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Desmond
24-02-2020, 06:33 PM
Total, utter bollocks.

When 61 countries are ranked by their climate change performance, Sweden (governed for 40 years by The Social Democratic Party) are top performers. Bottom - United States. CCPI-2020-Results_Web_Version.pdf (https://newclimate.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/CCPI-2020-Results_Web_Version.pdf)Looks like Australia is the only one with no points for climate policy. But we already knew that.

MichaelBaron
24-02-2020, 09:06 PM
The Totally, Utterly Irrefutable Case Against Socialism (https://www.heritage.org/conservatism/commentary/the-totally-utterly-irrefutable-case-against-socialism)
Lee Edwards, Ph.D., Heritage Foundation, 11 Jul 2019

Markets, not bureaucrats, are better for the environment, asserts Shawn Regan, a fellow at the Property and Environment Research Center, pointing out that Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union “were the most polluted and degraded places on earth.”

He quotes the economist Murray Feshbach and journalist Alfred Friendly Jr. as writing that when historians conduct an autopsy of Soviet Communism, “they may reach the verdict of death by ecocide.”

Closer to home, says Regan, the attempts of Cuban socialists to maximize production at all costs “has caused extensive air, soil, and water pollution.”

In Venezuela, socialist policies have contaminated drinking water supplies, fueled rampant deforestation, and caused frequent oil spills. The principal guilty party is the state-owned energy company.

Rarely, if ever, will Ocasio-Cortez and other sponsors of the Green New Deal concede the painful truth about socialism’s dismal environmental legacy.


Actually its very similar to chess market forces are dynamic so consider a range of factors and without market forces - dynamism goes!

Ian Murray
25-02-2020, 10:05 AM
Breking news

Equinor abandons plans to drill for oil in Great Australian Bight (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-02-25/equinor-abandons-plan-to-drill-for-oil-in-great-australian-bight/11997910)

Norwegian company Equinor has become the third major fossil fuel producer to abandon plans to drill for oil in the Great Australian Bight.

The company said it had concluded that its exploration drilling plan was "not commercially competitive" compared with other exploration opportunities. ...

ER
25-02-2020, 06:40 PM
Looks like we have an anti - Greta!
Sounds like she is eloquent, educated and she knows what she is talking about!

https://youtu.be/-mIMhQKb1BA
Ladies and gentlemen here's Naomi Seibt!

bzzt a debate between Naomi and Greta would be interesting, provided it won't escalate into a hair pulling bout!

Ian Murray
25-02-2020, 08:20 PM
... a debate between Naomi and Greta would be interesting

In Swedish

ER
25-02-2020, 09:27 PM
In Swedish

In German!

MichaelBaron
26-02-2020, 01:11 AM
Looks like we have an anti - Greta!
Sounds like she is eloquent, educated and she knows what she is talking about!

https://youtu.be/-mIMhQKb1BA
Ladies and gentlemen here's Naomi Seibt!

bzzt a debate between Naomi and Greta would be interesting, provided it won't escalate into a hair pulling bout!

It is a true pleasure to listen to someone analytical, calm...and most importantly...normal for a change!

ER
26-02-2020, 04:48 AM
How come the video was removed?
Actually, it looks like it was removed from other sites as well, maybe fake, inappropriate, or somehow non legit. well ...

Blunderbuss
26-02-2020, 06:41 AM
Maybe because of The Heartland Institute's links to the far right : https://www.desmogblog.com/heartland-institute (https://www.desmogblog.com/heartland-institute)


President Tim Huelskamp is former chairman of the Tea Party Caucus and a member of the far-right House Freedom Caucus.

Oh no wait that can't be it dutton-says-leftwing-lunatics-must-be-dealt-with-as-asio-warns-of-far-right-threat (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/feb/25/dutton-says-leftwing-lunatics-must-be-dealt-with-as-asio-warns-of-far-right-threat) :)

ER
26-02-2020, 07:35 AM
it's on again but I won't bother. gotta travel interstate anyway!

Blunderbuss
26-02-2020, 04:06 PM
Looks like we have an anti - Greta! ... here's Naomi Seibt!

You can read more about The Heartland Institute 'hiring' Naomi Seibt here : washington-post-amplifies-climate-change-denialism-from-noted-propaganda-factory (https://www.vice.com/en_au/article/n7j4dm/washington-post-amplifies-climate-change-denialism-from-noted-propaganda-factory)

Patrick Byrom
26-02-2020, 05:46 PM
You can read more about The Heartland Institute 'hiring' Naomi Seibt here : washington-post-amplifies-climate-change-denialism-from-noted-propaganda-factory (https://www.vice.com/en_au/article/n7j4dm/washington-post-amplifies-climate-change-denialism-from-noted-propaganda-factory)You can also read more about her here (https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/feb/25/anti-greta-teen-activist-cpac-conference-climate-sceptic), including her association with the far-right AfD party in Germany.

The huge difference between her and Thunberg is that Thunberg accepts the science. Seibt, on the other hand, despite having no obvious qualifications or experience in physics, believes that she understands physics better than actual physicists: 'In another film, Naomi Seibt vs Greta Thunberg: Whom Should We Trust?, Seibt says: “Science is entirely based on intellectual humility and it is important that we keep questioning the narrative that is out there instead of promoting it, and these days climate change science really isn’t science at all."'

Ian Murray
26-02-2020, 07:53 PM
You can also read more about her here (https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/feb/25/anti-greta-teen-activist-cpac-conference-climate-sceptic), including her association with the far-right AfD party in Germany.

The huge difference between her and Thunberg is that Thunberg accepts the science. Seibt, on the other hand, despite having no obvious qualifications or experience in physics, believes that she understands physics better than actual physicists: 'In another film, Naomi Seibt vs Greta Thunberg: Whom Should We Trust?, Seibt says: “Science is entirely based on intellectual humility and it is important that we keep questioning the narrative that is out there instead of promoting it, and these days climate change science really isn’t science at all."'

An AfD member, no less. Neo-Nazis can find a good home with the Heartland Institute.

Blunderbuss
27-02-2020, 10:16 AM
Looks like Australia is the only one with no points for climate policy. But we already knew that.

Yes, unfortunately it seems not much has changed from the 60’s. 'Australia is a lucky country run by second rate people who share its luck.' - Donald Horne

MichaelBaron
27-02-2020, 10:32 AM
https://inews.co.uk/culture/television/solve-problem-like-donald-trump-shoot-says-sir-david-attenborough-533183?fbclid=IwAR0dkZIID0TqblcLr2oHs1gIOoR8OwR55B ToSWw1K97jyJuYDuHp31nxHls

Suggesting to ''shoot'' Donald Trump due to his stand on Climate change....what a fantastic civilised approach ...may be She and Greta can cooperate on this one. If she is the one to fire a shot - she may be able to avoid prison given her mental condition.

MichaelBaron
27-02-2020, 10:36 AM
You can also read more about her here (https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/feb/25/anti-greta-teen-activist-cpac-conference-climate-sceptic), including her association with the far-right AfD party in Germany.

The huge difference between her and Thunberg is that Thunberg accepts the science. Seibt, on the other hand, despite having no obvious qualifications or experience in physics, believes that she understands physics better than actual physicists: 'In another film, Naomi Seibt vs Greta Thunberg: Whom Should We Trust?, Seibt says: “Science is entirely based on intellectual humility and it is important that we keep questioning the narrative that is out there instead of promoting it, and these days climate change science really isn’t science at all."'

It is questioning (critical analysis) of the scientific facts that moves the very science forward. I am not familiar with Seibt's political background but It has little to do with what she has to say about climate change anyway, so I suggest we consider her opinion on this topic rather than launch a personal attack at her, shifting focus from what she has to say about our obsession with climate.

Ian Murray
27-02-2020, 11:47 AM
It is questioning (critical analysis) of the scientific facts that moves the very science forward. I am not familiar with Seibt's political background but It has little to do with what she has to say about climate change anyway, so I suggest we consider her opinion on this topic rather than launch a personal attack at her, shifting focus from what she has to say about our obsession with climate.

The scientific facts remain facts regardless of what deniers may or may not believe. Siebt has nothing to offer the advancement of science - her association with Heartland only contributes to the denial of science, in the interests of the fossil fuel lobby. Heartland still denies the link between smoking and cancer.

Blunderbuss
27-02-2020, 12:25 PM
.. rather than launch a personal attack at her...

Oh the irony. You never miss an opportunity to make baseless remarks about Greta’s alleged mental health issues. Yet, we point out that Heartland ‘hire’ the daughter of a far right politician – and you accuse us of making personal attacks!

Ian Murray
27-02-2020, 12:26 PM
Inside Australia's climate emergency: the killer heat (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2020/feb/27/killer-heat-how-a-warming-land-is-changing-australia-forever)

... Australia’s seven hottest days on record were in the second half of December, 2019. Prior to 2018, there were only four days on which the maximum temperatures across the country were on average hotter than 40C. In the past two years there have been 18.

Karl Braganza, the Bureau of Meteorology's manager of climate monitoring, says the number of extreme heat days — those hotter than 35C — has increased five-fold in just the past 30 years. ...

The mortality rate increases nearly 20% when the average temperature across a 24 hour period is above 30C, she [Dr Diana Egerton-Warburton, an emergency doctor at Monash Health in Melbourne] says. “When the overnight minimum is 24C or above is really when our heat health alert steps in.”

In early 2009, two weeks before the Black Saturday bushfires in Victoria that killed 173 people, Egerton-Warburton was working in the Monash medical centre emergency department in Melbourne when an extreme heatwave struck.

Temperatures in the state got as hot as 48.8C. More than 400 people died over four days in south-eastern Australia due to heat exposure. ...

Patrick Byrom
27-02-2020, 01:23 PM
Oh the irony. You never miss an opportunity to make baseless remarks about Greta’s alleged mental health issues. Yet, we point out that Heartland ‘hire’ the daughter of a far right politician – and you accuse us of making personal attacks!

Michael would never make a personal attack :P

It is a true pleasure to listen to someone analytical, calm...and most importantly...normal for a change!

Patrick Byrom
27-02-2020, 01:28 PM
It is questioning (critical analysis) of the scientific facts that moves the very science forward. I am not familiar with Seibt's political background but It has little to do with what she has to say about climate change anyway, so I suggest we consider her opinion on this topic rather than launch a personal attack at her, shifting focus from what she has to say about our obsession with climate.Would you like to quote her explanation of why atmospheric physics isn't science?

MichaelBaron
27-02-2020, 02:11 PM
Oh the irony. You never miss an opportunity to make baseless remarks about Greta’s alleged mental health issues. Yet, we point out that Heartland ‘hire’ the daughter of a far right politician – and you accuse us of making personal attacks!

I do not mind you pointing this out...I trust it is no ground for dismissing her opinion though! :)

MichaelBaron
27-02-2020, 02:13 PM
Would you like to quote her explanation of why atmospheric physics isn't science?

As I am not qualified in atmospheric physics. I would not want to comment on it in the first place. I trust that climate alarmists are all qualified in Atmospheric physics...AC in particular :).

Patrick Byrom
27-02-2020, 06:40 PM
As I am not qualified in atmospheric physics. I would not want to comment on it in the first place. I trust that climate alarmists are all qualified in Atmospheric physics...AC in particular :).You don't need to be qualified in physics to accept what the experts at the CSIRO and BOM are telling you - just as you don't need to be a GM to accept the advice of Magnus Carlsen. On the other hand, if you want to reject the advice of experts, as Seibt does, then you do need to be an expert yourself - otherwise it's like taking the advice of a beginner over that of Carlsen.

Blunderbuss
28-02-2020, 05:23 PM
Inside Australia's climate emergency: the killer heat (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2020/feb/27/killer-heat-how-a-warming-land-is-changing-australia-forever)...

Really good series from the Guardian I notice that they credit The Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/national/gone-in-a-generation/) for inspiring them.

Ian Murray
28-02-2020, 05:44 PM
Albanese says we can’t replace steelmaking coal. But we already have green alternatives (https://theconversation.com/albanese-says-we-cant-replace-steelmaking-coal-but-we-already-have-green-alternatives-126599)

Despite a wealth of evidence to the contrary, some still propagate the myth that the world will need Australian coal for decades to come. Last weekend Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese joined in, saying thermal and metallurgical coal mining and exports would continue after 2050, even with a net zero emissions target.

Metallurgical coal (or “coking coal”) is mined to produce the carbon used in steelmaking, while thermal coal is used to make steam that generates electricity.

Albanese argues there’s no replacement for metallurgical coal, but this is not the case. The assertion stems from a fundamental misunderstanding of modern steelmaking, and places Australian manufacturers at risk of missing out on massive opportunities in the global shift to a low-carbon economy.

Just as thermal coal can be replaced with clean energy from renewables, we can use low-emissions steel manufacturing to phase out metallurgical coal. ...

MichaelBaron
29-02-2020, 07:18 PM
Albanese says we can’t replace steelmaking coal. But we already have green alternatives (https://theconversation.com/albanese-says-we-cant-replace-steelmaking-coal-but-we-already-have-green-alternatives-126599)

Despite a wealth of evidence to the contrary, some still propagate the myth that the world will need Australian coal for decades to come. Last weekend Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese joined in, saying thermal and metallurgical coal mining and exports would continue after 2050, even with a net zero emissions target.

Metallurgical coal (or “coking coal”) is mined to produce the carbon used in steelmaking, while thermal coal is used to make steam that generates electricity.

Albanese argues there’s no replacement for metallurgical coal, but this is not the case. The assertion stems from a fundamental misunderstanding of modern steelmaking, and places Australian manufacturers at risk of missing out on massive opportunities in the global shift to a low-carbon economy.

Just as thermal coal can be replaced with clean energy from renewables, we can use low-emissions steel manufacturing to phase out metallurgical coal. ...

So replace it...just do it through the market forces! :).

Also, I wonder if by the year 2050, totally new kinds of fuels may become available. In 30 years, a lot of things may happen.

Ian Murray
29-02-2020, 08:15 PM
So replace it...just do it through the market forces! :).

It's happening right now. Major European steelmakers like ThyssenKrupp and SSAB are building pilot plants, while Boston Metal ([/QUOTE]) in the US is being backed by Bill Gates.

The era of making steel without carbon emissions is here (https://www.aumanufacturing.com.au/the-era-of-making-steel-without-carbon-emissions-is-here)


Also, I wonder if by the year 2050, totally new kinds of fuels may become available. In 30 years, a lot of things may happen.

Hydrogen. Made from water, emissions-free (assuming the electrolysis process is powered by renewables), easily packed and transported, able to power industry and transport.

MichaelBaron
01-03-2020, 03:19 PM
It's happening right now. Major European steelmakers like ThyssenKrupp and SSAB are building pilot plants, while Boston Metal () in the US is being backed by Bill Gates.

The era of making steel without carbon emissions is here (https://www.aumanufacturing.com.au/the-era-of-making-steel-without-carbon-emissions-is-here)



Hydrogen. Made from water, emissions-free (assuming the electrolysis process is powered by renewables), easily packed and transported, able to power industry and transport.[/QUOTE]

Good! This is the best solution of all. To quote the article: While SSAB estimates steel made with its process s currnetly 20 to 30 per cent more expensive, Boston claims that its steel would actually be cheaper.

So...if its really cheaper - that is the way to go.

ER
01-03-2020, 04:16 PM
Hysteria whippers beware, Naomi's back! :D

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/feb/25/anti-greta-teen-activist-cpac-conference-climate-sceptic

Ian Murray
01-03-2020, 05:00 PM
"]Boston Metal[/URL] in the US is being backed by Bill Gates.

The era of making steel without carbon emissions is here (https://www.aumanufacturing.com.au/the-era-of-making-steel-without-carbon-emissions-is-here)



Hydrogen. Made from water, emissions-free (assuming the electrolysis process is powered by renewables), easily packed and transported, able to power industry and transport.

Good! This is the best solution of all. To quote the article: While SSAB estimates steel made with its process s currnetly 20 to 30 per cent more expensive, Boston claims that its steel would actually be cheaper.

So...if its really cheaper - that is the way to go.[/QUOTE]

But note of course that the solutions are not being driven by market forces as narrowly defined by short-term profits, but by the global decarbonisation imperative

Capablanca-Fan
02-03-2020, 08:52 AM
Why and how China secretly supports climate hysteria (https://www.spectator.com.au/2020/02/why-and-how-china-secretly-supports-climate-hysteria)
Andrew L. Urban, Spectator Australia, 26 February 2020

At the United Nations, for the purpose of setting emission-reduction targets, China self-declares as a ‘developing country’, avoiding onerous expectations. It exploits this privilege to maximum advantage. Its ‘greenhouse’ gas emissions are rising at the fastest pace in seven years. It has plans to build 300–500 new coal-fired power stations and to open 17 new coal mines within a decade. That’s how seriously they take the alleged threat of CO2 driven climate change. (They don’t seem bothered by uber-alarmist prophecies that the planet will have fried n’ died by then.) And I suggest this is a conscious decision to take advantage of the climate hysteria.

China’s economy is, in fact, the world’s second-largest economy overall (behind the United States) with a GDP of over US$14 trillion. Pretty darned good for a ‘developing’ economy.

The long term detriment to economies caused by aggressive climate change activism-driven public policies — and the erosion of quality of life for millions in the west — dovetails with the failures of politicians, the self-interest of businesses, the TTP and all the influencing campaigns that China runs. Thanks to climate hysteria, Australia, one of the most energy-rich nations in the world (even without nuclear options), has denied itself the benefits of cheap energy. Many politicians are determined to further undermine (if that’s the right word) the benefits of our self-sufficiency in coal.

Ian Murray
02-03-2020, 09:35 PM
Why and how China secretly supports climate hysteria (https://www.spectator.com.au/2020/02/why-and-how-china-secretly-supports-climate-hysteria)
Andrew L. Urban, Spectator Australia, 26 February 2020

LOL. Never let the facts get in the way of a good story

Patrick Byrom
02-03-2020, 09:51 PM
LOL. Never let the facts get in the way of a good storyCapablanca-Fan seems to think that the science of atmospheric physics originated in China :)

Ian Murray
03-03-2020, 06:20 PM
Tesla “big battery” in Australia is becoming a bigger nightmare for fossil fuel power generators (https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-big-battery-hornsdale-australia-cost-savings)

Tesla’s “big battery” utility-scale Powerpack system at the Hornsdale Power Reserve in South Australia has yielded more than doubled the savings to consumers in 2019 than the year prior as it dominates fossil fuel generators on quicker demand response for the grid.

Hornsdale Power Reserve saved consumers AUD116 million ($75.78 million) in 2019, a big jump from AUD40 million ($26.14 million) savings in 2018. ...

MichaelBaron
07-03-2020, 12:51 AM
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-bristol-51696203
Hundreds have called for the organisers of a Greta Thunberg climate change rally to pay for damage caused to green space.

Around 15,000 people are believed to have attended Friday's Bristol Youth Strike 4 Climate rally, churning up College Green and angering many.

A fundraiser was set up for repairs, which then resulted in calls for rally organisers to cover the costs.

The organiser said people had done their best in the muddy conditions.

Climate campaigner Greta gave a speech on College Green before leading a march around the city.

Ian Murray
07-03-2020, 07:14 AM
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-bristol-51696203
Hundreds have called for the organisers of a Greta Thunberg climate change rally to pay for damage caused to green space.

Around 15,000 people are believed to have attended Friday's Bristol Youth Strike 4 Climate rally, churning up College Green and angering many.

A fundraiser was set up for repairs, which then resulted in calls for rally organisers to cover the costs.

The organiser said people had done their best in the muddy conditions.

Climate campaigner Greta gave a speech on College Green before leading a march around the city.

Avon and Somerset Police had raised safety concerns before the event, but Supt Andy Bennett praised the organisers afterwards.

He said: "I think it's been a great success for the city and a great success for the organisers." (ibid)

ER
07-03-2020, 07:40 AM
Would be good to have her come down to Oz for a bit of balance (and sense)


https://youtu.be/aKET8Hs2aac

Patrick Byrom
07-03-2020, 12:33 PM
Would be good to have her come down to Oz for a bit of balance (and sense) ...
Maybe she can have a debate with Nobel Prize winner Brian Schmidt on why atmospheric physics isn't science? Of course, she wouldn't actually be able to understand Schmidt, so maybe a debate can be arranged with a local primary school student instead :)

MichaelBaron
07-03-2020, 08:20 PM
Avon and Somerset Police had raised safety concerns before the event, but Supt Andy Bennett praised the organisers afterwards.

He said: "I think it's been a great success for the city and a great success for the organisers." (ibid)

What a great success...so who will play for cleaning up?

MichaelBaron
07-03-2020, 08:21 PM
Maybe she can have a debate with Nobel Prize winner Brian Schmidt on why atmospheric physics isn't science? Of course, she wouldn't actually be able to understand Schmidt, so maybe a debate can be arranged with a local primary school student instead :)

Re debate with student: is Greta still in school? If yes...could be her...but not sure Greta is :).

William AS
07-03-2020, 08:31 PM
Maybe she can have a debate with Nobel Prize winner Brian Schmidt on why atmospheric physics isn't science? Of course, she wouldn't actually be able to understand Schmidt, so maybe a debate can be arranged with a local primary school student instead :)

May be difficult to find a primary school student who would not puke at the overwhelming odour of male bovine ordure. ;)

ER
07-03-2020, 09:29 PM
Maybe she can have a debate with Nobel Prize winner Brian Schmidt on why atmospheric physics isn't science? Of course, she wouldn't actually be able to understand Schmidt, so maybe a debate can be arranged with a local primary school student instead :)

Every suggestion, (no matter how silly) is welcomed! :D :P


May be difficult to find a primary school student who would not puke at the overwhelming odour of male bovine ordure.

Billy you naughty boy, obviously you still haven't recovered from the traumatic memories of that disgusting puking display of someone in Ballarat some years back! :D :P

Desmond
07-03-2020, 09:40 PM
Maybe she can have a debate with Nobel Prize winner Brian Schmidt on why atmospheric physics isn't science? Of course, she wouldn't actually be able to understand Schmidt, so maybe a debate can be arranged with a local primary school student instead :)

The problem is: denialists are post-fact. You can't convice them with facts.

Patrick Byrom
08-03-2020, 01:34 PM
Re debate with student: is Greta still in school? If yes...could be her...but not sure Greta is :).Greta is not in primary school.

Ian Murray
08-03-2020, 02:07 PM
What a great success...so who will play for cleaning up?

