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Desmond
17-04-2020, 07:56 PM
https://www.magnuscarlsen.com/en/invitational

The Magnus Carlsen Invitational sees 8 of the world's best players compete online on the chess24 Playzone for a $250,000 prize fund, with $70,000 for 1st place. It begins with a single round-robin from April 18-30, with the top scoring players qualifying for the Final Four knockout. Each match consists of four 15+10 rapid games, with the winner earning 3 match points. If the players tie 2:2 a single Armageddon game is played, where White has 5 minutes to Black's 4, but a draw sees Black win the match. An Armageddon winner gets 2 points, the loser 1. No draws offers are allowed before move 40.


Magnus Carlsen
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave
Alireza Firouzja
Ian Nepomniachtchi
Anish Giri
Ding Liren
Fabiano Caruana
Hikaru Nakamura

MichaelBaron
19-04-2020, 05:43 PM
A little ''incident'' in the final Naka-Magnus game :).

Desmond
19-04-2020, 07:32 PM
Yes, apparently Naka was contacted by one of the arbiters in the armageddon game and was interrupted. The clocks on the public broadcast were showing the time incorrectly, but apparently the clocks for the players themselves were correct. The game was pretty much decided when it happened, otherwise presumably a replay would have been in the offing. Maybe Naka could have pushed for one anyway if he had wanted to.

Very interesting matches, all 5 of the Carlsen-Naka games were decisive, while a single win for Liren was enough to secure full points.

Liren - Alireza 2.5-1.5
Carlsen - Naka 3-2

Very nice save by Alireza after his queen got trapped early.

1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nd7 3.d4 Nb6 4.Bg2 Bf5 5.O-O e6 6.Nbd2 c6 7.c4 dxc4 8.e4 Bg6 9.Qe2 Nf6 10.Rd1 Bb4 11.Ne5 c3 12.bxc3 Bxc3 13.Rb1 O-O 14.Nb3 Qe7 15.Bg5 Qa3 16.Rd3 Na4 17.h4 c5 18.Bxf6 gxf6 19.Nc4 Qb4 20.Nbd2 Bxd2 21.Rxb4 Bxb4 22.h5 b5 23.hxg6 bxc4 24.gxh7+ Kh8 25.Rf3 c3 26.a3 cxd4 27.axb4 Rac8 28.Qc2 Nb2 29.Bf1 Rfd8 30.Bd3 e5 31.g4 Kxh7 32.Kf1 Nxd3 33.Rxd3 Rc4 34.Qc1 Kg7 35.g5 f5 36.g6 fxe4 37.gxf7 exd3 38.Qg5+ Kxf7 39.Qf5+ Ke7 40.Qxe5+ Kf7 41.Qf5+ Ke7 42.Qe5+ Kf7 1/2-1/2

Caruana - Nepo and MVL - Giri tonight.

Capablanca-Fan
20-04-2020, 12:54 PM
Thanks for that ↑↑

Games and results here (https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/magnus-carlsen-invitational-2020).

Desmond
20-04-2020, 01:56 PM
Yes, apparently Naka was contacted by one of the arbiters in the armageddon game and was interrupted. The clocks on the public broadcast were showing the time incorrectly, but apparently the clocks for the players themselves were correct. The game was pretty much decided when it happened, otherwise presumably a replay would have been in the offing. Maybe Naka could have pushed for one anyway if he had wanted to.
Just watching the commentary replay (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBYzSIB4w9w) and Magnus confirmed he was also contacted during the game, but he just ignored it.

Desmond
21-04-2020, 08:33 AM
Carlsen won his match with Alireza 2.5-1.5 with 3 decisive games. Looks like the game he lost he had a strong position after an enterprising exchange sac, but blundered into a mating attack.
Naka beat Giri with a single win.

Desmond
22-04-2020, 08:40 PM
Some amazing games overnight.

