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rolly16
05-08-2006, 09:46 PM
Last Jan 2006, Filipino GM Mark Paragua made the elite Top 100 based on FIDE List. The July edition dropped him from the Top 100 but he managed to retain his Super-GM status with a 2604 rating.

He had a fine showing in the recent Olympiad in Italy and even managed to DRAW with highly touted Kamsky of the US Team. I think that it as a game that, statistically speaking, Paragua is bound to lose due to the ELO difference. But no, Paragua held his ground and refused to be intimidated by one of the World's Top 10 GM!

rolly16
05-08-2006, 09:52 PM
["37th Chess Olympiad"]["Turin"]["2006.05.31"][Round "10"]
[White "M Paragua"][Black "H Mas"]
[ECO "B91"]
[WhiteElo "2617"][BlackElo "2412"]


1.e4 c5
Capablanca in Chess Fundamentals, “The strategic point of the Sicilian is to use the c-pawn to battle for the d4 square and keep the e and d pawns in reserve to hold critical central squares and blunt White’s attack.


2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4
Aron Nimzovich in My System, "A center pawn should always be taken if this can be done without too great danger.”


4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3
Lasker in Manual of Chess, “Get the knights into action before both bishops are developed.”


5... a6
The early ... a6 is an improvement aimed to counter White’s strong initiative on the King-side. It is formerly known as the Paulsen Defence and is now generally referred to as the NAJDORF Variation, named after Miguel Najdorf of Poland/Argentina.

But Mark is an expert on the Black side of the Najdorf. His 4.5 score in 9 international games is highlighted by a Queen sacrifice vs Geirnaert in World Juniors 2002,a win over now Super-GM Ni Hua in World Youth 2001 and a draw with Super-GM Movsesian in World Cup 2005.


6.g3 (1st Diagram)
In opening theories, this King-side fianchetto is called the ZAGREB Line. Super-GM Mark has picked up this seldom used system that has a successful history in Philippine chess. Rodolfo Tan Cardoso, who is now running a chess school in Las Pinas, used it in taking Fischer to school in New York 1957 while the late Rosendo Balinas, our 2nd GM, banked on it in obtaining an elusive draw with Fischer in MERALCO 1967.


6... e5
Kotov in Think Like A Grandmaster, “If we wish to gain a noticeable advantage in space, we must have a firm control over the center, we must break the opponent’s resistance there and drive his pieces from there.”

The ... e6 move was the root of spectacular Q-sacrifices seen in Kudrin-De Firmian in Greenville 1983 and Rublevsky-Volokitin in Sochi 2006.

[Event "Russian Club Cup"]["Sochi"]["2006.04.28"]
[White "Rublevsky"][Black "Volokitin"]
[ECO "B80"]
6... e6 7.Bg2 Qc7 8.O-O Be7 9.g4 h6 10.f4 Nc6 11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.e5 dxe5 13.fxe5 Nd7 14.Bf4 Bb7 15.Qf3 Rb8 16.Qh3 Bc5+ 17.Kh1 Bd4 18.Ne4 Bxe5 19.Bxe5 Nxe5 20.Rad1 O-O 21.g5 c5 22.gxh6 Bxe4 23.Bxe4 g6 24.Qg3 Rb4 25.Rde1 f5 26.Bf3 f4 27.Qg2 Rf6 28.Be4 Rb8 29.Rf2 Rbf8 30.Qg5 Kh8 31.b3 Qd6 32.c3 Kh7 33.Ref1 Rf5 34.Qg2 f3 35.Qg3 Rf4 36.Rxf3 Rxf3 37.Bxf3 Qd3 38.Kg2 Qxf1+ 39.Kxf1 Rxf3+ 0-1