Perhaps you should read the article you linked to

Patrick Byrom
08-03-2020, 05:04 PM
Every suggestion, (no matter how silly) is welcomed! :D :P Then I suggest she should read this primary school level article on global warming (https://www.ducksters.com/science/environment/global_warming.php) to help prepare for future debates. There are plenty of more advanced articles on the internet, of course, but she needs to start at a level appropriate to her level of understanding :P

ER
08-03-2020, 06:28 PM
… There are plenty of more advanced articles on the internet, of course, …

Research has been done concluding that the highest intelligent cogent point b/n speaker and audience on the particular matter was


https://youtu.be/pc-CQKaGjkY

:D :P

Ian Murray
08-03-2020, 10:05 PM
Perhaps you should read the article you linked to

By this time you will have read your posted article, and learned that there is a GoFundMe crowd-funding campaign (https://www.gofundme.com/f/TurnCollegeGreenGreenAgain?utm_medium=copy_link&utm_source=customer&utm_campaign=p_lico+share-sheet+exp4va) to pay for the damage:


...Jon Usher, head of partnerships of Bristol-based charity Sustrans, set up a GoFundMe page after the march ended, aiming to raise £20,000.

By Sunday morning more than £9,000 had been donated.

Mr Usher, who attended the rally, said: "I did it knowing how important the green is to our staff as a place to go in the spring and summertime.

"I thought it would be nice to give something back to the city." ...

Desmond
09-03-2020, 11:25 AM
https://i.redd.it/yf14mibvcgl41.jpg

Patrick Byrom
09-03-2020, 08:21 PM
I guess there are no science deniers in foxholes: Ted Cruz has suddenly 'found science' and is self-quarantining after contact with a corona virus carrier :)

Ian Murray
09-03-2020, 08:48 PM
4115

Ian Murray
11-03-2020, 08:32 PM
Regional NSW town to host large-scale hydrogen energy storage project – state’s first (https://reneweconomy.com.au/regional-nsw-town-to-host-large-scale-hydrogen-energy-storage-project-states-first-79334/)

Renewable hydrogen will be used for large-scale energy storage for the first time in New South Wales, after securing government support for the integration of Australian developed technology at a community solar farm. ...

Desmond
07-05-2020, 12:46 PM
Global warming pushes April temperatures into record territory, as 2020 heads for disquieting milestone (https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2020/05/05/global-warming-pushes-april-temperatures-into-record-territory-2020-heads-disquieting-milestone/?fbclid=IwAR0ZUZLRYouDZoCiDCQCZsXF3EcDP3De9kvDJPEc XdAYwKSZJxaZfvjDKL0)
May 5, 2020

Last month tied for the warmest April on record for the globe, as 2020 hurtles toward the warmest year milestone.

New data, released Tuesday from the European Union’s Copernicus Climate Change Service, lends further support to the prediction that 2020 will rank among the top two warmest years recorded.

In April, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, using its own temperature monitoring data, reported that there is a 75 percent chance that 2020 will become the planet’s warmest year since instrument records began in 1880, and very likely long before that. ...

The Great Barrier Reef, a World Heritage Site, suffered its biggest coral bleaching event on record in 2020 as a marine heat wave gripped the 1,400-mile-long biodiversity hot spot. ...

Assuming NOAA ranks April as having global average temperatures above the 20th-century average, it would be the 424th straight month to have that distinction.

In other words, those who are 35 years old and younger have never experienced a cooler-than-average month on Earth.

antichrist
07-05-2020, 02:04 PM
The Reef got hit very badly a few years ago and well. What a disaster. Even Obama had a go at Abbott over it

Desmond
13-05-2020, 11:18 AM
End of the road for fossil fuel subsidies (https://www.politico.com/news/2020/04/24/the-end-of-the-road-for-fossil-fuel-subsidies-205584)
Politico, 24 April 2020

How financially sustainable is an industry if it is distorted by $5 trillion in annual subsidies? That's the challenge laid out by United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres, who is taking direct aim at government subsidies for producers and consumers of fuels such as oil, gas and coal. “Fossil fuel subsidies must end, and polluters must start paying for their pollution,” Guterres said Wednesday. ...

Five trillion dollars can pay off a lot of debt or buy a lot of green infrastructure. And that means subsidy policies that once seemed impossible to shift, may suddenly be impossible to maintain.

Oil prices ranging from zero to $20 a barrel also force investors and executives to confront deeper issues about fossil fuel companies. ...

Francesco Starace, CEO of Italian electric provider ENEL, put it this way: “The crisis is a confirmation of a stakeholder trend that was already underway. It’s about longer term sustainable practices. A company needs to address deeper issues than just quarterly results. They need to find the roots that justify their existence.” ...

Ian Murray
15-05-2020, 05:55 PM
While the world looked the other way, corporate giants abandoned coal (https://www.theage.com.au/environment/climate-change/while-the-world-looked-the-other-way-corporate-giants-abandoned-coal-20200514-p54ssj.html)

Can we deal with a pandemic and global warming at once – both urgent, one an immediate hit, the other a decade-long burn? Well, yes, because – even with front pages dominated by COVID-19 – last month saw an astonishing concentration of decisions by international corporates to ditch carbon. And they slipped by, with the world looking the other way.

Apart from anything else, April's tilt against thermal coal puts paid to dreams in Canberra of a new coal-fired plant. After last month’s shift, nobody will invest in it, nobody will insure it. ...

littlesprout85
15-05-2020, 11:01 PM
Ahh..... Sprouty is totally on-board with a lot of like minded Aussies up in this thread when it comes to da Corona Virus..... Sprout totally thinks that Climate Change/Global Warming caused the Corona Virus Pandemic of 2020.... Just a few years ago back in 2015 when da Ebola Outbreak happened in Africa.The Obama Admin warned that due to da up tick in global temperature aka.Global Warming da Ebola could easily break da containment hot zone in da Congo n go pandemic...

So now 5 years later da global temperature is now like 1 more degree hotter than back in 2015 globally n da Corona Virus which btw is in da same catagory da Ebola has broke containment in China n has gone Worldwide. Da only thing that can possible slow it is to get it cold/freezy winter snow weather n for long stretch of time of which we don't have due to global warming now in 2020..to bad da US isn't da same temperature say like back in 1980..Keep in mind Sproutys Lives in da desert n its over 100f each n every day now til Nov 2020 in Arizona n da Corona Laughs Hard at Thump Hypothesis "oh da Summer Heat will kill da corona" LOLOLOL yea right ...

HAhaHahaha da Clown Prez Thump hasn't even taken any regular public High School Science Classes or Biology n yet claims greatness in both fields(private school majoring in women)....... We are in trouble folks n da only way out is for da US n da World to get tough on old energy streams(oil/natural gas/petro/hydrocarbons) n go with new cleaner energy streams(solar/wind/hydro) worldwide, oh yes......

-Sprout85

Blunderbuss
09-06-2020, 12:42 PM
Britain goes coal free as renewables edge out fossil fuels (https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52973089)


... it is not just coal that is being eclipsed by renewables.

So far this year, renewables have generated more power than all fossil fuels put together.

Breaking it down, renewables were responsible for 37% of electricity supplied to the network versus 35% for fossil fuels.

Nuclear accounted for about 18% and imports for the remaining 10% or so, according to figures from the online environmental journal, Carbon Brief.

"So far this year renewables have generated more electricity than fossil fuels and that's never happened before", says Dr Simon Evans of Carbon Brief.

Ian Murray
26-06-2020, 10:34 AM
Reserve Bank warns of 25% GDP loss by 2100 unless action taken on climate change (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/jun/26/reserve-bank-warns-of-25-gdp-loss-by-2100-unless-action-taken-on-climate-change)

More than 60 central banks, including the Reserve Bank of Australia and the Bank of England, have warned that global GDP could fall by 25% by 2100 if the world does not act to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions.

They suggested if the world acted to limit emissions to net zero by about 2070, giving a 67% chance of limiting global heating to 2C above pre-industrial levels, the impact of the climate crisis on global GDP could be about 4%. ...

antichrist
26-06-2020, 12:16 PM
I understand and agree but I care more about our environment than the GDP etc.

Ian Murray
26-06-2020, 12:30 PM
I understand and agree but I care more about our environment than the GDP etc.

They are not separate issues - the effects of global warming on the environment and human society will cause a fall in economic output.

It is common for sceptics to dismiss climate action because of the costs, without considering the greater costs of inaction.

Effects of Global Warming (https://www.livescience.com/37057-global-warming-effects.html)

Climate change and the cost of inaction (https://voxeu.org/article/climate-change-and-cost-inaction)

MichaelBaron
26-06-2020, 12:47 PM
Reserve Bank warns of 25% GDP loss by 2100 unless action taken on climate change (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/jun/26/reserve-bank-warns-of-25-gdp-loss-by-2100-unless-action-taken-on-climate-change)

More than 60 central banks, including the Reserve Bank of Australia and the Bank of England, have warned that global GDP could fall by 25% by 2100 if the world does not act to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions.

They suggested if the world acted to limit emissions to net zero by about 2070, giving a 67% chance of limiting global heating to 2C above pre-industrial levels, the impact of the climate crisis on global GDP could be about 4%. ...

Or yes...now is the time to fight climate change....Even Greta started to diversify her activities to remain in the limelight :)

MichaelBaron
26-06-2020, 12:48 PM
I understand and agree but I care more about our environment than the GDP etc.

Brilliant response...so...go back to a tribal society? Everything around you must collapse in hope that dinasaurs come back?

antichrist
26-06-2020, 03:14 PM
Brilliant response...so...go back to a tribal society? Everything around you must collapse in hope that dinasaurs come back?

I don't think that we need dinos because we still have dinosaur thinking today. You mentioned tribal society not me. For long term healthy survival of the biosphere and ourselves we need to severely regulate physical production to let the earth recover. That is even written in the holy books a few thousand years ago. Man made climate is a combination of using of fossil fuels, certain types of production and their raw materials and destruction of the environment. These are fueled by increasing population of course. When considering the environment since popular use of the motor car at the beginning of last century we cannot go on much further in this manner. If you watched that ABC program the Odyssey of the Ocean (?) the past few weeks you would have seen the serious damage we have already inflicted. WE either have morals or we don't. People pre WW2 lived a much more austere and environmentally friendly life that since then. In the countryside where I have lived as a youngster that lifestyle had not changed dramatically I don't think except for more cars. With all our mod cons that have changed our lives we can pick and choose the ones are really necessary and are bearable on the environment and adjust accordingly. I have seen domestic coffee-making machines that are big as a 1,000cc motor bike engine and maybe just as heavy -what a polluting waste. They cost about $2,000. that is only one example. The old slogan was painted on the railway bridge at Ashfield Railway Station in Sydney, I am sure that ER has seen it a hundred times - CONSUME, BE SILENT AND DIE!

ER
26-06-2020, 04:37 PM
I am sure that ER has seen it a hundred times - CONSUME, BE SILENT AND DIE!

Yeah I remember it clearly since the one on Ashfield was the most prominent one! I think the "AND" was missing was just "Consume, Be Silent, Die"! There was also a very long one in graffiti form on one of the tunnel walls connecting Redfern to Central expanding to a length of more than 30m. Sydney was light years ahead of other capital cities regarding social awareness movements. Melbourne was leading the trade union struggle though. Another popular slogan which survived well into the 80s (it started in the 50s) was Stace's Eternity, which finally adorned Harbour Bridge in the Millennium celebrations as well as the Sydney Olympics opening ceremony. https://www.amusingplanet.com/2018/07/the-story-behind-sydneys-eternity.html
Back to the topic, continuous urbanization of the cities, analogous population increase and industrial base expansion just to name three of what you consider as negative factors in environment's damage won't fade away that easy!

MichaelBaron
01-07-2020, 06:55 PM
https://www.theaustralian.com.au/commentary/sorry-for-misleading-you-but-i-cried-wolf-on-the-global-dangers-of-climate-change/news-story/0079baab2757686b0bffc014de064676?fbclid=IwAR2mMftO of4myK9HsleZEQjD3WD1KrbJoCEy1xiANfTOOnlYBt2-5IhkBa0

Some food for thought...

Ian Murray
01-07-2020, 07:23 PM
https://www.theaustralian.com.au/commentary/sorry-for-misleading-you-but-i-cried-wolf-on-the-global-dangers-of-climate-change/news-story/0079baab2757686b0bffc014de064676?fbclid=IwAR2mMftO of4myK9HsleZEQjD3WD1KrbJoCEy1xiANfTOOnlYBt2-5IhkBa0

Some food for thought...

The Australian is paywalled. I for one would never pay for a subscription again, while it remains in the Murdoch stable

idledim
02-07-2020, 08:58 PM
The Australian is paywalled. I for one would never pay for a subscription again, while it remains in the Murdoch stable

What a shame that you can't read the 1983 comments published in response to this article so far! Thankfully, the article itself also appears in Quillette (which is not paywalled), and interested readers can access the apology by environmental activist Michael Shellenberger HERE (https://quillette.com/2020/06/30/on-behalf-of-environmentalists-i-apologize-for-the-climate-scare/)

Patrick Byrom
02-07-2020, 09:22 PM
Of course the so-called 'climate scare' is based on the laws of physics, which have nothing to do with Shellenberger. Although I'm sure the publicity will help to sell his new book :)

Kevin Bonham
02-07-2020, 10:36 PM
I'd be interested to read his book and see how much I agreed with and how sound or otherwise the arguments are.

To pick a few close to my areas of understanding, "Wood fuel is far worse for people and wildlife than fossil fuels" is almost certainly true, though impacts on wildlife can be reduced by using approved plantation-sourced timber and not wood ripped out of the bush (often illegally).

"Humans are not causing a “sixth mass extinction”" - I do find the "sixth mass extinction" stuff overcooked and frequently disagree with it. We are causing a significant species extinction rate but at the moment we don't seem to be wiping out major branches of life. To this point the rate of known climate related extinctions is very low. Perhaps they will accelerate several decades down the track if climate change is allowed to escalate.

"Habitat loss and the direct killing of wild animals are bigger threats to species than climate change" - in the short to medium term, definitely true. In the long term if current climate trends continue, that might change.

Blunderbuss
02-07-2020, 11:49 PM
I confess I have only quickly read the article, none the less three points jumped out for me.

(1). He is a big fan of Nuclear Power. I don’t necessarily disagree and nor do others (I remember George Monbiot and Arthur Scargill arguing about this years ago https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2008/aug/08/nuclearpower.fossilfuels). The free market crowd tell us let the ‘market’ decide, we should be technology agnostic. Well the only way building a Nuclear power station in Oz stacks up is if there is a price on carbon emissions.

(2). He claims ‘100 percent renewables would require increasing the land used for energy from today’s 0.5 percent to 50 percent’ which sounds like complete bollocks to me. Quite apart from off-shore windfarms (popular in the UK), here is a more thoughtful take on the area of solar panels needed to power Europe (or even the whole world if you are more ambitious) https://theconversation.com/solar-panels-all-over-the-sahara-desert-imagine-newsletter-2-116320

(3). His views on meat consumption and production also appear to be completely out of wack with reality. Again a better take from Jane Goodall https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/06/jane-goodall-coronavirus-humanity-natural-animals-covid-finished/

Blunderbuss
03-07-2020, 12:07 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNxaN77dcCk

idledim
03-07-2020, 11:01 AM
Of course the so-called 'climate scare' is based on the laws of physics, which have nothing to do with Shellenberger. Although I'm sure the publicity will help to sell his new book :)


From the Introduction to Apocalypse Never:

Much of what people are being told about the environment, including
the climate, is wrong, and we desperately need to get it right. I decided to
write Apocalypse Never after getting fed up with the exaggeration,
alarmism, and extremism that are the enemy of a positive, humanistic, and
rational environmentalism.
Every fact, claim, and argument in this book is based on the best-
available science, including as assessed by the prestigious
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and other scientific bodies.
Apocalypse Never defends mainstream science from those who deny it on
the political Right and Left.
Apocalypse Never explores how and why so many of us came to see
important but manageable environmental problems as the end of the
world, and why the people who are the most apocalyptic about
environmental problems tend to oppose the best and most obvious
solutions to solving them.

In other words, as I understand him, he would strongly disagree with your conflation of 'climate change' with 'climate scare' precisely because Climate Scare is not based on the laws of physics. Still, that's just my reading. Why not do as Kevin suggests and read the book? You'll then be in a better position to properly comment on the arguments of the man nominated by Time magazine as "Hero of the Environment."

Blunderbuss
03-07-2020, 11:17 AM
This https://independentaustralia.net/business/business-display/murdoch-press-supports-reformed-climate-activist-michael-shellenberger,14065#disqus_thread (https://independentaustralia.net/business/business-display/murdoch-press-supports-reformed-climate-activist-michael-shellenberger,14065#disqus_thread) seems to explain Shellenberger’s stance on nuclear power.


The mainstream press published an attack on climate science by a supposed environmentalist who is, in fact, a nuclear lobbyist, writes Steve Bishop.


I also note he doesn’t deny the effects of climate change – for example Bangladesh will end up below sea level. He just counters this with so are the Netherlands and they are doing just fine!

Blunderbuss
03-07-2020, 11:55 AM
Although I'm sure the publicity will help to sell his new book :)

From the Independent Australia article...


What makes The Australian’s publishing of the article all the more risible is that in reality, it is a puff piece for Shellenberger’s new book, ‘Apocalypse Never’ and is more or less identical with what he had published on his website on 29 June.

Forbes, which has carried Shellenberger’s articles in the past, withdrew the puff piece.

National Post asked Forbes why this had happened and was told:

‘Forbes requires its contributors to adhere to strict editorial guidelines. This story did not follow those guidelines and was removed.’

Desmond
03-07-2020, 02:05 PM
From the Independent Australia article...


What makes The Australian’s publishing of the article all the more risible is that in reality, it is a puff piece for Shellenberger’s new book, ‘Apocalypse Never’ and is more or less identical with what he had published on his website on 29 June.

Forbes, which has carried Shellenberger’s articles in the past, withdrew the puff piece.

National Post asked Forbes why this had happened and was told:

‘Forbes requires its contributors to adhere to strict editorial guidelines. This story did not follow those guidelines and was removed.’


lol.

I see my decision to cancel my The Australian subscription due to their woeful coverage of climate change was the right one.

Patrick Byrom
03-07-2020, 03:54 PM
... In other words, as I understand him, he would strongly disagree with your conflation of 'climate change' with 'climate scare' precisely because Climate Scare is not based on the laws of physics. Still, that's just my reading. Why not do as Kevin suggests and read the book? You'll then be in a better position to properly comment on the arguments of the man nominated by Time magazine as "Hero of the Environment."

His Forbes article (cached here (https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:83Dqet9haB4J:https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshellenberger/2019/11/25/why-everything-they-say-about-climate-change-is-wrong/+&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=au)) doesn't inspire confidence in his understanding of the laws of physics.

For example:

What about sea level rise? IPCC estimates sea level could rise two feet (0.6 meters) by 2100. Does that sound apocalyptic or even “unmanageable”?
Does he seriously think that the laws of physics predict that the sea level rise will stop in 2100 if carbon dioxide emissions continue?

And:

Nor are the fires solely due to drought, which is common in Australia, and exceptional this year. “Climate change is playing its role here,” said Richard Thornton of the Bushfire and Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre in Australia, “but it's not the cause of these fires."
The laws of physics suggest otherwise: (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-10/more-than-climate-change-driving-queensland-fires/11493950)

Dr Thornton expects this trend to continue. "What climate change will do is it will increase the frequency, or the return rate if you like, of really bad fire weather days," he said.

I don't bother reading non-fiction books that contradict the laws of physics - there are more than enough sf and fantasy books to read (that do that already) :)

Patrick Byrom
03-07-2020, 04:33 PM
This claim is also dubious, although not contradicting the laws of physics:

In 1931, 3.7 million people died from natural disasters. In 2018, just 11,000 did. And that decline occurred over a period when the global population quadrupled.
If you actually check the website, you'll find that he's comparing 2018 with the worst result for this century! I guess he doesn't know the meaning of the word "cherry-picking". If he'd made the comparison with 1903 or 1904, the conclusion would have been the opposite :(

That's three claims that I've been able to refute in a few minutes, so I definitely won't be reading a book by such an unreliable author.

Blunderbuss
03-07-2020, 10:51 PM
I have been tipped off, via twitter, that both The Guardian and SMH are preparing to write an article about Mr. Shellenberger. and he doesn’t seem happy about it.

4252

The reply https://twitter.com/GuardianAus/status/1278961145278169088

4253

Blunderbuss
04-07-2020, 07:33 AM
@Shellenberger wrote an opinion piece in @Quillette
with some very big claims on environment issues in order to push his new book sales. Here’s a thread on the accuracy of these claims.

https://twitter.com/Marcusdstewart/status/1278133212959645697 (https://twitter.com/Marcusdstewart/status/1278133212959645697)

Ian Murray
05-07-2020, 10:35 AM
Stop making sense: why it's time to get emotional about climate change (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jul/05/stop-making-sense-why-its-time-to-get-emotional-about-climate-change)

,,, The science behind climate change has been proven correct to the highest degree of certainty the scientific method allows. But climate change is more than just the science. It’s a social phenomenon. And the social dimensions of climate change can make the science look simple – the laws of physics are orderly and neat but people are messy. ...

Blunderbuss
16-07-2020, 12:00 PM
Climate change: Siberian heatwave 'clear evidence' of warming - https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53415297 (https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53415297)

Ian Murray
17-07-2020, 09:08 AM
Court Slaps Down Trump Administration’s Rollback of Methane Rule (https://earthjustice.org/news/press/2020/court-slaps-down-trump-administrations-rollback-of-methane-rule?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_term=page&fbclid=IwAR1aD0-bZUUw-TSbq5VdU3nrKbDk9rSrsHRbZaTR2q9ha_pZbQ-yjILVAkM)
Victory: Ruling reinstates Obama administration’s BLM Waste Prevention Rule

Late yesterday, in a resounding victory for taxpayers, public health, and the environment, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California invalidated the Trump administration’s rollback of the Obama-era Waste Prevention Rule. This ruling means that the Waste Prevention Rule goes back in effect in 90 days, and the oil and gas industry will have to comply with the Rule’s requirements to prevent waste of gas on federal lands.

Enacted in 2016, the Waste Prevention Rule was designed to protect the public from wasteful venting, flaring, and leaking of gas from drilling operations on federal and tribal lands. In 2018, the Trump administration’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) rescinded this rule to give oil and gas companies operating on public lands a free pass for air and climate pollution from wasted gas. ...