In the first round both games were exciting sacs. Nepo saced a piece for what seemed an enduring attack against MVL, though MVL hung on to make the piece count in the end.
Nepo then went on to wheel out the Winawer again, in a game that was kind of interesting in that at one point he had his Queen safely tucked away on g8 and his King on d7 with more space around him than a Bondi bodysurfer! MVL seemed close to winning but had to settle for a draw in the end.

1n4q1/3k1pp1/p3p2p/PnQpP2P/2pP1N2/2P2P2/6P1/2B3K1 w - - 0 33

Game 3 and it was Nepo with white who missed his winning chance and ended up with a draw, missing the precise

52.h4+ Kxh4 53.Bf6+ Qxf6 54.Qxd7 Qe7 55.Qf5 Qe5 56.Rxd6 Qxf5 57.gxf5

Nepo struck back in game 4 though, to win on demand with Black and force the armageddon game. In which Nepo had black again and won in just 20 moves!

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nf3 Nxe4 5.d3 Nf6 6.d4 d5 7.Bd3 Bd6 8.Qe2+ Be6 9.Ng5 Qe7 10.Nxe6 fxe6 11.c3 O-O 12.f4 c5 13.O-O Nc6 14.Be3 Rae8 15.Nd2 e5! 16.dxe5 Nxe5 17.Bb5 Neg4 18.Bxe8 Rxe8 19.Rf3 Nxe3 20.Re1 Nf5 0-1


As mentioned Ding - Caruana also had an exciting sac in game 1, though ended peacefully. Game 2 also drawn. Game 3 saw some fireworks in which Caruana's Queen got stuck and he got some wood and some tricks, but ultimately not enough

24.f5 gxf5 (24...Nxf5!) 25.Rf4 d4 26.Nb1 Qxf4 27.Qxf4 Ng6 28.Qd2 Nxe5 29.Ra3 Bb5 30.Rxa7 Ng4 31.Na3 Bxe2 32.h3 d3 33.hxg4 hxg4 (and white won in 44 moves)

With Caruana needing to win with white, did so probably against the run of play

49...Rc3+ (49...Rf6 50.Rg1+ Bg5 picking up the rook) 50.Ke4 Bg5 51.Rg1 Kh6 52.Rxf4 Bxf4 53.Kxf4 and white won in 64 moves

Then it was to armageddon and Caruana with Black sacced the a-pawn for queenside pressure. Ultimately breaking thru with

36.Qb2 ? 36...Rxa2 0-1


Because of the scoring (3 points for winning in rapid phase, 2 for winning in armageddon phase, 1 for losing in armageddon phase) the standings are:

1-2 Carlsen, Caruana 5
3-5 MVL, Naka, Ding 4
6 Nepo 2
7-8 Giri Alireza 0

Matches tonight
Caruana - Carlsen
Alireza - Naka

Should be great :D

Capablanca-Fan
23-04-2020, 12:28 PM
Matches tonight
Caruana - Carlsen
Alireza - Naka

Should be great :D
Yes, 1–3 and ½–3½. Ali agreed a draw in the first game in a winning position, lost the second fairly, lost the third after having a winning position for much of the game with a giant protected passed P on d6, then lost the fourth in only 15 moves.

Desmond
23-04-2020, 01:37 PM
Yes, 1–3 and ½–3½. Ali agreed a draw in the first game in a winning position,

Seems like he timed out, disconnected and game was declared drawn. They were meant to resume but I guess Naka was not keen on that.

Desmond
23-04-2020, 08:35 PM
Yes, 1–3 and ½–3½. Ali agreed a draw in the first game in a winning position, lost the second fairly, lost the third after having a winning position for much of the game with a giant protected passed P on d6, then lost the fourth in only 15 moves.

