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View Full Version : What do you guys think is the best game of all-time?



Pharoah
11-06-2006, 09:40 AM
Self-explanatory.

I'd say the match between Adolph Andersson and Dufrense.

He saw like 50 moves ahead. :doh:

Dozy
11-06-2006, 09:54 AM
Well, Pharoah, I gotta admit that's not a bad game but your question was specifically asking what we think is the best game of all time.

In my opinion you can't possibly go past the last round clash between Paul Reynolds and Dozy on Board 1 in the final round of the U1600 division of last year's NSW Open. :D :D

Of course, if I'd lost it I'd probably agree that Anderson-Du Fresne was pretty good...

But seriously it's an interesting question and an interesting thread. You'll get lots of responses -- and lots of argument!

Welcome aboard anyway...

Desmond
11-06-2006, 10:04 AM
Pick any between Kasparov and Karpov that was a Ruy Lopez - Zaitsev Variation.

Davidflude
11-06-2006, 10:40 AM
Estrin - Berliner

World correspondence chess championship.

Desmond
11-06-2006, 12:36 PM
Estrin - Berliner

World correspondence chess championship.

That's a nice one. It can be found:
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1224863

Carl Gorka
11-06-2006, 12:48 PM
I like Keres queen sac against Euwe in their 1939(?) match. Game 7 I think.

Also Reti-Alekhine Game where Alekhine played ...Re3

MichaelBaron
11-06-2006, 12:56 PM
Nezhmetdinov-Chernikov, 1962

tritty
11-06-2006, 01:21 PM
The immortal game is pretty neat... sacks everything for a minor piece mate at move 20sih

ursogr8
11-06-2006, 03:15 PM
Well, Pharoah, I gotta admit that's not a bad game but your question was specifically asking what we think is the best game of all time.

In my opinion you can't possibly go past the last round clash between Paul Reynolds and Dozy on Board 1 in the final round of the U1600 division of last year's NSW Open. :D :D

Of course, if I'd lost it I'd probably agree that Anderson-Du Fresne was pretty good...

But seriously it's an interesting question and an interesting thread. You'll get lots of responses -- and lots of argument!

Welcome aboard anyway...


hi Dozy...nice post of yours.

If the 'game' was restricted to Australian players it would be a candidate for the 100-year time capsule currently being put together by the ABC.
At the moment, your contribution could well be selected as the one to enter the time-capsule.

Sealing happens soon.


starter

Arrogant-One
11-06-2006, 04:02 PM
The immortal game is pretty neat... sacks everything for a minor piece mate at move 20sih

Immortal Game? Too old Tritty.

The best game of all time is actually a lesser known game played by Bobby Fischer. He uses the Evans gambit as white and utterly destroys his opponent by giving him all his material for position.

Its as clear as day that that is the best game of all time.

antichrist
11-06-2006, 08:12 PM
Immortal Game? Too old Tritty.

The best game of all time is actually a lesser known game played by Bobby Fischer. He uses the Evans gambit as white and utterly destroys his opponent by giving him all his material for position.

Its as clear as day that that is the best game of all time.

Is that llike having the best grave site in the cemetery but nothing to put in it?

Bill Gletsos
12-06-2006, 12:08 PM
Immortal Game? Too old Tritty.

The best game of all time is actually a lesser known game played by Bobby Fischer. He uses the Evans gambit as white and utterly destroys his opponent by giving him all his material for position.

Its as clear as day that that is the best game of all time.Fischer never played the Evans Gambit in any serious games, only in simuls and not against anyone of any significance.

Fischer's 6th game against Spassky in 1972 is a masterpiece and one of only a handful of games where Fischer opened with any move other than 1.e4.

Arrogant-One
12-06-2006, 04:35 PM
Fischer never played the Evans Gambit in any serious games, only in simuls and not against anyone of any significance.

Fischer's 6th game against Spassky in 1972 is a masterpiece and one of only a handful of games where Fischer opened with any move other than 1.e4.

No, No, I remember going over this game several times. Fischer did play it and its in the book Fischer's 101 brilliant chess moves. The game might have been against Euwe (the weakest world chess champ ever).

Dozy
12-06-2006, 04:52 PM
No, No, I remember going over this game several times. Fischer did play it and its in the book Fischer's 101 brilliant chess moves. The game might have been against Euwe (the weakest world chess champ ever).My Chessbase "Big Data Base" lists only 3 Fischer-Euwe games, none of them Evans Gambit.

I did find a number of other Evans Gambits he played including this 17 move drubbing of Reuben Fine

I dunno if it'll show up this way but I'll post it one way or the other. If this isn't the one you were talking about, AO, I'll try again.

You'll have to cut and paste.

[Event "New York"]
[Site "New York"]
[Date "1963.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Fischer, Robert James"]
[Black "Fine, Reuben"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C52"]
[PlyCount "33"]
[EventDate "1963.??.??"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2004.01.01"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4 7. O-O dxc3 8.
Qb3 Qe7 9. Nxc3 Nf6 10. Nd5 Nxd5 11. exd5 Ne5 12. Nxe5 Qxe5 13. Bb2 Qg5 14. h4
Qxh4 15. Bxg7 Rg8 16. Rfe1+ Kd8 17. Qg3 1-0

Bill Gletsos
12-06-2006, 05:19 PM
My Chessbase "Big Data Base" lists only 3 Fischer-Euwe games, none of them Evans Gambit.

I did find a number of other Evans Gambits he played including this 17 move drubbing of Reuben Fine

I dunno if it'll show up this way but I'll post it one way or the other. If this isn't the one you were talking about, AO, I'll try again.

You'll have to cut and paste.

[Event "New York"]
[Site "New York"]
[Date "1963.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Fischer, Robert James"]
[Black "Fine, Reuben"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C52"]
[PlyCount "33"]
[EventDate "1963.??.??"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2004.01.01"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4 7. O-O dxc3 8.
Qb3 Qe7 9. Nxc3 Nf6 10. Nd5 Nxd5 11. exd5 Ne5 12. Nxe5 Qxe5 13. Bb2 Qg5 14. h4
Qxh4 15. Bxg7 Rg8 16. Rfe1+ Kd8 17. Qg3 1-0That's a game of blitz according to Chessbase although Fischer's 60 Memorable Games lists it as a skittles game.

