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Kevin Bonham
03-01-2004, 11:01 PM
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 O-O 9. O-O Nc6 10. Be3 Bg4 11. f3 Na5 12. Bd3 cxd4 13. cxd4 Be6 14. d5 Bxa1 15. Qxa1 f6 16. Nd4 Bd7 17. Bh6 Re8 18. e5 fxe5 19. Ne6 Qb6+ 20. Kh1 Qd6 21.Re1 Rac8 22. Rxe5 Qa3 23. Bxg6 Qc3 24. Qxc3 Rxc3 25. Bh5 Kh8 26. Bxe8 Bxe8 27.Rf5 1-0

Very interesting practical exchange sac for attack with 14.d5, and eventually White's attack crashed through. My question: at what point (if any) could Black have got out of this with an OK position?

23...hxg6 is losing after 24.Qb1.

Black had 21...Bxe6 but 22.Rxe5 Bxd5 23.Re6 wins Q leaves White with Q for 2R but nice bishops and exposed Black king hence very strong.

Or 21...Rec8 (at least it doesn't get taken in this line) 22.Rxe5 Qa3 23.Re4 Qc3 24.Qb1! with a great attack.

Maybe 18...fxe5 ? Doesn't look very convincing at all but I can't find an advantage for White there ... yet. Anyone with a bigger and fatter computer (or who is actually really good at tactics!) want to have a go at this one?

Sutek
04-01-2004, 10:39 AM
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 O-O 9. O-O Nc6 10. Be3 Bg4 11. f3 Na5 12. Bd3 cxd4 13. cxd4 Be6 14. d5 Bxa1 15. Qxa1 f6 16. Nd4 Bd7 17. Bh6 Re8 18. e5 fxe5 19. Ne6 Qb6+ 20. Kh1 Qd6 21.Re1 Rac8 22. Rxe5 Qa3 23. Bxg6 Qc3 24. Qxc3 Rxc3 25. Bh5 Kh8 26. Bxe8 Bxe8 27.Rf5 1-0

Very interesting practical exchange sac for attack with 14.d5, and eventually White's attack crashed through. My question: at what point (if any) could Black have got out of this with an OK position?

23...hxg6 is losing after 24.Qb1.

Black had 21...Bxe6 but 22.Rxe5 Bxd5 23.Re6 wins Q leaves White with Q for 2R but nice bishops and exposed Black king hence very strong.

Or 21...Rec8 (at least it doesn't get taken in this line) 22.Rxe5 Qa3 23.Re4 Qc3 24.Qb1! with a great attack.

Maybe 18...fxe5 ? Doesn't look very convincing at all but I can't find an advantage for White there ... yet. Anyone with a bigger and fatter computer (or who is actually really good at tactics!) want to have a go at this one?

18...Rc8!? is recommended by theory to the best of my knowledge.

2rqr1k1/pp1bp2p/5ppB/n2PP3/3N4/3B1P2/P5PP/Q4RK1 w - - 0 19

After 18...fxe5 I think black is in serious trouble and may already be at the point of no return?

atomikrej
14-01-2004, 04:59 PM
I've analysed the position after 21.Re1 and it seems that there is a definite advantage for white in every line and I think Black is close to lost.

After 21...Bxe6, 22.Rxe5 Bxd5 23.Re6 Kf7 (only move) 24.Rxd6 exd6 25.Qg7+ Ke6 26.Qxh7 black has two main possibilites:
1) 26...Re7 27.Qxg6 Kd7 28.Qf5+ Kc6 29.Bb5+! Kc5 is winning for white.
2) 26...Nc6! 27.Bf4 Ne5 28.Bxe5 dxe5 29.Qxg6 Ke7 is less clear but should be winning for White. Fritz says White's advantage is around 0.8.

The other main try is 21...Rec8. The difference between 21...Rac8 and 21...Rec8 is with 21...Rec8 in some lines the g6 pawn can be defended with Be8. Therefore 21...Rac8 as played in the game is weaker and lost to 23.Bxg6.

