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Jezza
12-12-2006, 12:05 PM
Hey Everyone,

I was wondering what peoples openings were like. I ALWAYS play the same openings as black and white - the Modern Defence as Black and the Kings Indian Attack as white. I have done so since about 2001 and still am not bored with them. I find it great since every single game I play I gain more knowledge into my openings. On top of that, since I am usually busy I dont have time to study chess and so it is great that I only have 2 openings to know. I have thought about learning the Sicillian or something else but have thought that I would get completely creamed by even the weakest player who knows all of the theory and so I plan to stick to what I know since I have no real time to learn. So I was wondering what other peoples opinions were on this. Is there anyone else out there like me? :cool:

Jezza

qpawn
12-12-2006, 07:27 PM
I used to play the KIA a lot with white for similar reasons; I had no time to work out a way to counter the Sicillian, Benoni etc. Another method to save time is to play 1.d4 and go for Queen pawn games without a queen's gambit: Torre attack, Colle, London etc.

French defence is also quite good for economy of preparation time.

I agree that the Sicillian is a nightmare to prepare, especially if white goes "off the beaten track" with 2. f4 or the quite poisonous Maroczy bind systems with a delayed c4.

Kevin Bonham
12-12-2006, 07:56 PM
I like the idea of always having a plan B because there will always be certain opponents whose style suits the opening I am playing too well, and there are days when I get sick of playing the same stuff all the time and like to freshen up my game with something different. Plan B doesn't necessarily mean a totally different opening, it might mean that in certain lines you don't always play the same move in a given position.

For instance I like playing 1.e4, but I'm not convinced White has anything all that great after 1...e6 (excluding the possum of course :D). So if I am playing someone who I know plays the French very well, I'll switch to 1.c4, 1.Nf3, 1.g3 etc. I'll also do the same thing if the opponent's repertoire gives me cause to suspect a particularly boring Pirc line, for instance. :D

Alan Shore
12-12-2006, 08:41 PM
I am a self-admitted openings patzer. I used to know many openings in depth after playing 1.. e5 2.. Nc6 which forced me to learn some opening theory (albeit only from playing many games) but I specialise in opening brew nowadays - i.e. getting people OUT of book. I suppose the opening I'd know the 2nd best would be the Scotch with white and the best being my secret black opening that allowed me to defeat a GM (clue: it starts with P).

MichaelBaron
12-12-2006, 09:53 PM
Who cares about openings anyway?;)

eclectic
12-12-2006, 10:14 PM
Who cares about openings anyway?;)

When they lead directly to mate then maybe ... ;)

MichaelBaron
13-12-2006, 12:41 PM
When they lead directly to mate then maybe ... ;)

I think learning how to play chess is more important than pointless memorizing of the openings. No opening leads to mate directly..sigh

sleepless
13-12-2006, 05:00 PM
I played d4 openings exclusively in my younger days (1970s) but decided to rotate my openings fairly often when I picked up chess again about 18 months ago. Variety is fun, and until just recently it kept my rating down. I scored some prize money during the year when I went serious again and played what I knew well.

littlesprout85
20-03-2007, 08:56 PM
Very Nice Thread here -

Sprouty thinks it deserves second life . What do some of the members here at chesschats think of openings. We all know that all of us follow some old favorites- Lets post some of these on up here. Or at least post some variety on this subject on here- some pros & cons etc. :D

-Sprout :)

Zwischenzug
20-03-2007, 08:59 PM
Very Nice Thread here -

Sprouty thinks it deserves second life . What do some of the members here at chesschats think of openings. We all know that all of us follow some old favorites- Lets post some of these on up here. Or at least post some variety on this subject on here- some pros & cons etc. :D

-Sprout :)

I think players remember opening moves in order to enter into a middle game position they know well and are comfortable playing.

littlesprout85
21-03-2007, 08:41 PM
Right-Right

Very true is that a good opening leads you into a great middlegame, which is sprouts most favorite part of chess.

Sprout thinks that opening as in every move is important and not to waste. Sprouty is playing black and on the defensive more,but still gets too agressive sometimes.:doh:

Opening for black is so important and is always good to have two maybe three openings cause its really all up to what white breaks out with that leads to blacks movements.

-Sprout :)

darkshadowdog
28-03-2007, 04:24 PM
In slow tournament chess I tend to play a few openings always:

For white: 1.e4 leading to The Italian Game and Smith Morra mostly. I have other lines I play against more obscure responses.