[Event "Ch USA"]["Greenville"]["1983"]
[White "Kudrin Sergey (USA)"][Black "DeFirmian Nick E (USA)"]
[ECO "B80"]
6... e6 7.Bg2 Be7 8.O-O O-O 9.Be3 Nc6 10.Nxc6 bxc6 11.e5 Nd5 12.exd6 Bxd6 13.Bd2 Rb8 14.Na4 c5 15.c4 Ne7 16.Bc3 Nf5 17.b3 e5 18.Bb2 Nd4 19.Nc3 f5 20.f4 exf4 21.gxf4 Re8 22.Rf2 Bb7 23.Nd5 Bxd5 24.Bxd5+ Kh8 25.Kh1 Qc7 26.Qd2 Re7 27.Rg1 Rbe8 28.Bxd4 cxd4 29.b4 Re3 30.c5 Bxf4 31.Qxd4 Bh6 32.Rxf5 Re2 33.Qh4 Qd7 34.Rgf1 g6 35.Qd4+ R8e5 36.Rxe5 Bg7 37.Rxe2 Bxd4 38.Rf8+ 1-0


7.Nb3
The alternate return path of 7.Nde2 was favored by the now retired IM Rodolfo Tan Cardoso and won with in vs Fischer in New York 1957, Tatai in Bauang 1973 and Ardiansyah in Manila 1973.

[Event "New York"]["1957"]
[White "Cardoso Rodolfo"][Black "Fischer Robert"]
[ECO "B91"]
7.Nde2 Be7 8.Bg2 O-O 9.O-O Nbd7 10.h3 b5 11.a4 b4 12.Nd5 Nxd5 13.Qxd5 Qc7 14.c3 Bb7 15.Qd1 Nc5 16.f3 a5 17.Be3 Ba6 18.Rc1 Rab8 19.f4 bxc3 20.Rxc3 Rxb2 21.Rf2 Qb6 22.Rc1 Qb3 23.Nc3 exf4 24.Rxb2 Qxb2 25.Bxc5 dxc5 26.gxf4 c4 27.Nd5 Bc5+ 28.Kh2 Bb4 29.Rc2 Qb3 30.e5 Qxa4 31.Be4 g6 32.Qg4 Bb7 33.Nf6+ Kg7 34.Qh4 Rc8 35.Qxh7+ Kf8 36.e6 Rc7 37.Qg8+ Ke7 38.Qxf7+ Kd8 39.Rd2+ Bd5 40.Rxd5+ 1-0

["Bauang"]["1973"]
[White "Rodolfo Tan Cardoso"][Black "Stefano Tatai"]
[ECO "B91"]
[WhiteElo "2375"][BlackElo "2430"]
7.Nde2 Be7 8.Bg2 Qc7 9.O-O b5 10.h3 Bb7 11.Be3 Nbd7 12.a4 b4 13.Nd5 Bxd5 14.exd5 O-O 15.c3 Rab8 16.Rc1 b3 17.Ra1 Nb6 18.Bxb6 Rxb6 19.Nc1 Rc8 20.Qd2 Nd7 21.Rd1 Rb7 22.Bf1 Qa5 23.Nd3 Re8 24.Nb4 Nc5 25.Bc4 Bf6 26.Ra3 e4 27.Re1 h6 28.Bxb3 Qc7 29.a5 Rxb4 30.cxb4 Nd3 31.Rb1 Bd4 32.Ba4 Re5 33.Rxd3 exd3 34.Qxd3 Bxb2 35.Bc2 Qc3 36.b5 axb5 37.a6 Re1+ 38.Rxe1 Qxe1+ 39. Kg2 Qa5 40.Qe3 g5 41.a7 Kg7 42.Bd3 Ba3 43.Qd4+ Kg8 44.Qb6 1-0