Yes having watched the rest of it now, this was really uncharacteristic from Alireza. Not sure what was happening behind the scenes after the first game disconnection/timeout, but whatever it was it took a long time. The tournament is timed such that the games in each round of the 2 concurrent matches are starting at the same time, I believe due to the Norwegian TV agreements. However game 2 in Caruana-Carlsen was started and finished before the result was even official on G1 for Naka-Alireza. Game 3 even started before game 2 on the other board. Presumably some arguments/appeals were going on, for perhaps an hour. According to Nepo, who was commentating, the rules were that in the case of disconnection the game would be resumed as though it had been adjourned. Not sure why that didn't happen, presumably Naka didn't want to continue in that position for obvious reasons.

Maybe it's down to experience for the younger player, but I can only imagine it's pretty tough to continue in the match when but for a disconnection you'd be a point up. Game 2 yes he lost fairly but perhaps relaxed the tension unnecessarily on move 17 when he could be fighting for an advantage. Game 3 hard to see him failing to win that many times out of 10, let alone getting into a tough position and then throwing away any drawing chances. Game 4, well that's just utter dispondency.

Shame because he's all but out of contention now. Maybe not mathematically, if we can win the last 4 matches I'm sure he's likely to advance, but seems tough.

Capablanca-Fan
24-04-2020, 09:41 AM
Ding–MVL were all draws in the main games, then Ding won the playoff game in only 16 moves.

Nepo beat Giri, winning game 2 and drawing the rest. That win was fortunate; Giri took his eyes off the passed a-P in an equal position.

Desmond
24-04-2020, 03:11 PM
Ding–MVL were all draws in the main games, then Ding won the playoff game in only 16 moves.Incredible game from MVL there. Maybe pre-move blunder?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uysqDMRhZc8

Desmond
24-04-2020, 07:50 PM
Yes having watched the rest of it now, this was really uncharacteristic from Alireza. Not sure what was happening behind the scenes after the first game disconnection/timeout, but whatever it was it took a long time. The tournament is timed such that the games in each round of the 2 concurrent matches are starting at the same time, I believe due to the Norwegian TV agreements. However game 2 in Caruana-Carlsen was started and finished before the result was even official on G1 for Naka-Alireza. Game 3 even started before game 2 on the other board. Presumably some arguments/appeals were going on, for perhaps an hour. According to Nepo, who was commentating, the rules were that in the case of disconnection the game would be resumed as though it had been adjourned. Not sure why that didn't happen, presumably Naka didn't want to continue in that position for obvious reasons.

Maybe it's down to experience for the younger player, but I can only imagine it's pretty tough to continue in the match when but for a disconnection you'd be a point up. Game 2 yes he lost fairly but perhaps relaxed the tension unnecessarily on move 17 when he could be fighting for an advantage. Game 3 hard to see him failing to win that many times out of 10, let alone getting into a tough position and then throwing away any drawing chances. Game 4, well that's just utter dispondency.

Shame because he's all but out of contention now. Maybe not mathematically, if we can win the last 4 matches I'm sure he's likely to advance, but seems tough.

Explanation from Naka's point of view here from around 15 min mark:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rUPhYxT0fLM

Capablanca-Fan
25-04-2020, 05:21 AM
Thanks for keeping us informed ↑↑

Meanwhile:

Carlsen–MVL +1=3. Even in Game 4, where Carlsen needed only a draw as Black, he pressed hard, but MVL was able to save R v R+2P by achieving the Vančura position. The basic position is R v R + RP, where the defending R attacks the P along the third rank. An extra RP on the opposite side is often not enough to win. Aronian also once saved a draw against Carlsen with that position (https://en.chessbase.com/post/karsten-mueller-understanding-the-vancura-draw), and in this case, three Ps down, where Carlsen had two doubled RPs on the opposite side. In both cases, the engines were clueless as were many of the spectators.

Caruana–Firouzja 3–1. Firouzja needed to win the last game with Black, and looked on track for that. He had an extra P and good position with fairly reduced material. But he erred in allowing a deadly pin of his B against his R, and he just couldn't avoid losing a piece.

