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Kevin Bonham
15-08-2005, 11:16 PM
Interested in seeing what different people here do with their tournament games after they have finished. I'll give some basic questions and my own answers to them to get the ball (hopefully) rolling.

1. Do you keep them?

I've played 818 tournament games at main-list rated or ratable time limits (not all would have actually been rated, for various reasons) since I started in 1986. I still have at least partial scores of 773 of these.

(The breakdown of the remaining 45: 7 not kept from my first ever tournament, 16 lost (mostly during 1991-2 when I tended to just chuck them on the floor of my very messy room), 1 thrown away in disgust after I lost the ending from knight and four pawns up when aged 15, and 21 where the unrated opponent was too weak for me to bother keeping the game - typically players who would be a piece or more down inside 10 moves).

I don't keep the original scoresheets - I just transcribe them into a folder. For a long time I was typing them in by electric typewriter so I could easily add them game by game, but now I wait until I have a page full and do them as a word document.

I don't bother with anything faster than main-list-rated. I seldom record them let alone keep them and don't consider them part of my record against an opponent. I can't believe it that there are people who save online games played at a time limits below five minutes and analyse them in detail.

2. Do you analyse them?

I give all my tournament games a brief Fritz-assisted run-through so I can put reasonably accurate !!s or, far more often, ??s, on moves when I add the game to my folder, and so that I know where I could have done better. I also like to check up how my opening went in comparison to theory, eg if I mixed up lines (a very common event.)

3. Do you annotate them?

Historically I've only annotated them where they were of some kind of interest for publication somewhere. However, at the start of 2000, I started a project of annotating all my games in the order they were played starting from the beginning, using Fritz. This is a very low-priority thing, and because the rate at which I play new games and the rate at which I annotate old ones are about the same, I am not sure if I will ever catch up (although it may get faster once I get up to post-2000 games which I sometimes have saved annotated versions of already.) Annotating games I had forgotten ever playing is great fun. Sometimes I find amazing resources that both players missed, or amusing things like my opponent resigning a won position. :owned: If I ever do catch up there will be all kinds of useful things I can do to look at things like stats by opening line in more detail than I can now.

4. Do you use them in preparation?

I index my folder of games so I can look up all the games I have played against a specific opponent before a game. Whether I flick through them or not will depend on the player I am up against and whether I think this will be useful. Often it is good to feel prepared against whatever openings that opponent has played against me before.

Also I keep an eye on my scoreline against each opponent, and use this for motivation purposes. I particularly like to turn a minus score into an equals or an equals score into a plus. I've recently equalised (or better) a few minuses so that now only one opponent on the current Tasmanian rating list has a plus against me. That's one too many as far as I'm concerned.

5. Do you have a "best game"?

I find this a difficult question because I have had a few very spectacular games but most of them had flaws - one move where the opponent could have been winning. I always want to play one game that I am really totally happy with but it's never yet happened. The one in this thread (http://chesschat.org/showthread.php?t=644) would have some sort of claim to be my best so far ... which doesn't say much for the other 817. :rolleyes:

Over to you.

Rincewind
15-08-2005, 11:28 PM
1. Yes.

2. Yes.

3. Some but i certainly have no goal to annotate all of them.

4. Most definitely. I play mostly at a small club and so preparation is worthwhile and hugely possible just based on my own database of games.

5. I have favourite games but no best game. I don't think any of my games deserve the name best. Maybe one or two correspondence games might come close. At least in general less blunders than in OTB games. However, when I think of favourite games they are almost all OTB games.

Kevin Bonham
15-08-2005, 11:54 PM
If it's not confined to OTB and team events are allowed then the best game I've been involved in was the NZS-Tas draw in the Australasian Internet Challenge.

Spiny Norman
16-08-2005, 08:21 AM
1. Yes, I keep all of them, but not in paper form ... I transcribe them into ChessBase. When I was a junior I kept a score book.
2. Yes, I analyse them, mostly using a brief run-through in Fritz. Now that I am getting some better-late-than-never coaching, my coach is also analysing them for me. He tends to find the more positional ideas. Fritz finds the tactical stuff.
3. Yes, I annotate them. Mostly variations and/or ideas that were possibilities but never made their way into the score. Occasionally I record what was going through my mind at the time, or events that happened around the board whilst playing. That makes it easier for me to recall the game months/years later.
4. No, I don't have enough recorded (yet) to warrant using them in preparation. I rely on club websites with games played by the opponent for that purpose.
5. No, I don't think I could say that I have a "best game". Hadn't really thought about it...

Carl Gorka
16-08-2005, 12:40 PM
I've lost a number of my games over the years due to the fact that I've moved around a lot....born in England, lived in Holland, France, back in England and now Aus.