Patrick Byrom
22-07-2020, 07:59 PM
This case is still going: (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/jul/22/james-cook-university-wins-appeal-in-peter-ridd-unfair-dismissal-case)

James Cook University did not act unlawfully when it sacked the contrarian academic Peter Ridd for serious misconduct in 2018, the federal court has ruled. The university had appealed an earlier decision, by federal court circuit judge Salvatore Vasta, who awarded Ridd $1.2m compensation and found that his sacking breached workplace laws. The full bench of the federal court on Wednesday allowed an appeal by JCU, effectively overturning the earlier finding and financial payout.

Blunderbuss
23-07-2020, 03:50 PM
This case is still going: (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/jul/22/james-cook-university-wins-appeal-in-peter-ridd-unfair-dismissal-case)

James Cook University did not act unlawfully when it sacked the contrarian academic Peter Ridd for serious misconduct in 2018, the federal court has ruled. The university had appealed an earlier decision, by federal court circuit judge Salvatore Vasta, who awarded Ridd $1.2m compensation and found that his sacking breached workplace laws. The full bench of the federal court on Wednesday allowed an appeal by JCU, effectively overturning the earlier finding and financial payout.

As with coral reefs so with polar bears. The deniers go to expert Susan Crockford was ‘let go’ (or dumped as this headline has it susan-crockford-fired (https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/oct/20/susan-crockford-fired-after-finding-polar-bears-th/)) last year by the University of Victoria in Canada.

ER
06-08-2020, 05:10 AM
It must be said that by now this user is well established as being (to put it mildly) not so enthusiastic
about all this climatologically inclined drastic measures of the Save the ... (ad lib) kind as suggested by some.
On the other hand, efforts like those of the businessperson / investor / real climate warrior whose biogas initiatives
not only dramatically reduce the amount of methane (*) being released into the atmosphere but also generate
clean useful energy (as referred to in the article below) are commendable and should be rewarded.
He and other biogas related businesspeople should not only be relieved of taxation now equal to those
huge large natural gas plant companies (**) but should be given additional financial support to continue their efforts.

(*) This greenhouse gas is up to 40 times more potent than carbon dioxide
(**) they were well over one hundred last time I had checked

Click on the link below for the story as well as some very useful information.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/we-pay-a-tax-to-produce-clean-energy-the-queensland-pig-farmer-who-is-leading-the-way-on-climate-action/ar-BB17BBv9?ocid=msedgdhp

Capablanca-Fan
06-08-2020, 09:13 AM
The Dirty Secrets Of ‘Clean’ Electric Vehicles (https://www.forbes.com/sites/tilakdoshi/2020/08/02/the-dirty-secrets-of-clean-electric-vehicles)
Tilak Doshi, Forbes, 2 Aug 2020

Zero Emissions and All That

Proponents of EVs might counter by saying that despite these evident environmental and social problems associated with mining in many third world countries, the case remains that EVs help reduce carbon dioxide emissions associated with the internal combustion engines run on gasoline and diesel fuels. According to the reigning climate change narrative, it is after all carbon dioxide emissions that are threatening environmental catastrophe on a global scale. For the sake of saving the world, the climate crusaders of the richer nations might be willing to ignore the local pollution and human rights violations involved in mining for minerals and rare earths in Africa, China, Latin America and elsewhere.

While one might question the inherent inequity in imposing such a trade-off, the supposed advantages of EVs in emitting lower carbon emissions are overstated according to a peer-reviewed life-cycle study comparing conventional and electric vehicles. To begin with, about half the lifetime carbon-dioxide emissions from an electric car come from the energy used to produce the car, especially in the mining and processing of raw materials needed for the battery. This compares unfavorably with the manufacture of a gasoline-powered car which accounts for 17% of the car’s lifetime carbon-dioxide emissions. When a new EV appears in the show-room, it has already caused 30,000 pounds of carbon-dioxide emission. The equivalent amount for manufacturing a conventional car is 14,000 pounds.

Once on the road, the carbon dioxide emissions of EVs depends on the power-generation fuel used to recharge its battery. If it comes mostly from coal-fired power plants, it will lead to about 15 ounces of carbon-dioxide for every mile it is driven—three ounces more than a similar gasoline-powered car. Even without reference to the source of electricity used for battery charging, if an EV is driven 50,000 miles over its lifetime, the huge initial emissions from its manufacture means the EV will actually have put more carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere than a similar-size gasoline-powered car driven the same number of miles. Even if the EV is driven for 90,000 miles and the battery is charged by cleaner natural-gas fueled power stations, it will cause just 24% less carbon-dioxide emission than a gasoline-powered car. As the skeptical environmentalist Bjorn Lomborg puts it, “This is a far cry from ‘zero emissions’".

antichrist
06-08-2020, 09:49 AM
Capa Fan, I have not read your article above only the headline. But I have always being against the principle of about a ton of metal carrying about a 100 kg person. Put them on bicycles or small motorbikes with sidecars. Good public transport and suburban planning is essential. Unfortunately suburbs have been designed for strong private cars, even 4wd pick ups.

Blunderbuss
06-08-2020, 10:22 AM
Click on the link below for the story as well as some very useful information.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/we-pay-a-tax-to-produce-clean-energy-the-queensland-pig-farmer-who-is-leading-the-way-on-climate-action/ar-BB17BBv9?ocid=msedgdhp

Excellent find ER – probably best viewed in its original form here The Green Recovery (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/aug/06/we-pay-a-tax-to-produce-clean-energy-the-queensland-pig-farmer-who-is-leading-the-way-on-climate-action)

I have been fascinated by this technology since 2010 when as part of a biomass module I was studying, I attended a field trip to the local Marmite factory - Industrial_scale_anaerobic_digestion_of_brewery_wa ste_Marmite-Unilever_three-year_case_study (https://repository.lboro.ac.uk/articles/Industrial_scale_anaerobic_digestion_of_brewery_wa ste_Marmite-Unilever_three-year_case_study/9431963)


All based on the same microbes that predate us by billions of years and after the oxygenation event caused by photosynthesis had to find a new home where it was warm and oxygen free – like the human stomach :)

Blunderbuss
06-08-2020, 04:28 PM
Compare the pear.


(1) The ‘solar canals’ making smart use of India’s space: the-solar-canals-revolutionising-indias-renewable-energy (https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200803-the-solar-canals-revolutionising-indias-renewable-energy)
(2) Digging up and then shipping/rail coal over 8,000km to burn: adani-godda-power-plant (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-10/adani-godda-power-plant-threatened-by-land-owner-court-action/12439624)

ER
06-08-2020, 05:25 PM
Excellent find ER – probably best viewed in its original form here The Green Recovery (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/aug/06/we-pay-a-tax-to-produce-clean-energy-the-queensland-pig-farmer-who-is-leading-the-way-on-climate-action) [/pgn]

Thanks for the link... this stuff fascinating as it is to read, requires a much more concentrated effort to study, I might be missing for a few!

[QUOTE] have been fascinated by this technology since 2010 when as part of a biomass module I was studying, I attended a field trip to the local Marmite factory - Industrial_scale_anaerobic_digestion_of_brewery_wa ste_Marmite-Unilever_three-year_case_study (https://repository.lboro.ac.uk/articles/Industrial_scale_anaerobic_digestion_of_brewery_wa ste_Marmite-Unilever_three-year_case_study/9431963)

that's much shorter but by no means easier than the previous! Thanks for all the info you provided. Cheers.

Blunderbuss
06-08-2020, 10:32 PM
that's much shorter but by no means easier than the previous! Thanks for all the info you provided. Cheers.

If you are really interested in anaerobic digestion you could do a lot worst than starting with the Wikipedia page, I wouldn’t start with the Marmite (think Vegemite for Brits) paper. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaerobic_digestion (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaerobic_digestion)

My fascination with the technology stems from the microbes that breakdown the waste (or food). Since they have found a way to coexist with all animals, from humans to insects - Human_gastrointestinal_microbiota (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_gastrointestinal_microbiota)

Capablanca-Fan
16-08-2020, 10:03 AM
vhttps://www.prageru.com/video/do-we-have-to-destroy-the-earth-to-save-it/ (https://www.prageru.com/video/do-we-have-to-destroy-the-earth-to-save-it/)
Michael Shellenberger, PragerU, 10 Aug 2020

Do wind turbines and solar farms hold the keys to saving the environment? Michael Shellenberger, founder of Environmental Progress and noted climate activist, used to think so. Now he’s not so sure. He explains why in this important video.

Industrial wind turbines—those giant generators of wind power—are the greatest new threat to golden and bald eagles. But the eagles are hardly the only ones threatened. Condors, owls, hawks and falcons all fall prey to the turbines’ mighty blades.

Big Wind—and believe me, there's a Big Wind industry now, just like there's Big Oil and Big Pharma—claims that house cats kill more birds than wind turbines. That's true. But whereas cats kill small, common birds like sparrows, wind turbines kill big, threatened-with-extinction and slow-to-reproduce species like bald eagles and condors.

Indeed, industrial wind farms are killing fields for birds. The more turbines you put up, the more birds you're going to slaughter.

Then there's the issue of what to do with solar panels that wear out. The panels contain lead and other toxic chemicals that can't be removed without breaking up the entire panel. Since it's far cheaper for solar manufacturers to just buy the raw materials than recycle old panels, those old panels end up in landfills—or, as the New York Times discovered in a 2019 investigation, dumped in poor African nations.

Consider this: Today's energy system requires just a half a percent of the land in the US. If we were to get all the energy we now use from wind and solar, at least 25% of all land in the US would be required.

That's a lot of dead wildlife.

Doesn't sound very green, does it?



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rc5AlFo3zTk

Ian Murray
16-08-2020, 11:03 AM
...
Michael Shellenberger, PragerU, 10 Aug 2020

Do wind turbines and solar farms hold the keys to saving the environment? ...

Some facts:

Do wind turbines kill birds? (https://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/green-science/wind-turbine-kill-birds2.htm)

In the past couple of decades, turbine designs have changed dramatically. Turbine blades are now solid, meaning no lattice structure to attract birds looking to perch. Also, the blades' surface area is much larger, so they don't have to spin as fast to generate power. Slower-moving blades mean fewer bird collisions.

Perhaps the biggest change in wind-farm safety, though, has to do with location. Now, all new turbine proposals are reviewed for ideal, bird-friendly placement. Wind farms cannot be built in migratory pathways, in areas with high bird populations, or in areas with special features that could possibly attract high bird populations in the future. Also, the growing trend toward offshore turbine construction bodes well for birds, since offshore wind farms have fewer bird collisions than land-based farms. ...

Solar panel recycling: Turning ticking time bombs into opportunities (https://www.pv-magazine.com/2020/05/27/solar-panel-recycling-turning-ticking-time-bombs-into-opportunities/)

...Providing scientific evidence on the potential impacts and benefits of recycling PV panels could incentivize the government and industry.

Our collaborative study with The Group of Research in Energy and Environment from Materials (The GREENMAT) at the University of Liege in Belgium, provides such evidence. Evidence that in the future, end-of-life solar panels may prove to be a valuable secondary resource for a critical material in electric-vehicle batteries: Ultra-pure Nano-structured Silicon. ...

How Much Land Does Solar, Wind and Nuclear Energy Require? (https://energycentral.com/c/ec/how-much-land-does-solar-wind-and-nuclear-energy-require)

.... In other words: with an area no larger than the amount of land currently devoted to golf courses, we could power a third of the country with solar energy.

That assumes we build solar farms on undeveloped land, in deserts or other untrammeled areas. If instead, we put solar on one quarter of U.S. rooftops and across parking lots, industrial brownfields, landfills, and other degraded lands, this total land footprint would shrink dramatically.

If carefully sited, it may even be possible to power a third of the country with solar without measurably expanding humanity’s land use footprint. ...

Wind turbines are spaced out, however, and wind energy can cohabitate perfectly well with farming, grazing, and other productive uses of the underlying land.

The direct land use impact associated with wind turbine pads, roads, substations and transmission lines is much smaller.

According to data collected by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory on dozens of U.S. wind farms completed before 2009, the land area permanently taken out of production by wind farms amounts to just about 1 percent of the total area spanned by the wind farm.

Powering one-third of the country in 2050 with wind farms would thus truly impact only on the order of 2,000 sq-km, of which less than 700 sq-km would be permanently removed from production.

That’s an almost trivially small amount of land, equal to only 7 percent of the land area wasted, er, devoted to golf in this country. ...

Agriculture and forestry has thus already disturbed three to four orders of magnitude more land area than would be impacted if we powered two-thirds of the country with wind and solar together.

That’s no reason to ignore the imperative to responsibly site wind and solar energy in order to limit their ecological impact, but it also means that discussions about shrinking humanity’s physical footprint on the planet should center on agriculture and forestry, not solar or wind energy. ...

Desmond
17-08-2020, 08:31 AM
Large-scale wind and solar power are very damaging to the environment


Tell that to the Gulf of Mexico.

Ian Murray
17-08-2020, 09:23 AM
Oil Companies Wonder If It’s Worth Looking for Oil Anymore (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-08-16/oil-companies-wonder-if-it-s-worth-looking-for-oil-anymore)

... As the coronavirus ravages economies and cripples demand, European oil majors have made some uncomfortable admissions in recent months: oil and gas worth billions of dollars might never be pumped out of the ground.

With the crisis also hastening a global shift to cleaner energy, fossil fuels will likely be cheaper than expected in the coming decades, while emitting the carbon they contain will get more expensive. These two simple assumptions mean that tapping some fields no longer makes economic sense. BP Plc said on Aug. 4 that it would no longer do any exploration in new countries.

The oil industry was already grappling with the energy transition, copious supply and signs of peak demand as Covid-19 began to spread. The pandemic will likely bring forward that peak and discourage exploration, according to Rystad Energy AS. The consultant expects about 10% of the world’s recoverable oil resources—some 125 billion barrels—to become obsolete....

antichrist
17-08-2020, 11:56 AM
About turbines killing birds? I never heard of these same concerned citizens ever care about birds before in their lifetime, bulldoze the forests not a word from them etc. Climate change will kill whole species not just the odd bad flyer.

Blunderbuss
19-08-2020, 02:16 PM
https://www.snopes.com/news/2020/08/04/shellenberger-climate-change/ (https://www.snopes.com/news/2020/08/04/shellenberger-climate-change/)

Shellenberger’s Optimistic, Viral Take on Climate Future Challenged by Scientists He Cites - Michael Shellenberger argues that fears of a future climate-driven apocalypse are unfounded. But several scientists he cites told Snopes he misunderstands — or mischaracterizes — their research.

ER
19-08-2020, 02:27 PM
If you are really interested in anaerobic digestion you could do a lot worst than starting with the Wikipedia page, I wouldn’t start with the Marmite (think Vegemite for Brits) paper. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaerobic_digestion (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaerobic_digestion)

My fascination with the technology stems from the microbes that breakdown the waste (or food). Since they have found a way to coexist with all animals, from humans to insects - Human_gastrointestinal_microbiota (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_gastrointestinal_microbiota)

I have been reading (not studying yet since I have to refresh / extend my rather limited knowledge on geophysical phenomena) extensively.
I have some questions re geographical characteristics, nature (as in eg size, type of production, jobs lost or gained)
of industries benefited / non benefited by this groundbreaking initiative. I am in the process of formulating questions. Cheers!

Blunderbuss
19-08-2020, 11:18 PM
Okay. Interestingly the product Marmite was developed to recycle waste yeast generated from breweries in Burton Upon Trent. However even after whatever magic happens to turn yeast into Marmite the water flowing out of the factory is contaminated in the sense that it has a very high COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand).

So, I think the primary payback for Unilever was recovering money that was literally flowing down the drain. The local water authority charges are based on measuring the water’s COD levels, the higher the COD the higher the costs. Hence the process saves Unilever 10,000 of pounds a year on wastewater charges.

In addition, after a reverse osmosis process the water recovered is supposedly potable although in practice it was used to wash trucks and such like.

As for jobs the plant does require full time monitoring and maintenance but clearly wouldn’t employ a lot of people. I seem to remember that Unilever expected a return on their investment over the long term 5-10 years maybe.

ER
19-08-2020, 11:45 PM
thanks, cheers!

Capablanca-Fan
23-08-2020, 06:52 AM
CA, Dependent On Solar Power, Has Rolling Blackouts In Heat Wave. Hint: The Sun Sets At Night (https://www.dailywire.com/news/ca-dependent-on-solar-power-has-rolling-blackouts-in-heat-wave-hint-the-sun-sets-at-night)
By Hank Berrien, Daily Wire, 20 Aug 2020

In California, where reliance on solar power is favored over the idea of nuclear power, many Californians suffering through an intense heat wave over the last weekend lost power because of rolling blackouts. That loss of power was at least partially derived from one single fact:

The sun sets at night.

The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board added on Wednesday (https://www.wsj.com/articles/californias-green-blackouts-11597879215):

California’s Independent System Operator (Caiso) has been warning for years that the state’s increasing dependence on intermittent renewables, especially solar, is making it harder to ensure reliable power. Renewables currently make up about 36% of California’s electric generation, and Democrats have set a 60% mandate for 2030 and 100% for 2045.

Dozens of natural-gas plants that can ramp up power on demand have closed since 2013—enough to supply about four million households—so California is relying more on energy imported from other states when needed. In normal times it imports about 15% of its energy. But the Golden State’s neighbors are also experiencing heat waves, and many have also been replacing fossil fuels with renewables too…

Sexton noted, “California was able to meet that demand for most of the day Friday and Saturday but several reports note that, because it was cloudy during the day, solar generation was off a bit and as the sun began to set solar sources cut out.”

The World Nuclear Association pointed out (https://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/country-profiles/others/californias-electricity.aspx) in September 2018:


In August 2018 the state assembly voted to produce 60% of electricity from renewables by 2030 and produce all the state’s electricity without fossil fuels by 2045. At present, just under half is supplied by natural gas. This target supersedes an earlier one to produce 50% of electricity from renewables by 2030. Apart from in-state generation, about one-third of the power consumed in California is imported, but the new measure would eliminate imports that are not carbon-neutral by 2045. The state has set a goal of reducing its carbon dioxide emissions by 80% of 1990 levels by 2050, as required by its Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 and a 2005 executive order.

antichrist
23-08-2020, 07:39 AM
If people used fans only and not aircon they would fare a lot better. One aircon is equavalent to about 6 fans.

Ian Murray
23-08-2020, 10:19 AM
CA, Dependent On Solar Power, Has Rolling Blackouts In Heat Wave. Hint: The Sun Sets At Night
By Hank Berrien, Daily Wire, 20 Aug 2020

In California, where reliance on solar power is favored over the idea of nuclear power, many Californians suffering through an intense heat wave over the last weekend lost power because of rolling blackouts. That loss of power was at least partially derived from one single fact:

The sun sets at night. ...

It may surprise you to know that California's energy planners are aware that the sun sets at night - the last Californian blackouts were in 2001 (remember Enron?). The huge energy surplus from solar power during the day is regularly passed on to neighbouring states. Storing that surplus for release at night, particularly during heat wave conditions, solves the problem, aided by smart technology (smart grids, smart meters, smart devices etc).

Energy storage is not science fiction - it is here and now. Bulk storage facilities already exist, and can be built much faster than and at a fraction of the cost of nuclear plants, right down to individual households, with rooftop solar charging a battery, or drawing power from the EV in the garage, to power the home at night.

California’s ‘smart’ energy future glows on the horizon—but how to get there? (https://calmatters.org/projects/california-smart-grid-future-of-energy/)


... California is in the midst of a ... hugely transformative, experiment: an effort to redesign the future of electricity generation, distribution and use to meet a surging demand.

The complex system that powers the world’s fifth-largest economy is at a turning point. Utility executives, policymakers and regulators are peering into a future where California has shed fossil fuels and is fully buzzing with electricity. Before the state completes its shift to a modern, safe, sustainable energy grid, it has to decide precisely how that should be accomplished.

... More and more micro-grids will form, ranging from a family with solar panels to hospitals, malls and small counties taking care of their own electricity needs. The state has been encouraging this: A new law begins the process of setting rates and rules, and the California Energy Commission awarded more than $50 million in grants to accelerate the creation of smaller, more resilient power grids.

... Wind and solar power plants will rely on energy storage to make clean energy available when it’s needed, not just when it’s produced. One intriguing notion is called “vehicle-to-grid,” or V2G: electric cars storing excess power, which their owners sell back to the grid when the vehicles sit idle. Those same owners could also use the cars’ untapped energy to replenish energy storage they may have at their homes.

The state is encouraging the quest for storage solutions with an incentive plan extended last year to 2025. It added $800 million to a program that aids homeowners in adding batteries to their solar setups.

... The new grid will also be populated with devices attentive to the nuances of electricity. Microprocessors will snap open and closed instantly, correcting imbalances in the ebb and flow of power. To that end, California utilities are already employing artificial intelligence in their operations.

Ian Murray
10-09-2020, 11:08 AM
Trillions up in smoke: The staggering economic cost of climate change inaction (https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2020/09/10/economic-cost-climate-change/?fbclid=IwAR2CPCGl4MSqzcAwVUClg3NY_qD_SOw3171F-QKvylCMVolTb6Q-qGhSwBw)

Over the next 30 years, increasing economic damages from climate change will cost the Australian economy at least $1.89 trillion – or roughly 4 per cent of projected GDP each year – if current emissions policies are maintained.

New research from the University of Melbourne reveals annual economic damages by 2038 will be comparable to the current estimated annual cost of COVID-19 in Australia. ...

Ian Murray
14-09-2020, 06:18 PM
Quit the Bullshit and Tell the Truth News Corp, Demands Extinction Rebellion (https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/quit-the-bullshit-and-tell-the-truth-news-corp-demands-extinction-rebellion/)

“We are here as Extinction Rebellion asking and demanding that News Corp quits the bullshit and tells the truth,” said XR Sydney spokesperson Larissa Payne out the front of the News Corp offices in Surry Hills at around 8.30 am on Friday morning.

The climate activist just happened to be standing next to a sizable mound of bullshit that had recently been dumped on the media giant’s doorstop, as part of a surprise nonviolent direct action that was carried out early on 4 September.

Members of Extinction Rebellion (XR) were out in force calling on Murdoch’s media machine to halt its promotion of a decades-long campaign that involves spreading lies and disinformation to hide the fact that the planet is now in the midst of an ever-worsening climate and ecological crisis. ...

Desmond
15-09-2020, 07:59 AM
Quit the Bullshit and Tell the Truth News Corp, Demands Extinction Rebellion (https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/quit-the-bullshit-and-tell-the-truth-news-corp-demands-extinction-rebellion/)

“We are here as Extinction Rebellion asking and demanding that News Corp quits the bullshit and tells the truth,” said XR Sydney spokesperson Larissa Payne out the front of the News Corp offices in Surry Hills at around 8.30 am on Friday morning.