Carlsen looks on track to win. Depending on R8, Nakamura could catch him, and he is probably second only to Carlsen in speed chess. Firouzja is second-last only to Giri, a shocker considering his win in the recent fast chess, with a narrow win against Carlsen in the final match.

Desmond
25-04-2020, 07:07 PM
Yes Carlsen is certainly in a commanding position. Just bear in mind this is just the first stage, with the top 4 advancing to semi-final and final phases.

Alireza very nearly pulled off a massive comeback from 2-0 down in a 4-game match. Certainly the first game he had no business in losing, and also the last as you outlined. I think in a year or two he will not be letting some of the top tier players off the hook in these games.

It's hilarious watching Carlsen, he such a chess troll. Playing nonsense like the Alekhine's Defence, and then this (Game 1 v MVL):

1. e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Bc4? e6 and MVL doesn't take him on.

Capablanca-Fan
26-04-2020, 06:57 AM
Yes, a lot of bluff. MVL could have called it, but even with the game moves, Carlsen had to retreat.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Bc4? e6
(5...Nxe4 6.Bxf7+ Kxf7 7.Qh5+ g6 8.Qd5+ Kg7 9.Qxe4 e5 10.Ne2 Nc6 11.Nbc3 =/+) 6.O-O Be7 7.Bd3

Capablanca-Fan
26-04-2020, 07:45 AM
Meanwhile:

Naka–Nepo +1=3, with Naka winning the first game and drawing the rest.

Giri–Ding +1-1=3. Both wins were scored with Black, and Ding was winning the fifth game with Black right out of the opening, but only drew.

Desmond
26-04-2020, 09:16 AM
Meanwhile:

Naka–Nepo +1=3, with Naka winning the first game and drawing the rest.

Giri–Ding +1-1=3. Both wins were scored with Black, and Ding was winning the fifth game with Black right out of the opening, but only drew.

So Giri finally registers on the match points column, albeit only with a 1 for losing in the armageddon phase.

Standings after 4 rounds:

1 Carlsen 11
2 Naka 10
3-4 Caruana, Liren 8
5-6 MVL, Nepo 5
7 Giri 1
8 Alireza 0

Kevin Bonham
26-04-2020, 12:12 PM
I wasn't familiar with the line 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5 Nd7 4.Ba4!? from Nakamura-Nepomniachtchi but the commentators said it has been trendy for a couple of years. There was a game Adams-Gordon that the commentators talked about a lot, it is annotated in detail here https://firstmovechess.org/2019/08/spanning-the-years/

Capablanca-Fan
27-04-2020, 04:55 AM
Both of the R9 matches (https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/magnus-carlsen-invitational-2020/9/2/4) had upsets: Both Giri–Carlsen and Firouzja—MVL were +1=3. In both cases, the lone win was with Black, and it was the first match loss for Carlsen and first match win for Firouzja—indeed, his first non-loss.

Desmond
27-04-2020, 08:25 AM
Both of the R9 matches (https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/magnus-carlsen-invitational-2020/9/2/4) had upsets: Both Giri–Carlsen Wow huge upset, would never have predicted that.

Kevin Bonham
27-04-2020, 12:05 PM
Yes, Carlsen blundered a rook to a very simple tactic.

ER
27-04-2020, 02:09 PM
TOURNAMENT DETAILS

The Magnus Carlsen Invitational sees 8 of the world's best players compete online on the chess24 Playzone for a $250,000 prize fund, with $70,000 for 1st place.
It begins with a single round-robin from April 18-30, with the top scoring players qualifying for the Final Four knockout.
Each match consists of four 15+10 rapid games, with the winner earning 3 match points.
If the players tie 2:2 a single Armageddon game is played, where White has 5 minutes to Black's 4, but a draw sees Black win the match.
An Armageddon winner gets 2 points, the loser 1. No draws offers are allowed before move 40.