With analysis, I try to analyse games myself, and then run an analysis engine over it to check for tactics I might have missed. I try to add some annotations where I think thry're necessary.

I use the games to learn openings better, so I suppose I do use them for preparation purposes.

I haven't played my best game yet.

bergil
07-10-2005, 05:56 AM
1. No
2. Not really
3. No
4. No
5. Yeah in a blockaded position sacked a bishop and then the exchange to win

rob
07-10-2005, 03:33 PM
1. I keep many scoresheets except those where both: I played badly plus the opening info will not help me in future. Some easy wins against ppl lower rated also get discarded.
2. Usually I only analyse with my opponent or briefly with my wife :) (I should use Fritz).
3. Annotate my games (very rarely done), it seems like a lot of effort and too much self-criticism for my precious ego.
4. Occasionally I use them to prepare, I store them by year with one white pile & one black pile and ordered by surname.
5. Yes a few best games - too few and far between :(

With more WA rated games going on the net these days then more ppl like me should get prepared.

Thanks Kevin, for helping me admit that I'm kinda slack - note to self: do more chess study :)

Adamski
01-01-2008, 05:59 PM
Resurrecting an interesting old thread.
1. Yes, but with some big gaps. My career began in 1968 as an Under 14 school-boy. I have my first 119 games neatly rewriten out in a hard back exercide book. Then the enthusiasm ran out and the next lot of games I have are both looseleaf and in scorebooks, but dating at least 3 years later. Then its more regularly (but with gaps again) in exercide books. One thing that has helped me find some missing games is a New Zealand chess games database in ChessBase format compiled by Peter Stuart which I bought. In it I found some lost games of mine - more losses than wins sadly, but one of my best wins included (see later).
2. Yes, but not enough.
3. Very rarely , like when annotaing for NZ Chess magazine when I lived in NZ.
4. Not nearly enough. I have to hunt to find games by an opponent unless they were recent. One day I must index my games!
5. Yes,. I have a favourite game where I sacc'ed a Bishop (unsoundly) then Rook (completely soundly!!) for what turned out to be a winning attack against a reasonably good player (who expected to beat me). Here is that game - sorry I haven't got a tool that will paste it in PGN format. Found the game again in Perter Stuart's database. My own copy is loose somewhere! Marred by a blunder by him but the kind of piece sacrifice by me that though it could have been refuted can give good practical chances.
Jonathan Adams - Hamish Gold, NZ Major Open, Dunedin, 1999.
1 b4 c6 2 e3 d5 3 Bb2 Bf5 4 Nf3 Nd7 5 c4 dxc4 6 Bxc4 e6 7 Nd4 Nb6(?!) 8 Nxf5 exf5 9 Bb3 Qg5 10 0-0 Bxb4 11 f4 Qg6 12 Rf3 Nf6 13 Rg3 Qh6 14 Qc2 Ng4 15 Bxf7+! (unsound, but it worked out well! Better 15 h3 Qh4 16 Rf3 Nf6 17 Qxf5 0-0 with a slight plus for White.) 15...Kxf7 16 Qxf5+ Nf6 17 e4 Qh5?? (Much better is 17...Rhe8 18 e5 Qh5 19 Rxg7+ [ or 19 e6+ Kf8 20 Rg5 Qe2! -+] 19... Kxg7 20 exf6+ Kh6 -+) I guess you can all spot White's 18th now. 18 Rxg7+! Ke8 (of course if 18..Kxg7 19 Qxf6+ followed by mate) 19 Qe6+ (+_) 19...Kf8 20 Qxf6+ Ke8 21 Nc3 Rd8 22 Rg5 Bc5+ 23 Kh1 1-0. I have too many threats! One of my more enjoyable games.

I also once played a game where I should have beaten Jono Sarfati. I played the Pirc, He played the Austrian Attack, I played...c5 line, in middle game won his Queen for Rook and minor piece after he underestimated the strength of letting my Queen go to c4, then I played badly and lost - Jono do you have in that excellent memory of yours the full score of that game? I'd like to keep it.

