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Maxwell843
24-04-2007, 12:28 AM
hi,

In two months time I will be entering my first tournament.
I was just wondering if anyone has any advice?
Things I should know, be prepared for, etc. etc.

And also how do people suggest you should practice/ train for a tournament?

Thanks

Basil
24-04-2007, 01:03 AM
Hi Maxwell

First Advice
Set out to have fun!
Particularly because it is your first tournament. There's time enough in your chess career for sweaty palms, anxiety and all manner of rubbish you may wish to impose upon yourself later.

Second Advice
Accept from the outset that despite your best efforts, you will be blundering, boobing and stuffing up games for the rest of your life. Like me, Eurotrash, macavity & GMs. What you have there is world champs, state presidents, lawyers, club presidents, quality Australian players and the best in the world. To put pressure on yourself is just silly.

Third Advice
You can start advising yourself once you have a coupla tournaments under your belt.

Good luck.

Garrett
24-04-2007, 06:53 AM
Good luck Maxwell.

There is all manner of advice that could be given but as Howie says, set out to have fun and anything else that comes your way is a bonus.

Cheers
George.

Desmond
24-04-2007, 09:17 AM
Bring 2 pens. And a jumper. Make sure you know how to use a chess clock.

After each game, ask your opponent if they would mind examining it with you. Learn what you can.

Good luck.

Garvinator
24-04-2007, 04:26 PM
I would add that the first thing is to make sure you know where the venue is and to get there in plenty of time. Seems obvious, but when it is your first tournament, one of the last things you need to be worried about is trying to make it on time.

Take your time in each game. Depending on the tournament, you will have at least 60 mins plus increment to make all your moves. There is usually quite a bit of time between rounds (if playing in a weekender). Might as well use that time at the board thinking of what you want to play, rather than sitting around after each game wondering what to do to occupy your time till the next round starts.

Mind if I ask, which state/territory will you be playing your first tournament in?

ER
24-04-2007, 04:54 PM
Bring 2 pens.

Good luck.

and learn how to score moves! :)

Cheers and good luck!

Maxwell843
24-04-2007, 06:29 PM
ggrayggray I will be playing in the NSWCA Rapid Play event.

Garvinator
24-04-2007, 08:58 PM
ggrayggray I will be playing in the NSWCA Rapid Play event.
Ok, as it is a rapid event, you wont have to record moves. Also, there wont be so long a wait between rounds.

Most of the other pieces of advice still hold :)

Maxwell843
24-04-2007, 09:45 PM
Thanks ggrayggray I didn't know that about not having to record moves because its a rapid event. Thank you very helpful!

Kevin Bonham
24-04-2007, 11:43 PM
Don't worry about the clock until you get in genuine time trouble (say only a few minutes left). Many new players play way too fast because they are scared of running out of time. If you play too fast you will lose. Better to take some time even if you get behind on the clock, and only speed up when you really have to. Certainly you'll have better games which you learn more from that way.

Basil
25-04-2007, 12:02 AM
Hi Maxwell

I see you've received some good advice from Garvin and Kevin regarding recording. They're both cluey on the subject and you're lucky to have access to them. I also note their shoutbox comments.

The only missing piece of relevant information about recording and colours for rapid events is:

Section 14 (b)
Rapid Events
Where a player's opponent elects to record his moves, then the player who is not recording must either say
- 'God rest Capablanca' before the commencement of the game (although this is only custom and seldom enforced these days, but at least you've been told in case someone asks you to say it then you know it's not a crank, or
- advise the arbiter after the game that they had the benefit of advantage (in the event of a win). In the event of a loss or a draw, nothing need be said.

Further, if a player who is recording, and who has the clock on the same side as their natural writing hand (i.e. a right-handed player with clock on the right hand side, then the player who is not recording may not win a rating prize, but may win a trophy or a major prize. All ratings points earned in that tournament will be reduced by 15%.