The climate activist just happened to be standing next to a sizable mound of bullshit that had recently been dumped on the media giant’s doorstop, as part of a surprise nonviolent direct action that was carried out early on 4 September.

Members of Extinction Rebellion (XR) were out in force calling on Murdoch’s media machine to halt its promotion of a decades-long campaign that involves spreading lies and disinformation to hide the fact that the planet is now in the midst of an ever-worsening climate and ecological crisis. ...

Even his son knows it's bullshit.

News Corp: Rupert Murdoch's son James quits company (https://www.bbc.com/news/business-53617966#:~:text=James%20Murdoch%2C%20the%20younge r%20son,decisions%22%20made%20by%20the%20company.)
BBC Aug 1 2020


James Murdoch, the younger son of media mogul Rupert Murdoch, has resigned from the board of News Corporation citing "disagreements over editorial content".

In a filing to US regulators, he said he also disagreed with some "strategic decisions" made by the company.

The exact nature of the disagreements was not detailed.

But Mr Murdoch has previously criticised News Corp outlets, which include the Wall Street Journal, for climate change coverage. ...

Ian Murray
15-09-2020, 08:58 AM
Even his son knows it's bullshit.

James resigns to spend less time with his family :)

Blunderbuss
15-09-2020, 10:00 AM
Trump in California today ‘I don’t think science knows’ …


During the briefing on the west coast wildfires, multiple officials, including California governor Gavin Newsom, said climate change was exacerbating the disaster.
As one official made this argument, Trump interrupted to say, “It will start getting cooler.”
However, climate experts have warned the planet will continue to get hotter if greenhouse gas emissions are not curtailed.
But Trump told the officials at the briefing, “Just watch. I don’t think science knows actually.”

Blunderbuss
15-09-2020, 01:11 PM
Earth may temporarily pass dangerous 1.5℃ warming limit by 2024, major new report says - https://theconversation.com/earth-may-temporarily-pass-dangerous-1-5-warming-limit-by-2024-major-new-report-says-145450 (https://theconversation.com/earth-may-temporarily-pass-dangerous-1-5-warming-limit-by-2024-major-new-report-says-145450)

Blunderbuss
16-09-2020, 09:20 AM
Turns out, all it took to radicalise those nerds at Scientific American was a catastrophically mishandled pandemic and wilful climate denialism in the face of a burning west coast. scientific-american-endorses-joe-biden (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-endorses-joe-biden/)

antichrist
16-09-2020, 12:00 PM
Turns out, all it took to radicalise those nerds at Scientific American was a catastrophically mishandled pandemic and wilful climate denialism in the face of a burning west coast. scientific-american-endorses-joe-biden (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-endorses-joe-biden/)

from the link:
Scientific American has never endorsed a presidential candidate in its 175-year history. This year we are compelled to do so. We do not do this lightly.

The evidence and the science show that Donald Trump has badly damaged the U.S. and its people—because he rejects evidence and science. The most devastating example is his dishonest and inept response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which cost more than 190,000 Americans their lives by the middle of September. He has also attacked environmental protections, medical care, and the researchers and public science agencies that help this country prepare for its greatest challenges. That is why we urge you to vote for Joe Biden, who is offering fact-based plans to protect our health, our economy and the environment. These and other proposals he has put forth can set the country back on course for a safer, more prosperous and more equitable future.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Trump should print in gold and frame for creating a 175 year old precedent. He could adopt Tony Abbott as his sidekick.

ER
16-09-2020, 01:24 PM
Meanwhile in the real world (where real world = away from any exstinker ranting :D )

4533

Source: provided in the heading

Blunderbuss
16-09-2020, 01:46 PM
Meanwhile in the real world (where real world = away from any exstinker ranting :D )

I agree with Cannon-Brookes on this ...

“I don’t understand the announcement. There’s a lot of parts of the announcement that don’t make much sense,” Cannon-Brookes said. “All I am asking is ‘what are the rules of that facility’?”

Energy analysts have made clear that the threat of a big gas plant won’t fix the problem, won’t lower prices, or bring down emissions, and will bring other investments to a complete stop. “He needs to listen to the experts,” Cannon Brookes said. “We don’t need any new gas.”

https://reneweconomy.com.au/are-cannon-brookes-and-elon-musk-about-to-team-up-for-big-battery-plans-36666/ (https://reneweconomy.com.au/are-cannon-brookes-and-elon-musk-about-to-team-up-for-big-battery-plans-36666/)

ER
16-09-2020, 02:14 PM
Meanwhile in the real world (where real world = away from any exstinker ranting :D )

4533

Source: provided in the heading

Was reading a rather interesting article about Cannon-Brookes the other day on the Financial Review

https://www.afr.com/policy/foreign-affairs/why-mike-cannon-brookes-is-on-a-chinese-military-database-20200913-p55v5g

Maybe he wants to buy into it? For the time being, however, he's got the bucks but Scomo makes the policy!

Blunderbuss
16-09-2020, 03:12 PM
... For the time being, however, he's got the bucks but Scomo makes the policy!

Bad policy

Patrick Byrom
16-09-2020, 03:29 PM
Bad policyIt's terrible policy. Renewables are already competitive in price with gas, so the plant will be soon be a white elephant - if it's actually built, which I very much doubt.

ER
17-09-2020, 11:06 PM
Maybe he wants to buy into it? For the time being, however, he's got the bucks but Scomo makes the policy!

Τold ya so, but it ain't a matter of

"I am just a soul whose intentions are good
oh Lord please don't let me be misunderstood"

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/mike-cannon-brookes-and-elon-musk-are-in-talks-to-replace-one-of-australia-s-largest-coal-fired-power-plants-if-the-government-will-let-them/ar-BB197n5e?ocid=msedgdhp

This really is not a matter of what Scomo decides or Cannon - Brooks and his mate wish!

It's what the market approves / disapproves, and for the time being I see no movement in the station! ;)

Ian Murray
18-09-2020, 11:00 AM
The Age of Megafires: The World Hits a Climate Tipping Point (https://e360.yale.edu/features/the-age-of-megafires-the-world-hits-a-climate-tipping-point?fbclid=IwAR3t3fxxMddfMTnhFovmThZhThpsr0fOTS4 3YBlahnL45FYKqIJwW61zV_0)

From Siberia to Australia to the western U.S., massive fires have consumed millions of acres this year and spawned fire-generated tornados and other phenomena rarely seen before. Scientists say the world has entered a perilous new era that will demand better ways of fighting wildfires. ...

Capablanca-Fan
19-09-2020, 06:25 AM
Why There Are So Many Wildfires in California, but Few in the Southeastern United States (https://fee.org/articles/why-there-are-so-many-wildfires-in-california-but-few-in-the-southeastern-united-states)
The New York Times recently detailed why the solution to California's megafires begins with ending overzealous fire suppressi (https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/10/climate/wildfires-climate-policy.html)on.
Jon Miltimore, FEE, 16 Sep 2020

Though the Times doesn’t mention Baja California, the paper does endorse the Mexican state’s strategy of allowing fires to burn naturally to eliminate vegetation, pointing out that experts attribute the tactic to the more successful fire prevention approach found in the Southeastern United States.


Scientists who study wildfires agree that allowing forests and grasslands to burn periodically — by, say, intentionally setting smaller fires under controlled conditions — can be a more effective way to clear out vegetation. In Ponderosa pine forests, for instance, low-level fire can nurture ecosystems and help prevent destructive large-scale fires from breaking out.

This already occurs in the Southeastern United States, where officials use prescribed fires to burn millions of acres each year. While the region still sees destructive blazes — like Tennessee’s drought-fueled Great Smoky Mountains fires in 2016, which killed at least 14 people — experts credit the use of controlled burns with sparing many Southeastern communities from fire damage.

Contrary to Western states, “fire is widely accepted as a tool for land management in the Southeast,” fire scientist Crystal Kolden told the Times. This is in stark contrast to California, where just 50,000 acres were intentionally burned in 2017. (As a point of reference, academics estimate between 4.4 million and 11.8 million acres of forest burned annually in prehistoric California.)

The truth is federal agencies are much better at enforcing regulations than providing meaningful land stewardship. This is one of inherent problems when lands are owned collectively. As FEE’s Webb Beard has observed, echoing Aristotle, when something is owned by everyone, it is effectively owned by no one. The incentive to maintain or improve it is removed because these decision-makers do not benefit from prudent stewardship, and often do benefit from imprudent exploitation, neglect, and virtue-signaling but counterproductive “protection.”

This is why many economists see property rights as a solution to federal land mismanagement. When individuals own something, they have incentive to maintain it and protect it effectively, evidenced by the strong record of private property owners who have turned around threatened ecosystems.

“Ted Turner and buffalo ranchers brought the buffalo population back from the brink of extinction because of property rights. Fishermen almost fished the population of British Columbia halibut into extinction, and property rights brought their population back,” Beard wrote. “In many regions of Africa, trophy hunting helps to keep populations of certain animals from dipping to extinction levels and helps to fund conservation.”

If you’re wondering why you rarely hear of wildfires ravaging Texas, consider this fact: 95 percent of Texas’ land mass is privately owned (https://nri.tamu.edu/blog/2017/august/taking-care-of-the-land-an-intro-to-private-land-stewardship/).

Patrick Byrom
19-09-2020, 01:01 PM
Why There Are So Many Wildfires in California, but Few in the Southeastern United States (https://fee.org/articles/why-there-are-so-many-wildfires-in-california-but-few-in-the-southeastern-united-states)
… If you’re wondering why you rarely hear of wildfires ravaging Texas, consider this fact: 95 percent of Texas’ land mass is privately owned (https://nri.tamu.edu/blog/2017/august/taking-care-of-the-land-an-intro-to-private-land-stewardship/). …Texas has had some very bad wildfires (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Texas_wildfires), including as recently as 2018 (https://texasclimatenews.org/tcn-journal/californias-in-the-2018-spotlight-for-wildfires-but-texas-has-the-most/).

Ian Murray
19-09-2020, 01:37 PM
Texas has had some very bad wildfires (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Texas_wildfires), including as recently as 2018 (https://texasclimatenews.org/tcn-journal/californias-in-the-2018-spotlight-for-wildfires-but-texas-has-the-most/).

And California is hotter than Texas

4543
http://www.usda.gov/sites/default/files/documents/wwcb.pdf

Ian Murray
19-09-2020, 03:56 PM
Just like Australia, disinformation is thriving during the US fire crisis (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/sep/19/just-like-australia-disinformation-is-thriving-during-the-us-fire-crisis)

isinformation successfully obscured the real causes of Australia’s catastrophic bushfire season. Now the same thing is happening around me, as I report on a disastrous wildfire season in the American west.

In both countries, the response to a pandemic is also being complicated by disinformation, as conspiracy theorists refuse isolation, refuse masks, and ready themselves to refuse vaccines. ...

Blunderbuss
19-09-2020, 08:35 PM
just like australia disinformation is thriving during the us fire crisis (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/sep/19/just-like-australia-disinformation-is-thriving-during-the-us-fire-crisis) ....

Fix URL

ER
19-09-2020, 09:06 PM
Meanwhile in the real world (where real world = anywhere in the domain outside ex-stinker daydreaming) :D :P_

4545

For the full and enlightening article please click on the link

https://www.mining-technology.com/news/carmichael-project-creates-over-1500-jobs/

and according to the poll

4546

Looks like fellow investors faired fared much more positive than myself the eternal optimist.
Well sometimes I am carried away by facts like covid-19 despite the writings on the wall claiming Scomo and team are doing ok!

Source: Mining-Technology yesterday: 18-09-20

Ian Murray
20-09-2020, 07:43 AM
Fix URL

Fixed, thanks

Ian Murray
20-09-2020, 08:31 AM
Angus Taylor says Australia has the world's largest carbon capture and storage project. Here's what he's not saying (https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2020-09-19/angus-taylor-carbon-capture-storage-gorgon-chevron/12676732?utm_source=sfmc%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&utm_medium=email%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&utm_campaign=abc_news_newsmail_am_sfmc%e2%80%8b%e2 %80%8b&utm_term=%e2%80%8b&utm_id=1435825%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&sfmc_id=221519335)

Federal Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction Angus Taylor has been spruiking carbon capture and storage technology this week as part of the Federal Government's push to overhaul clean energy investment in Australia.

The Government plans to expand the mandates of the Australian Renewable Energy Agency and the Clean Energy Corporation to fund new and emerging low-emissions technologies like carbon capture and storage — technologies that may help extend the life of some coal and gas-fired power plants — ahead of wind and solar. ...

But when questioned about the reliability of carbon capture and storage, Minister Taylor has repeated the claim that Australia has the biggest carbon capture and storage project in the world, as evidence that the technology is working.

"Let's be clear, carbon capture and storage is already working. We've got it working in Australia, we've got the biggest project in the world in Australia," he said.

And he's correct that we have the world's biggest carbon capture and storage project.

But here's what he's not saying.

Failed carbon capture cost millions of tonnes of emissions ...

ER
21-09-2020, 12:43 PM
Not a problem chief, ex - stinkers have plenty of time to wait :D

4550

Full article here:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-09-20/scott-morrison-refuses-to-commit-net-zero-carbon-emissions-2050/12682714

Source: ABC news yesterday 20-09-20

Ian Murray
21-09-2020, 07:23 PM
Scott Morrison’s three hundred year climate plan is a dark moment for Australia (https://reneweconomy.com.au/scott-morrisons-three-hundred-year-climate-plan-is-a-dark-moment-for-australia-23503/)

... “Gas has chosen itself, because as yet there has been nothing that has been presented which meets the goals that we have which is reliability and the firming capability for renewables to meet the gap that will be created”

It’s a lie, and an important one. Several years ago, AGL proposed a plan to replace Liddell’s capacity with a mixture of gas, wind and battery storage. A UTS study went a step further, proposing a fully zero emissions replacement, including demand-side response. Most recently, AEMO’s assessment found there was sufficient existing and proposed capacity to fully meet reliability requirements – no new machines needed at all. Morrison immediately began walking back the ‘1,000 megawatt’ figure, but confusingly insisted there was still a ‘250 megawatts’ gap, despite that also contradicting the market operator’s advice.

Will the government’s new gas-fired power station keep shrinking in size? Will it be 100 megawatts next week, and 10 the week after, until it finally reaches parity with the reality: that we should have precisely zero megawatts of new fossil fuels on the grid? The messages have been worse than mixed – they’ve been weird, confusing, contradictory and far from reassuring.
What it all means

When Morrison says ‘gas chose itself’, it makes perfect sense. There was never any doubt that those who most loudly profess to be ‘technology neutral’ are scrambling for a euphemistic way of dismissing the urgency of climate action. Liddell is the first long-forewarned coal shutdown on Australia’s grid, and the eye-opening mess that is unfolding before our eyes forecasts the same process of bluster and repetition of the word ‘reliability’, instead of simple, effective climate policy that allows planners, investors and communities to forge ahead. Gas is choosing itself: it is the only fossil fuel left that hasn’t lost 100% of its public support and investability. There is no other hydrocarbon left to choose, and the future pathway of continued fossil fuel reliance and ultra-high emissions is linked inextricably to the growth of fossil gas. ...

Capablanca-Fan
23-09-2020, 01:27 AM
John Stossel:


The massive, deadly wildfires in America's West are caused by climate change,” smirks California governor Gavin Newsom. In reality, bad forest management and excessive regulation are bigger causes.

"All of this catastrophizing around climate change is a huge distraction,” says Mike Shellenberger, an environmentalist once named a "Hero of the Environment" by Time Magazine.

"Climate change is real," he says, but "it's not the end of the world. It's not our most serious environmental problem."

California warmed 3 degrees over the last half-century, but Shellenberger notes: "You could’ve had this amount of warming and not had these fires. The reason we know that is because the forests that were well-managed have survived the megafires."

Well managed forests like the one at Shaver Lake, California, maintained by Southern California Edison, have survived the blazes. In that forest, the utility company conducted "prescribed burns" to get rid of tinder that creates big out-of-control fires, and they created "fire breaks" — swaths of forest that are made sparse, so big fires die off when they hit them.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-xvc2o4ezk

Patrick Byrom
23-09-2020, 12:42 PM
I assume that Stossel and Shellenberger realise that the temperature is not going to stop increasing if we continue to add carbon dioxide to the atmosphere?

Capablanca-Fan
24-09-2020, 11:14 AM
Forest Fires Aren’t at Historic Highs in the United States. Not Even Close (https://fee.org/articles/forest-fires-aren-t-at-historic-highs-in-the-united-states-not-even-close/)
California’s wildfires are a serious matter, but the official record of the United States shows forest fires in the US today are far below the annual average in the 1930s and 1940s.
Jon Miltimore, FEE, 21 Sep 2020

As I pointed out, it’s not unreasonable to assume that both poor land management and California’s high temperatures and arid climate have played a role in the fires. But California is not the only place in America that experiences high temps and dry weather.

Texas actually has more forest and higher temperatures than California, but the Lone Star state rarely struggles with fires, perhaps because 95 percent of its land mass is privately owned and these owners act as responsible stewards of the land.

If climate change was truly the primary culprit of the wildfires, wouldn’t it stand to reason other parts of the US would be suffering similar results? Are there reasons climate change impacts California more than Texas and the Southeast US?

This brings me to my second point. There’s a perception that today’s fires are historically unprecedented.

“Even though the U.S. is only halfway through wildfire season, this year is one of the worst in history,” CNBC reported Friday. “Human-caused climate change has made blazes more frequent and intense, especially during extreme heat waves and drought conditions.”

But, the claim that 2020 is one of the worst in US history is simply not true.

A news story making such a claim might start by telling readers how many acres of land have burned in the record-setting year. CNBC doesn’t. One also sees a second problem: most of its charts don’t include information prior to 1990.

Blunderbuss
24-09-2020, 11:45 AM
Fire and Ice - www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2727-5 ("https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2727-5"https://)

Melting Antarctic ice will raise sea level by 2.5 metres – even if Paris climate goals are met, study finds

Patrick Byrom
24-09-2020, 12:54 PM
Maybe California is having worse fires than Texas because it's actually hotter at present?

And California is hotter than Texas
http://www.usda.gov/sites/default/files/documents/wwcb.pdf

Ian Murray
24-09-2020, 02:12 PM
Maybe California is having worse fires than Texas because it's actually hotter at present?

California is having a brief respite while the next heat wave moves in

Pacific Northwest is Getting Much-Needed Rain, But Then Another Heat Wave Moves into Wildfire-Weary California, Oregon
(https://weather.com/forecast/regional/news/2020-09-22-west-pattern-change-wildfires-washington-oregon-california)

while 29 Texan counties are in flood

Tropical Storm Beta Floods Houston Area; Standing Water Closes Interstate, Highways (https://weather.com/news/news/2020-09-22-tropical-storm-beta-houston-flooding-streets-closed)

4561

Desmond
27-09-2020, 09:16 PM
Not a problem chief, ex - stinkers have plenty of time to wait :D

4550

Full article here:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-09-20/scott-morrison-refuses-to-commit-net-zero-carbon-emissions-2050/12682714

Source: ABC news yesterday 20-09-20It's unclear why Huckster Scotty from Marketing won't commit to the target when all Australian states have, as well as many countries. Is he planning to generate more emissions himself?


Individually, every Australian state has also signed up to net zero emissions by 2050 — either as a target or goal.

Ian Murray
28-09-2020, 06:46 PM
It's unclear why Huckster Scotty from Marketing won't commit to the target when all Australian states have, as well as many countries. Is he planning to generate more emissions himself?


Individually, every Australian state has also signed up to net zero emissions by 2050 — either as a target or goal.

The backbench Luddites like George Christensen and Craig Kelly are making sure he doesn't commit, even if he was inclined to himself.

Capablanca-Fan
29-09-2020, 07:17 AM
What's Wrong with Wind and Solar? (https://www.prageru.com/video/whats-wrong-with-wind-and-solar/)
Mark Mills, 14 Sep 2020

Are wind, solar, and batteries the magical solutions to all our energy needs? Or do they come with too high a price? Mark Mills, Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, analyzes the true cost — both economic and environmental — of so-called green energy.

Blunderbuss
29-09-2020, 08:00 AM
/\ /\ /\ /\ :wall:

Do coal-fired power stations produce radioactive waste?

Yes – and the waste contributes far more radiation to the environment than nuclear power stations. The radioactivity comes from the trace amounts of uranium and thorium contained in coal. These elements have been trapped in the Earth’s crust since its formation and are usually in concentrations too low to pose any serious threat. But the burning of coal produces fly ash, a material in which the uranium and thorium are much more concentrated.

The exact amounts depend on the source of the coal, but are usually in the range of a few parts per million. That might not sound a lot until you realise that a typical gigawatt-capacity coal power station burns several million tonnes of coal per year. That means every such station creates fly ash containing around 5-10 tonnes of uranium and thorium each year. Multiply that by the number of such stations worldwide and the total amount of radioactive waste produced is truly astonishing.

According to estimates by the US Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the world’s coal-fired power stations currently generate waste containing around 5,000 tonnes of uranium and 15,000 tonnes of thorium. Collectively, that’s over 100 times more radiation dumped into the environment than that released by nuclear power stations.

Ian Murray
29-09-2020, 08:36 AM
/\ /\ /\ /\ :wall:

Do coal-fired power stations produce radioactive waste? ....

But wait, there's more!

Ash in Lungs: How Breathing Coal Ash is Hazardous to Your Health (https://earthjustice.org/blog/2014-july/ash-in-lungs-how-breathing-coal-ash-is-hazardous-to-your-health)

https://earthjustice.org/documents/report/ash-in-lungs-how-breathing-coal-ash-is-hazardous-to-your-health

Blunderbuss
29-09-2020, 09:34 AM
The source for my post above...
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-54211450 (https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-54211450)

4571

antichrist
29-09-2020, 12:28 PM
All these industrial methods of producing and storing energy of course are going to be detrimental to the environment. Modern society does not want to bite the bullet that society has to change. Also the fact that capitalism will be greatly modified and profit motive often won't necessarily prevail.

Capablanca-Fan
01-10-2020, 04:38 AM
Driving Towards Utopia, Skidding on ICE (https://the-pipeline.org/driving-towards-utopia-skidding-on-ice/)
John O'Sullivan, The Pipeline, 27 Sep 2020

In this case there is an alternative policy. It is to improve the efficiency of the internal combustion engine so that it releases fewer carbon emissions into the atmosphere. It’s a very simple and practical approach to solving a difficult problem. It does not require the building of any infrastructure, let alone a massive one, in order to work effectively. For that and other reasons, it doesn’t constitute a heavy increase in expenditures by governments and consumers. It’s already being accomplished by the research departments of automobile companies which have transformed conventional cars to an astounding extent since the 1960s.