Kruupy
08-01-2008, 08:42 AM
Hi all,

Just recently I have been getting into the habit of using sound and video capturing devices on my computer to record a video of my analysis at the time, recording first personal and then crafty computer lines. I think this is great because I can recall the emotions I felt after certain good or bad moves and it really helps me to avoid making the same mistakes. I do not really use these in preparation as I don't really think I have enough recorded games yet

It's always hard to pick a best game I think but here is something I felt really attached to:

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 e6 3. c4 Be7 4. Nc3 d5 5. e3 O-O
6. Nf3 b6 7. Rc1 Ba6 8. Be2 Nbd7 9. cxd5 Bxe2 10. Qxe2 Nxd5
11. Nxd5 Bxg5 12. Nxc7 Rc8 13. O-O Bf6 14. Nb5 a6 15. Nd6 Rxc1
16. Rxc1 Qa8 17. Rc7 Rd8 18. Qc2 Be7 19. Rc8 Rxc8 20. Nxc8 Bf8
21. Qc7 Qe4 22. h3 Qb1+ 23. Kh2 Nf6 24. Ng5 Qg6 25. Ne7+ Bxe7
26. Qxe7 Nd7 27. Qxd7
1-0

Capablanca-Fan
08-01-2008, 11:18 AM
I lost a lot of my game scores when I moved from Wellington to Brisbane. But http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=39623 has 234 of my games, mostly from NZ Champs, master tourneys and Olympiads, but also has a few blindfold simul games.

Miguel
08-01-2008, 05:10 PM
Yes. I store them in a PGN file. Unfortunately, I threw out most of my pre-1997 games, before I got a computer.
Just a quick annofritz, with a deeper, more "hands-on" look at interesting positions.
No. I considered it at one stage, but thought the effort would outweigh the benefit.
Sometimes, depending on recency.
Not really, but I do have games with which I'm pleased.

Southpaw Jim
11-01-2008, 09:02 PM
1. Yep, keep all standard rated games and quite a few rapid games in a Fritz/CB database. This only includes rated games from the club, games on FICS are not stored as such, but my FICS gamescores are emailed to my Gmail account and are, therefore, "stored".

2. I give it to Fritz, which has until recently, been sufficient given the grossly tactical nature of my losses. The last 12 months has seen some improvement here, to the point where the true cause of some losses is strategic - here, Jono's kind analysis in the HICC thread has been and continues to be invaluable.

3. Not at the moment, but at the moment my losses still tend to be for rather obvious tactical reasons, so annotation is largely superfluous. In addition, I don't really have the knowledge to be able to do this myself - however, I will probably start this year by including Jono's notes.

4. Not really, except to remind myself of the general openings played by a particular opponent. Generally, the way our club tournaments are run, I don't know who I'll be playing on any given night, so it'd be impossible to prepare in those circumstances. I don't play weekenders where the draw is known, due to family commitments.

5. Not yet! :) I'm glad of all my wins in the last 12 months, but not especially proud of any particular game - most of my wins were games where my opponent could've won or obtained a draw but for a blunder of some kind.

markus
13-04-2008, 04:18 PM
1. Most of them (90%)
2. Yes
3. Most of them (90%)
4. Whenever I wished.
5. No

eclectic
13-04-2008, 04:23 PM
if you haven't gone over at a game you played after 7 years shred it; it's not like the tax office will ever want to look at it! :confused:

ER
13-04-2008, 04:49 PM
I find this thread extremely helpful due to the various ideas, suggestions etc expressed here.
After a huge drop, I am planning to improve my chess in the future, or whatever has left of it, so learning from my games will assist me toward that goal.
I have kept ALL my games from the last 3 years in the Fritz database, classified in ELO opening codes. I will take it from here!
Cheers and good luck!

road runner
13-04-2008, 08:51 PM
I once heard a player remark that he had a very good recond with the Benko; he gave the caveat that he usually threw away his losses, so the record may not be completely reliable. :lol:

Adamski
19-11-2008, 07:41 PM
if you haven't gone over at a game you played after 7 years shred it; it's not like the tax office will ever want to look at it! :confused:Ec, on this I find myself in complete disgreement with you! I still look at games I played many more years ago. Indeed, in www.chessgames.com you can find games I played as a teen - many years ago (but not millions!!). Just search on Jonathan Adams. Some of the openings in my repertoire (such as it is) don't arise that often and I have to go back in time a lot to find the last time I played it (or was permitted to play it). I have no doubt that Eccles would like to look back at his wins over Neddy and maybe Bluebottle too!

MichaelBaron
19-11-2008, 08:07 PM
1) Put all your games into a database
2) Analyse all of them carefully
3) Annotate the most interesting/typical of your play and analyse the games together with your coach
4) Keep notes that you make over the years on how your play could possibly be improved on.