Bill Gletsos
12-06-2006, 05:31 PM
No, No, I remember going over this game several times. Fischer did play it and its in the book Fischer's 101 brilliant chess moves.None of the books of Fischer's games or databases show that Fischer ever played the Evan's Gambit in anything other than simuls and skittles and never in any tournament games.

The game might have been against Euwe (the weakest world chess champ ever).Fischer only played Euwe 3 times. Of these two were with the white pieces, a Ruy Lopez and Caro Cann.

antichrist
12-06-2006, 06:37 PM
Euwe may have been a weak chess champ but was certainly a better chess writer than Bobby.

Pharoah
13-06-2006, 02:36 AM
Can someone give me the link to a site that has examples of each common opening; such as the Ruy Lopez (Every time I see this word, I think it's a famous foreign actor or something) and the Caro Cann? Even the Evans Gambit. I've seen examples of them, but I don't really know when the opening ends.

Dozy
13-06-2006, 04:33 AM
. . . I don't really know when the opening ends.I'm not sure the opening ends at all, it sort of transmogrifies into the middle game or (if you've dropped an absolute clanger) the end game.

In my games this usually happens about move five if I know the opening well -- and even sooner if I don't!

Arrogant-One
13-06-2006, 03:00 PM
My Chessbase "Big Data Base" lists only 3 Fischer-Euwe games, none of them Evans Gambit.

I did find a number of other Evans Gambits he played including this 17 move drubbing of Reuben Fine

I dunno if it'll show up this way but I'll post it one way or the other. If this isn't the one you were talking about, AO, I'll try again.



Thats the game Dozy. Great job!

Now I am sure you'll agree that this is the greatest game of all time. It has everything - tactics, gambiting, position, and everything else that makes chess so fun!

Arrogant-One
13-06-2006, 03:02 PM
That's a game of blitz according to Chessbase although Fischer's 60 Memorable Games lists it as a skittles game.

I don't recall it being in his memorable 60 games, but will take your word for it.

Incidentally, thats the best chess book ever written.

Ian Rout
13-06-2006, 03:23 PM
I don't recall it being in his memorable 60 games, but will take your word for it.

Incidentally, thats the best chess book ever written.
It's game 44 in my edition. It's described as "one of seven or eight offhand games" with no time limit listed, though from that description it's likely they were played at one sitting and hence reasonably fast. Possibly also without scoresheets and the moves reconstructed later.

Arrogant-One
13-06-2006, 03:39 PM
It's game 44 in my edition. It's described as "one of seven or eight offhand games" with no time limit listed, though from that description it's likely they were played at one sitting and hence reasonably fast. Possibly also without scoresheets and the moves reconstructed later.

Its strange you know because I once played a blitz game that went move for move exactly like Fishcer's game, the only difference being that my opponent played one move beyond Qg3! so I then crushed him.

I think that opponent, who considered himself a better chess player than myself, retired from the game after that. It really shook him up.

Davidflude
13-06-2006, 03:54 PM
I don't recall it being in his memorable 60 games, but will take your word for it.

Incidentally, thats the best chess book ever written.

That is a matter of opinion.

Other candidate books are Bronstein's book on the 1953 candidates tournament and the second volume of Alekhine's games. You could argue for hours as to which is the best but why bother. Just buy and treasure them.

Alan Shore
13-06-2006, 04:07 PM
That is a matter of opinion.

Other candidate books are Bronstein's book on the 1953 candidates tournament and the second volume of Alekhine's games. You could argue for hours as to which is the best but why bother. Just buy and treasure them.

My favourite chess book is Dan the Pawn because of the racist undercurrent and its belief in the pursuit of unity under one ruling monarchy by conquering all opposition.

Southpaw Jim
13-06-2006, 07:08 PM
Can someone give me the link to a site that has examples of each common opening; such as the Ruy Lopez (Every time I see this word, I think it's a famous foreign actor or something) and the Caro Cann? Even the Evans Gambit. I've seen examples of them, but I don't really know when the opening ends.

Try Chessgames.com (http://www.chessgames.com/) - you can search by player, for famous players like Fischer etc. You can also search by ECO code (Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings) - on the main page search form there's a little link ("Eco help") that will list the various openings by ECO code and the basic moves of each. They also have an Opening Explorer (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/explorer?help=1) which allows you to play through various moves to find example games.

My favourite resource for anything I don't know is the Wikipedia - here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chess_openings) is a list of openings by ECO code, and the Wiki also has a general entry on the main openings and general opening ideas here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_opening).

Alternatively your local library almost certainly has a few general books on chess that list the main openings ;)

Denis_Jessop
13-06-2006, 09:11 PM
Try Chessgames.com (http://www.chessgames.com/) - you can search by player, for famous players like Fischer etc. You can also search by ECO code (Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings) - on the main page search form there's a little link ("Eco help") that will list the various openings by ECO code and the basic moves of each. They also have an Opening Explorer (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/explorer?help=1) which allows you to play through various moves to find example games.

My favourite resource for anything I don't know is the Wikipedia - here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chess_openings) is a list of openings by ECO code, and the Wiki also has a general entry on the main openings and general opening ideas here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_opening).

Alternatively your local library almost certainly has a few general books on chess that list the main openings ;)

On the vexed question of Bobby and the Evans, I looked up Chessgames.com last night which lists 13 of them - the Fine game and 12 1964 simul games. Fischer won 9 drew 1 and lost 3. One of them - the 1964 simul game v Celle - is also in the 60 Memorable Games at no.50.

DJ

Pharoah
13-06-2006, 10:38 PM
Thanks Euro :D

I checked my local library, and they only had TWO Chess books :( Both very basic ones for the beginner. But, I ended up borrowing one, just because it had famous chess games and a short analysis of it near the end of the book, so I'm workin' through those now.