STANDINGS SO FAR

4154

Capablanca-Fan
28-04-2020, 04:57 AM
R10:

Fabiano Caruana 3–2 Hikaru Nakamura. Sequence WLDDW. Fabi won the armageddon game with White.
Ian Nepomniachtchi 1½–2½ Ding Liren. Sequence DLWL.

Nak is now leading on BP with 12½, Carlsen 11½, Ding 11. Those three are tied on MP with 11.

Desmond
28-04-2020, 08:30 AM
R10:

Fabiano Caruana 3–2 Hikaru Nakamura. Sequence WLDDW. Fabi won the armageddon game with White.
Ian Nepomniachtchi 1½–2½ Ding Liren. Sequence DLWL.

Nak is now leading on BP with 12½, Carlsen 11½, Ding 11. Those three are tied on MP with 11.
Yes with Carlsen and Naka both having losses this round, it has brought the field much closer together.

1-3 Naka, Carlsen, Ding 11
4 Caruana 10
5-6 MVL, Nepo 5
7 Giri 4
8 Alireza 3

With 2 rounds left and maximum of 3 points for a win each round, it seems possible to imagine one of MVL or Nepo catching up to Caruana. Tough for them though as MVL has Caruana himself left and Naka, while Nepo has Carlsen and Alireza.

Ding has to play both of the other 2 co-leaders in the last 2 rounds, but it seems almost certain he will be in the top 4 regardless of the outcomes.

At one stage in the commentary they were saying that the semi-final phase was to be decided by the player who finishes first getting to pick his semi-final opponent, but that ultimately that was discarded for the traditional 1v4 2v3 format.

Capablanca-Fan
29-04-2020, 06:21 AM
R 11:

Magnus Carlsen 3–2 Ian Nepomniachtchi. Sequence LDWDW
In Game 1, Carlsen played his bluff line, but this time Nepo called it. Carlsen just went beserk and found himself a piece down for nothing.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Bc4 Nxe4 6.Qh5 e6
(6...g6?? 7.Qd5 e6 8.Qxe4)
7.Nxe6 {perhaps Magnus forgot to play 7.Bb5+ first}
(7.Bb5+ Nd7 8.Nxe6 Nf6 9.Nxd8 Nxh5 10.Bxd7+ Bxd7 11.Nxb7 Bc6 12.Na5 Bxg2)
7...Bxe6 8.Bxe6 Qe7 9.Bxf7+ Qxf7 10.Qe2 Qe7 {and Black won easily}

In the Armageddon game where Magnus had to win with White because a draw would count as a win to Black, Nepo reached a tablebase draw, but erred [I don't know why the position and moves don't show]:

67...Ke7
[67...Ba7 {and White can't even get his P any further. But the text move is enough to draw.}]
68.Nc5 Kd8 69.b6 Bh2 70.b7 Bb8 71.Na6 Bf4 72.Nc5 Bb8 73.Ne6+ Ke7 74.Nc7 Kd8 75.Nd5 Bg3 76.Nf6 Bh2 77.Ne4 Bb8??
(77...Bc7 =)
(77...Ke7 =)
78.Nc5! Bh2 {1-0}
(78...Ba7 79.Na6 Ke7 80.Kc7 Bg1 81.Nb4 Ke6 82.Kc8 Bh2
(82...Ba7 83.Nc6)
83.Na6 Bg3 84.Nc7+)
79.Ne6+
(79.Ne6+ Ke7 80.Nc7 {and queens) )


Alireza Firouzja 2½–1½ Anish Giri. Sequence WLWD. Equalizing injustice of chess at work in games 2 and 3, where Giri and Firouzja took turns at winning after getting a lost position.

Desmond
29-04-2020, 08:52 AM
R 11:

Magnus Carlsen 3–2 Ian Nepomniachtchi. Sequence LDWDW
In Game 1, Carlsen played his bluff line, but this time Nepo called it. Carlsen just went beserk and found himself a piece down for nothing.Interesting, I'm surprised he tried it twice. Seems like you just keep Nepo in book for a long time then he blunders as soon as he gets out, lately.