Adamski
19-11-2008, 08:10 PM
5. Yes,. I have a favourite game where I sacc'ed a Bishop (unsoundly) then Rook (completely soundly!!) for what turned out to be a winning attack against a reasonably good player (who expected to beat me). Here is that game - sorry I haven't got a tool that will paste it in PGN format. Found the game again in Perter Stuart's database. My own copy is loose somewhere! Marred by a blunder by him but the kind of piece sacrifice by me that though it could have been refuted can give good practical chances.
Jonathan Adams - Hamish Gold, NZ Major Open, Dunedin, 1999.
1 b4 c6 2 e3 d5 3 Bb2 Bf5 4 Nf3 Nd7 5 c4 dxc4 6 Bxc4 e6 7 Nd4 Nb6(?!) 8 Nxf5 exf5 9 Bb3 Qg5 10 0-0 Bxb4 11 f4 Qg6 12 Rf3 Nf6 13 Rg3 Qh6 14 Qc2 Ng4 15 Bxf7+! (unsound, but it worked out well! Better 15 h3 Qh4 16 Rf3 Nf6 17 Qxf5 0-0 with a slight plus for White.) 15...Kxf7 16 Qxf5+ Nf6 17 e4 Qh5?? (Much better is 17...Rhe8 18 e5 Qh5 19 Rxg7+ [ or 19 e6+ Kf8 20 Rg5 Qe2! -+] 19... Kxg7 20 exf6+ Kh6 -+) I guess you can all spot White's 18th now. 18 Rxg7+! Ke8 (of course if 18..Kxg7 19 Qxf6+ followed by mate) 19 Qe6+ (+_) 19...Kf8 20 Qxf6+ Ke8 21 Nc3 Rd8 22 Rg5 Bc5+ 23 Kh1 1-0. I have too many threats! One of my more enjoyable games.Here it is in PGN.

Capablanca-Fan
19-11-2008, 08:17 PM
Jonathan Adams - Hamish Gold, NZ Major Open, Dunedin, 1999.
1. b4 c6 2. e3 d5 3. Bb2 Bf5 4. Nf3 Nd7 5. c4 dxc4 6. Bxc4 e6 7. Nd4 Nb6{?!} 8. Nxf5 exf5 9. Bb3 Qg5 10. 0-0 Bxb4 11. f4 Qg6 12. Rf3 Nf6 13. Rg3 Qh6 14. Qc2 Ng4 15. Bxf7+! (unsound, but it worked out well! Better 15. h3 Qh4 16. Rf3 Nf6 17. Qxf5 0-0 with a slight plus for White.) 15...Kxf7 16. Qxf5+ Nf6 17. e4 Qh5?? {Much better is 17...Rhe8 18. e5 Qh5 19. Rxg7+ [or 19. e6+ Kf8 20. Rg5 Qe2! -+] 19... Kxg7 20. exf6+ Kh6 -+. I guess you can all spot White's 18th now.} 18. Rxg7+{!} Ke8 {of course if 18... Kxg7 19. Qxf6+ followed by mate} 19. Qe6+ {+-} 19... Kf8 20. Qxf6+ Ke8 21. Nc3 Rd8 22. Rg5 Bc5+ 23. Kh1 1-0. (I have too many threats! One of my more enjoyable games.)

Zwischenzug
19-11-2008, 08:24 PM
[Event "New Zealand Major Open"]
[Site "Dunedin"]
[Date "1999.12.30"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Adams, Jonathan"]
[Black "Gold, Hamish"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A00"]
[Annotator "Adams,Jonathan"]
[PlyCount "45"]
[EventDate "99.??.??"]

1.b4 c6 2.e3 d5 3.Bb2 Bf5 4.Nf3 Nd7 5.c4 dxc4 6.Bxc4 e6 7.Nd4 Nb6?! 8.Nxf5 exf5 9.Bb3 Qg5 10.O-O Bxb4 11.f4 Qg6 12.Rf3 Nf6 13.Rg3 Qh6 14.Qc2 Ng4 15.Bxf7+ (unsound, but it worked out well! Better 15.h3 Qh4 16.Rf3 Nf6 17.Qxf5 0-0 with a slight plus for White.) 15...Kxf7 16.Qxf5+ Nf6 17.e4 Qh5?? (Much better is 17...Rhe8 18.e5 Qh5 19.Rxg7+ [ or 19.e6+ Kf8 20.Rg5 Qe2! -+] 19... Kxg7 20.exf6+ Kh6 -+) {I guess you can all spot White's 18th now.} 18.Rxg7+ Ke8 (of course if 18...Kxg7 19.Qxf6+ followed by mate) 19.Qe6+ (+-) 19...Kf8 20.Qxf6+ Ke8 21.Nc3 Rd8 22.Rg5 Bc5+ 23.Kh1 (I have too many threats! One of my more enjoyable games.) 1-0

Zwischenzug
19-11-2008, 08:25 PM
Jono beat me to it!