Rincewind
13-06-2006, 11:50 PM
What I find amazing is that this is about the best game of all-time and you are talking Bobby Fischer and some exhibition game he played. Dozy even came out with a game from New York, 1963, and no one has mentioned Byrne, R - Fischer from the US Championship tournament held in the same city and year. Fischer rips apart his opponent in a brilliant and brutal fashion. This game is also in My 60 Memorable Games (#48) and is not an exhibition, blitz or skittles. :) (Oh and it is a Gruenfeld, not Evans, sorry).

Basil
14-06-2006, 03:16 AM
What I find amazing is that this is about the best game of all-time and you are talking Bobby Fischer and some exhibition game he played. Dozy even came out with a game from New York, 1963, and no one has mentioned Byrne, R - Fischer from the US Championship tournament held in the same city and year. Fischer rips apart his opponent in a brilliant and brutal fashion. This game is also in My 60 Memorable Games (#48) and is not an exhibition, blitz or skittles. :) (Oh and it is a Gruenfeld, not Evans, sorry).

Is that the one where Bobby has black, sacks his queen, while bishop, knight and rook go hard windmill fashion?

Dozy
14-06-2006, 06:18 AM
That is a matter of opinion.

Other candidate books are Bronstein's book on the 1953 candidates tournament and the second volume of Alekhine's games. You could argue for hours as to which is the best but why bother. Just buy and treasure them.I hadn't heard of Bronstein's book until a couple of weeks ago when I was given a copy by a friend. He shares your view that it was one of the best chess books ever written. The annotations are superb.

Rincewind
14-06-2006, 08:01 AM
Is that the one where Bobby has black, sacks his queen, while bishop, knight and rook go hard windmill fashion?

No. I believe you are probably thinking of his game against Donald Byrne from 1956. From memory it isn't exactly "windmill fashion" but Fischer mates nicely with two bishops, knight and rook.

Rincewind
14-06-2006, 08:02 AM
I hadn't heard of Bronstein's book until a couple of weeks ago...

:eek:

You really must stay in more.

Desmond
14-06-2006, 08:45 AM
Incidently, would the "best game of all time" necessarily have best play from both sides and are we in agreement that the result would be a draw?

That was my understanding of the question, perhaps there should be a a seperate thread for "best combination" or "best fireworks" for example.

Kevin Bonham
14-06-2006, 12:11 PM
Incidently, would the "best game of all time" necessarily have best play from both sides and are we in agreement that the result would be a draw?

If so, the closest thing to said "best game" so far was probably played between two computers sometime in the last couple of years and witnessed by hardly anyone.

Rincewind
14-06-2006, 12:17 PM
If so, the closest thing to said "best game" so far was probably played between two computers sometime in the last couple of years and witnessed by hardly anyone.

By best game I am thinking in terms of brilliancy prize criteria. Usually one side plays much better than the other to come up with the brilliant combination (although not significantly so or else the brilliancy is tarnished).

Desmond
14-06-2006, 12:23 PM
If so, the closest thing to said "best game" so far was probably played between two computers sometime in the last couple of years and witnessed by hardly anyone.

fair point, but the converse is to get 10 different GMs to play a 400 rated player and see who can destroy him the most efficiently and call this the best game of all time.

Kevin Bonham
14-06-2006, 12:32 PM
By best game I am thinking in terms of brilliancy prize criteria. Usually one side plays much better than the other to come up with the brilliant combination (although not significantly so or else the brilliancy is tarnished).

I agree. There are a couple of forms I can think of:

(i) The loser's play is plausible throughout but the winner gradually and brilliantly creates a winning advantage and triumphs.

(ii) The winner creates such difficult issues for the loser that they are drawn into error in a position where the correct move is extremely difficult to see.

(I include (ii) for the benefit of players like Tal and Alekhine, whose flashiest wins often prove to be a result of a clear opponent error and can therefore be underrated for that reason.)

Desmond
14-06-2006, 04:54 PM
By best game I am thinking in terms of brilliancy prize criteria. Usually one side plays much better than the other to come up with the brilliant combination (although not significantly so or else the brilliancy is tarnished).

I think we will have to agree to disagree at this point and I will stand by my earlier post stating that some of the Kasparov-Karpov draws being amoung the best ever played.

Rincewind
14-06-2006, 05:15 PM
Euwe (the weakest world chess champ ever).

I assume you are not including Khalifman, Ponomariov and Kazimdzhanov in that number.

Alan Shore
14-06-2006, 05:26 PM
I assume you are not including Khalifman, Ponomariov and Kazimdzhanov in that number.

Nah, they don't count to me.

A century from now I doubt they'll be counted by anyone.

Arrogant-One
15-06-2006, 02:27 PM
That is a matter of opinion.

Other candidate books are Bronstein's book on the 1953 candidates tournament and the second volume of Alekhine's games. You could argue for hours as to which is the best but why bother. Just buy and treasure them.

Treasure them? No thanks.

For instance, GM Zuniga of Peru, a tomato farmer, one day picked up a single chess book and discovered he was a Grandmaster. To this day he claims he earned his GM title having read only one chess book.

It kind of puts all chess books in their place, doesn't it? ;)

Arrogant-One
15-06-2006, 02:28 PM
My favourite chess book is Dan the Pawn because of the racist undercurrent and its belief in the pursuit of unity under one ruling monarchy by conquering all opposition.

Sounds philosophical!

What openings did this book advocate?

Arrogant-One
15-06-2006, 02:30 PM
On the vexed question of Bobby and the Evans, I looked up Chessgames.com last night which lists 13 of them - the Fine game and 12 1964 simul games. Fischer won 9 drew 1 and lost 3. One of them - the 1964 simul game v Celle - is also in the 60 Memorable Games at no.50.

DJ

Cool! So 2 Evans gambit games are in his memorable 60.

Did you know that the Evans Gambit was first developed by a captain named Evans whilst he was at sea?