["Manila"]["1973"]
[White "Cardoso"][Black "Ardiansyah"]
[ECO "B91"]
7.Nde2 Be7 8.Bg2 O-O 9.O-O Qc7 10.h3 b5 11.Be3 Bb7 12.a4 b4 13.Nd5 Nxd5 14.exd5 Nd7 15.a5 Nf6 16.Ra4 e4 17.Rxb4 Bxd5 18.Nc3 Bc6 19.Rb6 d5 20.g4 Rfd8 21.g5 Ne8 22.Qg4 Bd6 23.Rd1 Be5 24.Bd4 Bxd4 25.Rxd4 Qe5 26.Qd1 Rd6 27.Nxe4 dxe4 28.Rxd6 Nxd6 29.Rxc6 Ne8 30.Qd2 Qxb2 31.Bxe4 Rb8 32.Qf4 Rd8 33.Rxa6 Qa1+ 34.Kh2 Qd4 35.Ra8 Kf8 36.Rxd8 Qxd8 37.Qe5 Qd2 38.Kg2 f6 39.Qc5+ Kf7 40.g6+ hxg6 41.Bd5+ 1-0


7... Be7
Current World Champion Veselin Topalov preferred to develop his other knight to Nbd7 instead of this bishop move, en route to a rook acrifice, vs Adams in MTel Masters 2005.

["MTel Masters"]["2005.05.19"]
[White "Michael Adams"][Black "Topalov"]
[ECO "B91"]
7... Nbd7 8.Bg2 b5 9.O-O Be7 10.a4 b4 11.Na2 a5 12.c3 bxc3 13.Nxc3 Nb6 14.Nb5 O-O 15.Bd2 Nc4 16.Bc3 Be6 17.Re1 Qb8 18.Nd2 Rc8 19.b3 Nxd2 20.Qxd2 Nd7 21.Reb1 Nc5 22.Qd1 Ra6 23.b4 axb4 24.Bxb4 Qa8 25.Nc3 Bd8 26.Bf1 Ra7 27.Nb5 Rd7 28.Nxd6 Rc6 29.Bxc5 Rxc5 30.Bb5 Rdc7 31.a5 g6 32.a6 Bg5 33.h4 Be7 34.Ne8 Ra7 35.Qd2 Rxb5 36.Rxb5 Qxe8 37.Rb7 Bc5 38.Ra5 Qc8 39.Rxa7 Bxa7 40.Kh2 Qc7 41.Kg2 h5 42.Ra1 Qc4 43.Qe1 Qd3 44.Ra5 Bg4 45.Kh2 Kh7 46.Ra2 Bf3 47.Ra5 Qc2 48.Kg1 Kg7 49.Rd5 Bxe4 50.Rd2 Qc4 51.Kh2 Qc3 52.Qe2 Bd4 53.Ra2 Ba8 54.Qd1 Qc4 0-1


8.Bg2
Capablanca in Chess Fundamentals, “Placed on the long diagonal, the bishop is posted for its maximum potential control of the central squares as well as eyeing the opposite wing of the enemy’s camp.”

8... O-O
Fine in The Ideas Behind The Chess Openings, “Castle as soon as possible, preferably on the King’s side.”


9.O-O Be6
World Champion Topalov crossed the frontiers with ... Bg4 vs Vallejo Pons in Ciudad de Leon 2006.

[Event "XIX Ciudad de Leon"]["2006.06.10"]
[White "Vallejo Pons"][Black "Topalov"]
9... Bg4 10.Bf3 Be6 11.a4 Nbd7 12.Re1 Nb6 13.Nd2 Rc8 14.Nf1 Rc5 15.Be3 Rc8 16.Bg5 Nc4 17.b3 Nb6 18.Re3 Nbd7 19.Rd3 Nc5 20.Bxf6 Bxf6 21.Rxd6 Qe8 22.Nd5 Bd8 23.b4 Nxa4 24.Nfe3 Bg5 25.Bg4 Bxe3 26.Nxe3 Nb2 27.Qe2 Bxg4 28.Qxg4 Nc4 29.Nf5 g6 30.Rf6 Qd8 31.Qg5 Nd2 32.Nh6+ Kg7 33.Nf5+ Kh8 34.Qh4 0-1


10.a4
Another motherly Q-sacrifice crowned the 10.f4 line in Kupreichik-Weber in Plovdiv 2003.