How effective might this approach be in reducing carbon emissions? Professor Kalghatgi estimates that a 5 percent reduction in fuel consumption by ICE vehicles would obtain a larger reduction in carbon emissions than the massive switch to electric cars with all its attendant infrastructure costs. That alone would be a massive prize. But he also believes that a reduction much larger than 5 percent in fuel consumption by ICEVs could be obtained through such methods as “better combustion, control and after-treatment systems along with partial electrification and reductions in weight.”

The snag is that though these innovations are being pursued now, how long is that likely to continue if the U.K. government instructs car manufacturers that they must stop selling their product in ten years? What incentive is there for companies to maintain large R&D expenditures when they are officially told that these innovations, even if successful, will reduce carbon emissions and make other improvements in their automobiles for only a short period before production is halted altogether?

Ian Murray
03-10-2020, 08:03 AM
Driving Towards Utopia, Skidding on ICE (https://the-pipeline.org/driving-towards-utopia-skidding-on-ice/)
John O'Sullivan, The Pipeline, 27 Sep 2020

In this case there is an alternative policy. It is to improve the efficiency of the internal combustion engine so that it releases fewer carbon emissions into the atmosphere. It’s a very simple and practical approach to solving a difficult problem.


Marginal improvements in fuel efficiency will not lead to zero emissions.

Ian Murray
16-10-2020, 10:47 AM
Elon Musk's SpaceX is launching a satellite that can measure rising sea levels to the millimetre from 830 miles above Earth (https://www.businessinsider.com.au/elon-musk-spacex-nasa-satellite-track-rising-sea-levels-2020-10)

* SpaceX is launching a satellite in November that will track how climate change is causing sea levels to rise.

* The Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will take off November 10 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, aboard a Falcon 9 rocket.

* The satellite will measure how rising sea levels are eroding coastlines by updating maps of the oceans every ten days. Its altimeters can measure millimetre-scale changes in elevation.

*The project is a collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA, which contracted SpaceX for the launch. ...

Ian Murray
20-10-2020, 08:26 AM
Electric vehicles are not just the wave of the future, they are saving lives today (https://earthjustice.org/features/electric-vehicles-explainer?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_term=page&fbclid=IwAR29aXaHUGrRdQ_8QYZHZK_INgh5P6g1UWwRvAkAD wKS-lRKnUSal50ZheY)

1. Electric vehicles now include cars, transit buses, trucks of all sizes, and even big-rig tractor trailers that are at least partially powered by electricity.

Electric vehicles fall into three main categories:

Battery electric vehicles are powered by electricity stored in a battery pack.
Plug-in hybrids combine a gasoline or diesel engine with an electric motor and large rechargeable battery.
Fuel cell vehicles split electrons from hydrogen molecules to produce electricity to run the motor.
...

Ian Murray
28-10-2020, 10:02 AM
Climate change worrying more Australians than ever before, Australia Institute report reveals (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-28/australia-institute-2020-climate-change-report-concern-growing/12764874?fbclid=IwAR31JCCOFmCcRKQw3JxGY53yzRE9u3zx LpxBpiy6q0jnwRoG4jRo__-i1RU)

Despite a global pandemic dominating headlines, concern about the impact of climate change is at a record high in Australia, with 80 per cent of people thinking we are already experiencing problems caused by climate change and 83 per cent supporting the closure of coal-fired power stations.
Key points:

The survey shows Australians greatly overestimate the economic impact of the gas industry
Half of the respondents said fossil fuel producers should pay for climate action
Nearly three-quarters thought Australia should be a global leader in combatting climate change

In addition, 71 per cent of Australians now think Australia should be a world leader on climate action, according to The Australia Institute's Climate of the Nation report, which has been tracking Australian attitudes to climate change since 2007. ...

Capablanca-Fan
29-10-2020, 07:38 AM
Is 'King Solar' Now the Cheapest Electricity Source Ever? (https://reason.com/2020/10/28/is-king-solar-now-the-cheapest-electricity-source-ever/)
Yes, and it's only going to get cheaper.
RONALD BAILEY, Reason, 28 Oct 2020

In its annual World Energy Outlook (https://www.iea.org/reports/world-energy-outlook-2020) report, the International Energy Agency (IEA) finds that, due to steeply declining costs, solar photovoltaic (PV) electric power generation "is consistently cheaper than new coal- or gas-fired power plants in most countries, and solar projects now offer some of the lowest-cost electricity ever seen." Taking into account the declared energy policies of various countries, the IEA projects that renewables will meet 80 percent of the growth in global electricity demand to 2030. This makes solar "the new king of electricity."

According to the IEA report, new utility-scale solar projects now cost $30 to $60 per megawatt-hour (MWh) (https://sarasinandpartners.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/WEO2020.pdf) in Europe and the U.S. and just $20 to $40 per MWh in China and India, where "revenue support mechanisms" such as guaranteed prices are in place (we'll get to the issue of the guaranteed prices shortly). This analysis accords with the new levelized cost of energy report from the Lazard financial consultancy that finds that electricity from unsubsidized utility-scale solar PV costs between $29 and $42 per MWh. The levelized cost of energy analysis takes into account the capital costs, fuel costs, operations and maintenance costs, debt and equity costs, and plant utilization rates for each type of electric power generation.

For example, a budget plan setting upper limits on customers' peak loads could be coupled with automation technology that helps them minimize the impact of power restrictions on their most critical uses. A premium plan would charge customers more for their higher capacity and for the amount of power they consume per month. Or customers could choose an intermediate capacity plan with a wide range of home automation services that enable them to stay within limit of the amount of power for which they wish to contract.

All signs are that cheap solar power is coming and that's really good news.

Ian Murray
29-10-2020, 09:21 AM
Is 'King Solar' Now the Cheapest Electricity Source Ever? (https://reason.com/2020/10/28/is-king-solar-now-the-cheapest-electricity-source-ever/)
Yes, and it's only going to get cheaper.
RONALD BAILEY, Reason, 28 Oct 2020

In its annual World Energy Outlook (https://www.iea.org/reports/world-energy-outlook-2020) report, the International Energy Agency (IEA) finds that, due to steeply declining costs, solar photovoltaic (PV) electric power generation "is consistently cheaper than new coal- or gas-fired power plants in most countries, and solar projects now offer some of the lowest-cost electricity ever seen." Taking into account the declared energy policies of various countries, the IEA projects that renewables will meet 80 percent of the growth in global electricity demand to 2030. This makes solar "the new king of electricity." ...

The generating cost of solar is predicted to fall as low as one or two cents per MWh by 2030. Allowing the market to choose is a no-brainer, but the entrenched interests of the fossil fuel industry will not go quietly into the night.

The hard-right rump of the Coalition in Australia is currently touting a government-built coal-fired power station in north Queensland (private equity is uninterested, of course). A taxpayer-funded $3 million feasibility study (https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2020-08-27/collinsville-locals-want-coal-power-station-study/12597658) is about to get under way

Ian Murray
30-10-2020, 08:13 AM
National Party goes all in on coal (https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/2020/10/30/michael-pascoe-national-party-coal/?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Morning%20News%20-%2020201030)

The National Party is at a low ebb when a former deputy prime minister, the present Deputy Prime Minister and the man tipped to be the next deputy prime minister are all happy to risk Australia’s financial stability for the sake of their coal sponsors.

But the former party of the bush is at an even lower ebb when it fakes concern for farmers as its excuse to do the fossil fuel industry’s bidding.

Australian agriculture, as represented by the National Farmers Federation and Meat and Livestock Australia, has moved on from the National Party in environmental responsibility and far beyond it in committing to carbon neutrality – red meat targeting carbon neutrality by 2030, the NFF backing net-zero carbon by 2050.

Farmers living at the sharp end of climate change understand the threat it poses to their livelihoods, but the National Party has served notice that it has forsaken them for fossil fuel. ...

Blunderbuss
30-10-2020, 11:06 AM
From the Bushfire Royal Commission report just published…



Extreme weather has already become more frequent and intense because of climate change; further global warming over the next 20 to 30 years is inevitable.

Globally, temperatures will continue to rise, and Australia will have more hot days and fewer cool days. Sea levels are also projected to continue to rise.

Tropical cyclones are projected to decrease in number, but increase in intensity. Floods and bushfires are expected to become more frequent and more intense.

Catastrophic fire conditions may render traditional bushfire prediction models and firefighting techniques less effective.

Natural disasters are expected to become more complex, more unpredictable, and more difficult to manage.

We are likely to see more compounding disasters on a national scale with far-reaching consequences.

Compounding disasters may be caused by multiple disasters happening simultaneously, or one after another. Some may involve multiple hazards – fires, floods and storms. Some have cascading effects – threatening not only lives and homes, but also the nation’s economy, critical infrastructure and essential services, such as our electricity, telecommunications and water supply, and our roads, railways and airports. Australia needs to be better prepared for these natural disasters.

They may not happen every year, but when they happen, they can be catastrophic. The summer of 2019-20 – in which some communities experienced drought, heatwaves, bushfires, hailstorms and flooding – provided only a glimpse of the types of events that Australia may face in the future.

Capablanca-Fan
31-10-2020, 04:40 AM
Marginal improvements in fuel efficiency will not lead to zero emissions.

But they will lead to reduced emissions. Presumable less is better than more.

Capablanca-Fan
31-10-2020, 04:42 AM
The generating cost of solar is predicted to fall as low as one or two cents per MWh by 2030. Allowing the market to choose is a no-brainer, but the entrenched interests of the fossil fuel industry will not go quietly into the night.
I support letting the market choose, i.e. millions of people freely buying and selling. The fossil fuel industry should compete in the marketplace without subsidies. If solar wins in a fair contest, then good for solar.


The hard-right rump of the Coalition in Australia is currently touting a government-built coal-fired power station in north Queensland (private equity is uninterested, of course). A taxpayer-funded $3 million feasibility study (https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2020-08-27/collinsville-locals-want-coal-power-station-study/12597658) is about to get under way
Not good.

Ian Murray
02-11-2020, 07:36 AM
But they will lead to reduced emissions. Presumable less is better than more.

Why choose less emissions rather than zero emissions?

Ian Murray
02-11-2020, 07:53 AM
The economic benefits of climate action and costs of inaction. A report by Deloitte Access Economics

A new choice: Australia's climate for growth (https://www2.deloitte.com/au/en/pages/economics/articles/new-choice-climate-growth.html)

Deloitte Access Economics has been a leader in shaping reform debates over many decades. Now we bring our expertise to the wicked problem of climate change – and the economics of it. This topic has been the subject of debate, misconstruction, and genuine complexity.

At the core of the issue on climate change is the assumption that unconstrained emissions (and therefore warming) are compatible with economies which can grow forever. But, based on the science, this is not possible. Yet this has been the benchmark of economic analysis and the basis for assessment of any actions to solve for climate change.

Deloitte Access Economics has constructed a view of the Australian economy where inaction, or mis-action, in preventing climate change causes damage to the Australian economy. Climate change is no longer a scenario, but instead becomes the baseline for the economy.

While inaction will have the effect of curtailing Australia’s economic growth to the tune of $3.4 trillion and 880,000 fewer jobs in just 50 years, there is an upside – a new choice that Australia can make to create a new climate for growth. And the payoff? A bigger economy –$680 billion bigger – with 250,000 more jobs in just 50 years.

It is a new choice – and an easy one to make.

While the effects are not spread evenly across our States and Territories or across industries, all are affected. There is no free ride and the choice to take no action is costly for all businesses, all sectors, and for the community.

This report provides a basis for a more hopeful and useful debate about climate change – because Australia’s current debate no longer appropriately serves Australians, our economy or our decision makers. The policy choices over the next 2-3 years are the choices that will shape the next 10-20 – this is the narrow window we have to choose the change that will prevent the worst consequences of a warming world.

Our Chief Economist, Chris Richardson, has a saying that “…everyone has a second job in life – the job of leaving the world a better place…” Never has that been more true or apt than in the analysis and insights of this report.

Download link (https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/au/Documents/Economics/deloitte-au-dae-new-choice-climate-growth.pdf?nc=1)

Blunderbuss
03-11-2020, 12:02 PM
Scott Morrison pressured by Britain, France and Italy to announce 'bold' climate action

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/nov/03/scott-morrison-pressured-by-britain-france-and-italy-to-announce-bold-climate-action (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/nov/03/scott-morrison-pressured-by-britain-france-and-italy-to-announce-bold-climate-action)

Ian Murray
06-11-2020, 02:00 PM
On the horizon: the end of oil and the beginnings of a low-carbon planet (https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/nov/01/end-of-oil-and-beginnings-of-a-low-carbon-planet)

A year ago, only the most ardent climate optimists believed that the world’s appetite for oil might reach its peak in the next decade. Today, a growing number of voices within the fossil fuel industry believe this milestone may have already been passed. While the global gaze has been on Covid-19 as it ripped through the world’s largest economies and most vulnerable people, the virus has quietly dealt a mortal blow to oil demand too. ...

Ian Murray
13-11-2020, 09:40 AM
Fortescue leads “stampede” into green energy with stunning plans for 235 gigawatts of wind and solar (https://reneweconomy.com.au/fortescue-leads-stampede-into-green-energy-with-stunning-plans-for-235-gigawatts-of-wind-and-solar-27936/?fbclid=IwAR1gOb34eusO69BZYv8upakdT1ACA1xgKzXIZPSu DNmo85hwVF0w59WU04Q)

Andrew Forrest’s iron ore mining giant Fortescue Metals has unveiled stunning plans to build more than 235 gigawatts (GW) of renewable capacity, mostly wind and solar, to become a supplier of green energy and hydrogen that would rival the country’s biggest oil suppliers in terms of energy produced.

The extraordinary vision – and the creation of Fortescue Future Industries – was unveiled by Forrest at the company’s annual general meeting on Wednesday, and it represents the single most aggressive push into renewables ever unveiled. ...

The scale of the program is breathtaking. To put it into context, 235GW of wind and solar is equivalent to nearly five times the current capacity of Australia’s main grit, more than 20 times the size of the proposed Sun Cable solar project Forrest is developing in conjunction with software billionaire Mike Cannon-Brookes, and more than the energy output of oil giants such as Chevron and Total. ...

Capablanca-Fan
25-11-2020, 03:59 AM
Why choose less emissions rather than zero emissions?

I've been looking into plug-in hybrids, which have even less emissions, and electric vehicles which have none, at least none after manufacture. The problem is the paucity of charging stations and the length of time to charge. Another idea is hydrogen fuel cells, such as Toyota Mirai (https://www.edmunds.com/toyota/mirai/) and Hyundai Nexo (https://www.edmunds.com/hyundai/nexo/). But these are expensive, and only California and Hawaii have hydrogen refueling stations. Meanwhile, the Limited edition of the Hyundai Sonata Hybrid 2020 (https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1127957_2020-hyundai-sonata-hybrid-what-to-expect-from-its-mpg-boosting-solar-roof) has a solar roof that could provide about 700 miles a year.

antichrist
25-11-2020, 04:37 AM
The only true long term answer is animal power - human (bicycle etc) or gee gee. Communities have to be redesigned around
accessible facilities.

I was hoping some wind-driven light weight land craft would be invented. We need a new Da Vinci.

We tailor our travel to prevailing breezes just as shipping used to be. Communities would be more attuned to nature. You have a game of chess between gails.

Ian Murray
25-11-2020, 09:42 AM
I've been looking into plug-in hybrids, which have even less emissions, and electric vehicles which have none, at least none after manufacture. The problem is the paucity of charging stations and the length of time to charge. Another idea is hydrogen fuel cells, such as Toyota Mirai (https://www.edmunds.com/toyota/mirai/) and Hyundai Nexo (https://www.edmunds.com/hyundai/nexo/). But these are expensive, and only California and Hawaii have hydrogen refueling stations. Meanwhile, the Limited edition of the Hyundai Sonata Hybrid 2020 (https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1127957_2020-hyundai-sonata-hybrid-what-to-expect-from-its-mpg-boosting-solar-roof) has a solar roof that could provide about 700 miles a year.

For normal day-to-day driving you park in your garage at night and plug in to a standard 110V socket, and let it charge overnight. The battery is never completely flat of course, so it should only take a few hours. With smart metering, the car battery can also be used to supply power to your home (as the existing technology expands into homes). Taking a trip, you need to plan your recharging points along your route. Vehicle range is the critical factor, but that's improving almost daily. Current models give 250-400 km (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_electric_cars_currently_available), with Tesla up to 600. Stop for a coffee during a quick-charge, which takes 20-30 mins at around 25c per minute. The newer ultra-chargers do it in minutes.

As the EV market grows, so does the charger network (https://www.georgiapower.com/residential/save-money-and-energy/products-programs/electric-vehicles/charging-your-ev.html). The market economy at work.

EVs are expensive compared to gas-guzzlers, but their whole-of-life costs are cheaper. And of course prices will come down as demand increases, and as more efficient batteries are developed.

I'd love to own one, but I've now disposed of my car. Being a two-person two-car family made no economic or environmental sense.

Ian Murray
25-11-2020, 12:20 PM
Taxing a small target like EV owners is easy. A lot easier than targeting those who damage the roads, trucking companies.

'Disastrous' or a smart move? How Victoria's case for an electric car usage tax stacks up (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/nov/25/disastrous-or-a-smart-move-how-victorias-case-for-an-electric-car-usage-tax-stacks-up?utm_term=b2673df45b3bb7c01c71bfbb04637b65&utm_campaign=GuardianTodayAUS&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&CMP=GTAU_email)

Ian Murray
27-11-2020, 11:42 AM
Taxing a small target like EV owners is easy. A lot easier than targeting those who damage the roads, trucking companies.

'Disastrous' or a smart move? How Victoria's case for an electric car usage tax stacks up (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/nov/25/disastrous-or-a-smart-move-how-victorias-case-for-an-electric-car-usage-tax-stacks-up?utm_term=b2673df45b3bb7c01c71bfbb04637b65&utm_campaign=GuardianTodayAUS&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&CMP=GTAU_email)

I watched an interesting webinar a couple of days ago on the proposed 'road-user' tax, and the EV market in general


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cf9YpSu1858&feature=youtu.be

Capablanca-Fan
27-11-2020, 06:12 PM
Taxing a small target like EV owners is easy. A lot easier than targeting those who damage the roads, trucking companies.

'Disastrous' or a smart move? How Victoria's case for an electric car usage tax stacks up (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/nov/25/disastrous-or-a-smart-move-how-victorias-case-for-an-electric-car-usage-tax-stacks-up?utm_term=b2673df45b3bb7c01c71bfbb04637b65&utm_campaign=GuardianTodayAUS&utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&CMP=GTAU_email)

That makes no sense. Why punish owners of green vehicles?

guruduff
09-12-2020, 02:51 PM
you also have to consider Jevons paradox when discussing efficiency gains. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jevons_paradox
Basically increased efficiency makes things more affordable / available leading to an increasing usage of resources. Planes are more efficient therefore cheaper to run = more air travel = increased fuel usage. Really a tax regime that properly accounts for the full cost of fossil fuel consumption and/or wholesale technological changes is the only solution

Blunderbuss
10-12-2020, 01:16 PM
you also have to consider Jevons paradox when discussing efficiency gains. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jevons_paradox
Basically increased efficiency makes things more affordable / available leading to an increasing usage of resources. Planes are more efficient therefore cheaper to run = more air travel = increased fuel usage. Really a tax regime that properly accounts for the full cost of fossil fuel consumption and/or wholesale technological changes is the only solution

I was familiar with the idea but not the name ‘Jevons paradox’. First described to me in the context of washing machines – as they improve (get more efficient and convenient), we then wash our clothes more frequently, thereby negating the efficiency gains. Certainly, in my house the poor machine gets little rest.

Ian Murray
12-12-2020, 07:06 AM
Scott Morrison may scoff, but his climate change summit snub matters (https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2020/12/12/scott-morrison-climate-summit/)

... The current prime minister has been reminded this week that weight divisions matter in international relations and national performance matters when it comes to qualifying for a place at discussions.

Scott Morrison scoffs at the importance of this weekend’s tele-conference hosted by Britain’s Boris Johnson and held on the fifth anniversary of the Paris Climate Agreement.

He wasn’t scoffing a few weeks ago when he had word of his proposed speech telegraphed in a front page report in the Nine/Fairfax newspapers.

Marking us down for bringing nothing new to the table, the conference organisers decided Australia’s performance wasn’t good enough to warrant Morrison getting a speaking spot. ...

Ian Murray
12-12-2020, 05:25 PM
The Liberal minister forcing action on climate change (https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2020/12/12/the-liberal-minister-forcing-action-climate-change/160769160010849#mtr)

When Matt Kean was made minister for Energy and Environment in the New South Wales government last April, he says, his first thought was: “I must have upset the premier. What have I done?”

He was only half joking. While he was “excited” at the opportunity to make his mark in the new portfolios – he has had a lifelong concern for the environment and his father worked for decades in the energy sector – Kean was also “filled with trepidation”.

“You know,” he tells The Saturday Paper, “this is a contested space in Australian politics. It has brought down three prime ministers, it’s torn down governments.”

Kean had good reason to fear the people who had torn down those leaders and governments – fellow Liberals and Nationals, the vested interests in the fossil fuel sector and reactionary media. They have come after him, and are still coming. ...

Ian Murray
18-12-2020, 10:05 AM
Australia's newest coal-fired power plant deemed worthless by Japanese owner (https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/dec/17/australias-newest-coal-fired-power-plant-deemed-worthless-by-japanese-owner)

The Japanese part-owner of Australia’s newest coal-fired power plant has written off its investment amid dimming prospects for coal.

The conglomerate Sumitomo and another Japanese company, Kansai, each own half the Bluewaters power plant, which provides about 15% of Western Australia’s electricity, after buying it for a reported $1.2bn in 2011.

But in accounts for the six months to the end of September, released last month, Sumitomo said it had written off the “total amount” of its investment in the power plant, built in 2009.

This translated into a loss of 26bn yen (about A$330m) on the now-worthless plant, the company said.
China’s ban is less of a threat to Australia’s coal industry than international climate ambition

In its accounts, it said the decision was made due to “difficulty in refinance of senior secured loans, whose due had come in August 2020”.

Kansai has reportedly also written off its investment in Bluewaters.

After being warned by the prudential regulator to take climate risk into account when making loans, banks have been increasingly unwilling to finance coal projects such as Bluewaters – a move that has outraged some in government ranks. ...