Arrogant-One
15-06-2006, 02:33 PM
What I find amazing is that this is about the best game of all-time and you are talking Bobby Fischer and some exhibition game he played. Dozy even came out with a game from New York, 1963, and no one has mentioned Byrne, R - Fischer from the US Championship tournament held in the same city and year. Fischer rips apart his opponent in a brilliant and brutal fashion. This game is also in My 60 Memorable Games (#48) and is not an exhibition, blitz or skittles. :) (Oh and it is a Gruenfeld, not Evans, sorry).

Actually Rincewind, I know the game you are talking about.

I think Fischer was about 15 years old at the time and the game was considered absolutely brilliant. I went over it and somehow Fischer managed to find himself in a crushing position using rather ordinary looking moves all the way along. Thats why I thought that game, as cute as the tactical knockout blow was, to be unworthy.

Arrogant-One
15-06-2006, 02:37 PM
I assume you are not including Khalifman, Ponomariov and Kazimdzhanov in that number.

A fair point, but lets face facts. Euwe is still the weakest former world champ even if we add the above named to the list. I read an article arguing otherwise once and going over one of Euwe's best games, but I was still unconvinced.

This sounds like a good question for a poll.

Rincewind
15-06-2006, 04:07 PM
Actually Rincewind, I know the game you are talking about.

I think Fischer was about 15 years old at the time and the game was considered absolutely brilliant. I went over it and somehow Fischer managed to find himself in a crushing position using rather ordinary looking moves all the way along. Thats why I thought that game, as cute as the tactical knockout blow was, to be unworthy.

Fischer was 19-20 in 1963 perhaps you are thinking of the game from 1956 too when Bobby was 13, I believe that game was dubbed "the game of the century" by Hans Kmoch. However, the 1963 game was incredible. From a reasonably ordinary position Fischer is able to totally bust Robert Byrne in 20 moves. I don't think it was any accident. Fischer was at the absolute hight of his powers in that tourny and won the US Championship by a margin of something like 3.5 points!!!

Rincewind
15-06-2006, 04:10 PM
A fair point, but lets face facts. Euwe is still the weakest former world champ even if we add the above named to the list. I read an article arguing otherwise once and going over one of Euwe's best games, but I was still unconvinced.

This sounds like a good question for a poll.

It is unfair to compare players from different eras but comparing them to their contemporaries I think one could reasonably convincingly argue that Max was at least the 2nd strongest player going around at the time he won the Championship. Given Alekhine's health issues he probably was the strongest.

I don't believe the same can be said for the other three.

Davidflude
15-06-2006, 09:58 PM
The immortal game is pretty neat... sacks everything for a minor piece mate at move 20sih

Rosanne - Anderssen is another beuty. I am playing a correspondence tournament where I went my own way in this game. I will post the games when they are all finished.

They are much more brutal and i never even sacd a rook.

Desmond
16-06-2006, 09:01 AM
It is unfair to compare players from different eras but comparing them to their contemporaries I think one could reasonably convincingly argue that Max was at least the 2nd strongest player going around at the time he won the Championship. Given Alekhine's help issues he probably was the strongest.

I don't believe the same can be said for the other three.

Using your metric, Kramnik would be the obvious choice.

Rincewind
16-06-2006, 09:32 AM
Using your metric, Kramnik would be the obvious choice.

He might be the obvious choice, but chosen for what exactly?

Desmond
16-06-2006, 09:57 AM
He might be the obvious choice, but chosen for what exactly?

Being the weakest world champ using the measurement you mentioned of relative strength vs contemporaries.

Rincewind
16-06-2006, 10:17 AM
Being the weakest world champ using the measurement you mentioned of relative strength vs contemporaries.

Not sure. At the time he won the London match I think it was a worthy contender and proved his worth. Of course, not everyone enjoyed his style.

qpawn
16-06-2006, 10:45 AM
While the question of finding a "best" game ever is insoluble I will attempt to proffer an opinion.

Capablanca played many, many fine games. But my favourite of all for its subtlety, imagination, unusual motif, and play against a worthy adversary, was the game Ossip Bernstein vs Capablanca [year unknown?] . It is the famous "zugzwang" game where Bernstein takes a pawn on the queenside but about 5 moves later, with most pieces still on the board, Bernstein has an array of moves at his disposal and they all lose!! Incredible. And it was not a zugzwang that you could see coming like those of Nimzowitsch. This one seemed to come from the clouds.

I found thsi game and many other gems of Capablanca's in a book: Capablanca's best 100 games or some similar title. I can't recall the author.

Someone asked when the opening ends and the middle game starts. A good marking point is when a player has freed up his or her back rank so rooks can be connected.

qpawn
16-06-2006, 11:02 AM
Surely, you have to factor in that Euwe was the last amateur chess champion. He was by profession a maths teacher. Hence he could only play in school term breaks, often without time for chess preparation. That being taken into account, Euwe's defeat of Alekhine was a great accomplishment. Also, Euwe offered an immediate rematch to Alekhine. Euwe did not dilly dally around like, say. Lasker did, in going many years without defennding the world title.

Arrogant-One
16-06-2006, 01:25 PM
Fischer was 19-20 in 1963 perhaps you are thinking of the game from 1956 too when Bobby was 13, I believe that game was dubbed "the game of the century" by Hans Kmoch. However, the 1963 game was incredible. From a reasonably ordinary position Fischer is able to totally bust Robert Byrne in 20 moves. I don't think it was any accident. Fischer was at the absolute hight of his powers in that tourny and won the US Championship by a margin of something like 3.5 points!!!

Thats precisely the game I was referring to. You really need to spend a lot of time analyzing it to understand the final position where he finally busts up his opponent.

Arrogant-One
16-06-2006, 01:27 PM
While the question of finding a "best" game ever is insoluble I will attempt to proffer an opinion.

Capablanca played many, many fine games. But my favourite of all for its subtlety, imagination, unusual motif, and play against a worthy adversary, was the game Ossip Bernstein vs Capablanca [year unknown?] . It is the famous "zugzwang" game where Bernstein takes a pawn on the queenside but about 5 moves later, with most pieces still on the board, Bernstein has an array of moves at his disposal and they all lose!! Incredible. And it was not a zugzwang that you could see coming like those of Nimzowitsch. This one seemed to come from the clouds.

