

... How we can stabilise the climate

IPCC Sixth Assessment Report - Fact Sheet (https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/2021/06/Fact_sheet_AR6.pdf)

https://theconversation.createsend1.com/t/ViewEmail/r/F3E67A485DE9ACBD2540EF23F30FEDED/DE42573924C8F77F2C69F821C9DCC086

Ian Murray
14-08-2021, 09:18 AM
Coal miners in talks to self-insure as climate pressure heats up (https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/coal-miners-in-talks-to-self-insure-as-climate-pressure-heats-up-20210806-p58gje.html?fbclid=IwAR0_UQPEo71HyX8z67zCzx5v2M0lJ vPadAsGb16FNFSJ3QX9eb3eXs8LCIo)

Australia’s coal mining industry is considering setting up a self-insurance scheme as major financial institutions abandon the sector because of concerns about global warming.

Producers of coal, the nation’s second-largest export, have been under growing pressure in the face of spiralling costs and insurance premiums as banks, insurers and investors dump coal assets or pledge not to make new investments in the industry. The withdrawal is expected to accelerate after the United Nations warned the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s latest update “must sound a death knell for coal and fossil fuels before they destroy our planet”. ..

antichrist
14-08-2021, 09:45 AM
Coal miners in talks to self-insure as climate pressure heats up (https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/coal-miners-in-talks-to-self-insure-as-climate-pressure-heats-up-20210806-p58gje.html?fbclid=IwAR0_UQPEo71HyX8z67zCzx5v2M0lJ vPadAsGb16FNFSJ3QX9eb3eXs8LCIo)

Australia’s coal mining industry is considering setting up a self-insurance scheme as major financial institutions abandon the sector because of concerns about global warming.

Producers of coal, the nation’s second-largest export, have been under growing pressure in the face of spiralling costs and insurance premiums as banks, insurers and investors dump coal assets or pledge not to make new investments in the industry. The withdrawal is expected to accelerate after the United Nations warned the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s latest update “must sound a death knell for coal and fossil fuels before they destroy our planet”. ..

I predict that within 30 to 50 years anti pollution will become cultish with "dropout communities " every where. There will be monstrous changes in all aspects of life and society.

Ian Murray
14-08-2021, 10:12 AM
I predict that within 30 to 50 years anti pollution will become cultish with "dropout communities " every where. There will be monstrous changes in all aspects of life and society.

We're seeing those changes now, as we continue to heat the planet.

antichrist
14-08-2021, 10:51 AM
We're seeing those changes now, as we continue to heat the planet.

I already speak to youngsters who are deciding not to breed due to state of the planet. Sad in a way. Not fair to them and it was all avoidable because we knew of these risks generations ago but the big dollar rules.

antichrist
25-08-2021, 10:07 AM
https://www.msn.com/en-au/entertainment/news/prince-harry-faces-renewed-private-jet-criticism-overshadowing-his-2-million-charity-pledge/ar-AANHzUH?ocid=msedgntp

Harry talks up the environment but takes private jet planes that are fifty times more polluting than trains. But the world won't listen

Ian Murray
01-09-2021, 09:13 AM
AUSTRALIA'S BIGGEST CLIMATE POLL (https://togetherwecanmovement.org.au/poll)

In July, 2021, Together we can conducted the biggest and most in-depth poll of climate change opinion in Australia. We polled 15,000 Australians and all 151 federal electorates.

79% of voters believe greater climate action will help nature and wildlife survive extreme weather

71% of voters do not believe that new coal or gas power stations should be a priority for the federal government.

67% of voters believe the federal government need to be doing more to address climate change.

67% of voters say Labor and Coalition plans for climate action will influence their vote.

Desmond
01-09-2021, 07:15 PM
XKCD - Earth Temperature Timeline (https://xkcd.com/1732/)

Capablanca-Fan
06-09-2021, 08:27 AM
Just 25 mega-cities produce 52% of the world’s urban greenhouse gas emissions (https://blog.frontiersin.org/2021/07/12/just-25-mega-cities-produce-52-of-the-worlds-urban-greenhouse-gas-emissions/)
Suzanna Burgelman, Frontiers Science News, 12 Jul 2021 in Climate Action

New research published by the open access publisher Frontiers inventories greenhouse gas emissions of 167 globally distributed cities. The study shows that just 25 mega-cities produce 52% of the greenhouse gas emissions from the studied cities. Asian cities emit the most greenhouse gasses (GHG), and most cities of developed countries had significantly higher per capita GHG emissions than those of developing countries. The authors propose three key policy recommendations.

Ian Murray
06-09-2021, 10:16 AM
Australia warned climate crisis will ‘wreak havoc’ on economy if coal isn’t phased out (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/sep/05/australia-warned-climate-crisis-will-wreak-havoc-on-economy-if-coal-isnt-phased-out?fbclid=IwAR1BsLKRobMFhkDH4SOVtnQFdYAGll8htw1Zy zpXRjpBbIhZ0ZxAk8AyBPk)

Senior UN official says it is in Australia’s interest to make the transition to renewables as investors increasingly abandon fossil fuels ...

Lorieas
08-09-2021, 12:20 PM
Who are the Greens. From what i heard the Solar Rays that bounce of the moons Surface and holes are the main cuaze of climate change and the BBC Articlke i found by Josh supports my argument! So i disagree with your statement cuz the greens only look aftert the nature oif our citities. 😜

Lorieas
08-09-2021, 12:23 PM
Prince Harry play golf so i like him hmph. Private jet planes are also good clearing your mind and they ar good for the envirnment cuz they block solar Rayes. ����

Ian Murray
08-09-2021, 12:34 PM
Who are the Greens. From what i heard the Solar Rays that bounce of the moons Surface and holes are the main cuaze of climate change and the BBC Articlke i found by Josh supports my argument! So i disagree with your statement cuz the greens only look aftert the nature oif our citities. ��

Please share Josh's article with us. The Beeb has had other things to say on climate change:

What is climate change? A really simple guide (https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-24021772)

The state of the climate in 2021 (https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20210108-where-we-are-on-climate-change-in-five-charts)

Lorieas
08-09-2021, 12:38 PM
Sure my G. Josh was one of me mates back in the day before the USA virus, He posted this about CLimate change and solar rayes. Unfortunaetly the Beeb is full of nutters whjo dont beleive in climate change bro. The BBC fired Josh so i cannot find the article about solar rayes but i remember it clearly and it had some very wise argumenrts that Trump aggress with