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View Full Version : Australasian Masters GM Norm + IM Norm 14-22 Dec



Kevin Bonham
10-12-2019, 10:45 PM
Just starting thread as ER asked in the shoutbox and I can't find one.

Pairings GM norm https://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019GMNorm/schedule.html

Pairings IM norm https://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019IMNorm/schedule.html

Metro
11-12-2019, 12:29 PM
Home page
http://chessnews.asia/2019-australasian-masters/

bundys_bro
11-12-2019, 04:47 PM
Interested in how the two Qlders go I think both could be an outside chance of the norm. Also pleased to see both playing in these prestigious tournaments.

Patrick Byrom
11-12-2019, 05:29 PM
Interested in how the two Qlders go I think both could be an outside chance of the norm. Also pleased to see both playing in these prestigious tournaments.Brodie is a definite GM norm chance, if everything goes well. I don't see Tom as an IM yet, but FM is very likely.

MIRKO
11-12-2019, 07:36 PM
Brodie is a definite GM norm chance, if everything goes well. I don't see Tom as an IM yet, but FM is very likely.

And knowing Patrick and his deep Chess Knowledge,I agree with his assessment.

MichaelBaron
11-12-2019, 07:51 PM
In IM tournament, I predict no norms. The 3 IMs are all strong or very strong. The 7 title contenders are all not that strong

ER
11-12-2019, 08:26 PM
Temur will kick arse in the GMs.
Brodie is not (yet) GM material, he could be in the future if he followed GM David Smerdon's no nonsense invaluable advice:



Play anyway. Opening prep only counts for so much in these events, especially as many of your opponents will be trying to dodge your prep anyway.
Far more important is the fact that you have the opportunity to play a GM norm event when you're in great form.
As everyone knows (including you!), your biggest weakness is your tendency to go 'on tilt'. Time to get over it and focus back on the chess!

MIRKO
11-12-2019, 08:44 PM
Temur will kick arse in the GMs.
Brodie is not (yet) GM material, he could be in the future if he followed GM David Smerdon's no nonsense invaluable advice:
I know Brodie very well and he is GM level no doubt, he is raw talent,if he puts it all together who knows how far he could go.as per my favourite saying "Time will Tell".

ER
11-12-2019, 11:23 PM
"Time will Tell".

I agree to that!

MichaelBaron
12-12-2019, 01:02 AM
I know Brodie very well and he is GM level no doubt, he is raw talent,if he puts it all together who knows how far he could go.as per my favourite saying "Time will Tell".

Brodie is a very nice guy...But he level of play currently is not 2500 (GM level) in my view. But hopefully, he will prove me wrong.

Capablanca-Fan
12-12-2019, 01:17 AM
Brodie is a definite GM norm chance, if everything goes well.
I agree. Would like to see him also as an Olympiad place contender, since he has very good head-to-head scores against other recent Olympians. How he will do will depend very much on his ‘form’, and I think GM Dr Smerdon gave good advice.

Adamski
12-12-2019, 08:38 PM
Hmm. Why are Ari Dale and James Morris playing in the IM tournament and not the GM one?

Kevin Bonham
12-12-2019, 09:12 PM
Hmm. Why are Ari Dale and James Morris playing in the IM tournament and not the GM one?

You need to have three IMs playing in the IM tournament so that IM norms will be available, and James is especially useful for the IM event because of his relatively high rating. Of course the challenge for the organiser is then convincing the IMs to play in the IM tournament rather than chasing GM norms, but there are various ways this can be done.

Organising the field for these things so as to provide a realistic chance of norms must be very hard work, it's a real juggling act.

Adamski
12-12-2019, 09:48 PM
Thanks for the explanation, Kevin. Much appreciated.

MichaelBaron
13-12-2019, 10:20 AM
You need to have three IMs playing in the IM tournament so that IM norms will be available, and James is especially useful for the IM event because of his relatively high rating. Of course the challenge for the organiser is then convincing the IMs to play in the IM tournament rather than chasing GM norms, but there are various ways this can be done.

Organising the field for these things so as to provide a realistic chance of norms must be very hard work, it's a real juggling act.

Re Organisers: I agree.
And as for players motivation to play in the IM event, I won't throw in the numbers that may be regarded as semi-confidential but IMs who play the IM norm event get an appearance fee for participating (and have a strong chance to win prizes) while those who play in GM event have to pay an entry fee that they may consider as high so they may find playing in the IM event more feasible.