I found thsi game and many other gems of Capablanca's in a book: Capablanca's best 100 games or some similar title. I can't recall the author.

Someone asked when the opening ends and the middle game starts. A good marking point is when a player has freed up his or her back rank so rooks can be connected.

You can't get us licking our chops like that and then not provide the game. Please dig it up, I want to take a look.

qpawn
16-06-2006, 02:30 PM
I will try to dig it up. I am not too skilled at finding games on the net. I will try. Your hunger for a great game will be sated, I assure you. It is Capablanca at his genius best; how he saw ahead to see that the pawn was poisoned goodness only knows.

Here is a link:

http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/Canon/canon172.html

The only thing I recalled incorrectly was that the zugzwang itself occurred in an endgame position. Nonetheless, it was a game of sheer genius by Capa that won the brilliancy prize.

Arrogant-One
16-06-2006, 02:47 PM
I will try to dig it up. I am not too skilled at finding games on the net. I will try. Your hunger for a great game will be sated, I assure you. It is Capablanca at his genius best; how he saw ahead to see that the pawn was poisoned goodness only knows.

Here is a link:

http://www.exeterchessclub.org.uk/Canon/canon172.html

The only thing I recalled incorrectly was that the zugzwang itself occurred in an endgame position. Nonetheless, it was a game of sheer genius by Capa that won the brilliancy prize.

Did you know Capa once played an Indian Sultan's servant named Khan who thoroughly thrashed Capa in several games and may have been the strongest chess player in the world at that time?

Rincewind
16-06-2006, 02:51 PM
Did you know Capa once played an Indian Sultan's servant named Khan who thoroughly thrashed Capa in several games and may have been the strongest chess player in the world at that time?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultan_Khan

Arrogant-One
16-06-2006, 02:55 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultan_Khan

Impressive. I didn't know he had played against Alekhine too.

Capablanca-Fan
22-06-2007, 09:53 PM
Did you know Capa once played an Indian Sultan's servant named Khan who thoroughly thrashed Capa in several games and may have been the strongest chess player in the world at that time?
No, Sultan Khan (which was his name, not a title) beat Capa in the only tourney game they played, and it was a long maneuvring game. Sultan Khan was weaker than Alekhine at the time.

Bill Gletsos
22-06-2007, 09:56 PM
No, Sultan Khan (which was his name, not a title) beat Capa in the only tourney game they played, and it was a long maneuvring game. Sultan Khan was weaker than Alekhine at the time.Arrogant-One was clueless at the best of times. ;)

Capablanca-Fan
23-06-2007, 06:44 PM
As far as best win by an Australian, Rogers–Milos, Manila Ol. 1992 (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1098937) would be up there. It would probably have won the brilliancy prize, if it were not for the corrupt system where Kasparov was both judge and contestant.

Basil
23-06-2007, 09:19 PM
Nice. Max respect to Ian. Thanks for digging it up, Jon.

machomortensen
15-11-2011, 03:21 AM
Michael Baron proposed: Nezhmetdinov-Chernikov, 1962, which is definetely a good one.

Michael Baron is a much stronger player than me and he has a much better "chessculturel" education than I have. Anyway Michael, why not Polugajevskij - Nezhmetdinov from Sochi 1958?? It was at least my first shot. When I deliver a lecture in a chessclub I always start with this game...

Other good ones are (after my taste):

Karpov - Kavalek Nice(OL) 1-0 1974.
Karpov - Unzicker Nice(OL) 1-0 1974.
Larsen - Gligoric Moskva 1-0 (OL) 1956.
Taimanov - Larsen 0-1 Vinkovci 1970.

Max Illingworth
15-11-2011, 09:30 AM
I don't know which game would be the best of all time, but the best of 2011 is probably Kamsky-Svidler, World Cup 2011, Game 2.

The most entertaining game of this year would have to be Zhao Jun-Zhou Weiqi, Chinese League 2011.

antichrist
20-11-2011, 02:08 PM
I dont know whose game it was, but a player did about six sacs (forced?) to win against the odds

antichrist
20-11-2011, 02:09 PM
I don't know which game would be the best of all time, but the best of 2011 is probably Kamsky-Svidler, World Cup 2011, Game 2.

The most entertaining game of this year would have to be Zhao Jun-Zhou Weiqi, Chinese League 2011.

well are you going to put the games up for techno deadheads like myself?

machomortensen
20-11-2011, 07:24 PM
You can find the Kamsky - Svidler game in most recent AUSTRALASIAN CHESS...

With Illingworths notes...

Max Illingworth
20-11-2011, 07:49 PM
well are you going to put the games up for techno deadheads like myself?

Okay, not everyone downloads TWIC every week, so here's the second game.


[Event "Chinese League"]
[Site "Qingdao CHN"]
[Date "2011.10.26"]
[Round "13"]
[White "Zhao Jun"]
[Black "Zhou Weiqi"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A28"]
[WhiteElo "2580"]
[BlackElo "2592"]
[PlyCount "90"]
[EventDate "2011.04.12"]
[EventType "team"]
[EventRounds "20"]
[EventCountry "CHN"]
[Source "Mark Crowther"]
[SourceDate "2011.10.31"]
[WhiteTeam "Shandong"]
[BlackTeam "Jiangsu"]

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. e4 Bb4 5. d3 d6 6. Be2 a5 7. O-O Bc5 8. Nd2
Nd4 9. Nb3 Nxb3 10. axb3 c6 11. Kh1 Bd4 12. Bd2 Ra6 13. Qe1 Nd7 14. f4 Nc5 15.
Ra3 exf4 16. Bxf4 Ne6 17. Bd2 O-O 18. Bg4 Bc5 19. Ra2 Nd4 20. Bxc8 Qxc8 21. Ne2
Nxb3 22. Bc3 f6 23. Ng3 Qd7 24. Nf5 d5 25. d4 Ba7 26. exd5 cxd5 27. cxd5 g6 28.
Qd1 a4 29. Ne3 Bb8 30. Qf3 Rd8 31. d6 Qxd6 32. Ng4 f5 33. Nh6+ Kg7 34. d5+ Kxh6
35. Qe3+ f4 36. Qh3+ Kg5 37. Qxh7 Qxd5 38. Qe7+ Kf5 39. Rxa4 Rxa4 40. Qf6+ Ke4
41. Qxg6+ Ke3 42. Qb1 Qd1 43. Re1+ Kf2 44. Qg6 Ra1 45. Qb6+ Rd4 0-1

Carlsen's four times in the Tal Memorial have all been extremely exciting, though none have involved running the black king to f2 and winning.