After 21...Rec8 22.Rxe5 Qa3 23.Bxg6 doesn't work because of 23...hxg6 24.Qb1 Be8. So White has to play 23.Re2 Qc3 24.Qb1 (threatening 25.Bxg6).
Black has a few defensive tries. The two best ones are:
1) 24...Bxe6 25.Rxe6 Nc4 26.Bxg6! Kh8 27.Bf5 with an overwhelming position for white.
2) 24...Qf6 25.Bg5 Qf7 and now white can win with the beautiful 26.Nc7!! Rxc7 27.Rxe7. Black is forced to give up the queen with 27...Bxe6 and although Black has 2 rooks for a queen and pawn White has a murderous attack and should win the game quickly.

18...Rc8 was played only once in my database in the game Grigorian - Beliavsky 1975. The game ended in a draw. Black was slightly on top after 19.Rb1 Qc7 20.e6 Ba4 21.Rb4 Qc3 22.Qxc3 Rxc3 23.Bf1, though White had some compensation.
I think 18...Rc8 may lead to a slight advantage for Black. If White's attack fails he is an exchange down.

Tomek

bobby1972
15-01-2004, 09:19 AM
that was fantastic this is what the bb shoul be like with chess content,not politics and crap,very interesting analysys everyone its amzing whats book today, when i looked at this game i was very impressed.

DoroPhil
15-01-2004, 10:15 PM
very interesting analysys everyone its amzing whats book today, when i looked at this game i was very impressed.

amazing indeed. under2200 player have analysis almost up to move 30 !! is this normal ??

Kevin Bonham
16-01-2004, 01:38 AM
Thanks very much for the comments Tomek and Sutek. Great to get comments from the winner of the game especially!

I didn't know 18...Rc8 was theory but I can see why - must have missed something when I was looking at this after the game because 19.Qb1 threatening Bxg6 doesn't work if Black plays ...Kh8 setting up a defence based around ...Rg8, ...Qe8, ...Qg6 if necessary. Intermediate moves all seem too slow because Black gets counterplay in the centre.

Sutek
17-01-2004, 09:05 AM
Thanks very much for the comments Tomek and Sutek. Great to get comments from the winner of the game especially!

I didn't know 18...Rc8 was theory but I can see why - must have missed something when I was looking at this after the game because 19.Qb1 threatening Bxg6 doesn't work if Black plays ...Kh8 setting up a defence based around ...Rg8, ...Qe8, ...Qg6 if necessary. Intermediate moves all seem too slow because Black gets counterplay in the centre.

Hi Kevin,

I searched my database from the critical position of 18.e5 and found the below games.

Tomek probably has these games in his database but thought they may be of interest to others who don't have access to large game collections.

Regards
Steve


Grigorian,Karen Ashotovich (2520) - Beliavsky,Alexander G (2500) [D89]
Vilnius zt Vilnius (11), 1975
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 Nc6 9.Be3 00 10.00 cxd4 11.cxd4 Bg4 12.f3 Na5 13.Bd3 Be6 14.d5 Bxa1 15.Qxa1 f6 16.Bh6 Re8 17.Nd4 Bd7 18.e5 Rc8 19.Rb1 Qc7 20.e6 Ba4 21.Rb4 Qc3 22.Qxc3 Rxc3 23.Bf1 Ra3 24.Nb5 Bxb5 25.Bxb5 Rd8 26.Rd4 Nc6 27.Rd2 g5 28.h4 Ra5 29.Bc4 Ra4 30.Bb3 Rd4 31.hxg5 f5 32.Rc2 Na5 33.Rc7 Re8 34.Rd7 Nxb3 35.axb3 a5 36.Rxb7 Rxd5 37.Ra7 f4 38.Kh2 Re5 39.Ra6 Re3 40.Kh3 Rxb3 41.Rxa5

Christiansen,Larry Mark (2575) - Rao,Vivek (2355) [D89]
World op Philadelphia, 1988
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 00 8.Ne2 c5 9.00 Nc6 10.Be3 Bg4 11.f3 Na5 12.Bd3 cxd4 13.cxd4 Be6 14.d5 Bxa1 15.Qxa1 f6 16.Bh6 Re8 17.Nd4 Bd7 18.e5 fxe5 19.Ne6 Qb6+ 20.Rf2 Qd6 21.Re2 Kf7 22.Ng5+ Kg8 23.Rxe5 Qf6 24.Ne4 Qh8 25.Bd2 b6 26.Bc3 Qg7 27.d6 Qf7 28.dxe7 Nc6 29.Nf6+ Qxf6 30.Bc4+ Qf7 31.Bxf7+ Kxf7 32.Re4 Rxe7 33.Qd1 Be6 34.Qd6 10