Banks that held Bluewaters’ debt reportedly dumped it for as little as 71c in the dollar in July. ...

Ian Murray
24-12-2020, 12:50 PM
Stop believing in fairy tales: Australia’s coal industry doesn’t employ many people or pay its fair share of tax (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/dec/23/stop-believing-in-fairy-tales-australias-coal-industry-doesnt-employ-many-people-or-pay-its-fair-share-of-tax?fbclid=IwAR0B3HCL3sUmqtXGJq30cjIvxzJc6Z9wipPJ_ WraIQWF7KMR5KwMy1ECXu8)

... Fossil fuel extraction provides an important source of income to a small number of people in a small number of regions. Whether the world continues to transition away from fossil fuels or not, most of the people working in Australian coal mines will retire or lose their jobs to robot trucks, trains and drilling equipment in the decades to come. ...

Capablanca-Fan
28-12-2020, 01:56 PM
Toyota to showcase new solid state batteries in 2021 (https://www.couriermail.com.au/motoring/hitech/toyota-to-showcase-new-solid-state-batteries-in-2021/news-story/c4df3da94fad5d59a054c80dea34cb17)
The Japanese giant is leading the pack in this revolutionary new technology that will be a game changer for the car industry.
Dom Tripolone, Courier Mail, 22 Dec 2020

There are signs things are looking up for 2021.

COVID-19 stalled a groundbreaking advancements in the development of electric cars, Toyota’s solid-state battery.

The Japanese giant was due to unveil a working prototype of its new electric-car tech at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games, which was cancelled due to the pandemic. But according to Asian business publication, the Nikkei, this is now due some next year.

A solid state battery is a huge advancement over the current lithium-ion batteries used in electric cars.

In simple terms, a solid-state battery is smaller, faster to charge, more energy dense and less likely to catch fire than current batteries. The main reason is because the battery uses a solid electrolyte instead of a liquid or gel.

Estimates put range at more than 800km and up to 1000km, with the ability to charge in under 10 minutes.

These advancements would enable electric cars to be more practical than most petrol- or diesel-powered cars.

The batteries provide other benefits such as a roomier cabin and greater efficiency due to a lower vehicle weight.

Capablanca-Fan
17-02-2021, 03:45 AM
Green New Deal: Fact versus Fiction
John Stossel, 22 Apr 2019

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal proposes to save the planet. It calls for the United States to reduce carbon emissions to zero in 10 years.

James Meigs, former editor of Popular Mechanics, tells me “That's a goal you could only imagine possible if you have no idea how the energy economy works or how energy is produced in this country.”


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIOiGtO2UBA

Capablanca-Fan
18-02-2021, 09:14 AM
One Thread Explains How Texas' Adoption of CA Model for Energy Led to Disaster After Brutal Winter Storm (https://townhall.com/tipsheet/mattvespa/2021/02/17/one-thread-explains-how-texas-adoption-of-ca-model-for-energy-led-to-disaster-af-n2584852)
Matt Vespa, Townhall, 17 Feb 2021

Texas’s energy emergency could last all week as the weather is forecast to remain frigid. “My understanding is, the wind turbines are all frozen,” Public Utility Commission Chairman DeAnn Walker said Friday. “We are working already to try and ensure we have enough power but it’s taken a lot of coordination.”

Blame a perfect storm of bad government policies, timing and weather. Coal and nuclear are the most reliable sources of power. But competition from heavily subsidized wind power and inexpensive natural gas, combined with stricter emissions regulation, has caused coal’s share of Texas’s electricity to plunge by more than half in a decade to 18%.

Wind’s share has tripled to about 25% since 2010 and accounted for 42% of power last week before the freeze set in. About half of Texans rely on electric pumps for heating, which liberals want to mandate everywhere. But the pumps use a lot of power in frigid weather. So while wind turbines were freezing, demand for power was surging.

Gas-fired power plants ramped up, but the Arctic freeze increased demand for gas across the country. Producers couldn’t easily increase supply since a third of rigs across the country were taken out of production during the pandemic amid lower energy demand. Some gas wells and pipelines in Texas and Oklahoma also shut down in frosty conditions.

[…]

Liberals claim that prices of renewables and fossil fuels are now comparable, which may be true due to subsidies, but they are no free lunch, as this week’s energy emergency shows. The Biden Administration’s plan to banish fossil fuels is a greater existential threat to Americans than climate change.

Blunderbuss
18-02-2021, 10:41 AM
Alternative take here: conservatives-falsely-blame-renewables-for-texas-storm-outages (https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/feb/17/conservatives-falsely-blame-renewables-for-texas-storm-outages)

"While some wind turbines did freeze, failures in natural gas, coal and nuclear energy systems were responsible for nearly twice as many outages as renewables, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (Ercot), which operates the state’s power grid, said in a press conference on Tuesday.

Frozen instruments at gas, coal and even nuclear power stations were among the main problems, Ercot director Dan Woodfin said, according to Bloomberg."

Desmond
18-02-2021, 10:52 AM
Liberals claim that prices of renewables and fossil fuels are now comparable, which may be true due to subsidies,

Fossil fuel subsidies amount to hundreds of billions of dollars a year – here’s how to get rid of them (https://theconversation.com/fossil-fuel-subsidies-amount-to-hundreds-of-billions-of-dollars-a-year-heres-how-to-get-rid-of-them-153740)
February 11, 2021

Any feasible pathway out of the climate crisis involves dramatically lowering our consumption of fossil fuels. It’s astonishing, then, that many countries not only don’t reflect the damage caused by burning fossil fuels in the taxes imposed on them, but actively subsidise their extraction and use. Despite an agreement at the G20 in 2009 to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies, the US, China and Russia alone spent US$909 billion (£656 billion) on them in 2017, the most recent year available – that’s nearly 40% more than in 2009. ...

If we take the difference between the price that fossil fuels should be sold at to reflect their full costs to society and the price at which they are actually sold, and multiply this by the quantity of fossil fuels consumed worldwide, we get an estimate of the harm caused by underpricing fossil fuels. Globally, this amounts to US$5.2 trillion, or 6.5% of the global economy – a far larger share than that caused by tariffs and quotas on international trade. ...

Ian Murray
18-02-2021, 08:45 PM
One Thread Explains How Texas' Adoption of CA Model for Energy Led to Disaster After Brutal Winter Storm (https://townhall.com/tipsheet/mattvespa/2021/02/17/one-thread-explains-how-texas-adoption-of-ca-model-for-energy-led-to-disaster-af-n2584852)
Matt Vespa, Townhall, 17 Feb 2021


Never let the truth get in the way of a good story. The cause is simply operator greed

The Texas grid got crushed because its operators didn’t see the need to prepare for cold weather (https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2021/02/16/ercot-texas-electric-grid-failure/)

When it gets really cold, it can be hard to produce electricity, as customers in Texas and neighboring states are finding out. But it’s not impossible. Operators in Alaska, Canada, Maine, Norway and Siberia do it all the time.

What has sent Texas reeling is not an engineering problem, nor is it the frozen wind turbines blamed by prominent Republicans. It is a financial structure for power generation that offers no incentives to power plant operators to prepare for winter. In the name of deregulation and free markets, critics say, Texas has created an electric grid that puts an emphasis on cheap prices over reliable service.

It’s a “Wild West market design based only on short-run prices,” said Matt Breidert, a portfolio manager at a firm called Ecofin.

And yet the temporary train wreck of that market Monday and Tuesday has seen the wholesale price of electricity in Houston go from $22 a megawatt-hour to about $9,000. Meanwhile, 4 million Texas households have been without power. ...

Capablanca-Fan
19-02-2021, 05:32 AM
Fossil fuel subsidies amount to hundreds of billions of dollars a year – here’s how to get rid of them (https://theconversation.com/fossil-fuel-subsidies-amount-to-hundreds-of-billions-of-dollars-a-year-heres-how-to-get-rid-of-them-153740)
February 11, 2021

I support getting rid of subsidies across the board.

Blunderbuss
19-02-2021, 06:37 AM
Or simply, as usual, the system is not prepared for cold weather and high power consumption. Every year it's winter and every year some kind of mess happens.

And another factor Texas stands-alone with no inter-connectors with other states: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-56085733 (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-56085733)

"Texas is the only state in the US with an independent power grid, meaning it is largely dependent on its own resources.

In normal times, this works fine because Texas is a large producer of energy, both fossil and renewable, and can provide enough for its population and export to other states.

But when its infrastructure is under strain, for example during a cold-weather event, most of the state cannot link up with other grids around the US to make up the shortfall.

Texas officials have now called for a hearing into the state's grid's ability to cope with extreme weather events."

Desmond
19-02-2021, 08:48 AM
I support getting rid of subsidies across the board.

OK, but you keep referring to renewables subsidies while ignoring the much larger fossil fuel subsidies (that are growing at 5% every year).

Patrick Byrom
19-02-2021, 11:06 AM
A lot of the problem is attitudes like this (https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2021/02/texas-public-officials-unprepared.html):


“No one owes you or your family anything; nor is it the local governments responsibility to support you during trying times like this! Sink or swim, it’s your choice!” said Tim Boyd, the now-former mayor of Colorado City, Texas, in a Facebook post. “The City and County, along with power providers or any other service owes you NOTHING! I’m sick and tired of people looking for a damn hand out! If you don’t have electricity you step up and come up with a game plan to keep your family warm and safe.” He added: “Bottom line, quit crying and looking for a handout! Get off your ass and take care of your own family!”

Boyd has since resigned.

Ian Murray
19-02-2021, 07:04 PM
A lot of the problem is attitudes like this (https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2021/02/texas-public-officials-unprepared.html):


“No one owes you or your family anything; nor is it the local governments responsibility to support you during trying times like this! Sink or swim, it’s your choice!” said Tim Boyd, the now-former mayor of Colorado City, Texas, in a Facebook post. “The City and County, along with power providers or any other service owes you NOTHING! I’m sick and tired of people looking for a damn hand out! If you don’t have electricity you step up and come up with a game plan to keep your family warm and safe.” He added: “Bottom line, quit crying and looking for a handout! Get off your ass and take care of your own family!”

Boyd has since resigned.

What you get when public utilities are privatised

Capablanca-Fan
22-02-2021, 04:20 AM
Turbulent Hydro

After 2 years of engineering and build iterations the team of Turbulent has finished its first 15kW low-head hydropower turbine. This is a scalable technology that can be installed at any kind of water fall, rapid, or water control structure in rivers and canals. By basing this turbine on the principle of a whirlpool, it is both fish friendly and can let debris pass through.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XiefORPamLU&feature=share

Ian Murray
22-02-2021, 01:13 PM
Turbulent Hydro

After 2 years of engineering and build iterations the team of Turbulent has finished its first 15kW low-head hydropower turbine. This is a scalable technology that can be installed at any kind of water fall, rapid, or water control structure in rivers and canals. By basing this turbine on the principle of a whirlpool, it is both fish friendly and can let debris pass through.

Advances in technology keep on coming. This is great, coming when massive dams are losing their appeal due to the ill effects on river systems (e.g. the Tasmanian Hydroelectric Authority [the 'Hydro', demonised for decades by activists - remember the Franklin/Lower Gordon proposal back in the 80s?] now builds wind farms.

Desmond
23-03-2021, 02:04 PM
Jeff Bezos will spend $1 billion a year to fight climate change (https://www.vox.com/recode/22321861/jeff-bezos-climate-earth-fund-andrew-steel-amazon)

Capablanca-Fan
24-03-2021, 02:10 PM
We Should Learn What Lessons From Fukushima? Lesson #1: People Died From Forced Evacuations, Not From Radiation (https://townhall.com/columnists/kelvinkemm/2021/03/23/we-should-learn-what-lessons-from-fukushima-n2586682)
Kelvin Kemm, Townhall, 23 Mar 2021

They progressively ordered the evacuation of 160,000 people living around the Fukushima neighbourhood. That was a mistake. As days and weeks passed, it materialized that not one single person was killed by nuclear radiation. Not one single person was even injured by nuclear radiation, either. Even today, a decade later, there is still no sign of any longer-term radiation harm to any person or animal. Sadly, however, people did die during the forced evacuation.

So one of the lessons learned from Fukushima is that a huge amount of nuclear power can be struck by the largest earthquake and tsunami ever recorded, and nobody gets harmed by nuclear radiation.

Another lesson learned is that an evacuation order issued too hastily did harm and kill people.

World Nuclear Association Director-General Dr. Sama Bilbao y León said: “The rapidly implemented and protracted evacuation has resulted in well-documented significant negative social and health impacts. In total, the evacuation is thought to have been responsible for more than 2,000 premature deaths among the 160,000 who were evacuated. The rapid evacuation of the frail elderly, as well at those requiring hospital care, had a near-immediate toll.”

Ian Murray
24-03-2021, 07:11 PM
We Should Learn What Lessons From Fukushima? Lesson #1: People Died From Forced Evacuations, Not From Radiation
Kelvin Kemm, Townhall, 23 Mar 2021…


Significant quantities of fission products were released into the atmosphere, posing long-term (not immediate) risks to human health, including fatal risks. It is not yet known how many people will die from the effects of radiation poisoning

The Truth About Radiation in Fukushima (https://thediplomat.com/2019/03/the-truth-about-radiation-in-fukushima/)

Ian Murray
02-04-2021, 08:43 PM
The Australian Academy of Science spells it out in a new report

What will happen to our cities (and beaches) at 3 degrees of warming? (https://www.smh.com.au/national/what-will-happen-to-our-cities-and-beaches-at-3-degrees-of-warming-20210331-p57fhj.html?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR2W-I-StCRMuS2R-t4IgBT7l4ZL-aUu_IteuZ98KvIsHnQIUjyzUdghFkA#Echobox=1617185007)

... So how far away are 50-degree summers in our major cities? What will global warming mean for our natural environment and for agriculture? How do tipping points work? And how can we avoid the worst of the climate fallout? ...

Capablanca-Fan
20-04-2021, 06:21 AM
Wouldn't it be very Green if Europe and North America could build huge hydroelectric power stations like Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in China of 22.5 GW (https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/three-gorges-dam-worlds-largest-hydroelectric-plant), which overtook the Itaipú station on the Paraná River on the border of Paraguay and Brazil (14 GW) as the world's largest hydroelectric plant? They don't let treehuggers stop them, and don't have reams of red tape of unelected government bureaucracies to wade through. They just do what's needed to get enormous quantities of green electricity. The USA's largest is the Depression era's Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River (6.8 GW), which helped power America's industries that helped it win WW2. NZ is green because the majority of its electrical generation is hydro. Hydro is green as well as both intense rather than diffuse, and constant rather than intermittent.

Ian Murray
20-04-2021, 12:36 PM
Wouldn't it be very Green if Europe and North America could build huge hydroelectric power stations like Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in China of 22.5 GW (https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/three-gorges-dam-worlds-largest-hydroelectric-plant), which overtook the Itaipú station on the Paraná River on the border of Paraguay and Brazil (14 GW) as the world's largest hydroelectric plant? They don't let treehuggers stop them, and don't have reams of red tape of unelected government bureaucracies to wade through. They just do what's needed to get enormous quantities of green electricity. The USA's largest is the Depression era's Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River (6.8 GW), which helped power America's industries that helped it win WW2. NZ is green because the majority of its electrical generation is hydro. Hydro is green as well as both intense rather than diffuse, and constant rather than intermittent.

Three Gorges took 17 years to build, Itaipú 32 years to finish. At the rate solar and wind are developing, similar new mega-dams would be obsolete long before they came on stream.

Compare the 10GW battery-backup solar farm (https://gienergy.com.au/worlds-largest-solar-farm/) Mike Cannon-Brookes and Twiggy Forrest are set to build in NT, for completion by 2027 including a submarine cable to supply Singapore.

Capablanca-Fan
21-04-2021, 02:13 AM
The Nuclear Option
John Stossel, 20 Apr 2021

"Climate change is the existential threat!" warns Bernie Sanders and others. But if he really believed that, he should support nuclear -- the only technology that has a track record of rapidly replacing fossil fuels.

----
To make sure you receive the weekly video from Stossel TV, sign up here: https://johnstossel.activehosted.com/f/1​
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50 years ago, the fastest decarbonization ever happened when France successfully switched to nuclear power.

But environmentalists in the U.S. rarely support nuclear. Some even protest against it.

"I live in terror of the next accident," Harvey Wasserman, who runs the group Solartopia, tells me. "It’s a virtual inevitability that we’re going to have another disaster."

But NO ONE died from the one serious nuclear accident in the US, 3 Mile Island.

Fukushima was overblown, too.

Chernobyl was terrible, but that was a bad plant sloppily constructed to please Soviet dictators. No nuclear facility like that will be built again.

Nuclear is better than the alternatives.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7VCea8LIec

Capablanca-Fan
21-04-2021, 03:52 AM
Three Gorges took 17 years to build, Itaipú 32 years to finish. At the rate solar and wind are developing, similar new mega-dams would be obsolete long before they came on stream.
Wow, that is indeed a long time. But would they be obsolete as such? Wouldn't they still be generating huge amounts of power both day and night? We may need more if we transition to fully electric road transport.


Compare the 10GW battery-backup solar farm (https://gienergy.com.au/worlds-largest-solar-farm/) Mike Cannon-Brookes and Twiggy Forrest are set to build in NT, for completion by 2027 including a submarine cable to supply Singapore.
Probably the solar PV generations has become as efficient as it's going to get, which means hugh land areas needed for solar farms. Solid state batteries would be a major game-change if they could be made on a large scale.

Ian Murray
21-04-2021, 09:24 AM
Wow, that is indeed a long time. But would they be obsolete as such? Wouldn't they still be generating huge amounts of power both day and night? We may need more if we transition to fully electric road transport.

To achieve global transition to carbon-free energy by 2050, installed renewables need to expand by more than the growth in energy demand (so that less non-renewable energy is needed). The long lead-time in building hydro capacity does not fit with the immediate new-build renewables necessity. Hydro will continue to be used in the longer term, but its share of global capacity will continue to fall.


Probably the solar PV generations has become as efficient as it's going to get, which means hugh land areas needed for solar farms. Solid state batteries would be a major game-change if they could be made on a large scale.

So the pundits keep saying, as solar panel efficiency increases year by year (currently 22% panels now being installed, with 45% achieved in lab development). New developments just keep on coming, from roof tiles incorporating solar panels and batteries to transparent sheet covering windows and generating power from UV and IR light while allowing visible light unobscured passage.

Ian Murray
21-04-2021, 09:39 AM
Woodside faces shareholder and community opposition to gas expansion (https://www.marketforces.org.au/woodside-faces-shareholder-and-community-opposition-to-gas-expansion/)

... Collectively known as the Burrup Hub, Woodside’s Scarborough, Pluto and Browse expansion projects “would be Australia’s most polluting fossil fuel project ever to be developed, with a total lifetime carbon footprint of over 6 billion tonnes of CO2 , equivalent to running 35 coal power stations every year until 2070”.

Many questions at the AGM raised the significant the financial risks, and major climate, environmental and Aboriginal cultural heritage concerns related to this destructive mega project. ...

Capablanca-Fan
23-04-2021, 12:32 PM
To achieve global transition to carbon-free energy by 2050, installed renewables need to expand by more than the growth in energy demand (so that less non-renewable energy is needed). The long lead-time in building hydro capacity does not fit with the immediate new-build renewables necessity. Hydro will continue to be used in the longer term, but its share of global capacity will continue to fall.
That's a pity. I grew up with hydro in NZ. Would the long lead time apply to smaller-scale hydro?


So the pundits keep saying, as solar panel efficiency increases year by year (currently 22% panels now being installed, with 45% achieved in lab development). New developments just keep on coming, from roof tiles incorporating solar panels and batteries to transparent sheet covering windows and generating power from UV and IR light while allowing visible light unobscured passage.
I meant, there is a limit to solar PV efficiency. But that is interesting and welcome news about solar power from parts of the spectrum invisible to our eyes. IR PV would be very good because just over half the solar radiation reaching earth is IR. It is a great achievement because IR photons are usually too low in energy to shift electrons to higher levels.

Probably more cars will follow the Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Limited in putting solar panels on the roof.

Ian Murray
24-04-2021, 12:24 PM
That's a pity. I grew up with hydro in NZ. Would the long lead time apply to smaller-scale hydro?

Apart from the capital costs, new dams are faced with significant and growing environmental backlash, aimed at protecting rivers and the lands lost to flooding by dam reservoirs. Then there is the problem of declining river flows due to climate change, as this article (https://spectrum.ieee.org/energy/renewables/future-of-hydropower) discusses.


I meant, there is a limit to solar PV efficiency. But that is interesting and welcome news about solar power from parts of the spectrum invisible to our eyes. IR PV would be very good because just over half the solar radiation reaching earth is IR. It is a great achievement because IR photons are usually too low in energy to shift electrons to higher levels.

Probably more cars will follow the Hyundai Sonata Hybrid Limited in putting solar panels on the roof.

The Sky’s the Limit: Solar and wind energy potential is 100 times as much as global energy demand (https://carbontracker.org/reports/the-skys-the-limit-solar-wind/)

Solar and wind potential is far higher than that of fossil fuels and can meet global energy demand many times over, unlocking huge benefits for society.

With current technology and in a subset of available locations we can capture at least 6,700 PWh p.a. from solar and wind, which is more than 100 times global energy demand.

Opportunities unlocked

The collapse in renewable costs in the last three years means that half of this solar and wind technical potential now has economic potential, and by the end of the decade it will be over 90%.

The land required for solar panels alone to provide all global energy is 450,000 km2, 0.3% of the global land area of 149 million km2. This differs by country as highlighted below. ...

Ian Murray
26-04-2021, 05:44 PM
Australian super funds to vote against company directors not tackling climate crisis (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/apr/26/australian-super-funds-to-vote-against-company-directors-not-tackling-climate-crisis)

Big super funds have threatened to vote against company directors who do not make sure their businesses are committed to action on global heating that includes hitting net zero by 2050.

The Australian Council of Superannuation Investors (Acsi), which represents investors that manage more than $1tn in retirement savings and hold about 10% of the shares in the top 200 companies in the country, said some boards were not tackling the climate crisis quickly enough.

Its tougher stance comes after a week in which regulators and ratings agencies stepped up the pressure on corporate Australia to properly consider climate risks and the US president, Joe Biden, increased the pressure on the Australian government to commit to emissions cuts sooner.

Australian companies attempting to find new markets due to the trade war with China face a risk that Europe will impose border taxes due to the country’s high emissions. At the same time, new research by insurance group Swiss Re, released this week, estimates that Australia’s economy will take a hit of as much as 12.5% by 2050 if the globe warms by 2.6C. ...