Agent Smith
20-11-2011, 08:17 PM
Okay, not everyone downloads TWIC every week, so here's the second game.


[Event "Chinese League"]
[Site "Qingdao CHN"]
[Date "2011.10.26"]
[Round "13"]
[White "Zhao Jun"]
[Black "Zhou Weiqi"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A28"]
[WhiteElo "2580"]
[BlackElo "2592"]
[PlyCount "90"]
[EventDate "2011.04.12"]
[EventType "team"]
[EventRounds "20"]
[EventCountry "CHN"]
[Source "Mark Crowther"]
[SourceDate "2011.10.31"]
[WhiteTeam "Shandong"]
[BlackTeam "Jiangsu"]

...

Carlsen's four times in the Tal Memorial have all been extremely exciting, though none have involved running the black king to f2 and winning.

Did you notice the refutation.

( 44.Rxd1 Rxd1+ 45.Qxd1 Ra1 46.Bd4+ Nxd4 47.Qxa1 )

1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.e4 Bb4 5.d3 d6 6.Be2 a5 7.O-O Bc5 8.Nd2 Nd4 9.Nb3 Nxb3 10.axb3 c6 11.Kh1 Bd4 12.Bd2 Ra6 13.Qe1 Nd7 14.f4 Nc5 15.Ra3 exf4 16.Bxf4 Ne6 17.Bd2 O-O 18.Bg4 Bc5 19.Ra2 Nd4 20.Bxc8 Qxc8 21.Ne2 Nxb3 22.Bc3 f6 23.Ng3 Qd7 24.Nf5 d5 25.d4 Ba7 26.exd5 cxd5 27.cxd5 g6 28.Qd1 a4 29.Ne3 Bb8 30.Qf3 Rd8 31.d6 Qxd6 32.Ng4 f5 33.Nh6+ Kg7 34.d5+ Kxh6 35.Qe3+ f4 36.Qh3+ Kg5 37.Qxh7 Qxd5 38.Qe7+ Kf5 39.Rxa4 Rxa4 40.Qf6+ Ke4 41.Qxg6+ Ke3 42.Qb1 Qd1 43.Re1+ Kf2 44.Qg6

( 44.Rxd1 Rxd1+ 45.Qxd1 Ra1 46.Bd4+ Nxd4 47.Qxa1 )

44...Ra1 45.Qb6+ Rd4 0-1

Kevin Bonham
20-11-2011, 08:38 PM
Did you notice the refutation.

( 44.Rxd1 Rxd1+ 45.Qxd1 Ra1 46.Bd4+ Nxd4 47.Qxa1 )

Neat. The seemingly dead queen takes away escape squares for the king and thereby saves itself by forcing the protector of the piece attacking it to take the bishop. Therefore Qd1 was false brilliance.

Apparently 42...f3 was winning.

Max Illingworth
20-11-2011, 09:17 PM
Yes, I noticed that line published on ChessVibes. ;) Instead of 43...Kf2, better is 43...Qxe1.

ER
20-11-2011, 10:47 PM
Hi Max can you locate that beautiful Knight sac Holmov played vs Bronstein's Najdorf in1965? He won that game brilliantly! I have it somewhere but I can't find it! I don't know if it was a great game in high standard analysis but it impressed me so much when I first saw it, I got dizzy looking at all possible variations!

Kevin Bonham
20-11-2011, 10:58 PM
Hi Max can you locate that beautiful Knight sac Holmov played vs Bronstein's Najdorf in1965? He won that game brilliantly! I have it somewhere but I can't find it! I don't know if it was a great game in high standard analysis but it impressed me so much when I first saw it, I got dizzy looking at all possible variations!

You can often find famous games quickly on chessgames.com. Quite often even entering the names and the year into Google brings it up.

This one? http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1034337

ER
21-11-2011, 12:12 AM
You can often find famous games quickly on chessgames.com. Quite often even entering the names and the year into Google brings it up.

This one? http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1034337

thanks and yes, that's he one! :)

peter_parr
21-11-2011, 01:22 PM
Famous author and grandmaster Jacob Aagaard was asked in the world’s best chess magazine (New in Chess No.7 2011) what was the most exiting chess game you ever saw?

Reply – Wohl-Gipslis, Biel 1996.

The combination is only a draw, but from where it starts, on move 16, till move 31, where the game ends Alex had seen everything (or so he says).

IM Aleks Wohl has come a long way since he was a mediocre player in his school chess team at my chess centre 30 years ago!

Aleksandar H Wohl - Aivars Gipslis [A30]
It (open) Biel (Switzerland) (9), 1996

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.Nc3 e6 4.g3 b6 5.Bg2 Bb7 6.0–0 Be7 7.d4 cxd4 8.Qxd4 Nc6 9.Qf4 0–0 10.Rd1 Qb8 11.b3 Rd8 12.Bb2 d6 13.Rd2 a6 14.Rad1 b5 15.Ng5 bxc4 16.Nce4 d5 17.Qh4 dxe4 18.Bxf6 Bxf6 19.Qxh7+ Kf8 20.Rd7 Rxd7 21.Rxd7 Ke8 22.Rxf7 Ne7 23.Rxf6 gxf6 24.Qf7+ Kd8 25.Nxe6+ Kd7 26.Nc5+ Kd6 27.b4 Qe8 28.Qxf6+ Kc7 29.Qe5+ Kb6 30.Nd7+ Kc6 31.Qc5+ Kxd7 32.Bh3+ 1–0