MichaelBaron
14-12-2019, 06:05 PM
Are there Live Games to follow?

Kevin Bonham
14-12-2019, 11:34 PM
So no real surprises in the GM norm event round 1. In the IM norm event a rotten start for the IMs (which is good for norm chances!) with Khamatgaleev drawing with Winkelman and Maguire beating Morris with black (!!). Ari Dale was the only IM to win.

Thai Ly
14-12-2019, 11:40 PM
Results for round 1 can be found at links below:

GM Norm: https://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019GMNorm/pairs1.html

IM Norm: https://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019IMNorm/pairs1.html

Capablanca-Fan
15-12-2019, 01:34 PM
Results for round 1 can be found at links below:

GM Norm: https://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019GMNorm/pairs1.html

IM Norm: https://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019IMNorm/pairs1.html

I couldn't get the games to play through.

Patrick Byrom
15-12-2019, 02:37 PM
So no real surprises in the GM norm event round 1. In the IM norm event a rotten start for the IMs (which is good for norm chances!) with Khamatgaleev drawing with Winkelman and Maguire beating Morris with black (!!). Ari Dale was the only IM to win.Maybe Tom is aiming to skip the FM title and go directly to IM!

Patrick Byrom
15-12-2019, 02:43 PM
I couldn't get the games to play through.The pgn files are empty as well. Maybe they haven't been updated yet.

Kevin Bonham
15-12-2019, 04:07 PM
Maybe Tom is aiming to skip the FM title and go directly to IM!

Also possible that James' pre-game routine (on double duty in the MCC quickplay) was suboptimal.

Kevin Bonham
15-12-2019, 05:12 PM
The pgn files are empty as well. Maybe they haven't been updated yet.

The GM norm games are in the PGN for me but the viewer doesn't come up. For the IM norm the viewer comes up but the PGN is empty.

Leonid Sandler
15-12-2019, 08:00 PM
http://newzealandchess.nz/Broadcast/

Keong Ang
15-12-2019, 08:22 PM
Both GM norm and IM norm events have games that can be replayed (playthrough) once round is finished and PGN has been uploaded. Available from respective Vega webpages.
Here are the links for GM Norm playthrough (http://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019GMNorm/games.html) and IM Norm playthrough (http://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019IMNorm/games.html).

Only GM norm event has live games broadcast. All 5 boards are broadcast.
Link for Live Games (http://newzealandchess.nz/Broadcast/) (GM norm tournament only).

More event information with links for pairings, schedule and live games broadcast available from Event Webpage (https://chessnews.asia/2019-australasian-masters/).

Photos are available from this link to Facebook photo album (https://www.facebook.com/pg/NZChessNews/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10157925921508750) that would be continually added to for rest of the event. No login necessary to view.

Kevin Bonham
15-12-2019, 09:54 PM
Morris - Maguire round 1 upset

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Bf5 4.Nf3 e6 5.Be2 c5 6.0-0 Nc6 7.Be3 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Nge7 9.g4 Nxd4 10.Bxd4 Bg6 11.f4 Nc6 12.c3 h5 13.Bf2 hxg4 14.Bxg4 Qc7 15.Nd2 0-0-0 16.Nb3 Kb8 17.Nd4 Nxd4 18.Qxd4 b6 19.b4 Be4 20.a4 f5 21.exf6 gxf6 22.Bg3 f5 23.Bf3 Bg7 24.Qf2 Qxc3 25.Rad1 Qxb4 26.Bxe4 dxe4 27.Kg2 Qxa4 28.Qe2 Qc6 29.Rc1 Qb7 30.Rfd1 Rd3 31.h4 Rhd8 32.Kh3 Qd5 33.Rxd3 Qxd3 34.Qh5 Bb2 35.Rg1 e3 36.Qg6 Qe4 37.h5 e2 38.h6 Rd3 39.Kh2 Rd1 40.Be1 Kb7 41.Qg2 Qxg2+ 42.Kxg2 a5 43.Kf2 a4 44.Kxe2 a3 45.h7 a2 46.Kxd1 a1=Q+ 47.Ke2 Qb1 0-1

White was worse quite early here.