For black: I play the 2. Nf6 scandanavian which is a lot of fun and against D4 I play the KID. I also have a fun little known gambit called The Vector that I play against the English.

In speed chess or slow games with friends for fun I tend to vary my openings up and play extremaly aggressive sacrificial stuff. Along with just irreguler openings I play the Ursov gambit, bishops opening and other stuff. The Danish is my pet blitz opening.

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2007, 05:55 PM
I also have a fun little known gambit called The Vector that I play against the English.

I have never heard of this so thought I'd look it up.

1.c4 d5 2.cxd5 c6 with a sort of reverse Morra.

andytoh
01-04-2007, 09:35 AM
Opening preparation is one of the reasons why I quit playing in chess tournaments. It just boggled my mind having to retain so much. There were so many games I lost simply because I did not know the latest wrinkle in a variation. Chess just wasn't fun anymore, nor was chess ability really tested.

I'm siding with Fischer about how a chess game starting from the usual set-up is becoming quite bothersome. But Fischer random is kind of weird, so I will instead simply go out of book in my blitz games intentionally. That is when real chess begins.

Trent Parker
01-04-2007, 02:07 PM
Opening preparation is one of the reasons why I quit playing in chess tournaments. It just boggled my mind having to retain so much. There were so many games I lost simply because I did not know the latest wrinkle in a variation. Chess just wasn't fun anymore, nor was chess ability really tested.

Well why not play something that has a little theory and can be played as both black and White. Eg KIA and KID. Skills in the Opening are just as important as skills in the Middlegame and endgame IMHO

Anyhow....

With my openings I have generally changed to what I have been inspired with. When I first started playing competitive chess I was a general e4 noob. I then studied the Colle System after an article by Gary Lane. I played the Colle as my Only Opening for White for a long time.

As black I went from being an e5 Noob to playing a bit of french to playing a bit of Pirc/Modern (which i used to have a book on but i somehow lost it....) until I saw one of Smerdon's games in Ian Roger's Column in the paper. It was an Icelandic gambit which starts from the 2.Nf6 Scandinavian Defence The 2.Nf6 Scandinavian served me well including a memorable win over Angela Song. I also defeated John Paul Wallace in a Simul with this opening but only because he blundered and left his Queen En Prise. Otherwise I was in trouble. Against 1.d4 I generally played the reverse Colle/ Orthodox QGD.

I love an attack. So when my colle was starting to get a little stale I decided to study more attacking openings (and the colle opening brings about a lot of attacks in itself!). My Gambiteering phase started. Along with the 2.Nf6 Scandinavian I decided to play the Blackmar Diemer Gambit as white and the Benko Gambit as black against 1.d4 (with a litle stint of playing the Tarrash/Shara Gambit(not sure of spelling)/Podolsk Variation/Endgame gambit). After a while I mellowed from my gambiteering stage and wanted to play something else.

Finally when Jesse Sales first came into Australia and visited Sydney I got a bit of coaching from him. From that coaching I started playing 1.Nf3 Intending to play 2.c4 unless d5 is played. As Black I started playing the Nimzowitch defence against 1.e4.

So thats the history with my openings.

To add:
- English: I have had a lot of trouble with the english over my chess life. However late last year one of my Chess club friends suggested playing the Kings Indian Defence against the English..... and it has worked for me so far.
- Polish/Orang Utan...... In my very first Competitive game of Chess I played Mal Murrell in the Newcastle Open..... He opened with b4! In the early stages of my tournament chess life I had some troubles/blunders with this opening. I remember when Mr Matthew Sweeney smashed me with this opening at fairfield one year. Anyhow I have taken a solid approach to this opening now and I tend to play a Colle for black intending to push the e pawn slowly e6-e5-e4 ensuring that it is supported adequately. Finally at Last year's Mingara May Major(Open?) I was finally able to play mal murrell who once again played b4. I defeated him!
- Birds Opening: I played froms gambit for a while but it just wasn't working so nowadays i play a colle for black against the Bird. I have never beaten Mos Ali who plays the Bird. Each time i play him i get closer and closer to beating him.

littlesprout85
01-04-2007, 07:43 PM
Right onz :D - Sprout is starting to really gain some new ground now while playing black. Use to play alot of french and Queens gambit stuff on black for long timez. Now sprout after learning the Sicilian style on black etc. have stumbled into the ways of the indian :D- old indian and queens/indian is starting to really pay off on black for da sprout at playchess :D

-Sprout :)

Capablanca-Fan
05-04-2007, 07:05 PM
I have never heard of this so thought I'd look it up.

1.c4 d5 2.cxd5 c6 with a sort of reverse Morra.
I'd say, ''Thanx for the free pawn", but maybe after the game so I'm not penalized for distraction. ;)

! # Abhi # !
08-04-2007, 04:01 AM
I think opening -is for the first 7 moves only. After that its all your own brain and brawn:P

I love RETI -- one fine day downloaded a very basic FREE chess programme --King Chess Elite --they have some really cool --opening tutorials.

As most people pay the nowmal -openings -e4,d4 --I was playing in a local tournament one day. I must mention that it was not of high standard as it was an unrated meet and only two rated player participated. As it was Suisse League-- I was pitted gainst the top rated --and I knew he would not be prepared for an unusual variation from a nobody. But I was well prepared with the RETI --and stunned him on 23rd move when I won a Knight --for nothing --then on it was just routine.:P

Since then I love this one -as very few paly this.

Zuker
21-07-2008, 11:13 AM
I like the Colle-Zukertort....
which is why I wrote a book on it!

-David


Hey Everyone,

I was wondering what peoples openings were like. I ALWAYS play the same openings as black and white - the Modern Defence as Black and the Kings Indian Attack as white. I have done so since about 2001 and still am not bored with them. I find it great since every single game I play I gain more knowledge into my openings. On top of that, since I am usually busy I dont have time to study chess and so it is great that I only have 2 openings to know. I have thought about learning the Sicillian or something else but have thought that I would get completely creamed by even the weakest player who knows all of the theory and so I plan to stick to what I know since I have no real time to learn. So I was wondering what other peoples opinions were on this. Is there anyone else out there like me? :cool:

Jezza

Carl Gorka
21-07-2008, 08:09 PM
Hey Everyone,

I was wondering what peoples openings were like. I ALWAYS play the same openings as black and white - the Modern Defence as Black and the Kings Indian Attack as white. I have done so since about 2001 and still am not bored with them. I find it great since every single game I play I gain more knowledge into my openings. On top of that, since I am usually busy I dont have time to study chess and so it is great that I only have 2 openings to know. I have thought about learning the Sicillian or something else but have thought that I would get completely creamed by even the weakest player who knows all of the theory and so I plan to stick to what I know since I have no real time to learn. So I was wondering what other peoples opinions were on this. Is there anyone else out there like me? :cool:

Jezza


I get thoroughly bored by openings almost as soon as I play them, so change frequently. The downside is my openings knowledge is pretty weak. The upside is my playing level is fairly strong:D

MichaelBaron
22-07-2008, 12:04 PM
I get thoroughly bored by openings almost as soon as I play them, so change frequently. The downside is my openings knowledge is pretty weak. The upside is my playing level is fairly strong:D

Good point. Many 1100-1600 rated players like to "chat" about openings because it gives them sense of belonging to an elite level. I heard complete patzers say things like "On move 9 i played i played Bg5 just like Karpov did against Topalov and as reccommended by Bronstein in his book...."

The funny thing is...that some of these opening gurus spend hours simply memorising the movies but do not even try to understand ideas behind these movies. I know one 1000 rated player and his opening knowledge is far greater than mine...its just that the only thing he understands about chess is ...what moves are legal and what moves are not :). On the other hand, strong players like Carl may not remember long opening lines, but they have good understanding of plans and themes in various openings.

With my chess coaching, i always try to emphasise to students that chess is not about memorizing moves..it is about understanding the purpose behind these moves :).

Davidflude
24-07-2008, 01:08 PM
Hey Everyone,

I was wondering what peoples openings were like. I ALWAYS play the same openings as black and white - the Modern Defence as Black and the Kings Indian Attack as white. I have done so since about 2001 and still am not bored with them. I find it great since every single game I play I gain more knowledge into my openings. On top of that, since I am usually busy I dont have time to study chess and so it is great that I only have 2 openings to know. I have thought about learning the Sicillian or something else but have thought that I would get completely creamed by even the weakest player who knows all of the theory and so I plan to stick to what I know since I have no real time to learn. So I was wondering what other peoples opinions were on this. Is there anyone else out there like me? :cool:

Jezza

White 1.e4

all manner of lines versus Sicilian

Advance versus French - with a sneaky transposition to confuse black

Austrian attack versus Pirc

A secret line versus Alekhine

King's Gambit versus 1.e5 (see Stefan Bucker article at Chess cafe)

secret line versus kerosine.

black - sicilian sometimes dragon (I have fascinating games in a correspondence fixed openings tournament) sometimes black side of Classical
and secret lines versus the rubbish.

Benoni - lots of secret stuff. In correspondence King's Indian.

Space_Dude
20-08-2008, 09:46 PM
I have created this forumto discuss the best and favouite openings.
My favouite opening is the bird's openning and the king's gambit:hmm: :hmm:

eclectic
20-08-2008, 11:04 PM
I have created this forumto discuss the best and favouite openings.
My favouite opening is the bird's openning and the king's gambit:hmm: :hmm:

my favourite opening would ideally be not to give my opponent an opening at all! :uhoh:

Space_Dude
21-08-2008, 09:53 PM
i always go for the king's gambit or the bird's opening as i always castle king side and it brings out the rook to the centre of the board.

If this not does not work i do the indian defence:)

Space_Dude
21-08-2008, 10:11 PM
1.f4 d5 2.Nc3 e5 3.e4 Nf6 4.Nh3
always works;)

Adamski
22-08-2008, 12:49 AM
White 1.e4

all manner of lines versus Sicilian

Advance versus French - with a sneaky transposition to confuse black

Austrian attack versus Pirc

A secret line versus Alekhine

King's Gambit versus 1.e5 (see Stefan Bucker article at Chess cafe)

secret line versus kerosine.

black - sicilian sometimes dragon (I have fascinating games in a correspondence fixed openings tournament) sometimes black side of Classical
and secret lines versus the rubbish.

Benoni - lots of secret stuff. In correspondence King's Indian.So David, when did you give away the BDG? I recall you advocating it strongly for White back in your NZ days....(I too have given it away and Jono has convinced me to give away my 1 b4.) I am now another 1 e4 player. As Black, various: sometimes 1..e5 and aim for Marshall, Sicilians, Caro Kann against certain opponents and Dutch or Nimzo-Indian/ QID.

Ivanchuk_Fan
28-08-2008, 08:21 PM
Another option for chess players without much spare time in regards to openings is to memorise a book such as Sam Collins's "Understanding the Chess Openings" and play almost every reasonable chess opening. Your opponents will never be able to prepare for you, and in spite of not knowing the theory, you will still understand the opening. :)

MichaelBaron
28-08-2008, 09:06 PM
My favorite openings are openings that i understand well :)

ER
27-09-2008, 07:24 PM
Last night I realised for uptenth time that it is ok to use unsound opening traps if you know that your oponent, a strong club player in this case, is not well prepared in opening theory... So

Podgarac 1600+ vs Renzies 1325
2008 Canterbury Open - Round 2


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e5 3. dxe5 Ng4 4. Qd4 d6 5. exd6 Bxd6 6. h3 Bb4 7. Qd2 Bxd2 8. Bxd2 Ne5 9. b3 Qe7 10. Kd1 O-O 11. f4 Nec6 12. Nf3 Bf5 13. Nc3 Na6 14. Ng5 Rad8 15. Rc1 Rfe8 16. g4 Rxd2 17. Kxd2 Qe3 18. Kd1 Bd3 19. exd3 Nd4 20. Nce4 Nc5 21. Rc2 Nxe4 22. dxe4 Nxc2 23. Kxc2 Qxf4 24. h4 h6 25. Nh3 Qxe4

0-1

Kevin Bonham
27-09-2008, 07:42 PM
Last night I realised for uptenth time that it is ok to use unsound opening traps if you know that your oponent, a strong club player in this case, is not well prepared in opening theory... So

White could have resigned after move 6. To play on queen for piece down against a player with a solid four-figure rating is a waste of time. Congrats on the very easy win.

ER
27-09-2008, 07:56 PM
thanks Kevin, I think Jeljko, who is a good friend anyway, tried to prolong the game as much as he could, to avoid the early departure and the questioning of the onlookers! :)
Cheers

Davidflude
27-09-2008, 09:38 PM
So David, when did you give away the BDG? I recall you advocating it strongly for White back in your NZ days....(I too have given it away and Jono has convinced me to give away my 1 b4.) I am now another 1 e4 player. As Black, various: sometimes 1..e5 and aim for Marshall, Sicilians, Caro Kann against certain opponents and Dutch or Nimzo-Indian/ QID.

I often play the BDG after

1.e4 d5 2.d4 I have patched up lines of the BDG which I was concerned about.

However I am not happy playing the Hubsch Gambit

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e4 Nxe4 or

1.d4 Nf6 2.f3 where black has all sorts of choices

For many years I would play 1.e4 in correspondence one year
and 1.d4 the next hoping to play the BDG.

Davidflude
27-09-2008, 09:56 PM
I am sure that most of you have seen Stefan Buckers articles on "The Chess Cafe"
He also publishes a magazine "Kaissiber".

The latest has just arrived.

1. Article on Centre-Counter which deals among other things with the line Solo plays as white.

1.e4 d5 2.exd Nf6 3.d4 Bg4 4.f3 Bf5 5.g4 which leads to a white advantage.

2. Kieseritzy Gambit - more on lines dealt with on Chess Cafe.

3. Schara-Hennig Gambit

4. Owens Defence

1.e4 b6 2.d4 Bb7

ER
28-09-2008, 12:05 AM
i some times play 1. Nc3 if ... d5 then 2. d4 with all sorts of David Flude ideas. If 1... e5 then a Vienna with all sorts of David Flude ideas. If 2... anything else I resign! :P
Cheers and good luck!

MichaelBaron
28-09-2008, 12:05 AM
Last night I realised for uptenth time that it is ok to use unsound opening traps if you know that your oponent, a strong club player in this case, is not well prepared in opening theory... So


0-1

It is definitely not OK :). You should not count on your opponent blundering:hmm:

ER
28-09-2008, 12:19 AM
Michael, thanks and you are correct. I think i made my initial comment out of momentary enthusiasm right after the win. I am not planning to keep this attitude. Cheers and good luck! :)

Rincewind
28-09-2008, 12:25 AM
It is definitely not OK :). You should not count on your opponent blundering:hmm:

I agree but Black did not risk much. If White played a more sensible move like 6.Qe4+ or 6.Nf3 then Black still seems to have a reasonable game with good pieces. If White plays moves like 6.h3 then all the better. :)

No doubt there are better lines for White earlier on but Elliot already noted the opponent's unbookish nature and so it can be expected that inaccuracy and good looking moves might be played instead of theory.

That being said Elliot's philosophy is not one I practice. My strategy is to play boring openings, try to maintain a solid position and wait for my opponent to make a mistake in the middle game. The downside of this philosophy is you don't win many games against stronger players. :)

Davidflude
28-09-2008, 12:47 PM
My strategy is to play boring openings, try to maintain a solid position and wait for my opponent to make a mistake in the middle game. The downside of this philosophy is you don't win many games against stronger players. :)

This is the way to go if you have a solid understanding of middle games and first rate ending technique if your opponent is markedly weaker than you. However remember Anatoly Karpov was once described as a toothless tiger as black. He would draw and draw against top opponents but crush the weakies.

I suggest that when you are playing an opponent whose middle ability is better than yours and who is an endgame expert then is the time to change style and
play the sharp stuff. Often supersharp openings lead to draws. For example the poisoned pawn Nadjorf is now regarded as a forced draw and the dragon despite its ferocity also leads to many draws. Remember that if you are the higher rated player with a very steady positional style the last thing you want against a weaker player is a totally berserk yukky mess where anything can happen.

For example I was annotating my game against Chris Wallace from Friday night and found at one point there was a sacrifice that I missed which would have given me a big advantage. (I shall post this game when I finish annotating it)

Dougy
28-09-2008, 02:31 PM
For example I was annotating my game against Chris Wallace from Friday night and found at one point there was a sacrifice that I missed which would have given me a big advantage. (I shall post this game when I finish annotating it)

I'd be interested in seeing that. A few of us were watching the game live over the internet. (:

Davidflude
28-09-2008, 03:32 PM
I'd be interested in seeing that. A few of us were watching the game live over the internet. (:

Here it is. Any comments would be greatly appreciated
Event: Canterbury Open 2008
Site: ?
Date: ????.??.??
Round: ?
White: Flude, David
Black: Wallace, Chris
Result: 1/2-1/2
ECO: C30
PlyCount: 113
EventDate: 2008.08.18