Capablanca-Fan
29-04-2021, 07:04 AM
Stop Wasting Money to Save the Planet | Bjorn Lomborg and Jordan B Peterson
28 Apr 2021

Lomborg supports a carbon tax, but also supports innovation and effective spending that does the most good, and stop telling people that they must live worse (from people flying private jets). E.g. using the catalytic converter did far more to reduce Los Angeles' pollution problem than preaching against cars.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqeuB084ySQ

Ian Murray
29-04-2021, 10:32 AM
Stop Wasting Money to Save the Planet | Bjorn Lomborg and Jordan B Peterson
28 Apr 2021

Lomborg supports a carbon tax, but also supports innovation and effective spending that does the most good, and stop telling people that they must live worse (from people flying private jets). E.g. using the catalytic converter did far more to reduce Los Angeles' pollution problem than preaching against cars

The introduction of catalytic converters and their effect on detoxing the Los Angeles basin is not so much a result of innovation as a result of government intervention. Carmakers developed the converters to meet the more stringent emission standards imposed by amendments to the Clean Air Act (http://www.meca.org/galleries/files/catconfact_0106.pdf) in 1970, aided by the abolition of leaded petrol as a danger to human health.

The Californian government is still more concerned than the federal government with the health of Angelenos and all Californians. Its Low Emission Vehicle (https://ww2.arb.ca.gov/our-work/programs/low-emission-vehicle-program/about) regulations impose much more stringent emission controls on light vehicles sold in the state than do the increasing standards of the Clean Air Act.

Bjorn Lomborg's credentials as a climate economist (https://www.lse.ac.uk/granthaminstitute/news/a-closer-examination-of-the-fantastical-numbers-in-bjorn-lomborgs-new-book/) are not held in high regard, while Jordan B Peterson (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/feb/07/how-dangerous-is-jordan-b-peterson-the-rightwing-professor-who-hit-a-hornets-nest) is only a clinical psychologist and culture-war guru.

Capablanca-Fan
29-04-2021, 01:53 PM
More Compact and Efficient Vertical Turbines Could Be the Future for Wind Farms (https://scitechdaily.com/more-compact-and-efficient-vertical-turbines-could-be-the-future-for-wind-farms/)
By OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY, SciTechDaily, 26 Apr 2021

The now-familiar sight of traditional propeller wind turbines could be replaced in the future with wind farms containing more compact and efficient vertical turbines.

New research from Oxford Brookes University has found that the vertical turbine design is far more efficient than traditional turbines in large-scale wind farms, and when set in pairs the vertical turbines increase each other’s performance by up to 15%.

A research team from the School of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics (ECM) at Oxford Brookes led by Professor Iakovos Tzanakis conducted an in-depth study using more than 11,500 hours of computer simulation to show that wind farms can perform more efficiently by substituting the traditional propeller-type Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs), for compact Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs).

Vertical turbines are more efficient than traditional windmill turbines
The research demonstrates for the first time at a realistic scale, the potential of large-scale VAWTs to outcompete current HAWT wind farm turbines.

VAWTs spin around an axis vertical to the ground, and they exhibit the opposite behavior of the well-known propeller design (HAWTs). The research found that VAWTs increase each other’s performance when arranged in grid formations. Positioning wind turbines to maximize outputs is critical to the design of wind farms.

Ian Murray
30-04-2021, 09:05 AM
More Compact and Efficient Vertical Turbines Could Be the Future for Wind Farms (https://scitechdaily.com/more-compact-and-efficient-vertical-turbines-could-be-the-future-for-wind-farms/)
By OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY, SciTechDaily, 26 Apr 2021

The now-familiar sight of traditional propeller wind turbines could be replaced in the future with wind farms containing more compact and efficient vertical turbines.

Verticals have been around for a long time, but the realities of fluid dynamics have made them less efficient than horizontals (https://www.motherearthnews.com/renewable-energy/vertical-axis-wind-turbines-zmaz08fmzmcc). I hope this study does lead to more efficient wind farming.

Capablanca-Fan
01-05-2021, 04:44 AM
Verticals have been around for a long time, but the realities of fluid dynamics have made them less efficient than horizontals (https://www.motherearthnews.com/renewable-energy/vertical-axis-wind-turbines-zmaz08fmzmcc).
Some comments were critical of this article. I must admit, I thought vertical axis turbines would have an intractable disadvantage that during the second half of the rotation, the wind would be pushing against the rotational direction. So the blade would need far less drag in that direction.


I hope this study does lead to more efficient wind farming.
Same here.

Ian Murray
09-05-2021, 12:19 PM
The need to decarbonise globally is too urgent to wait for plentiful cheap green hydrogen

Hydrogen instead of electrification? Potentials and risks for climate targets (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/05/210506142118.htm)

Hydrogen-based fuels should primarily be used in sectors such as aviation or industrial processes that cannot be electrified, finds a team of researchers. Producing these fuels is too inefficient, costly and their availability too uncertain, to broadly replace fossil fuels for instance in cars or heating houses. For most sectors, directly using electricity for instance in battery electric cars or heat pumps makes more economic sense. ...

Capablanca-Fan
09-05-2021, 05:07 PM
2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 Review (https://www.edmunds.com/hyundai/ioniq-5/)
Edmunds


The five-passenger Ioniq 5 will be the first vehicle to use Hyundai's new Electric Global Modular Platform, or E-GMP, designed solely to underpin electric vehicles. Many current EVs — including the Hyundai Ioniq and Hyundai Kona Electric — are designed to support both engine and electric applications, which causes some packaging issues when converting for EV use.

What's powering the Ioniq 5?
The Ioniq 5 will offer two battery sizes: 58 kWh or 72.6 kWh. The base Ioniq 5 has rear-wheel drive with a single electric motor. A dual-motor setup with all-wheel drive will also be available.

Range, according to Hyundai, is up to 480 kilometers (298 miles) on the Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP) with the bigger battery and rear-wheel drive. Typically, these figures are higher than the EPA's estimates, which we don't have right now. For what it's worth, 480 km from the WLTP test is similar to what Hyundai claims for the Kona Electric. The EPA gives the Kona Electric a range estimate of 258 miles.

With the bigger battery and dual-motor setup, Hyundai says the Ioniq 5 will produce 225 kW (approximately 302 horsepower) and accelerate from 0 to 62 mph in 5.2 seconds. That's respectably quick and similar to what Tesla claims for the Model Y Long Range (0-60 mph in 4.8 seconds). With the smaller battery and single-motor rear-wheel drive, 0-62 mph slows to a claimed 8.5 seconds.


2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 First Look: Forget the Ioniqs You Know (https://www.motortrend.com/news/2022-hyundai-ioniq-5-first-look-review/)
This is one gorgeous electric SUV—from Hyundai!
Motortrend


Multiple Battery And Motor Combinations
With the Ioniq 5, Hyundai is now a step beyond its Japanese competitors on the EV front, too. The crossover arrives with a choice of either a 58- or 72.6-kWh battery pack, and a further choice of either a single rear-mounted motor driving the rear wheels or a dual front-and-rear motor setup affording all-wheel drive. In its most potent powertrain combination—dual motors, the 72.6-kWh battery—the Ioniq 5 scoots around with a combined 301 hp and 446 lb-ft, allowing for mostly-silent runs from zero to 62 mph in a quick 5.2 seconds. Keep the big battery but ditch the front motor, and that output drops to a more than reasonable 214 hp and 258 lb-ft, and the 0-62 mph time extends to 7.4 seconds.

With the smaller battery, the dual-motor setup spins out a combined 232 hp and 446 lb-ft for a 6.1-second 0-62 mph run. In the lowliest (and presumably most affordable) configuration, the single-motor, rear-wheel-drive, standard battery Ioniq 5's power is unchanged over the big-battery's 214 hp and 258 lb-ft, though 0-62 mph is the slowest at a still-reasonable 8.5 seconds. Regardless of how you spec it, the Ioniq 5 tops out at 115 mph.

At the moment, Hyundai's only talking range for the specific configuration of the 72.6 kWh battery and single rear motor, claiming an impressive WLTP-rated range of between 292 and 298 miles. Expect the official EPA range to differ here in the U.S. Here's a neat little tidbit—if you do happen to brick your Ioniq 5 on an over-enthusiastic impromptu road trip, an optional solar roof panel can trickle charge the car for some extra range, giving you a shot at reaching a charger.

Ian Murray
15-05-2021, 11:47 AM
China looks to shift steel production, and carbon emissions, offshore


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SfihP1fAu8

Ian Murray
17-05-2021, 09:05 PM
Adani mine contractor says no insurer will cover its work on project, as providers flee due to risk (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-14/adani-mine-construction-contractor-says-lack-of-insurance-risky/100138016?fbclid=IwAR0Ztob2tRgm_1sXIh2icCVI7iC3LsP CzY7LpWonjCwZG-q9W-peL7tv7VY)

Federal and state governments have been urged to step in and use public funds to insure companies building Adani's Carmichael mine and rail link, after one of Adani's biggest contractors revealed it couldn't find a provider that would cover the project.
Key points:

Many big insurers have dropped support for coal on the basis that it is too risky for the companies
Contractor BMD says its failure to secure insurance leaves it in breach of its contract with Adani
The company has suggested federal or state governments could step in and help insure the coal industry

BMD Constructions is one of Australia's largest construction companies, and one of Adani's most significant contractors.

In a submission to a federal government inquiry instigated by Queensland National Party MP George Christensen, BMD said it found itself in the extraordinary position of being unable to find any insurer for its work on Adani-related projects. ...

Ian Murray
18-05-2021, 01:56 PM
Coal - who needs it. Apart from the government, to prop up their corporate mates

Australian grid used the least coal on record last summer as renewables shone (https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/australian-grid-used-the-least-coal-on-record-last-summer-as-renewables-shone-20210514-p57s30.html?fbclid=IwAR2M4C1QbzXJi_q3LhjXtbd6WT3pH F4H1IsE2PBTmcoqEZ6SxDRhgJleQjw)

Coal-fired power consumption in Australia hit a record low during the first three months of 2021 and gas generation crashed to the lowest level in 15 years, as renewable energy and falling prices continue to shake up the market.

Figures from the Australian Energy Regulator, released on Monday, shed light on the impact of the clean energy transition sweeping the country’s main power grid and the existential challenges engulfing fossil-fuel generators. ...

Capablanca-Fan
24-05-2021, 08:30 AM
The U.S. Should Not Count on China’s Climate Goals (https://townhall.com/columnists/daniellebutcher/2021/05/22/the-us-should-not-count-on-chinas-climate-goals-n2589840)
Danielle Butcher, Townhall, 22 May 2021

A new report this month from Rhodium Group explains that China’s 2019 greenhouse gas emissions eclipsed emissions from every single developed country in the world — combined. This is the first time China, the world’s worst polluter since emissions began to skyrocket in the ‘90s, has been able to claim this dubious distinction.

The U.S. peaked emissions in 2007 (https://www.wri.org/insights/turning-point-which-countries-ghg-emissions-have-peaked-which-will-future)and, according to the IEA (https://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/pdf/mer.pdf), has reduced more emissions than anyone else in the history of energy. We’ve been making historic reductions mainly because of two things considered off-limits by the progressive left: innovative fracking (https://twitter.com/sunrisemvmt/status/1318563711897010186?lang=en) and carbon-free nuclear energy (https://www.axios.com/green-new-deal-activists-dismiss-nuclear-power-98c6d22e-2777-4da7-b208-0e1805aed764.html). While our emissions have been decreasing dramatically, China’s emissions haven’t even peaked yet, with a goal set to do so by 2030. This timeline gives China a free pass and an unfair economic advantage over us until then.

While the United States has become the world leader in reducing emissions, China’s unfettered pollution has the potential to negate the good work we have done and must keep doing. We can’t take their pledges on climate, human rights, or anything else at face value. We need to be realistic: China is a bad actor and strong U.S. leadership is needed to actually reduce global emissions.

Despite these facts, the U.S. is still somehow demonized in mainstream global climate rhetoric. The U.S. has work to do in order to continue reducing emissions, but few global actors seem willing to call out China for its excess. Criticism of their environmental record is often met with claims that China is still a developing nation, but the truth is they have the second largest economy in the world (https://www.scmp.com/economy/china-economy/article/3128562/china-economy-2021-latest-economic-data-about-worlds-second) — just behind that of the United States.

Democrats often even praise China for their leadership in solar and wind deployment, as if the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is doing that with moral conviction and concern for the environment. The truth is different: China’s government commits genocide (https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/politics/2021/04/02/is-china-committing-genocide-what-you-need-know-uyghurs/7015211002/), locks ethnic minorities in re-education camps (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/12/uighur-xinjiang-re-education-camp-china-gulbahar-haitiwaji), and even sterilizes women (https://apnews.com/article/ap-top-news-international-news-weekend-reads-china-health-269b3de1af34e17c1941a514f78d764c). China has only turned to renewables because there aren’t enough fossil fuels within the nation’s borders. That’s why they’ve been building a monopoly on rare-earth elements and critical minerals while keeping costs low with forced labor. Those resources are essential to making solar panels, wind turbines, and batteries for electric vehicles. Not only does the CCP want to minimize any dependence on foreign regimes for energy, but ideally, they want to make other countries dependent on them. For example, they continue to finance coal plants (https://www.cnbc.com/2021/04/23/expert-calls-on-china-japan-to-end-financing-of-overseas-coal-plants.html)all across the world.

Ian Murray
25-05-2021, 08:43 AM
A mega dam on the Great Bend of China
(https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-25/chinas-plan-to-build-mega-dam-on-yarlung-tsangpo-brahmaputra/100146344?utm_source=sfmc%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&utm_medium=email%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&utm_campaign=abc_news_newsmail_am_sfmc%e2%80%8b%e2 %80%8b&utm_term=%e2%80%8b&utm_id=1644541%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&sfmc_id=221519335)

... Hydroelectricity is China’s second biggest source of energy, after coal. It makes up almost a fifth of the total energy production — and its dam building shows no signs of easing.

As China seeks to meet its targets of becoming carbon neutral by 2060, it is turning its sights to some of the wildest reaches of the Tibetan Plateau, where it plans to build a hydropower plant so ambitious that it could produce three times as much power as Three Gorges. ...

Ian Murray
25-05-2021, 08:50 PM
Australian Conservation Foundation wins Federal Court challenge against Adani and Environment Minister (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-25/conservation-foundation-federal-court-adani/100163382?fbclid=IwAR3Q2GywZafyGU0bDucqor1xvo71_6l 4Oqc9iDzxA1MKeieMEeSiEfRZRHM)

Environmental advocates have won a legal challenge against the federal government and mining giant Adani, over its proposed water use at its coal mine in central Queensland. ...

Ian Murray
27-05-2021, 08:48 AM
The G7 group of countries’ agreement to end funding in 2021 of new coal plants without carbon capture and storage piles even more pressure onto the coal sector and its backers. The announcement leaves China isolated as the lender of last resort for promoters of new international coal projects. (South Korea, which has long been the third major backer of global coal projects but is not a member of the G7, has promised to rule out new coal plant support but is facing objections to potential loopholes under consideration.)

The G7’s statement came hard on the heels of last week’s International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Net Zero by 2050 report on a pathway to the Paris Agreement’s goal of a 1.5°C temperature increase and helps create diplomatic momentum for a shift away from coal ahead of the Glasgow climate conference scheduled for November this year. Following the release of the IEA’s report, the World Coal Association – the lobby group representing coal mining companies such as Glencore, Peabody, Cerrejon and Adani – lamented “suddenly, 2030 is the new 2050.”

In the last week Serbia has announced the cancellation of a coal unit under construction and Romania has flagged a possible exit from coal power by 2030. The Czech Republic has rejected a proposed 2038 end date for coal power and is seeking advice on an earlier transition.

On the legal front, the European Court of Justice has ordered that mining at the Turow lignite mine should be immediately suspended and an Australian court has ruled that the Australian Government failed to properly consider the environmental impact of a water supply project for Adani’s Carmichael coal project.

In Bosnia and Herzegovina the government-owned utility has reached agreement with unions on cutting 2000 coal sector jobs by 2023 in a bid to staunch mounting losses. In a recent document Elektroprivreda BiH lamented “we missed the opportunity for a completely painless transition a long time ago.” There’s a lesson there for other countries and utilities peddling the false hope that planning for a just transition for coal communities can continue to be delayed. ...

https://mailchi.mp/2eb82589c1d0/coalwire-weekly-news-bulletin-1605481?e=55329c26ad

Ian Murray
27-05-2021, 09:12 AM
And the coalition has plans to spend $660m in taxpayer dollars to build a new coal-fired power plant in the Hunter Valley. The reason government funding is necessary is because no private developer will have a bar of such a crazy idea.

Of course there was a similar plan floated before the last election, to spend $600m on a coal plant at Collinsville in Queensland. That idea vanished like a wisp of smoke after the election.

Coal-fired power plant that caused Queensland blackouts broke down eight times in past year (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/may/26/coal-fired-power-plant-that-caused-queensland-blackouts-broke-down-eight-times-in-past-year)

Explosion and fire that caused widespread power outages occurred in one of the state’s youngest coal-fired plants, CS Energy’s Callide power station, which is expected to be closed for a year

The power plant explosion and fire that caused widespread blackouts in Queensland occurred in one of the state’s youngest coal-fired generators, which broke down eight separate times last year.

Queensland government-owned power company CS Energy says one of two units at the Callide C power station – a “supercritical” plant built in 2001 that is often championed as newer and cleaner than older stations – suffered “major damage” from the fire ...

.... the extent of blackouts caused by an incident at a single power station highlighted that the energy grid needed “more diversification, not more baseload”.

“The reason you have outages from Queensland to northern NSW is because Queensland is still heavily-reliant on a few large power stations,” Merzian said.

“The whole beauty of diversifying [energy generation] is to give you insulation against these sort of events.” ...

Capablanca-Fan
27-05-2021, 12:56 PM
A mega dam on the Great Bend of China
(https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-25/chinas-plan-to-build-mega-dam-on-yarlung-tsangpo-brahmaputra/100146344?utm_source=sfmc%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&utm_medium=email%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&utm_campaign=abc_news_newsmail_am_sfmc%e2%80%8b%e2 %80%8b&utm_term=%e2%80%8b&utm_id=1644541%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8b&sfmc_id=221519335)

... Hydroelectricity is China’s second biggest source of energy, after coal. It makes up almost a fifth of the total energy production — and its dam building shows no signs of easing.

As China seeks to meet its targets of becoming carbon neutral by 2060, it is turning its sights to some of the wildest reaches of the Tibetan Plateau, where it plans to build a hydropower plant so ambitious that it could produce three times as much power as Three Gorges. ...
Isn't that a good thing? Hydro is reliable, intense, and green. But the article ends on a cautionary note:


Experts believe it could be the riskiest mega structure ever built. Not only is the location prone to massive landslides and some of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded, it’s also precariously close to the disputed border between India and China. Meaning any major project could further escalate discontent in a tense territorial dispute between the world’s two most populous countries.

Ian Murray
27-05-2021, 03:05 PM
Australian court finds government has duty to protect young people from climate crisis (https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/may/27/australian-court-finds-government-has-duty-to-protect-young-people-from-climate-crisis)

The federal court of Australia has found the environment minister, Sussan Ley, has a duty of care to protect young people from the climate crisis in a judgment hailed by lawyers and teenagers who brought the case as a world first.

Eight teenagers and an octogenarian nun had sought an injunction to prevent Ley approving a proposal by Whitehaven Coal to expand the Vickery coalmine in northern New South Wales, arguing the minister had a common law duty of care to protect younger people against future harm from climate change.

Justice Mordecai Bromberg found the minister had a duty of care to not act in a way that would cause future harm to younger people. ...

antichrist
27-05-2021, 03:42 PM
The decision has made me a bit more satisfied for my effort in the environmental movement decades ago. Fifty years afterwards there is hope.

Ian Murray
27-05-2021, 04:52 PM
Isn't that a good thing? Hydro is reliable, intense, and green. But the article ends on a cautionary note:


Experts believe it could be the riskiest mega structure ever built. Not only is the location prone to massive landslides and some of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded, it’s also precariously close to the disputed border between India and China. Meaning any major project could further escalate discontent in a tense territorial dispute between the world’s two most populous countries.

The political and seismic risks are fraught, and there is the school of environmental thought which hates to see wild rivers tamed. But it's Chinese territory - they can build an engineering mind-blower at the Great Bend if anyone can.

Like antichrist, I have fond memories of past environmental battles. The Franklin and Lower Gordon Rivers in SW Tasmania are still flowing, despite the best efforts of the Tas Govt and Tas Hydro Authority. I took a five-day rafting trip down the Franklin with one of my sons(and a couple of guides plus two Russian tourists) a few years ago. Magic.

antichrist
27-05-2021, 11:56 PM
The political and seismic risks are fraught, and there is the school of environmental thought which hates to see wild rivers tamed. But it's Chinese territory - they can build an engineering mind-blower at the Great Bend if anyone can.

Like antichrist, I have fond memories of past environmental battles. The Franklin and Lower Gordon Rivers in SW Tasmania are still flowing, despite the best efforts of the Tas Govt and Tas Hydro Authority. I took a five-day rafting trip down the Franklin with one of my sons(and a couple of guides plus two Russian tourists) a few years ago. Magic.

I was arrested many times, bundled into paddy wagons and faced court - that was necessary for publicity, success and if you believed in the cause. No regrets and was good example. Learnt first hand off the old master Jack Mundy. I used to plaster the Vietnam war conscription recruitment caravans with anti-war posters whilst the personnel were sleeping in them. At 4am in Sydney's winter my fingers were frozen so would knock off a flagon of fortified wine to keep warm. Then the posters would be topsy turvy like music notes. Would laugh the next day.

Would tell the boss that I was sick the previous day off work but didn't gel when he told me he seen me being attested on tv and thrown into a paddy wagon. Haha those were the days.

antichrist
28-05-2021, 09:19 AM
In Netherlands Royal Dutch Shell has been ordered to cut it's CO2 emissions by 45% by 2030! The times they are a'changing - in the eightieth birthday of Bob Dylan

Ian Murray
30-05-2021, 09:37 AM
ExxonMobil Shareholders to Company: We Want a Different Approach to Climate Change (https://insideclimatenews.org/news/26052021/exxonmobil-shareholders-climate-change/?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=dde330cc0e-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-dde330cc0e-327835277)

ExxonMobil has spent the last six months locked in a battle for its future, ever since a small investment firm launched a long-shot bid to reshape the company’s board of directors and steer the oil giant on a more climate-friendly path.