Adamski
19-11-2008, 08:27 PM
Ta guys. If you have a pgn file as an attachment, how do you put it in the nice format?

Zwischenzug
19-11-2008, 08:32 PM
Ta guys. If you have a pgn file as an attachment, how do you put it in the nice format?

Just little details...
() for variations
{} for pure comments (variations within a {} won't play on the viewer)
All moves must have a '.' after it
...etc

Besides that, just place the the game within [ pgn ] [ /pgn ] (but without the spaces).

e.g. [ pgn ] 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4[ /pgn ]

Saragossa
19-11-2008, 08:59 PM
I find this thread extremely helpful due to the various ideas, suggestions etc expressed here.
After a huge drop, I am planning to improve my chess in the future, or whatever has left of it, so learning from my games will assist me toward that goal.
I have kept ALL my games from the last 3 years in the Fritz database, classified in ELO opening codes. I will take it from here!
Cheers and good luck!

Good work Jak!

I often try to commit to improving but simply can't muster the energy to do anything other then go over books on openings endings etc. But Carl's advice on chess camp seems valuable so I'm going to start analysing games of chess in hope that it will improve my game.

Adamski
19-11-2008, 09:01 PM
Thanks, Zw and Jono. I did one successfully in "The Seniors Fight Back" thread.:)

Kaitlin
19-11-2008, 09:09 PM
What do I do wif my games?... thats easy => show them to people if I win :D

WCL-Skwerly
20-11-2008, 04:23 AM
1. Do you keep them?

I do. I really do not see the point of playing in long tournament games and not keeping them to mark your improvement. I personally find it highly entertaining to look at some of the games I played five years ago, compared to what I would play today. If nothing else, it helps morale.

2. Do you analyse them?

I analyze all my games with Fritz. However, I usually just do a quick run-through, keeping my eye out for the major blunders. Once I get back into tournament play here, I will do the whole “overnight” analyze thing and have Fritz comment and stuff.

3. Do you annotate them?

I never had, but recently I started going over my old games, and making notes where things went horribly awry or really good for me.

4. Do you use them in preparation?

Not necessarily. Mostly what I do is decide the openings I am going to play, and go over tons of GM games which showcase that opening. That way, hopefully, some of the ideas might rub off on me and improve even a single game.

5. Do you have a "best game"?

I had never thought of it, really. I have some memorable games, but I would have to look further into it to decide if one is actually my `favorite` or `best`.

Miranda
20-11-2008, 07:24 AM
1. Hmmm... sometimes. I usually lose them/throw them away. The only games which I have safely put away are my games from my first Aus Juniors :lol:

2. I'll analyse them if there's a coach there, sometimes if I think I played an interesting game I'll run it through CB

3. I'm too awful to annotate them!

4. I only use games in perparation against opponents that I've already played... I don't use them to study opening or whatever.

5. Well, there was a game where I won against a GM... but it was online. Other than that, I don't have a best game, but I have lots of worst games!

MichaelBaron
20-11-2008, 10:46 AM
3. I'm too awful to annotate them!

!

But thats how you get better! Developing analytical skills is one of the keys to becoming a stronger player!

Miranda
20-11-2008, 10:49 AM
Oh, and I have one individual game saved. From the 2005 Schools Championships... where I sacked a Q for a back-rank mate against Letisha Simmonds. Sad thing is, now she can completely smash me!

Miranda
20-11-2008, 10:52 AM
But thats how you get better! Developing analytical skills is one of the keys to becoming a stronger player!
Hm... I think I need to get stronger before I can annotate!

Although I was going over someone's game on ICC last night, and I felt like a pro... "You probably should've moved this, because if your opponent did this you would get weak doubled pawns..."

And anyway, I'm too lazy to annotate... if I'm looking over a game in CB I'll put in good variations (without text), but otherwise... meh.

MichaelBaron
20-11-2008, 02:43 PM
Hm... I think I need to get stronger before I can annotate!


And anyway, I'm too lazy to annotate... if I'm looking over a game in CB I'll put in good variations (without text), but otherwise... meh.


You will get stronger as you annotate :). It is just a learning exercise. You do not have to submit your games for publication.

As for lazyness...it is another issue all together.

Igor_Goldenberg
20-11-2008, 02:59 PM
Analysing games is very important. When I go through the game, I always try to notes (it's easy in ChessBase).
Computer helps makes it easier to pick up tactical mistakes.
Help from the stronger player helps find strategic mistakes.

Miranda
20-11-2008, 03:03 PM
haha... I can usually tell where I made tactical mistakes - my opponent usually makes them obvious!