Cabrera,Gabriel (2240) - Romano,Rogelio [D89]
Havana-A Havana, 1992
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 Nc6 9.Be3 00 10.00 cxd4 11.cxd4 Bg4 12.f3 Na5 13.Bd3 Be6 14.d5 Bxa1 15.Qxa1 f6 16.Bh6 Re8 17.Nd4 Bd7 18.e5 fxe5 19.Ne6 Qb6+ 20.Kh1 Qd6 21.Bf4 Qxd5 22.Bxe5 Qxe6 23.Re1 Qf7 24.Re4 Bf5 25.Rf4 Bxd3 26.Rxf7 Kxf7 27.Qd4 Nc6 28.Qxd3 Nxe5 29.Qd5+ Kf6 30.g4 Nc6 31.Qb5 Rab8 32.Kg2 a6 33.Qb2+ Ke6 34.Qg7 Rh8 35.f4 Kd7 36.Kg3 Rbe8 37.h4 Kc8 38.h5 gxh5 39.g5 Reg8 40.Qh6 Kb8 41.Qxh5 h6 42.g6 e6 43.Qg4 Ne7 44.Qe2 Rxg6+ 45.Kf3 Ka8 46.Qe5 Rhg8 47.Ke4 Nc6 48.Qh5 Rf6 49.Qh4 Rgf8 50.Ke3 Rxf4 51.Qxh6 Rf3+ 52.Ke2 e5 53.Qh7 R3f7 54.Qg6 Rf2+ 55.Ke3 Rxa2 56.Qg7 Rd8 57.Ke4 Ra4+ 58.Kf5 e4 59.Qg1 01

Norri,Joose (2405) - Clavijo,Jorge Mario (2325) [D89]
WchT U26 Paranana, 1993
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 Nc6 9.Be3 00 10.00 Bg4 11.f3 Na5 12.Bd3 cxd4 13.cxd4 Be6 14.d5 Bxa1 15.Qxa1 f6 16.Bh6 Re8 17.Nd4 Bd7 18.e5 fxe5 19.Ne6 Qb6+ 20.Kh1 Qd6 21.Re1 Rac8 22.Rxe5 Qb4 23.Bb5 Bxb5 24.Re3 Rc1+ 25.Qxc1 Qc4 26.Qa1 Qf1+ 27.Qxf1 Bxf1 28.Nc7 Rd8 29.Rxe7 Bc4 30.Ne8 Rxe8 31.Rxe8+ Kf7 32.Re1 b5 33.d6 Be6 34.Re5 a6 35.Rc5 Bd7 36.Rc7 Ke6 37.Ra7 Kxd6 38.Rxa6+ Nc6 39.Bf8+ Kc7 40.Bc5 Be6 41.a3 h5 42.Kg1 Bc4 43.Ra8 Kd7 44.Kf2 Ne5 45.Bb4 Ke6 46.Bc3 Nc6 47.Rf8 Bd3 48.Ke3 Bc2 49.Bb4 Bb1 50.Kf4 Kd5 51.Rc8 Bd3 52.Kg5 Bf5 53.Rc7 Bb1 54.Bf8 Bc2 55.Rd7+ Kc4 56.Rg7 Nd4 57.Rxg6 Bxg6 58.Kxg6 h4 59.f4 Ne6 60.Bh6 Kd5 61.f5 Nd8 62.Bg5 10

Delva,Jean - Struss,John [D89]
APCT, Kt corr, 1980
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 c5 7.Bc4 Bg7 8.Ne2 00 9.00 cxd4 10.cxd4 Nc6 11.Be3 Bg4 12.f3 Na5 13.Bd3 Be6 14.d5 Bxa1 15.Qxa1 f6 16.Nd4 Bd7 17.Bh6 Re8 18.e5 e6 19.d6 fxe5 20.Qe1 Qf6 21.Nc2 Nc6 22.Ne3 Rac8 23.Ng4 Qh8 24.Bg5 Rf8 25.Qh4 Kf7 26.Bf6 10