In Australia, this does not apply in NSW where FIDE has no jurisdiction and the conduct of the players is decided by the NSWCA, currently a private company owned by Bill Gletsos and myself. (This situation is likely to change from 2008 after an unsuccessful appeal by the NSWCA).

Last piece of advice. If you don't record (which is fine) but you want a record of your game, you can call the arbiter (on your mobile or tournament hall phone) and ask if he wouldn't mind recording for you. They actually have very little to do once play has started and will likely be glad to help out. Don't ask him in person as they get very upset with small requests like this. And wait until after the game has started before making the call, because before play is when they are most busy.

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2007, 12:22 AM
Whether players who are just starting out in tournaments should record rapids or not is something I'm unsure about. I can only really recommend the practice if you're happy to risk losing every single game as a result. Just recording the first 12-15 moves is not too bad an idea if you want feedback on your openings, but a player good enough to give you feedback will probably remember it all anyway!

CameronD
25-04-2007, 01:51 AM
Bring a friend along, they can record for you :D

Personally, I disagree about playing games before/between rounds, I recommend resting or having lunch. Need to keep fresh and fully concentrated for the real games.

You should have your general opening repetiour set before the tournament, my play improved heaps once I got my openings set (about my 4th tournament.)

Finally and most importantly... HAVE FUN:cool: ... this tournament will give you a good base and ideas for future improvement

Metro
25-04-2007, 02:42 AM
Try to be:
1. well nourished before play(helpful to bring food and drink along sometimes)
2. in good,calm frame of mind(avoid stress,conflict and problems beforehand).You may find it helpful to get up and walk about(go outside amongst trees and nature) during and after a game.

ER
25-04-2007, 06:13 PM
2. in good,calm frame of mind(avoid stress,conflict and problems beforehand).

This is the reason I got divorced! (twice!!?)
Cheers and good luck!

littlesprout85
25-04-2007, 06:45 PM
Heyy Maxwell- good to meet yea here on chesschats :D

Like to say that all this advice so far from the others is great advice, let sprouty also give yea a tip. Goto www.playchess.com and just take the free dl and enter in as just a guest and play others online for some fast practice. Cant chat to em as a guest and nobody will know its you. there is alot of ppl there at playchess including alot of chessmasters from here :o (sprout sometimes plays for fun there too)

sprouty has found that online chess is great for practicing along with a good chess program offline to work on openings - middle - as well as the end games.

Most of all - Have fun and enjoy the experience, meet the ppl and just soak it all inz ! :owned:

-Sprout :)

Kevin Bonham
25-04-2007, 08:22 PM
Personally, I disagree about playing games before/between rounds, I recommend resting or having lunch.

Same here. In particular, I find playing blitz games between rounds to be quite draining, and refuse virtually all offers to do so.

Ian Rout
26-04-2007, 01:46 PM
Same here. In particular, I find playing blitz games between rounds to be quite draining, and refuse virtually all offers to do so.
I don't know about draining, but there is a real risk of going into the next round with your brain and hands in the mode of playing near-instantaneous moves.

Southpaw Jim
26-04-2007, 07:39 PM
On the subject of fast play - try not to let your opponent's pace influence your own - a couple of times in the past I've found I've unconsciously been playing fast (and therefore rushing/not thinking properly) because my opponent is.

Plus, making a fast player wait for you to move can disturb their rhythm and therefore their train of thought ;)

Kevin Bonham
27-04-2007, 02:02 PM
On the subject of fast play - try not to let your opponent's pace influence your own - a couple of times in the past I've found I've unconsciously been playing fast (and therefore rushing/not thinking properly) because my opponent is.

Yes, if the other player plays at lightning speed then try to pace yourself so that you will not run out of time, and ignore the speed they are playing at.

9/10 players who play very fast in full-length rated games are compulsively speedy players and won't slow down even when they need to. Thus provided you yourself don't get in time trouble, their "lead" on the clock is an illusion.