Igor_Goldenberg
20-11-2008, 03:05 PM
haha... I can usually tell where I made tactical mistakes - my opponent usually makes them obvious!
Good for you (well, may be not so good). I usually find a lot (on both sides) during analysis.

AzureBlue
02-01-2009, 05:38 PM
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No.
Lol =P

AzureBlue
02-01-2009, 05:39 PM
Hm... I think I need to get stronger before I can annotate!

Although I was going over someone's game on ICC last night, and I felt like a pro... "You probably should've moved this, because if your opponent did this you would get weak doubled pawns..."

And anyway, I'm too lazy to annotate... if I'm looking over a game in CB I'll put in good variations (without text), but otherwise... meh.
Yeh same I just use Fritz and Shredder to analyse my games and put variations in that could've been better than wat I played.
Cant be stuffed using text either =D

Kaitlin
02-01-2009, 07:12 PM
I preserve mine for antiquity :)

queenant89
03-01-2009, 05:39 AM
lol me too ive got a folder of every noted game ive played :P but 98% ive never sen again.... ive tried to put them into chess base, for my amusement and possibly annotate, but ive found annotating some damn difficult that i cant do it... maybe some time in the distant future...

MichaelBaron
03-01-2009, 11:18 AM
lol me too ive got a folder of every noted game ive played :P but 98% ive never sen again.... ive tried to put them into chess base, for my amusement and possibly annotate, but ive found annotating some damn difficult that i cant do it... maybe some time in the distant future...

Practice makes it perfect :)

black
03-01-2009, 11:35 AM
I have a collection of many of my junior games - as well as some of my visits to adult tournaments - but some scoresheets have been lost. In some cases entire sets of tournament scoresheets have been lost.

Since returning to chess, however, I have been concentrating more on being involved in making use of collecting my games.

Usually the first thing I do when I get home is to show my mum whatever game(s) I played that day. I try to explain the key moments and ideas in the game in a way which she can understand. Mum plays on Yahoo! and usually has a rating of 1350-1450. (Sometimes drops into the 1200s, has hit as high as 1600.) While doing this I usually remember a lot of details which come in useful for the next step.

Then I enter the game(s) into my database, including all lines which I recall having considered during the game; and any thoughts, evaluations, or any other comment which may be interesting or useful to view later.

After this I explore the game with Rybka. I direct it into lines which I want evaluated, and I follow it into lines I had not considered. I add these to the annotations with relevant comments of which are my ideas, which are Rybka's, and save the final product into my database.

Often I still get the computer to do a full analysis of the game at 120s/move using an opening reference.

I have been biased with sometimes putting a lot more time into analysing my strong or interesting wins. This is less useful than spending that time on losses in which one demonstrates a misunderstanding of the position.

June 2008-April 2009 is a study period for me. I am in preparation and do not have any (new) games of my own to analyse except the occasional online blitz game or street chess. I do all of the above analysis and filing of the street chess games in which my opponents offer reasonable resistance. I get Rybka to do shallow analysis of most online blitz games; and more deeply in mutually stronger games, or games with some kind of instructive element.

I find it very interesting to explore old games of mine. For many of the otb games I can recall clear details of how I was feeling during the game, the atmosphere, the posture and level of projected confidence shown by me and my opponent. For many of the later junior games I can recall using psychological tactics due to obvious lack of confidence, or nervous traits, shown by my opponent. These games are just kept as scoresheets so it is interesting that I can recall these things. In general the memories of time spent with my chess opponents are more clear than that of people I went to school with for several years.

Adamski
03-01-2009, 09:23 PM
I have a collection of many of my junior games - as well as some of my visits to adult tournaments - but some scoresheets have been lost. In some cases entire sets of tournament scoresheets have been lost.

Since returning to chess, however, I have been concentrating more on being involved in making use of collecting my games.

Usually the first thing I do when I get home is to show my mum whatever game(s) I played that day. I try to explain the key moments and ideas in the game in a way which she can understand. Mum plays on Yahoo! and usually has a rating of 1350-1450. (Sometimes drops into the 1200s, has hit as high as 1600.) While doing this I usually remember a lot of details which come in useful for the next step.

Then I enter the game(s) into my database, including all lines which I recall having considered during the game; and any thoughts, evaluations, or any other comment which may be interesting or useful to view later.

After this I explore the game with Rybka. I direct it into lines which I want evaluated, and I follow it into lines I had not considered. I add these to the annotations with relevant comments of which are my ideas, which are Rybka's, and save the final product into my database.

Often I still get the computer to do a full analysis of the game at 120s/move using an opening reference.

I have been biased with sometimes putting a lot more time into analysing my strong or interesting wins. This is less useful than spending that time on losses in which one demonstrates a misunderstanding of the position.

June 2008-April 2009 is a study period for me. I am in preparation and do not have any (new) games of my own to analyse except the occasional online blitz game or street chess. I do all of the above analysis and filing of the street chess games in which my opponents offer reasonable resistance. I get Rybka to do shallow analysis of most online blitz games; and more deeply in mutually stronger games, or games with some kind of instructive element.

I find it very interesting to explore old games of mine. For many of the otb games I can recall clear details of how I was feeling during the game, the atmosphere, the posture and level of projected confidence shown by me and my opponent. For many of the later junior games I can recall using psychological tactics due to obvious lack of confidence, or nervous traits, shown by my opponent. These games are just kept as scoresheets so it is interesting that I can recall these things. In general the memories of time spent with my chess opponents are more clear than that of people I went to school with for several years.Interesting, but I note you have a very long study period. What are you preparing for? Maybe it would be better to spend some of that time playing - which can also be good preparation.

Jesper Norgaard
18-01-2009, 01:21 PM
1. Yes I keep all full-time and rapid games in a chess database (Blitz only occasionally, and only because BabasChess and others allow it automatically). A few game scores were lost but that is the exception.

2. Normal games almost always, and annotating them, Rapid games usually, but with far less effort in analysis and annotations, Blitz never and I don't merge them from the scattered PGN files. Around 1200 OTB games and 700 rapid. But I did not annotate games before I got a chess database, so many of the games from when I was younger are not annotated.

3. See above.

4. I use them both to prepare against a specific opponent as well as for identifying particular phases or openings where I have shown weaknesses and need to study (either that particular game, the opening, the strategy, the technique I used or didn't use etc.)

5. I never thought of identifying my best game, so I would be hard pressed. But if you talk about the 30 best games, it would be different, I could produce my 30 best games.

Saragossa
19-01-2009, 02:04 PM
This year I decided that I would start a portfolio of my games (only the ones I lose and draw) and study them over and over. And the ones I win just keep somewhere perhaps look once over for improvements or tactical ideas either player missed.

MichaelBaron
19-01-2009, 03:57 PM
This year I decided that I would start a portfolio of my games (only the ones I lose and draw) and study them over and over. And the ones I win just keep somewhere perhaps look once over for improvements or tactical ideas either player missed.

Thats good..but focus not so much on tactical ideas (this can be done by Fritz) but on understanding positional plans and patterns.

Saragossa
19-01-2009, 05:53 PM
Thanks Michael lately I've been working on my positional chess, reading the ameteurs mind, reasses your chess, winning chess strategies and going over Petrosian and capa games but I find that I have very little competition inbetween tournaments so I can't measure improvement or work specifically on my weaknesses.

Davidflude
19-01-2009, 08:35 PM
I have a collection of many of my junior games - as well as some of my visits to adult tournaments - but some scoresheets have been lost. In some cases entire sets of tournament scoresheets have been lost.

Since returning to chess, however, I have been concentrating more on being involved in making use of collecting my games.

Usually the first thing I do when I get home is to show my mum whatever game(s) I played that day. I try to explain the key moments and ideas in the game in a way which she can understand. Mum plays on Yahoo! and usually has a rating of 1350-1450. (Sometimes drops into the 1200s, has hit as high as 1600.) While doing this I usually remember a lot of details which come in useful for the next step.

Then I enter the game(s) into my database, including all lines which I recall having considered during the game; and any thoughts, evaluations, or any other comment which may be interesting or useful to view later.

So far all good stuff. It is useful at this stage to look at the opening using your database program and books. You are checking that you played a good line, did not make any mistakes and punished any opposition errors. Also you should ask yourself. "Am I happy playing the sort of middle game that arose or should I have played a different variation."


After this I explore the game with Rybka. I direct it into lines which I want evaluated, and I follow it into lines I had not considered. I add these to the annotations with relevant comments of which are my ideas, which are Rybka's, and save the final product into my database.

This is good stuff. I suggest that you let rybka loose on infinite analysis in crucial positions. you will be amazed how often the evaluation changes as the program analyzes more deeply.


Often I still get the computer to do a full analysis of the game at 120s/move using an opening reference.

I have been biased with sometimes putting a lot more time into analyzing my strong or interesting wins. This is less useful than spending that time on losses in which one demonstrates a misunderstanding of the position.


This is a real temptation. In my opinion you will gain a great deal analyzing your losses especially looking for better defences.


June 2008-April 2009 is a study period for me. I am in preparation and do not have any (new) games of my own to analyse except the occasional online blitz game or street chess. I do all of the above analysis and filing of the street chess games in which my opponents offer reasonable resistance. I get Rybka to do shallow analysis of most online blitz games; and more deeply in mutually stronger games, or games with some kind of instructive element.

I find it very interesting to explore old games of mine. For many of the otb games I can recall clear details of how I was feeling during the game, the atmosphere, the posture and level of projected confidence shown by me and my opponent. For many of the later junior games I can recall using psychological tactics due to obvious lack of confidence, or nervous traits, shown by my opponent. These games are just kept as scoresheets so it is interesting that I can recall these things. In general the memories of time spent with my chess opponents are more clear than that of people I went to school with for several years.

If you are not playing much serious chess then there are several things that will cause rapid improvement. Set aside time to study endings, defence and middle games. Also play through games by really good players. Curiously I do not think that you will learn much from playing through Fischer or Capablanca games. They are just too classy. However playing through Bent Larssen, Petrosian or Emmanuel Lasker games has got to help.

MichaelBaron
20-01-2009, 01:46 PM
Thanks Michael lately I've been working on my positional chess, reading the ameteurs mind, reasses your chess, winning chess strategies and going over Petrosian and capa games but I find that I have very little competition inbetween tournaments so I can't measure improvement or work specifically on my weaknesses.

If you can afford coaching....there is a simple solution to this problem :).

If not, I suggest you do the following: a) compare you games played half-year ago with the ones played now..and try to spot the differences in: playing style, opening play, end game play, range of middle-game patterns used.

Saragossa
20-01-2009, 02:35 PM
If you can afford coaching....there is a simple solution to this problem :).

If not, I suggest you do the following: a) compare you games played half-year ago with the ones played now..and try to spot the differences in: playing style, opening play, end game play, range of middle-game patterns used.

I can afford coaching but live a little far away from any coaches and coaching seems void if it is attended infrequently. Just sticking to a large amount of books atm.

MichaelBaron
20-01-2009, 02:51 PM
I can afford coaching but live a little far away from any coaches and coaching seems void if it is attended infrequently. Just sticking to a large amount of books atm.

Well internet coaching is always an option :).

As for books, if you tell my what your current level of play is i may be able to give you some specific advice

chesstash
20-01-2009, 08:38 PM
JUst GO ON THe INternet ANd TRain:D

Sheroff
24-03-2009, 09:18 AM
1. No, unfortunately, once I've had a brief look at the game, I tend to chuck them out. Lazy and slack, I know.

2.I analyse losses to work out where I went wrong, and wins if there is something to learn there too. Otherwise, no.

3.No, rarely if ever.

4.Nope.

5.I do have four of five best games that I'm happy with. From a pure result standpoint, it's hard to go past my win over GM Rogers at the 1994 Noosa Open, but that wasn't a great game from a quality point of view, as he was thrashing me for most of the game, then made an interesting exchange sac, which may or may not have been correct, I defended well, then he played two bad moves at the end and lost to an exchange sac of my own. Basically I fluked a win that I didn't really deserve. I played a nice game against Sarfati in the 1998 Queensland Championships, but it wasn't in my top ten or anything. For the rest of the answer to this question you'll just need to check out my upcoming book Australian Chess Brilliancies, in which I may (or may not!) have some of my own chess efforts included.

I did play a brilliancy once that I no longer have the score to, that GM Larry Christiansen thought sufficiently entertaining that he included it in his regular chess column in the States (this is going back 15 years or more). Wish I could recall that one....

Cheers, Kevin Casey

MichaelBaron
24-03-2009, 04:33 PM
I did play a brilliancy once that I no longer have the score to, that GM Larry Christiansen thought sufficiently entertaining that he included it in his regular chess column in the States (this is going back 15 years or more). Wish I could recall that one....

Cheers, Kevin Casey

It must be still available somewhere in the paper archives

eclectic
24-03-2009, 05:01 PM
I did play a brilliancy once that I no longer have the score to, that GM Larry Christiansen thought sufficiently entertaining that he included it in his regular chess column in the States (this is going back 15 years or more). Wish I could recall that one....

Cheers, Kevin Casey

perhaps you could contact him for example via ICC

Kevin Bonham
03-10-2009, 11:28 PM
After almost nine years I have reached an amusing milestone in my game annotation project: for the first time, more than half my recorded games are included in it (I have just annotated game 490 of what I believe to be now 973).

This doesn't mean I'm halfway finished, of course. In fact, my rate of progress over the last nine years suggests I will never catch up, since when I started in January 2000 I had 465 as-yet unincluded games and now I have 483!

However I have been going faster since I got Fritz 11, and also once I get up to games played in about 2005 onwards I will have a lot of them already saved because of notes I did for this forum.