PDA

View Full Version : Endgame play sf. Dandenong Autumn Open 2006



Altecman
19-06-2006, 10:27 AM
*The top three games all came down to piece and pawn endings*


Sure do, lol. I could of won one of my games in the Vic Open if i knew more about Endings

qpawn
19-06-2006, 12:00 PM
I was the same; I drew a game that was actually a won endgame for me.

Altecman
19-06-2006, 06:51 PM
Who are you? How did you go in the Vic Open?

D Dragicevic
19-06-2006, 07:56 PM
Sure do, lol. I could of won one of my games in the Vic Open if i knew more about Endings

Well, you are not the only one who is not so great in endings.. Becoming good at endgames takes time and you will start playing endgames better with experience... The players that are really good at endgames are the masters... That is one of the main differences between them and us... My advice for you would be when you play higher rated players, try not to get into an endgame, you have more chances when you have a lot of pieces on..

qpawn
20-06-2006, 10:00 AM
In response to Altecman, I am Andrew Thornton [ no relation at all to my namesake in the event] and I got 3/7: 2 wins, 2 draws and 3 losses.

There was a strong player watching some of my games . I am not sure if he was playing . I never got his name. The advice he gave after my games was pretty good in most cases so I would guess that he is at least 1800.

If he is reading this by any chance and recalls a person with coke bottle glasses on the lower boards please PM :D

I am not altogether sure if I agree with the advice to avoid endgames against a much stronger player [ say, 500 pts or more above you] . It can be surprising how little some very high rated, even titled, players know about the endgame. Does anyone recall when Doug Hamilton had a won book endgame in the Vic champs about 5 years ago and didn't know how to convert it to a win?

But I feel really dumb about the endgame I messed up. I had a won position: 2 passed pawns and knight against two passed pawns and knight. Fritz gave the position as plus seven for me :eek: but I went for a draw by rep.

MichaelBaron
23-06-2006, 04:58 PM
Well, you are not the only one who is not so great in endings.. Becoming good at endgames takes time and you will start playing endgames better with experience... The players that are really good at endgames are the masters... That is one of the main differences between them and us... My advice for you would be when you play higher rated players, try not to get into an endgame, you have more chances when you have a lot of pieces on..


Domagoi, how can one become better in endgames if he avoids them at all costs. One has to study endgames and to play them out to get better. It may be a painful approach but this is the only road to improvement!

D Dragicevic
23-06-2006, 09:53 PM
Domagoi, how can one become better in endgames if he avoids them at all costs. One has to study endgames and to play them out to get better. It may be a painful approach but this is the only road to improvement!

I am not saying to avoid endgames at all costs. Of course, every player will play few endgames once in a while.. the main point i am making is that a player has more chances of beating a higher rated player in a tactical complicated position with pieces on than swapping on and getting into an endgame. If someone wishes to get into endgames to improve them, that is their choice, but I would rather against a master try to have complicated positions than go into an endgame. Everyone plays to their strengths, but I know that I will get into endgames once in a while, especially if I have black pieces.. Anyway, Michael, you know what I play like and you know that I will cause you more problems with lot of pieces on than I will in an endgame...

I hope this answers your question....

MichaelBaron
24-06-2006, 11:29 AM
Ya...I will never forget your crushing attacks on my king :mad: :( :evil:

You are probably right - in important tournaments you should play up to your strengths but in the events of lesser importance when result is not so critical why not treat yourself to an instructive experience of playing out a thematic endgame. Also, "hands on" endgame practice should be combined with studying endgames at home. There are plenty of fairly strong players whom I have been playing for 15 years (I am not going to name them here since they may take offence) and they keep playing the same way (e.g. same openings, same style, same type of the positions for all these years) and do not seem to worry about getting even stronger. Of course, they are successful at maintaining their current level but...they could have become much better players if they would work on their game.

I was lucky to recieve very good chess schooling from a young age (Moscow chess coaches are nothing like "Chess Kids" instructors they do not entertain you but they really teach you how to play) and i became a candidate master by the age of 15. However, after coming to Australia - I have never managed to improve further. The reasons my chess development has stopped are:

a)I stopped studying chess
b)lazyness over the board

and c) I never bothered to deal with my weaknesses. e.g. my poor calculation and lack of imagination.

So i think its really essential to keep working on chess and to adress ones weaknesses.