67...Ke7 [67...Ba7 {and White can't even get his P any further. But the text move is enough to draw.}] 68.Nc5 Kd8 69.b6 Bh2 70.b7 Bb8 71.Na6 Bf4 72.Nc5 Bb8 73.Ne6+ Ke7 74.Nc7 Kd8 75.Nd5 Bg3 76.Nf6 Bh2 77.Ne4 Bb8?? (77...Bc7 =) (77...Ke7 =) 78.Nc5! Bh2 {1-0} (78...Ba7 79.Na6 Ke7 80.Kc7 Bg1 81.Nb4 Ke6 82.Kc8 Bh2 (82...Ba7 83.Nc6) 83.Na6 Bg3 84.Nc7+)
79.Ne6+ (79.Ne6+ Ke7 80.Nc7 {and queens) )
Fixed

Desmond
29-04-2020, 12:06 PM
Carlsen did indeed confirm post match that he had intended 7.Bb5+ in game 1, but had a mental blank on his preparation.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pdW_eeSxoQ

Capablanca-Fan
29-04-2020, 03:14 PM
↑↑ Thanks for the fix and the extra info.

Even Magnus' intended move really doesn't give White much to write home about though; at best equality.

Capablanca-Fan
30-04-2020, 05:04 AM
Hikaru Nakamura 3–2 Ding Liren. All four main games were drawn. In the Armageddon, Nak had Black, less time, and draw odds. But Ding fell into an unbreakable pin of his R along the white long diagonal, and couldn't save it.

Fabiano Caruana 2½–1½ Maxime Vachier-Lagrave. Sequence WDWL; Fabi had already won the match by Game 3, so may have relaxed in Game 4.

Leader standings:
BP: Nak 14.5, Mag 13.5, Fabi and Ding 12.
MP: Nak, Mag, Fabi 13, Ding 12.

Desmond
01-05-2020, 09:04 AM
All 4 matches in the final group round were played overnight. Not a whole lot at stake since the top 4 was already determined.

Ding-Carlsen the World Champ was upset 3-1 with all decisive matches. They will play again tonight in the semi stage, so will be interesting to see how that goes.
Nepo-Alireza, again all decisive games, 2-2 and then Nepo won with White to clinch the armageddon.
MVL-Naka, a win each and 2 draws saw it go to armageddon where Naka won with black. MVL finishing the tournament in last place is pretty surprising to me, due to his recent form in the candidates and high Rapid rating.
Giri-Caruana Giri won to climb out of last place with 2.5-1.5 with 3 decisive games.

1-2 Naka (16.5 BP), Ding (16) 15
3-4 Carlsen (13), Caruana (13) 13
5 Nepo 8
6-7 Alireza, Giri 7
8 MVL 6

So the semi finals will be Naka-Caruana and Ding-Carlsen. Quite a distinction between the top 4 and the bottom 4 in the end.

Also there is a slight change to the format for the finals, with the addition up to 2 pairs of blitz games in the event of a tie after the rapid phase:


Each match consists of four 15+10 rapid games. If it ends 2:2 then a pair of 5+3 minute games are played. If still tied another pair of 5+3 games is played. If still tied the match is decided by an Armageddon game where White has 5 minutes to Black's 4, but a draw sees Black win the match.

Judging from the schedule both semis are tonight, then a rest day, then the final on Sunday night.

Capablanca-Fan
01-05-2020, 01:04 PM
Busy R13

Ding Liren 3–1 Magnus Carlsen: WLWW. Carlsen played silly openings in three games and got a lost position early on. He played a King's Gambit in the last game.
Ian Nepomniachtchi 3–2 Alireza Firouzja: LWWLW
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave 2–3 Hikaru Nakamura: WDLDL. MVL was better at the start of the last game, but the tables were turned, and was already lost when he hung a rook. Nak didn't even notice until another move.
Anish Giri 2½–1½ Fabiano Caruana: DWWL. The last game was only 24 moves, but I suppose Giri wasn't motivated since he had already won the match.

So after the preliminary round robin is over:

BP: 1 Nak 16.5 2 Ding 16, 3–4 Mag and Fab 14.5, 5 MVL 13.5, 6 Nepo 13, 7 Giri 12.5, 6 Ali 11.5
MP: 1–2 Nak and Ding 15, 3–4 Mag and Fab 13, 5. Nepo 8, 6–7 Ali and Giri 7, 8 MVL 6

Desmond
01-05-2020, 07:52 PM
From Nepo - Ding R10 G3 was interesting. Commentating live, Grischuck spotted a few moves ahead of time this pretty line that would never occur over the board as the players would never miss it. But it did.

21.Qh3 Qd7 ? 22.Ng4 Rxf5??
(22...Qxf5 23.Nxf6+ Qxf6 +- )
23.Nf6+ 1-0 picking up the queen

Alireza - Giri R11 G3, Alireza had been suffering for much of the game, before equalising. But he created a beautiful mating net in the endgame to clinch the full point.
55.Rb6 Rg1 56.Rh6 Rxg2+ 57.Kc3 Rf2??
(57...Be8 was still good enough to draw, controlling g6 )
58.d6+ Kf8 59.Rg6 Rxf3+ 60.Kb4 mating 1-0


From Naka - MVL R13 G2 Some beautiful tactics, even in drawn games

24.Nd5 Be6
(24...Qxd5 25.Qxe8#)
(24...Rxe7 25.Nxe7+ Kf8 26.Nxc6 +-)
(24...Qc5+ 25.Qxc5 Rxe1+ 26.Kf2 bxc5 27.Kxe1 +=)
25.f5 Kh8 and again all the captures are taboo, but 26.Nb4 Qa8 27.Qxc7 Bxf5 and the game was drawn on move 52

Capablanca-Fan
03-05-2020, 03:18 AM
Different page for the final 4 on Chess24 (https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/magnus-carlsen-invitational-2020-final-4).

"Each match consists of four 15+10 rapid games. If it ends 2:2 then a pair of 5+3 minute games are played. If still tied another pair of 5+3 games is played. If still tied the match is decided by an Armageddon game where White has 5 minutes to Black's 4, but a draw sees Black win the match."

GM Nakamura, Hikaru 2829 4–2 GM Caruana, Fabiano 2773: DDWLWW. They drew their rapid game match, where Fab did well to win the last of the four rapid games as Black. But Nak won both the lightning games in the playoff. . Here is a report on Chessbase.com (https://en.chessbase.com/post/magnus-carlsen-invitational-2020-semifinal-1). Fab commented:


Tough final (for me) match. Almost mounted a comeback but couldn't recover from that awful blunder in game 5. Still, it was a thoroughly enjoyable event. Congrats to Hikaru and good luck in the final.

Fab kept playing the Giuoco Pianissimo, but Nak kept on gaining the advantage. This includes even that 5th game, where Nak gained a clear advantage but allowed counterplay, until that R blunder. Nak likes to play ...a5 against it, while Carlsen sticks with the traditional ...a6, including his loss to Ding in the other final (although that loss wasn't because of the opening):

GM Carlsen, Magnus 2881 2.5–1.5 GM Ding, Liren 2836: DLWW. Carlsen didn't try such offbeat openings this time, but he was worse in the opening in the games he won, but was clearly stronger in the middlegame.

Capablanca-Fan
04-05-2020, 01:53 PM
GM Carlsen, Magnus 2881 2.5–1.5 GM Nakamura, Hikaru 2829: WLWD

MichaelBaron
05-05-2020, 03:52 PM
He is taking online chess as entertainment :).