Zelgiusfan5000
16-12-2019, 06:01 AM
Tom’s playing well so far. Perhaps lidums was a warm-up for him

Capablanca-Fan
16-12-2019, 06:48 AM
[Event "2019 Australasian Masters GM norm"]
[Site "Melbourne"]
[Date "2019.12.16"]
[Round "2.5"]
[White "Ikeda, Junta"]
[Black "Liu, Xiangyi"]
[Result "1-0"]
[BlackElo "2385"]
[WhiteElo "2439"]
[LiveChessVersion "1.4.8"]
[ECO "E91"]

1. Nf3 {[%clk 1:30:56]} Nf6 {[%clk 1:29:14]} 2. c4 {[%clk 1:31:13]} g6
{[%clk 1:27:43]} 3. Nc3 {[%clk 1:31:32]} Bg7 {[%clk 1:26:47]} 4. e4
{[%clk 1:30:58]} d6 {[%clk 1:25:55]} 5. d4 {[%clk 1:31:16]} O-O {[%clk 1:26:09]}
6. Be2 {[%clk 1:29:55]} a6 {[%clk 1:23:58]} 7. O-O {[%clk 1:25:10]} c6
{[%clk 1:24:21]} 8. e5 {[%clk 1:17:20]} dxe5 {[%clk 1:21:23]} 9. Nxe5
{[%clk 1:17:24]} Nbd7 {[%clk 1:16:40]} 10. Bf4 {[%clk 1:15:04]} c5
{[%clk 0:44:52]} 11. Nxd7 {[%clk 1:05:25]} Nxd7 {[%clk 0:44:10]} 12. d5
{[%clk 1:00:57]} Re8 {[%clk 0:21:42]} 13. Qd2 {[%clk 0:54:28]} Qa5
{[%clk 0:14:21]} 14. Rac1 {[%clk 0:53:11]} Nf6 {[%clk 0:13:21]} 15. Rfe1
{[%clk 0:44:06]} Bd7 {[%clk 0:07:06]} 16. Bf3 {[%clk 0:34:14]} Rad8
{[%clk 0:05:48]} 17. Be5 {[%clk 0:29:22]} Bf5 {[%clk 0:05:01]} 18. Qf4
{[%clk 0:27:07]} Qb4 {[%clk 0:03:36]} 19. g4 {[%clk 0:22:19]} Bd3
{[%clk 0:02:43]} 20. b3 {[%clk 0:21:31]} b5 {[%clk 0:01:57]} 21. d6
{[%clk 0:20:26]} bxc4 {[%clk 0:00:47]} 22. dxe7 {[%clk 0:16:52]} Rd4
{[%clk 0:00:37]} 23. Bxd4 {[%clk 0:15:24]} cxd4 {[%clk 0:01:06]} 24. g5
{[%clk 0:14:49]} Nh5 {[%clk 0:00:52]} 25. Qxf7+ {[%clk 0:15:04]} 1-0

Kevin Bonham
16-12-2019, 10:00 AM
^^
Awesome!

Round 2 IM norm: Maguire beats Ang and has 2/2, Winkelman beats IM Dale.

ER
16-12-2019, 05:11 PM
… Only GM norm event has live games broadcast. All 5 boards are broadcast.
Link for Live Games (http://newzealandchess.nz/Broadcast/) (GM norm tournament only)…

excellent thanks!

MichaelBaron
16-12-2019, 07:14 PM
In the IM tournament, there has been a forfeit today. Hopefully it will not affect IM norm chances as it was against an IM who does not need the norm anyway.

MichaelBaron
16-12-2019, 09:28 PM
http://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019IMNorm/games.html
Rd 2. Moung-Levi - 11 moves!~
Win or lose - Eddie wants to finish all his games under 20 moves :)

Kevin Bonham
16-12-2019, 10:14 PM
http://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019IMNorm/games.html
Rd 2. Moung-Levi - 11 moves!~
Win or lose - Eddie wants to finish all his games under 20 moves :)

Wow. I wonder if Eddie has ever beaten a player of this rating so quickly before.