See ya in the St.Kilda gardens today.
If not..there is a Allegro at MCC next week:lol: ;)

qpawn
24-06-2006, 11:38 AM
At the Vic Open there was the loss that Guy West suffered at the hands of Ronald Yu. West overpressed in the endgame; the psychological pressure of the "better player" feeling that he or she "should win" is something to think about. I recall Karpov mentioning once in his book "Learn from your defeats" that such overpressing is one of the most common ways that a vastly superior player, in rating pts, can lose a game.

four four two
24-06-2006, 11:48 AM
At the Vic Open there was the loss that Guy West suffered at the hands of Ronald Yu.

While I'm sure Ronald Yu of NSW would be happy to be awarded the win against Guy West,the win recorded was in fact Derek Yu of Victoria.;)

qpawn
24-06-2006, 04:45 PM
I am sure that he would take all the credit :D

D Dragicevic
24-06-2006, 09:20 PM
Ya...I will never forget your crushing attacks on my king :mad: :( :evil:

You are probably right - in important tournaments you should play up to your strengths but in the events of lesser importance when result is not so critical why not treat yourself to an instructive experience of playing out a thematic endgame. Also, "hands on" endgame practice should be combined with studying endgames at home. There are plenty of fairly strong players whom I have been playing for 15 years (I am not going to name them here since they may take offence) and they keep playing the same way (e.g. same openings, same style, same type of the positions for all these years) and do not seem to worry about getting even stronger. Of course, they are successful at maintaining their current level but...they could have become much better players if they would work on their game.

I was lucky to recieve very good chess schooling from a young age (Moscow chess coaches are nothing like "Chess Kids" instructors they do not entertain you but they really teach you how to play) and i became a candidate master by the age of 15. However, after coming to Australia - I have never managed to improve further. The reasons my chess development has stopped are:

a)I stopped studying chess
b)lazyness over the board

and c) I never bothered to deal with my weaknesses. e.g. my poor calculation and lack of imagination.

So i think its really essential to keep working on chess and to adress ones weaknesses.

See ya in the St.Kilda gardens today.
If not..there is a Allegro at MCC next week:lol: ;)

Well, I have been experimenting with openings lately and have been different openings, both in tournament games and on the internet... As a result, I have been playing diffeerent types of positions and sometimes different style.. I believe that having done this, my long term results will improve(hopefullly). You say that its essential to keep working on chess, but its also essential to also play a lot of strong tournaments. unfortunately, in australia you can't really play a lot of strong tournaments...

how was gardens today, did you clean up barbaros. unfortunately, i couldn't come today, but I am likely to play the allegro next week.. if i play you as white, my first move will be Nf3....

D Dragicevic
24-06-2006, 09:28 PM
At the Vic Open there was the loss that Guy West suffered at the hands of Ronald Yu. West overpressed in the endgame; the psychological pressure of the "better player" feeling that he or she "should win" is something to think about. I recall Karpov mentioning once in his book "Learn from your defeats" that such overpressing is one of the most common ways that a vastly superior player, in rating pts, can lose a game.

Well, this is something that frequently occurs.. i have done it number of times in the past, but I have learnt from that mistake, even though I know I will do it sooner or later... Half a point is much better than no point, so a higher rated player should acknowledge that a lower rated player played well, and accept that the game is a draw... one thing to realize is it is not the end of the world if you draw with a lower rated player(or even loose). it is true you will loose 15 rating points if you draw with lower rated player below 300 points, but it is better than loosing 30 points...

Altecman
25-06-2006, 03:21 PM
What are you complaining about Michael, becuase everytime i see your posts in the Dandenong threads usally they are pointless (as in the Vic Open thread) So, whats all the comotion Domajoi and Michael, i dont quite understand your disscussion. lol

thanx,

Altecman

D Dragicevic
25-06-2006, 05:41 PM
What are you complaining about Michael, becuase everytime i see your posts in the Dandenong threads usally they are pointless (as in the Vic Open thread) So, whats all the comotion Domajoi and Michael, i dont quite understand your disscussion. lol

thanx,

Altecman

This all started with my response to your post no.19 in which you said that you would have won a game in vic open if you knew endings... i gave you an advice to which michael responded so we started discussing about endings and chess in general. So, Altecman, this discussion would not have occured if it wasn't for your post...

MichaelBaron
26-06-2006, 11:42 PM
This all started with my response to your post no.19 in which you said that you would have won a game in vic open if you knew endings... i gave you an advice to which michael responded so we started discussing about endings and chess in general. So, Altecman, this discussion would not have occured if it wasn't for your post...


Altman, Post the position here...we can have a look
Good Luck in Vic Juniors. I think you have a good chance to finish in the top 3