{The only preparation I did for this game was to ski the spring slush at Mount
Buller the day before the game.} 1. e4 e5 2. f4 Bc5 3. Nf3 (3. Nc3 {
is a more flexible move order which avoids some black tries.}) 3... d6 4. Nc3
Nf6 {Note how I play an inferior move even though I have been playing the
King's Gambit for many years} {There is an affliction which affects skiers
called "Fear of the fall Line". When you hit a steep slope you freeze up and
perform badly. A similar thing often happens to chess players when they play a
much higher rated opponent.} 5. d3 (5. Bc4 {
is the main line which is very complex.}) 5... a6 6. fxe5 dxe5 7. Bg5 Qd6 8.
Be2 Ng4 {black is alredy better} 9. Rf1 h6 10. Bd2 Ne3 (10... O-O {why not keep
on developing. White will eventually have to play h3 to resolve te tension.})
11. Bxe3 Bxe3 12. Nd5 Ba7 {Black is better and even worse as Yermolinsky put
it in "The Road to Chess Improvement " the trend is downwards". Normal moves
will not do. I decided to try and create a yukky mess.} 13. Nh4 c6 14. Bg4 cxd5
(14... Bxg4 15. Qxg4 cxd5 {is probably winning for black but is anything but
clear.Black being the higher rated player decides to keep everything under
control.}) 15. Bxc8 g6 16. c3 {
thretening to take the pawn on b7 followed by the rook on a8} Qc7 17. Qg4 Nc6
18. exd5 {totally missing the winning sacrifice.} (18. Be6 fxe6 19. Qxe6+ Qe7 (
19... Kd8 20. Rf7 Ne7 21. Nxg6 Re8 22. Nxe7) 20. Qxg6+ Kd8 21. Rf7 Qxh4+ 22. g3
Ne7 23. Qd6+ Ke8 24. gxh4 Kxf7 25. exd5) 18... Qxc8 (18... Ne7 19. d6 Qxc8 20.
Qe4 Nf5 21. Nxf5 gxf5 22. Rxf5 {is a position which is difficult to assess.})
19. Qxc8+ Rxc8 20. dxc6 Rxc6 21. Nf3 O-O 22. O-O-O f6 23. Rfe1 Rd8 24. Re4 Bb8
25. Rb4 Rd7 26. d4 exd4 27. Rbxd4 Rcd6 28. Rxd6 Rxd6 29. Rxd6 Bxd6 30. Kc2 Kf7
31. Kd3 Ke6 32. c4 f5 33. a3 g5 34. b4 g4 35. Nd4+ Kf6 36. h3 gxh3 37. gxh3 Ke5
38. c5 Bc7 39. a4 (39. b5 {gives black the chance to go wrong} axb5 (39... a5 {
is a bad mistake} 40. b6 Bd8 41. h4 h5 42. c6 Bxb6 43. cxb7 Bc7 44. Nc6+ Kd6
45. b8=Q Bxb8 46. Nxb8 Kc7 47. Kd4 Kxb8 48. Ke5 Kc7 49. Kxf5) 40. Nxb5 Bb8 41.
Nd4 Bc7 42. Nb5 Bb8 43. Nd4) 39... f4 40. b5 axb5 41. axb5 Kd5 42. c6 b6 43. h4
h5 44. Ne2 f3 45. Nc3+ Kc5 46. Ke3 Kc4 47. Ne4 Kxb5 48. Kxf3 Kxc6 49. Nf6 b5
50. Ke4 b4 51. Kd3 b3 52. Nxh5 Be5 53. Ng3 (53. Nf4 {also draws}) 53... Kb5 54.
Ne2 Kb4 55. Nc1 b2 56. Kc2 Ka3 57. Nd3 1/2-1/2

Ivanchuk_Fan
28-09-2008, 04:04 PM
I think you mean Chris Wallis, rather than Chris Wallace, who is the host of Fox News Sunday and an American journalist.

Perhaps Black avoided 10...0-0 because he was worried about 11.Qc1 with the idea of 12.h3, but then 11...Qb6 looks good for Black. The N vs. B ending looks roughly level, since although Black has the slightly better minor piece, White can exchange most of the pawns quite easily if necessary.

Congrats on your upset draw David!:clap:

Dougy
28-09-2008, 11:50 PM
First off, well played David.

After 14...Bxg4 15. Qxg4 cxd5 there are several very complicated lines 16. Qc8+ and 16. Nf5. So I think Chris made a good choice there.

Perhaps 17.Qf3 and 17.Bh3 are worth some consideration

18. Be6 is a win? Well that's certainly far from easy to see and even if it is a win it wouldn't be an easy one.

I'm not sure if you noticed this 47. Na4 Kxb5 48.Nxb6 draws - Black has the wrong coloured bishop.

Is 49...Bd8 better for Black? Eg. after 50.Nxh5 Bxh4.