Capablanca-Fan
17-12-2019, 04:09 AM
[Event "2019 Australasian Masters IM Norm Tournament"]
[Site "Melbourne Chess Club"]
[Date "2019.12.15"]
[Round "2.2"]
[White "Maung, Maung Kyaw Zaw Hein"]
[Black "Levi, Eddy L"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2274"]
[BlackElo "2110"]
[EventDate "2019.12.15"]

1.Nf3 d6 2.d4 f5 3.g3 Nf6 4.Bg2 e6 5.O-O Be7 6.c4 O-O 7.Nc3 Qe8 8.Re1 Qg6 9.Qc2
(9.e4 fxe4 10.Nxe4! Nxe4 11.Rxe4 Qxe4? 12.Nh4 +/-)
9...Ne4 10.Nxe4? fxe4 11.Nd2
(11.Nh4 Qf6 12.Be3 g5 -/+)
11...e3! [11... e3 12.Qxg6 exf2+ 13.Kf1 fxe1=Q+ 14.Kxe1 hxg6 -+ ] 0-1

MichaelBaron
17-12-2019, 11:07 AM
Wow. I wonder if Eddie has ever beaten a player of this rating so quickly before.

Should be noted though that the 2274 rated player played in Adelaide Young Masters last week and scored 1.5/9.

JackRodgers
17-12-2019, 01:01 PM
Am I the only one who thinks that the 2274 player whom scored 1.5/9 in Lidums has had some very curious tournament results? https://ratings.fide.com/individual_calculations.phtml?idnumber=13001698&rating_period=2016-11-01&t=0

The player managed to gain 272 points (from 2080 to 2360) in one event not losing a game in 2016 and has never managed to near replicate that kind of form. A very strange one off performance.

BlairMandla
17-12-2019, 01:56 PM
Have to love the 40K factor overshoot.
1 good tournament and hes 200+ points overrated.
At least hes helping people obtain norms during his "Correction" And with a 20K Factor!

Before I completely jump to conclusions, what was his reason apart from the fact he wanted to save those 7.8 rating points for the forfeit against Ari Dale?

Leonid Sandler
17-12-2019, 04:00 PM
http://newzealandchess.nz/Broadcast/

MichaelBaron
17-12-2019, 04:06 PM
Am I the only one who thinks that the 2274 player whom scored 1.5/9 in Lidums has had some very curious tournament results? https://ratings.fide.com/individual_calculations.phtml?idnumber=13001698&rating_period=2016-11-01&t=0

The player managed to gain 272 points (from 2080 to 2360) in one event not losing a game in 2016 and has never managed to near replicate that kind of form. A very strange one off performance.

Myanmar used to have many overrated players. So it's not too surprising unfortunately

Capablanca-Fan
17-12-2019, 04:11 PM
Eddie's on a roll! He beat the new Redcliffe star Maguire, giving a good demonstration of the power of 2Bs v 2Ns:

[Event "2019 Australasian Masters IM Norm Tournament"]
[Site "Melbourne Chess Club"]
[Date "2019.12.16"]
[Round "3.4"]
[White "Levi, Eddy L"]
[Black "Maguire, Tom"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2110"]
[BlackElo "2139"]
[EventDate "2019.12.16"]

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.f3 dxe4 4.fxe4 e5 5.Nf3 Bg4 6.Bc4 Nd7 7.c3 Bh5 8.O-O
Ngf6 9.Nbd2 Bd6 10.Bb3 O-O 11.Nc4 Qe7 12.Nxd6 Qxd6 13.dxe5 Qxd1 14.Rxd1
Bxf3 15.gxf3 Nxe5 16.Kf2 Rfd8 17.Ke2 Rxd1 18.Bxd1 Rd8 19.Bc2 h6 20.b3 Nh5
21.f4 Ng6 22.Kf3 Nf6 23.Be3 b6 24.Rd1 Rxd1 25.Bxd1 Nf8 26.Bc2 Ne6 27.c4 g5
28.f5 Nc5 29.Bd4 Nfd7 30.e5 Kf8 31.Kg4 Ke7 32.Kh5 f6 33.e6 Ne5 34.Kxh6 Nf3
35.Bc3 Nxh2 36.Kg6 Ng4 37.b4 Nb7 38.Bd1 Ne5+ 39.Bxe5 fxe5 40.f6+ Kxe6 41.
f7 Ke7 42.Kg7 Nd8 43.f8=Q+ Kd7 44.Qf5+ 1-0

Great recovery after his first-round disaster:

[Event "2019 Australasian Masters IM Norm Tournament"]
[Site "Melbourne Chess Club"]
[Date "2019.12.14"]
[Round "1.5"]
[White "Levi, Eddy L"]
[Black "Dale, Ari"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2110"]
[BlackElo "2413"]
[EventDate "2019.12.14"]

1.e4 d5 2.Nc3 d4 3.Nce2 e5 4.Ng3 Be6 5.Bb5+ c6 6.Ba4 Na6 7.Bb3 Bxb3 8.axb3
d3 9.Nf3 Nb4 10.cxd3 Qxd3 11.Ne2 Nc2+ 12.Kf1 Nxa1 13.Nxe5 Qxb3 14.Qe1 Nc2
15.Qd1 Ne3+ 0-1

MIRKO
17-12-2019, 06:23 PM
Go Brodie,nice game!!

Andrew Hardegen
17-12-2019, 07:10 PM
Myanmar used to have many overrated players. So it's not too surprising unfortunately

OK, so no need to worry about the Oceania Zonal anymore -- we can just head to Myanmar for the soft titles :lol:

Zelgiusfan5000
17-12-2019, 08:30 PM
It’s funny how some are so eager to pounce on a bad performance but nobody mentions Temur’s perfect score. I’m looking forward to his game with Brodie (also performing well), should be quite interesting

Capablanca-Fan
18-12-2019, 01:55 AM
[Event "2019 Australasian Masters GM norm"]
[Site "Melbourne"]
[Date "2019.12.17"]
[Round "4.4"]
[White "Ikeda, Junta"]
[Black "Kuybokarov, Temur"]
[Result "0-1"]
[BlackElo "2496"]
[WhiteElo "2439"]
[LiveChessVersion "1.4.8"]
[ECO "A06"]

1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 c5 3.b3 Nf6 4.Bb2 Nc6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.O-O g6 7.Bxf6 exf6 8.d4 cxd4 9.Nxd4 Bd6 10.Qf3 O-O 11.Qxd5 Qc7 12.Bxc6
[12.h3 Nxd4 13.exd4 Bxb5 14.Qxb5 Qxc2 {-/+}]
12...bxc6 13.Qf3 Bxh2+ 14.Kh1 Be5 15.Nc3 c5 16.Nde2 h5 17.Rae1 Bg4 18.Qe4 Rfe8 19.Qc4 Be6 20.Nd5 Qc6 21.Rd1 f5
[21...Kg7 {=+} 22.Nef4? Bxf4]
22.Nef4 Bc8 23.Nb4 Qb6 24.Nfd5 Qd6 25.Nf4 Qb6 26.Nfd5 Qd6 27.Nf4 Qf6 28.Qxc5 Qh4+ 29.Kg1 Bb7 30.Rd7
[30.Nbd5 g5? 31.g3 Qg4 32.Ne7+]
30...Rac8 31.Qb5 Ba8 32.Rxa7 g5?!
[32...Bxf4 33.exf4 Bxg2 34.Kxg2 Qg4+ {=}]
33.Qd7 {+/-} 33...Rf8 34.Nbd5
[34.Qxf5! gxf4 35.Rxa8! Rxa8 36.Qxe5 {breaks the attack and remains with lots of Ps for the exchange}]
34...Bxd5 35.Qxd5 Bb8 36.g3
[36.Qxf5 Bxa7 37.Nd5 Kg7 38.Qf6+ Kh7 39.Ne7 Rc5 40.Nf5 Rxf5 41.Qxf5+ Kg7 {=}]
36...Qg4 37.Ra5
[37.Nxh5 Qxh5 38.Ra5 {=}]
37...gxf4 38.exf4 Rxc2 39.Qxf5
[39.Qd3 Rc6 40.Rxf5]
39...Qxf5 40.Rxf5 Rxa2 41.Rg5+ Kh7 42.Rxh5+ Kg6 43.Rg5+ Kf6 44.Rc5 Ba7 45.Rc6+ Kf5 46.Kg2 Rb8 47.Rc3 f6 48.Kf3 Rb2 49.Kg2 R8xb3 50.Rxb3 Rxb3 51.Ra1 Bd4 52.Rd1 Ke4 53.Re1+ Kf5 54.Rd1 Ke4 55.Re1+ Kd5 56.Re2 Rb2 57.Rxb2 Bxb2 58.Kf3 Bd4 59.Kg4 Ke6 60.Kf3 Kf5 61.g4+ Ke6 62.Kg3 Kd5 63.Kf3?
[63.f5 {aiming for f4 and g5, swapping off Black's last P}]
63...Bc5 64.Kg3
[64.f5 {too late} 64... Ke5 65.Kg3 Bd6 66.f4+? Ke4 67.g5? Bxf4+]
64...Ke4 65.f5 Bd6+ 66.Kh4 Bf4 67.Kh5 Kf3