Sutek
21-11-2011, 01:34 PM
S.KERR - R.LUNDQUIST
Big Team Match, Sydney
1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qa5 4.d4 Nf6 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.Bb5 Nd5 7.Qd3 Nxc3 8.bxc3 a6 9.Bxc6+ bxc6 10.Ne5 Be6 11.0–0 Qa4 12.Qf3 Bd5 13.Qe2 g6 14.Re1 Be6 15.c4 f6 16.Nxc6 Bxc4 17.Qxe7+ Bxe7 18.Rxe7+ Kf8 19.Bh6+ Kg8 20.Rg7+ Kf8 21.Rxc7+ Kg8 22.Re1 Qa3 23.Rg7+ Kf8 24.Ra7+ Kg8 25.Rxa8+ Kf7 26.Ra7+ Kg8 27.Re8+ Qf8 28.Rg7# 1–0

machomortensen
21-11-2011, 03:29 PM
@ P Parr

Thanks for the game. It's not only Aleks Wohl who has made some progress... Jacob Aagaard has also done quite well. I was his first coach...

Max Illingworth
29-11-2011, 10:24 PM
I just thought of two other serious contenders for the best game of 2011: Zhao Jun-Xiu Deshun, Chinese Championships 2011, and Moiseenko-Morozevich, Saratov Cup 2011.

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
01-12-2011, 01:32 PM
wohl - gipslis was very nice !

littlesprout85
03-12-2011, 12:26 AM
Meh think Max Illingworth Is a rising star in the international chess scene. In the past year max has achieved all the goals he set forth right here on chesschat, to which sprout stands in aww of ems brightness(wheres sproutys shades when ems needs ems ) :cool:

-Sprout85 =)

Sheroff
04-12-2011, 07:02 AM
Have to agree with Fire-eater on Kere's excellent 1939 queen sac game against Euwe - it's quite beautiful. Always been a big fan of Polugaevsky-Nezhmetdinov from the 1958 Soviet Championship, too.

Cheers,
Kevin Casey

peter_parr
31-12-2011, 08:28 PM
game 170 on page 133 of chess informant vol 112 with GM Rogers notes was Max Illingworth v Gary Lane 2011 1-0 - a game that mattas from Parr --- amatta.

Sutek
31-12-2011, 08:50 PM
game 170 on page 133 of chess informant vol 112 with GM Rogers notes was Max Illingworth v Gary Lane 2011 1-0 - a game that mattas from Parr --- amatta.

M.Illingworth v G.Lane
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d3 a6 6. Bb3 Ba7 7. h3 h6 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. g4 d5 10. Qe2 Re8 11. Nf1 Na5 12. Bc2 c5 13. g5 hxg5 14. Bxg5 dxe4 15. dxe4 Qb6 16. Ba4 Bd7 17. Bxd7 Nxd7 18. Ne3 f6 19. Nd5 Qc6 20. Be3 Nb6 21. O-O-O Nxd5 22. exd5 Qa4 23. b3 Qe4 24. Rhg1 Qh7 25. Rg2 b5 26. Rdg1 Re7 27. Rg6 Kf8 28. Bh6 gxh6 29. Rxf6+ Rf7 30. Qxe5 Re8 31. Qd6+ Re7 32. Ne5 Nb7 33. Rxf7+ Qxf7 34. Qxh6+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
27-03-2012, 04:24 PM
I don't know which game would be the best of all time, but the best of 2011 is probably Kamsky-Svidler, World Cup 2011, Game 2.

The Informator judges agreed with it as best of the year, awarding it 61 votes of a possible 70, with four judges ranking it first and two second (there were seven judges.)

Another memorable game Mamedyarov - Gelfand from the World Champs qualifiers was third but was narrowly shaded for second by Ivanchuk - Leko, which went as follows:

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re1 Qh4 14. g3 Qh3 15. Qe2 Bg4 16. Qf1 Qh5 17. Nd2 f5 18. c4 f4
19. cxd5 c5 20. Re4 c4 21. Bc2 fxg3 22. hxg3 Bxg3 23. fxg3 Rxf1+ 24. Nxf1 Qh3 25. Re3 Rf8 26. Bd2 Bf3 27. Rxf3 Rxf3 28. Be4 Rxg3+ 29. Nxg3 Qxg3+
30. Bg2 Qd3 31. Be1 Qxd4+ 32. Bf2 Qxb2 33. Rf1 Qd2 34. Bc5 g6 35. Rf8+ Kg7 36. Rf2 Qd1+ 37. Rf1 Qd2 38. Kh2 c3 39. Rf2 Qe1 40. Bd4+ Kh6 41. Bh3 c2 0-1

Agent Smith
27-03-2012, 06:36 PM
Yes that game was great.
But Leko's 37. ... Qd2 seemed to indicate he would settle for a draw, after which Chucky went astray.

chessonaleg
30-03-2012, 09:14 PM
The game this year where the chuckster chucked it. Ivan the chuck-happy chuck-a-piece.

Rincewind
31-03-2012, 12:22 PM
Channel 10 - tonight - 11:35pm

Seed of Chucky

Two possessed and homicidal dolls must deal with the unexpected discovery that they have a gender-confused, pacifist son as they try to transfer their souls back into human bodies.

