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skip to my lou
15-03-2004, 10:28 PM
Just to get started:

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Bg5 Be7 5.Nc3 Nbd7 6.e3 c6 7.Bd3 O-O 8.O-O h6 9.Bh4 Re8 10.Rc1 Nh7 11.Bg3 Ng5 12.Nxg5 Bxg5 13.Qc2 dxc4 14.Bxc4 Nb6 15.Bd3 Nd5 16.Rfe1 Nb4 17.Qb1 Nxd3 18.Qxd3 e519.Rcd1 exd4 20.Qxd4 Qxd4 21.Rxd4 Bf6 22.Rd3 Be6 23.Rc1 Rad8 24.Rxd8 Rxd8 25.a3 Rd2 26.Rb1 Rc2 27.Nd1 Ba2 28.Ra1 Bb3 29.Rb1 Rd2 30.Nc3 Bc2 31.Rc1 Bd3 0-1

I am white played on last friday in WSCP Koala U1800 vs Mounties U2000 (I think) against a 1600, sorry, didn't note down his name.

The game goes on much longer. Basically he just steam rolled his queen side pawns and I lost. I think I shouldn't have let him get double bishop, and after letting him do that, atleast shouldn't have swapped off.

Garvinator
15-03-2004, 10:50 PM
Just to get started:

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Bg5 Be7 5.Nc3 Nbd7 6.e3 c6 7.Bd3 O-O 8.O-O h6 9.Bh4 Re8 10.Rc1 Nh7 11.Bg3 Ng5 12.Nxg5 Bxg5 13.Qc2 dxc4 14.Bxc4 Nb6 15.Bd3 Nd5 16.Rfe1 Nb4 17.Qb1 Nxd3 18.Qxd3 e519.Rcd1 exd4 20.Qxd4 Qxd4 21.Rxd4 Bf6 22.Rd3 Be6 23.Rc1 Rad8 24.Rxd8 Rxd8 25.a3 Rd2 26.Rb1 Rc2 27.Nd1 Ba2 28.Ra1 Bb3 29.Rb1 Rd2 30.Nc3 Bc2 31.Rc1 Bd3 0-1

I am white played on last friday in WSCP Koala U1800 vs Mounties U2000 (I think) against a 1600, sorry, didn't note down his name.

The game goes on much longer. Basically he just steam rolled his queen side pawns and I lost. I think I shouldn't have let him get double bishop, and after letting him do that, atleast shouldn't have swapped off.
tactical note, at move 12 you could have played 12, cxd5 exd5 13, Nxd5 and if the black captures the knight its curtains for the black queen.

Kerry Stead
16-03-2004, 01:33 AM
[Event "WSCP"]
[Site "Koala"]
[Date "2004.03.12"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jeo"]
[Black "??"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Annotator "Kerry Stead"]
[PlyCount "62"]
[EventDate "2004.??.??"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Nc3 Nbd7 6. e3 c6 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O
h6 9. Bh4 Re8 10. Rc1 Nh7 11. Bg3 ?! (11. Bxe7 {this looks better from a
positional perspective. Although you don't necessarily want to give up the two
bishops so soon, the thing to notice is what remains in the position. White
has a little bit more space, but more importantly has a 'good' bishop v 'bad'
bishop position. The key squares then become e5 and c5, as they are the moves
that black will be looking to play in order to give the c8 bishop some scope.
This is one of these positions where you have to become Darryl Johansen and
just sit and squeeze your opponent to death, slowly taking squares away from
pieces and improving your own position.}) 11... Ng5 ? 12. Nxg5 ? {Even if you
don't see the tactic, the advantage that white has in this position is a space
advantage. Black's pieces don't have much space to work in, so black is trying
to exchange pieces to alleviate this problem. In addition to that, the knight
on g5 doesn't have much of a future, so trading it off really does go against
the general principles. A better alternative would be 12. Ne5 or even 12. Nd2
Trading the d7 knight for the e5 knight is not such a problem, as black still
has the poor g5 knight, the e5 pawn gains more space for white (increasing an
advantage that you already have) and the e6 pawn is fixed (restricting the c8
bishop further).} (12. cxd5 ! exd5 13. Nxd5 {
picks up a pawn with a good position.}) 12... Bxg5 13. Qc2 dxc4 14. Bxc4 Nb6
15. Bd3 Nd5 {If you compare this position with the one a few moves ago, you
can see how white's position hasn't really gone anywhere and black's has
improved dramatically! The bishop on g5 is preventing white from playing e4,
the knight is on a good square on d5, and the space problem of a few moves ago
is no longer a worry.} 16. Rfe1 ? {I can see what you were trying to do with
this move - develop and protect e3 from tactical possibilities - however you
also need to stop black from being able to trade knight for bishop, as
following the trade, black can play e5 because of tactics on the d file (as
happened in the game), which allows the c8 bishop to come into play with great
effect!} (16. Qe2 {is a much better alternative}) 16... Nb4 17. Qb1 Nxd3 18.
Qxd3 e5 ! {This is a very good move, and one that has to be played
immediately. Now black gets active with the bishop pair and seems to take
control of the game.} 19. Rcd1 ?! (19. d5 {is a better move. You should always
be looking to steer the position into a direction that is favourable for
yourself or less favourable for your opponent. This tries to prevent the
position from being opened up, which would obviously favour the bishops.})
19... exd4 20. Qxd4 Qxd4 21. Rxd4 Bf6 {Now black has the initiative, as well
as an almost ideal position for the bishop pair. The thing to do is to try and
make converting the position as tough as possible - if you don't give someone
the opportunity to go wrong, then they wont!} 22. Rd3 (22. Rd2 {looks better -
you can still double on the d file, but don't allow black a free move.}) 22...
Be6 (22... Bf5 {looks more natural}) 23. Rc1 {this move doesn't make much
sense to me. If you're worried about your a pawn, then 23. a3 looks like the
go. Otherwise I'd be inclined to play 23. Red1 to try to keep the d file as
compensation for the bishop pair.} 23... Rad8 24. Rxd8 ? {this just gives up
the d file without a fight, which just makes black's job of winning easier.} (
24. Rcd1 {is the only vaguely sensible move that you have in this position.})
24... Rxd8 25. a3 Rd2 26. Rb1 Rc2 27. Nd1 Ba2 28. Ra1 Bb3 29. Rb1 Rd2 30. Nc3
Bc2 31. Rc1 Bd3 0-1


A few things you can take from this game:
* keep an eye out for tactical possibilities at all times!
* Try to increase an advantage you might have, or increase a disadvantage that your opponent might have.
* If you are in a bad position, make it tough for your opponent to finish you off! If you make it easy for them, then they will (in most cases) do the obvious thing and finish you off.

Complete pgn file attached in zip file.

Lucena
09-12-2004, 12:04 AM
tactical note, at move 12 you could have played 12, cxd5 exd5 13, Nxd5 and if the black captures the knight its curtains for the black queen.

compare the game Wallace-Lewinsky, Australian Masters 1993(can get it through chessbase online)