["EU-chT (Men)"]["Plovdiv"]["2003.10.10"]
[White "Viktor D Kupreichik"][Black "Jean Marie Weber"]
[ECO "B91"]
10.f4 Nbd7 11.f5 Bc4 12.Re1 a5 13.Nd2 Ba6 14.a4 Qc7 15.Nf1 Nb6 16.Ne3 Rfd8 17.Qf3 Rac8 18.Kh1 Qc6 19.g4 Nfd7 20.Qg3 Nc5 21.g5 g6 22.Ng4 Ncxa4 23.Nxa4 Nxa4 24.Qb3 Nc5 25.Nh6+ Kh8 26.Nxf7+ Kg7 27.f6+ Bxf6 28.gxf6+ Kf8 29.Bh6+ Ke8 30.Nxd8 Nxb3 31.f7+ 1-0


10... Qc7 11.h3 Nbd7 12.f4
Reinfeld in The Complete Chess Player, “Even experienced players fail to realize that White’s counter-play is chiefly based on the possibility of playing f4 followed by f5 or e5 according to circumstances.”


12... b5 13.Nd5 Bxd5 14.exd5 Rac8
Lasker in Manual of Chess, “The target for the attack has to be a weakness in the hostile position.”


15.c3 Nc5 16.axb5 (2nd Diagram)
Nimzovich in My System, “We exchange in order to seize or open a file or diagonal without loss of time.”


16... Nxb3 17.Qxb3 Qc5+ 18.Kh2 axb5 19.Re1 e4 20.Ra5
Mason in The Art of Chess, “A threat or menace of exchange, or of occupation of some important point, is often far more effective than its actual execution.”


20... Rb8 21.Be3
Lasker in Manual of Chess, “We name it briefly the “geometrical” motif. This motif inspires the player to seek for simultaneous attacks and defences.”


21... Qc4 22.Qd1 Bd8 23.Ra6 b4 24.Rc6!
Nimzovich in My System, “In order to break down the enemy’s resistance in a file, we must establish outposts in it.”


24... Qxd5 25.Rxd6 Qa2 26.Rd2 bxc3 27.bxc3 Qa3 28.Bd4 Re8 29.Be5
Botvinnik’s Law: One aspect of technique that is overlooked or underappreciated is the attacking of unprotected enemy pieces.


29... Rc8 30.g4! (3rd Diagram)
Lasker in Manual of Chess, “The most usual of all motifs is the weakness of a piece of little or no mobility.”


30... Ba5 31.g5 Rxe5 32.fxe5+- Qxc3 33.gxf6 Qxe5+ 34.Kh1 Bxd2 35.Qg4!!! 1-0
Eli Wallach in The Magnificent Seven said, “The days of good hunting are over.”

Garvinator
05-08-2006, 10:05 PM
Last Jan 2006, Filipino GM Mark Paragua made the elite Top 100 based on FIDE List. The July edition dropped him from the Top 100 but he managed to retain his Super-GM status with a 2604 rating.
I think you will find that the commonly accepted fide rating for super gm status is 2700.

MichaelBaron
06-08-2006, 02:14 AM
Last Jan 2006, Filipino GM Mark Paragua made the elite Top 100 based on FIDE List. The July edition dropped him from the Top 100 but he managed to retain his Super-GM status with a 2604 rating.

He had a fine showing in the recent Olympiad in Italy and even managed to DRAW with highly touted Kamsky of the US Team. I think that it as a game that, statistically speaking, Paragua is bound to lose due to the ELO difference. But no, Paragua held his ground and refused to be intimidated by one of the World's Top 10 GM!


Paragua was rated 60 points or so below Kamsky only. With white pieces, holding him to a draw was not really that surprising:hmm: