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Trent Parker
08-07-2005, 11:59 AM
I have been studying the Benko gambit. I have had this book for a while but when i first had a look at it i didn't understand positions as i do now.

One question i have though. In this line

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6 5.bxa6 g6 6.Nc3
which in this book is considered main line accepted... Why g6 straight away? wouldn't that allow e3 to be played? Thus enableing white to castle normally? Or would that make the advanced d pawn too weak?

Garvinator
08-07-2005, 03:00 PM
Yes it does allow e3, but black 'wants' white to play e3. Normally in these positions, which are similar to the benoni, white wants to advance e2-e4 in one move, not two. Therefore black allows e3. Basically, white has got more 'useful' moves than e3. The e3 knight also helps to support the d5 pawn.

After 5. ... g6, white gets on with development with Nc3. Nc3 helps with getting in e4 in one go.

Kerry Stead
08-07-2005, 08:14 PM
I have been studying the Benko gambit. I have had this book for a while but when i first had a look at it i didn't understand positions as i do now.

One question i have though. In this line ... <snip> ... which in this book is considered main line accepted... Why g6 straight away? wouldn't that allow e3 to be played? Thus enableing white to castle normally? Or would that make the advanced d pawn too weak?
Trent, its a move order finesse. White can always castle in the Benko if he wants to - its normally done by playing g3 & Bg2, delaying the moving of the e pawn until the early middlegame. The idea is that once white has taken the on a6, the dark squared bishop wants to be on the h8-a1 diagonal, but if white plays a g3/Bg2 line, the white squared bishop could be more useful on the c8-h3 diagonal, so black may recapture on a6 with the b8 knight.
Either way, the pawn sacrifice gives black the standard Benko play, with the rooks aiming down the a & b files, the bishop on the h8-a1 diagonal & the knights ready to find some good squares ...
The d pawn usually isn't the main concern for black ... rather its the e pawn. If white plays e3, then its hardly going to be a problem as soon as it would ordinarily be.

Hope the Benko serves you well!

Trent Parker
08-07-2005, 11:58 PM
Thanks Garvin and Kerry.

Hey BTW what is the best plan if white plays 2.dc in the benoni?

Garvinator
09-07-2005, 12:33 AM
Thanks Garvin and Kerry.

Hey BTW what is the best plan if white plays 2.dc in the benoni?
do you mean after 1. d4 c5 2. dxc5 ? If so then a benoni isnt really possible. Benko and benoni plans are rather similiar in some aspects, especially as white advances the d pawn to d5. Most of the time, black will not play c5 on move one after d4 because of this option of exchanging dxc5.

Black will normally choose Nf6, e6, c5 usually with Nf6 first. therefore, 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 (or c5), 3. Nf3 or Nc3 then c5 (or e6) is not an unusual line.

Trent Parker
09-07-2005, 09:16 AM
Ok gray i meant 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.dc as if i was going for a Benko.

Kerry Stead
09-07-2005, 06:10 PM
Ok gray i meant 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.dc as if i was going for a Benko.
The conventional wisdom is that you just play 3...e6 and Bxc5 in the near future, and have equality ... then you just play chess from an equal position, which theoretically is what black is trying to achieve from the opening.

Bereaved
10-07-2005, 12:03 AM
TCN

As far as the line 1.d4 c5 2.dxc5 e6 3.b4? a5 4.c3? axb4 5.cxb4?? Qf6 winning a piece is very similiar to the trap in the Queen's gambit when black tries to hang on to the pawn.

I seem to recall that the line 1.d4 c5 2.dxc5 e6 3.Nc3 was popular at some point, with the sequel of 3...Bxc5 being 4.Ne4 with an attempt to achieve the two bishops quite early owing to ideas involving Nd6+. I think that a German master called Stefan Bucker did quite a lot of work on structures of this type and early deviations for both sides in Benoni's; perhaps have a look online??

Also aside from after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.dxc5 e6, I also think that moves such as 3...Na6 are quite reasonable, as should white take silly measures to hold on to the pawn, then a later ...e6 and/or Qa5(+) should easily recover the pawn, in this case with a better position.

On a final note after 1.d4 c5 2.dxc5 e6 3.Nc3 Bxc5 4.Ne4, I have seen Melbourne's FM Michael Baron play simply 4...d5 and after 5.Nxc5 Qa5+ he recovered the piece and had good control of the centre at the cost of 2 bishops, i think this is reasonable, but it is my own opinion, of which I do not neccessarily expect you to agree,

take care, all the best, and God Bless, Malcolm

Davidflude
09-08-2005, 12:57 AM
Yes Stefan Bucker does analyse various unusual lines for white against
1. d4 c5 in his book "The Vulture". I have a set of Kassiber magazines. Stefan is a superb analyst.

forketta
29-09-2005, 09:32 AM
<the chess nut>

The reason for Black to delay capturing on a6 is to avoid an ideal White's set-up in the double fianchetto variation with b3, Bb2, Nd2, g3 etc...which thing enable Black to meet an early b3 with Nxa6 instead Bxa6, having the b4 square for the N. After White has declared himself with Nc3 Black usually go for Bxa6.
:cool:

Carl Gorka
29-09-2005, 04:17 PM
Yes Stefan Bucker does analyse various unusual lines for white against
1. d4 c5 in his book "The Vulture". I have a set of Kassiber magazines. Stefan is a superb analyst.

Checkout Chesscafe.com. He's got an article there now, dealing with these lines :)

Frank Walker
01-10-2005, 11:52 AM
Whenever i play d4 c5 the other player just goes d5 (i dont know much about chess)

Bereaved
14-10-2005, 05:34 AM
Hello Everyone,

Here are two examples of the capture dxc5 in Benoni type openings



1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.dxc5 Na6 4.Nc3 Nxc5 5.b4 Nce4 6.Nxe4 Nxe4 7.Bb2 Qb6 8.Qd4 Qxd4 9.Nxd4 e5 10.Nb5 Bxb4+ 11.c3 Ba5 12.f3 a6 13.fxe4 axb5 14.e3 b4 15.cxb4 Bxb4+ 16.Kf2 d6 17.a3 Bc5 18.Bc4 Bd7 19.Bd5 Ra7 20.Rhc1 f6 21.h3 Ke7 22.g4 h5 23.gxh5 Rxh5 24.Rg1 g5 0-1

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 c5 4.dxc5 Na6 5.Nc3 Nxc5 6.g3 Bg7 7.Bg2 O-O 8.O-O d6 9.Nd2 Rb8 10.Qc2 a6 11.b3 Bf5 12.Qd1 Nfe4 13.Ndxe4 Nxe4 14.Bxe4 Bxc3 15.Bxf5 Bxa1 16.Be4 Bg7 17.Qc2 Qc7 18.Rd1 b5 19.Bd3 Rbc8 20.e4 a5 21.Bb2 Bxb2 22.Qxb2 b4 23.a4 Rfd8 24.Be2 Qb6 25.Kf1 Rc5 26.f4 h5 27.Bf3 Rcc8 28.Rd5 Qe3 29.Qg2 Rc5 30.Rxc5 dxc5 0-1

Take care and God Bless, Macavity