Adamski
03-04-2012, 12:50 AM
M.Illingworth v G.Lane
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d3 a6 6. Bb3 Ba7 7. h3 h6 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. g4 d5 10. Qe2 Re8 11. Nf1 Na5 12. Bc2 c5 13. g5 hxg5 14. Bxg5 dxe4 15. dxe4 Qb6 16. Ba4 Bd7 17. Bxd7 Nxd7 18. Ne3 f6 19. Nd5 Qc6 20. Be3 Nb6 21. O-O-O Nxd5 22. exd5 Qa4 23. b3 Qe4 24. Rhg1 Qh7 25. Rg2 b5 26. Rdg1 Re7 27. Rg6 Kf8 28. Bh6 gxh6 29. Rxf6+ Rf7 30. Qxe5 Re8 31. Qd6+ Re7 32. Ne5 Nb7 33. Rxf7+ Qxf7 34. Qxh6+ 1-0
Nice attack by Max! :clap:

davhur
10-05-2012, 11:54 PM
One can give many examples of Ivanchuk's games as being truly outstanding creative achievements. I am always drawn to the ridiculous Qg7 move against Shirov in 1996. Take a look at this article on the pure inventiveness of this master - http://leeds-rose-forgrove-chess.org/ivanchuk.html

Capablanca-Fan
17-09-2013, 06:10 AM
Some rare TV footage of Capablanca and Euwe just before Euwe started the 1935 match with Alekhine. Unfortunately we hear Euwe only in Dutch, so see the notes in the thread for translation. Capa speaks in clear English. He pronounces Alekhine's name in the original Russian way, ‘alYEkheen’, not surprisingly because they met in Moscow and were very good friends at first. Capa gives assessment of the strengths and styles of both Euwe and Alekhine.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nuyMzb5_tlU

Capablanca-Fan
17-09-2013, 06:13 AM
The next video contains some silent footage of Capa with an extract of that dialogue in the other one.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3q7a42BJ-w

ER
17-09-2013, 07:11 PM
Thanks very much for posting these video clips Jono.

In my opinion Capablanca possessed a more pleasant voice than Dr Alekhine.

Well here's an extract of Dr Alekhine's interview to BBC in the mid 30s as well as some "live" footage! (*)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMRg3I--SfA

However, the brilliant performance of Bach's Gavotte in E by Andres Segovia as a background to Capa's silent scenes (**) is really wonderful! :)

(*) "Interesting the way he moves a piece with his pinkie out and then puts his hand under his chin"! Comment by a kibitzer on youtube.


(**) from the Soviet 1925 silent comedy Chess Fever, Шахматная горячка, directed by Vsevolod Pudovkin and Nikolai Shpikovsky. Chess Fever is a comedy about the Moscow 1925 chess tournament, made by Pudovkin during the pause in the filming of Mechanics of the Brain. The film combines acted parts with the actual footage from the tournament. (Ref. based on a Wikipedia article)

Capablanca-Fan
18-09-2013, 01:57 AM
You're welcome, JaK. There is a fuller version of that Alekhine interview below. I agree about Capa having a more pleasant voice than Alekhine. Ed Lasker described Alekhine's "inimitable heavy Russian accent" in German as well as English, and it shows here. Not stated was Alekhine's consistent sharply falling terminal displayed in this interview—the opposite of many Aussie girls and young women today. Alekhine almost sounds like a caricature of a Hollywood portrayal of a KGB agent.

However, both the previous descriptions of Capa's voice I am familiar with are clearly wrong as shown in that interaction. An English reporter described Capa as speaking English with a "strong American accent", but if anything it seems closer to RP than American. And one of my chess mentors, the late Arcadii Feneridis, former NZ Champ, who actually visited the Moscow 1935 tourney, said that Capa had quite a high-pitched womanly speaking voice. Again, this was not at all apparent in the film footage.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrH-tcDTU48

Capablanca-Fan
18-09-2013, 06:57 AM
Actually, Alekhine doesn't sound too bad in French, which was the second language of many aristocratic Russians. Capa's note surrendering the world title was in French. See this archival film footage celebrating Euwe taking the world title (http://www.sport195.com/videos/max_euwe_and_capablancathe_chess_machine_rare_foot age_76857). Alekhine speaks at around 3:10.

antichrist
19-09-2013, 05:24 PM
from GM Ian Rogers was robbed thread: ... Kasparov then said the best game was definitely his win over Ivanchuk but as the game was played at such a high level no-one else would understand it. ...

Surely this game must be in contention with such a reference.

ER
21-09-2013, 12:37 AM
Actually, Alekhine doesn't sound too bad in French, which was the second language of many aristocratic Russians. Capa's note surrendering the world title was in French. See this archival film footage celebrating Euwe taking the world title (http://www.sport195.com/videos/max_euwe_and_capablancathe_chess_machine_rare_foot age_76857). Alekhine speaks at around 3:10.


Hi Jono, I think you might have linked the wrong video here. It only runs for 2.39 whereas, as you note above, Alekhine speaks at around 3:10!

Capablanca-Fan
21-09-2013, 05:15 AM
Hi Jono, I think you might have linked the wrong video here. It only runs for 2.39 whereas, as you note above, Alekhine speaks at around 3:10!
Hi JaK, sorry, this one Dr.. World Chess Champion Max Euwe (Profilti) (http://www.geschiedenis24.nl/speler.program.7099283.html).

GrahamClayton
29-12-2013, 08:10 AM
The Uruguayan "Immortal Game":


http://youtu.be/kkM63dr8XQA

Davidflude
13-01-2014, 06:11 PM
Estrin v Berliner is an incredible correspondence game.

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
13-01-2014, 07:50 PM
One can give many examples of Ivanchuk's games as being truly outstanding creative achievements. I am always drawn to the ridiculous Qg7 move against Shirov in 1996. Take a look at this article on the pure inventiveness of this master - http://leeds-rose-forgrove-chess.org/ivanchuk.html

I'm pretty sure the game was published in Shirov's "Fire on board".

I thought it was the standout game in a book filled full of inventive examples.

Denis_Jessop
14-01-2014, 04:38 PM
Arsenal's 3-2 win over Manchester United in the FA Cup Final 1979.

DJ

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
14-01-2014, 05:37 PM
Arsenal's 3-2 win over Manchester United in the FA Cup Final 1979.

DJ

Leaky defence. :D

ER
15-01-2014, 03:29 PM
Sixes and eights

Man United vs Arsenal 6-1 (2001)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdQIw5k1-gM

and Ten Years After (not the band)

Man United vs Arsenal 8-2 (2011)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMIJs3nGddI

James Peirce
05-03-2014, 08:25 AM
Cohn vs Chiszar 1944
Phillipe Meitner vs Carl Hamppe Vienna 1872(Immortal Draw)
Polugaevsky-Nezhmetdinov Sochi 1958