On Wednesday, Exxon lost, at least in part, when a majority of shareholders approved a pair of new corporate directors backed by the firm, which said they could help the company transform itself. The vote for a third new candidate was too close to call as of the end of the company’s annual meeting, which was held virtually.

The votes marked a substantial blow to Exxon and a rebuke of what critics see as an inadequate response to calls for the company to remake itself for a transition away from fossil fuels. ...

Ian Murray
30-05-2021, 09:40 AM
In Netherlands Royal Dutch Shell has been ordered to cut it's CO2 emissions by 45% by 2030! The times they are a'changing - in the eightieth birthday of Bob Dylan

It was a tough week for Big Oil

Dutch Court Gives Shell Nine Years to Cut Its Carbon Emissions by 45 Percent from 2019 Levels (https://insideclimatenews.org/news/26052021/dutch-court-gives-shell-nine-years-to-cut-its-carbon-emissions-by-45-percent-from-2019-levels/?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=dde330cc0e-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-dde330cc0e-327835277)

In a landmark ruling being hailed by climate activists as “game-changing,” a Dutch court on Wednesday ordered Royal Dutch Shell to cut its carbon emissions by 45 percent from 2019 levels by 2030.

The Hague District Court verdict is only legally binding in the Netherlands. But the ruling could influence dozens of similar cases around the world, including in the United States. And it’s the first time a court has held a major energy company liable for its role in rapidly warming the planet, according to activists involved in the lawsuit.

“This is a turning point in history,” said Roger Cox, a lawyer with Friends of the Earth Netherlands, in a press release announcing the verdict. “This case is unique because it is the first time a judge has ordered a large polluting company to comply with the Paris climate agreement.” ...

antichrist
31-05-2021, 07:14 AM
It was a tough week for Big Oil

Dutch Court Gives Shell Nine Years to Cut Its Carbon Emissions by 45 Percent from 2019 Levels (https://insideclimatenews.org/news/26052021/dutch-court-gives-shell-nine-years-to-cut-its-carbon-emissions-by-45-percent-from-2019-levels/?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=dde330cc0e-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-dde330cc0e-327835277)

In a landmark ruling being hailed by climate activists as “game-changing,” a Dutch court on Wednesday ordered Royal Dutch Shell to cut its carbon emissions by 45 percent from 2019 levels by 2030.

.....

“This is a turning point in history,” said Roger Cox, a lawyer with Friends of the Earth Netherlands, in a press release announcing the verdict. “This case is unique because it is the first time a judge has ordered a large polluting company to comply with the Paris climate agreement.” ...

I notice the case was brought by Friends of the Earth - I was an organiser in that mob 45 years ago. Good on them. Only a hundred years too late of course.

Ian Murray
31-05-2021, 09:08 AM
I notice the case was brought by Friends of the Earth - I was an organiser in that mob 45 years ago. Good on them. Only a hundred years too late of course.

I donate to their Market Forces (https://www.marketforces.org.au/) every month

Capablanca-Fan
04-06-2021, 08:17 AM
Bill Gates and Warren Buffett to Go Nuclear in Wyoming (https://www.fool.com/investing/2021/06/03/bill-gates-and-warren-buffett-to-go-nuclear-in-wyo/)
This power couple is looking to advance innovative power solutions.
Scott Levine, Motley Fool, 3 Jun 2021

Bill Gates is opening a new front in his fight against climate change—Wyoming. The state may not be the first place people think of when it comes to nuclear power plants, but Gates and Warren Buffett are looking to change that. The two business leaders announced that TerraPower, an innovative nuclear power company which Gates founded more than a decade ago, and PacifiCorp, a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE:BRK.A) (NYSE:BRK.B), has chosen Wyoming as the site for the first Natrium plant, an advanced nuclear reactor.

Estimated to cost $1 billion, the Natrium demonstration project consists of a 345 megawatt (MW) sodium-cooled fast reactor as well as a molten salt-based energy storage system, which can boost the system's power output to 500 MW on demand for more than five and a half hours—equal to the energy required to power about 400,000 homes. According to TerraPower, the advanced technology included in the Natrium project allows it "to integrate seamlessly with renewable resources and could lead to faster, more cost-effective decarbonization of electricity generation."

Capablanca-Fan
04-06-2021, 08:18 AM
The political and seismic risks are fraught, and there is the school of environmental thought which hates to see wild rivers tamed. But it's Chinese territory - they can build an engineering mind-blower at the Great Bend if anyone can.

Like antichrist, I have fond memories of past environmental battles. The Franklin and Lower Gordon Rivers in SW Tasmania are still flowing, despite the best efforts of the Tas Govt and Tas Hydro Authority. I took a five-day rafting trip down the Franklin with one of my sons(and a couple of guides plus two Russian tourists) a few years ago. Magic.

That sounds interesting. It seems though that we can still have plenty of rivers even after building green hydro stations, or enjoy the new lake as in Lake Karapiro near Hamilton, NZ.

Ian Murray
04-06-2021, 11:54 AM
That sounds interesting. It seems though that we can still have plenty of rivers even after building green hydro stations,

The developed countries have pretty well run out of undammed rivers. In Asia China has 20,000-odd dams over 15'. Finding suitable sites for new large dams is becoming more difficult (but well within reach of engineering ingenuity). Of interest:

Selecting A Dam Site (https://www.nps.gov/common/uploads/teachers/lessonplans/Salmon%20-%20Dam-Site-Selection-pptx.pdf)

SEVEN SINS OF DAM BUILDING (http://awsassets.panda.org/downloads/wwf_seven_sins_of_dam_building.pdf)


or enjoy the new lake as in Lake Karapiro near Hamilton, NZ.

Artificial lakes do provide plenty of recreational opportunities, but at significant cost. The biodiversity of the drowned region under the lake is lost, probably forever, the silt flushing by the river is stopped and silt builds up year by year and the scenic aesthetics of gorges, rapids and waterfalls are lost, along with their recreational opportunities for more adventurous visitors. (Lake Karapiro, for example is one of several artificial lakes behind dams along the Waikato River, although there is still some surviving white water (https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/battling-the-white-dragon/)).

There is a fledgling campaign in Tasmania to restore iconic Lake Pedder (https://lakepedder.org/#content-wrapper), which was drowned by the Hydro 50 years ago despite one of the first environmental campaigns to save it. The dam's hydropower output is now only a blip on the state grid, and the dam can be demolished with little economic impact.

Kevin Bonham
04-06-2021, 12:46 PM
There is a fledgling campaign in Tasmania to restore iconic Lake Pedder (https://lakepedder.org/#content-wrapper), which was drowned by the Hydro 50 years ago despite one of the first environmental campaigns to save it. The dam's hydropower output is now only a blip on the state grid, and the dam can be demolished with little economic impact.

That campaign has been in the fledgling stages on and off for 27 years. As noted on its website it was at one stage called Pedder 2000. Given the energy crisis of 2016 in which hydro storage levels became critically low, I don't think the draining will be politically palatable any time soon.

Ian Murray
04-06-2021, 01:19 PM
That campaign has been in the fledgling stages on and off for 27 years. As noted on its website it was at one stage called Pedder 2000. Given the energy crisis of 2016 in which hydro storage levels became critically low, I don't think the draining will be politically palatable any time soon.

Live and learn. And I thought my $20 donation would turn the tide :)

Ian Murray
05-06-2021, 08:45 AM
The price of batteries has declined by 97% in the last three decades (https://ourworldindata.org/battery-price-decline?utm_source=OWID+Newsletter&utm_campaign=0696d301d7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_06_04_02_33_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_2e166c1fc1-0696d301d7-536801366)

To reduce global greenhouse gas emissions we need to shift towards a low-carbon energy system. Large reductions in the cost of renewable technologies such as solar and wind have made them cost-competitive with fossil fuels. But to balance these intermittent sources, and electrify our transport systems we also need low-cost energy storage. Lithium-ion batteries are the most commonly used.

In this article I show that lithium-ion battery cells have also seen an impressive price reduction. Since 1991, prices have fallen by around 97%. Prices fall by an average of 19% for every doubling of capacity. Even more promising is that this rate of reduction does not yet appear to be slowing down. ...

antichrist
05-06-2021, 11:02 AM
The price of batteries has declined by 97% in the last three decades (https://ourworldindata.org/battery-price-decline?utm_source=OWID+Newsletter&utm_campaign=0696d301d7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2021_06_04_02_33_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_2e166c1fc1-0696d301d7-536801366)

To reduce global greenhouse gas emissions we need to shift towards a low-carbon energy system. Large reductions in the cost of renewable technologies such as solar and wind have made them cost-competitive with fossil fuels. But to balance these intermittent sources, and electrify our transport systems we also need low-cost energy storage. Lithium-ion batteries are the most commonly used.

In this article I show that lithium-ion battery cells have also seen an impressive price reduction. Since 1991, prices have fallen by around 97%. Prices fall by an average of 19% for every doubling of capacity. Even more promising is that this rate of reduction does not yet appear to be slowing down. ...

I know batteries will be the response but I don't like to even imagine all the resources and pillution caused in manufacturing those batteries. As well of disposing of such at their life's end. As well who controls the manufacture and raw materials of production?

Patrick Byrom
05-06-2021, 01:23 PM
I know batteries will be the response but I don't like to even imagine all the resources and pillution caused in manufacturing those batteries. As well of disposing of such at their life's end. As well who controls the manufacture and raw materials of production?Those are legitimate worries - but there is already a serious problem with batteries in mobile phones (and other portable devices). Batteries used for EVs and storage won't be a major issue for a while, so there is plenty of time to put in place recycling schemes, as the EU and the US are already doing.

Ian Murray
05-06-2021, 02:41 PM
Those are legitimate worries - but there is already a serious problem with batteries in mobile phones (and other portable devices). Batteries used for EVs and storage won't be a major issue for a while, so there is plenty of time to put in place recycling schemes, as the EU and the US are already doing.

Technology is changing the field so rapidly that anything can happen. Today's problems are tomorrow's footnotes to history

10 alternatives to lithium-ion batteries: Which new tech will power the future? (10 alternatives to lithium-ion batteries: Which new tech will power the future?)

antichrist
06-06-2021, 08:54 AM
There is a heavy sludge on a beach of Turkey due to warming temperatures and industrial pollutants coming down rivers.

The overall cumulative effect has to be taken into account. Like that that chemical in teflon making tbe human sperm count plunder. Every aspect of the biosphere is under stress.

The more population exacerbates everything.

Even our Green mayor in Byron drives a hugh 4 wd. What hope is there

Capablanca-Fan
08-06-2021, 07:21 AM
Biden's Green Agenda Meets Environmental Red Tape (https://reason.com/2021/06/07/bidens-green-agenda-meets-environmental-red-tape)
A clean-energy future will require more than just spending money.
SHAWN REGAN, Reason, 7 Jun 2021

President Joe Biden's new $6 trillion budget proposal calls for massive spending increases to advance his climate and infrastructure plans, which include everything from upgrading the nation's electric grid and building new transmission lines to investing in electric vehicles and other clean-energy technologies. But spending money is one thing. To deliver on its green pledges, the Biden administration will have to do something its environmental supporters are often reluctant to do: Cut the red tape that delays or derails the very development projects needed to build a clean-energy future. It will also have to make tough environmental tradeoffs that sometimes come along with such projects.

One test is unfolding in Nevada in a fight over a planned lithium mine and a rare desert wildflower. A mining company, ioneer Ltd., has proposed building a large-scale lithium-boron mine in western Nevada (the first of its kind in the United States) to supply materials for electric vehicle batteries, wind turbines, and other clean-energy technologies. If approved, the mine could quadruple domestic lithium production and help build 400,000 electric cars each year, according to the company's estimates, helping to advance Biden's goal "to win the EV market."

Ian Murray
08-06-2021, 09:09 AM
Biden's Green Agenda Meets Environmental Red Tape
A clean-energy future will require more than just spending money.
SHAWN REGAN, Reason, 7 Jun 2021

President Joe Biden's new $6 trillion budget proposal calls for massive spending increases to advance his climate and infrastructure plans, which include everything from upgrading the nation's electric grid and building new transmission lines to investing in electric vehicles and other clean-energy technologies. But spending money is one thing. To deliver on its green pledges, the Biden administration will have to do something its environmental supporters are often reluctant to do: Cut the red tape that delays or derails the very development projects needed to build a clean-energy future. It will also have to make tough environmental tradeoffs that sometimes come along with such projects.

One test is unfolding in Nevada in a fight over a planned lithium mine and a rare desert wildflower. ...


An interesting conundrum, how to balance protecting the environment and incentivising development

guruduff
08-06-2021, 03:25 PM
the new Ford F150 EV pick up. price parity with petrol/diesel models. the tradie can plug in up to 6 power tools no need for noisy petrol generators on site or take it camping on the weekend https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0W9yXI2U6hc
Where's Michaela Cash to rubbish it

antichrist
08-06-2021, 06:31 PM
the new Ford F150 EV pick up. price parity with petrol/diesel models. the tradie can plug in up to 6 power tools no need for noisy petrol generators on site or take it camping on the weekend https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0W9yXI2U6hc
Where's Michaela Cash to rubbish it

Years ago my brickie told me that batteries can do cement mixers quite okay.

Ian Murray
11-06-2021, 10:50 AM
Activists chalk up big court case wins

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION WINS THE DAY: GREENPEACE TRIUMPHS OVER AGL IN LANDMARK COURT RULING (https://www.greenpeace.org.au/news/freedom-of-expression-wins-the-day-greenpeace-triumphs-over-agl-in-landmark-court-ruling/)

Whitehaven pleads guilty to stealing one billion litres of water during drought (https://www.lockthegate.org.au/whitehaven_pleads_guilty_to_stealing_one_billion_l itres_of_water_during_drought)

Ian Murray
15-06-2021, 09:19 AM
The writing is on the wall - Australia will be trying to sell coal nobody wants to buy

Australia left isolated on climate after G7 leaders pledge to end support for coal-fired power stations
(https://www.sbs.com.au/news/australia-left-isolated-on-climate-after-g7-leaders-pledge-to-end-support-for-coal-fired-power-stations)
Australia has become even more isolated on climate change after the heads of the world's largest economies agreed to end government support for coal-fired power stations by the end of the year.

A joint statement from leaders at the G7 summit said continued global investment in unabated coal power generation was incompatible with keeping global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. ...

Desmond
15-06-2021, 09:51 AM
The writing is on the wall - Australia will be trying to sell coal nobody wants to buy

Australia left isolated on climate after G7 leaders pledge to end support for coal-fired power stations
(https://www.sbs.com.au/news/australia-left-isolated-on-climate-after-g7-leaders-pledge-to-end-support-for-coal-fired-power-stations)
Australia has become even more isolated on climate change after the heads of the world's largest economies agreed to end government support for coal-fired power stations by the end of the year.

A joint statement from leaders at the G7 summit said continued global investment in unabated coal power generation was incompatible with keeping global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. ...

I presume this is just on the generation side? Still, a step in the right direction. Coal subsidies are a staggering 3% of global GDP, nearly half of the 6.4% of all fossil fuels. https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2019/05/02/Global-Fossil-Fuel-Subsidies-Remain-Large-An-Update-Based-on-Country-Level-Estimates-46509

Ian Murray
15-06-2021, 10:39 AM
I presume this is just on the generation side? Still, a step in the right direction. Coal subsidies are a staggering 3% of global GDP, nearly half of the 6.4% of all fossil fuels. https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2019/05/02/Global-Fossil-Fuel-Subsidies-Remain-Large-An-Update-Based-on-Country-Level-Estimates-46509

Coal won't disappear by next Tuesday, but capitalists can read the tea leaves. Spending half a billion dollars or more on a coal-fired power plant trying to compete with cheaper and cleaner renewables makes no economic sense, as has been demonstrated here - there is no private capital willing to invest in new coal plants. So this government is planning to use taxpayer dollars to build one. Maybe. One was announced for Collinsville before the last election. Now it's in the Hunter Valley for the coming election.

Meanwhile Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, UK and USA (the G7 with 39% of global GDP) have pulled the rug on public financing for 'unabated' coal plants (i.e. without carbon capture and storage, which is yet to be proven economical at scale).

And Australia opens new coal mines to sell into a dwindling market. What will happen to prices, one wonders.

Ian Murray
16-06-2021, 05:58 PM
“This is renewable energy, don’t be afraid:” Chris Bowen taunts Coalition in House of Reps
(https://reneweconomy.com.au/this-is-renewable-energy-dont-be-afraid-chris-bowen-taunts-coalition-in-house-of-reps/)
Federal Labor spokesperson for climate change and energy, Chris Bowen, has channelled prime minister Scott Morrison’s ‘lump of coal’ moment, brandishing a solar panel in parliament and telling the federal Coalition government it should not be afraid of renewable energy.

“I have a message for this government, this is renewable energy, don’t be afraid,” Bowen told parliament while holding the solar panel. “Don’t run away from it.”

“Those opposite have an ideological pathological fear of renewable energy. There’s no word for renewable energy-phobia officially, but that’s the malady that effects those opposite.”

“That’s the malady afflicting the jobs in the towns and industries indeed in his country because of a pathological ideological opposition to renewable energy being an important part of our sustainable and more certain energy future.” ...

Ian Murray
16-06-2021, 07:20 PM
Adani loses 5th current insurer for its Carmichael coal project.
(https://www.marketforces.org.au/adani-loses-5th-current-insurer-for-its-carmichael-coal-project/?fbclid=IwAR27yRFJIgY-9PyYS-YG16_gJTVtgz686762CSWqm0t7eQJqbPUSFNOqYa4#gf_436)
In a victory for the #StopAdani movement and life on Earth, Ascot Group announced last week it has ruled out renewing its policy for the Adani Carmichael coal mine, once it expires in September this year.[1]

This makes Ascot Adani’s 5th current insurer to rule out any further coverage for the Carmichael project. The five current insurers to make this commitment are all participants in the Lloyd’s marketplace.

In total, 102 companies have so far ruled out working with Adani, including 38 major insurance companies. This is clear proof that more and more companies are responding to the serious concerns raised by the #StopAdani campaign regarding Adani’s climate-wrecking coal mine and rail project. ...

MichaelBaron
24-06-2021, 11:50 AM
https://www.facebook.com/jjurjeviccorovic/posts/10156174441002245
ever wondered what happened to David Bellamy?
"I’m sceptical about man-made climate change. There’s absolutely no proof that carbon dioxide will kill us all. It’s not a poison, it’s the most important gas in the world. Carbon dioxide is an airborne fertiliser. How can farmers grow increasing amounts of food without a rise in CO2?”
"The 80-year old environmentalist and former broadcaster, admitted that his scepticism signalled the end of his career as he had known it.

SO MUCH FOR FREEDOM OF SPEECH
Its a typical left wing approach. But wait...they say they stand for democracy and freedom of expression.

Patrick Byrom
24-06-2021, 12:48 PM
https://www.facebook.com/jjurjeviccorovic/posts/10156174441002245
ever wondered what happened to David Bellamy? "I’m sceptical about man-made climate change. There’s absolutely no proof that carbon dioxide will kill us all. It’s not a poison, it’s the most important gas in the world. Carbon dioxide is an airborne fertiliser. How can farmers grow increasing amounts of food without a rise in CO2?”
"The 80-year old environmentalist and former broadcaster, admitted that his scepticism signalled the end of his career as he had known it.
SO MUCH FOR FREEDOM OF SPEECH
Its a typical left wing approach. But wait...they say they stand for democracy and freedom of expression.Do you have any evidence that Bellamy's career ended because of his views, and not because he was 80? And "freedom of expression" isn't a guarantee of a job at the BBC, it just means that the government won't imprison you for your views (as happens in China, for example, if you speak out in favour of democracy).

Carbon dioxide does help plants to grow. It also acts as a greenhouse gas, increasing the world's temperatures. A chemical can have more than one effect.

Ian Murray
24-06-2021, 03:47 PM
https://www.facebook.com/jjurjeviccorovic/posts/10156174441002245
ever wondered what happened to David Bellamy?
"I’m sceptical about man-made climate change. There’s absolutely no proof that carbon dioxide will kill us all. It’s not a poison, it’s the most important gas in the world. Carbon dioxide is an airborne fertiliser. How can farmers grow increasing amounts of food without a rise in CO2?”
"The 80-year old environmentalist and former broadcaster, admitted that his scepticism signalled the end of his career as he had known it.

SO MUCH FOR FREEDOM OF SPEECH
Its a typical left wing approach. But wait...they say they stand for democracy and freedom of expression.

Poor old Bellamy is losing his wits. He now thinks carbon dioxide is not a greenhouse gas, and that the globe is cooling not warming. No wonder he's no longer welcome on the Beeb or science platforms - he's an embarrassment to himself and to science.

Kevin Bonham
24-06-2021, 06:20 PM
Do you have any evidence that Bellamy's career ended because of his views, and not because he was 80?

His broadcasting career had ended several years earlier when he made these comments. Also note the qualifier "as he had known it" - specifically he alleges that the decline began from 1996 when he was 63. However, Bellamy's own explanations of his career decline were inconsistent; in a 2002 interview (https://www.theguardian.com/media/2002/sep/30/broadcasting.academicexperts) he blamed it on his decision to run for Parliament for the proto-Brexit Referendum Party at the 1997 UK election. The comments quoted above date from 2011 and are probably less reliable.

Age is no barrier in natural history TV (at least for men); Attenborough has still been working this year and he is 95!

MichaelBaron
24-06-2021, 06:50 PM
Poor old Bellamy is losing his wits. He now thinks carbon dioxide is not a greenhouse gas, and that the globe is cooling not warming. No wonder he's no longer welcome on the Beeb or science platforms - he's an embarrassment to himself and to science.

I am no expert on the scientific matters in the field. But he is a recognized scholar - surely he deserves to be heard!

Kevin Bonham
24-06-2021, 07:10 PM
Poor old Bellamy is losing his wits. He now thinks carbon dioxide is not a greenhouse gas, and that the globe is cooling not warming. No wonder he's no longer welcome on the Beeb or science platforms - he's an embarrassment to himself and to science.

I'd assume he lost any wits he still retained when he died in 2019.

Ian Murray
24-06-2021, 07:38 PM
I'd assume he lost any wits he still retained when he died in 2019.

It's a well known fact that death tends to cause some curtailment of one's mental faculties

Kevin Bonham
24-06-2021, 07:43 PM
It's a well known fact that death tends to cause some curtailment of one's mental faculties

In most cases, yes.