[Event "2019 Australasian Masters GM norm"]
[Site "Melbourne"]
[Date "2019.12.17"]
[Round "4.1"]
[White "McClymont, Brodie"]
[Black "Mikalsen, Erlend"]
[Result "1-0"]
[BlackElo "2361"]
[WhiteElo "2389"]
[LiveChessVersion "1.4.8"]
[ECO "B32"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e5 5.Nb5 a6 6.Nd6+ Bxd6 7.Qxd6 Qf6 8.Qd2 {Not the most common move, but White has a number of good options for his Q, and this move seems to be one way to retain a small plus.} 8... Nge7 9.Nc3 O-O 10.b3 b5 11.Bb2 Bb7 12.O-O-O Nd4 13.Bd3 Rfc8 14.Kb1 Rc7 15.Rhf1 Rac8 16.f4 Qh6 17.Nd5 Nxd5 18.exd5 Nxc2? {The N can't be taken, but it also can't get out safely}
19.Rc1 Nd4 20.Rxc7 Rxc7 21.Qa5

[21.Qe1! {would have won quickly, by unpinning, further attacking the rickety support for the Nd4, and X-raying the back-rank mate on e8, so there is a double threat of 22. Bxd4 and 23. Qxe5}
21...f6 22.fxe5 fxe5 23.Qxe5 {attacking the Rc7, Nd4, and the mating square e8}]

21... Rc8 22.fxe5 Qe3 23.Rd1 Bxd5 24.Bxd4 Rc1+ [24... Qxd4? 25. Bxh7+] 25.Rxc1 Qxd3+ 26.Kb2

[26.Rc2! Qd1+ 27.Kb2 Qxd4+ 28.Qc3 Qxc3+ 29.Kxc3 {Because the Rc2 holds the Pg2, White has extra moves with his K to reach a5 and the Q-side Ps. It would have saved a lot of moves. White would not have needed to demonstrate his excellent endgame technique, clarifying the K-side position so that the only remaining action is on the Q-side.}]

26... Qxd4+ 27.Qc3 Qxc3+ 28.Rxc3 Bc6 29.b4 Kf8 30.Ra3 Bb7 31.Kc3 Ke7 32.Kd4 Ke6 33.Rg3 g6 34.Ra3 h5 35.g3 Kf5 36.h4 Ke6 37.Rc3 Bc6 38.Rc1 Bd5 39.Rc2 Bc4 40.Rf2 Ke7 41.a3 d6 42.exd6+ Kxd6 43.a4 Bb3 44.a5 Bd5 45.Rf6+ Be6 46.Ke4 Kd7 47.Ke5 Ke7 48.Rf4 Bc4 49.g4 hxg4 50.Rxg4 Bb3 51.Rf4 Bc4 52.Rf6 Be6 53.h5 gxh5 54.Rh6 Kd7 55.Rxh5 Kc7 56.Rh6 Kd7 57.Rh2 Kc7 58.Rd2 Bc8 59.Rd6 Kb7 60.Kd5 Kc7 61.Kc5 Kb7 62.Rb6+ Kc7 63.Rc6+ Kb7 64.Kd6 f5 65.Rc7+ Kb8 66.Rf7 Bb7 67.Rxf5 Ka7 68.Rf7 Kb8 69.Kc5 Ka7 70.Rh7 Kb8 71.Kb6 Bc8 72.Rh8 Ka8 73.Rxc8# 1-0

Kevin Bonham
18-12-2019, 06:04 PM
Urkedal has rather neatly hacked McClymont's kingside (18.Nf5! - haven't checked it with an engine but doesn't look like the pawn can take it) but McClymont's norm chance is still alive for now (needs 3.5/4).

Patrick Byrom
18-12-2019, 06:21 PM
Urkedal has rather neatly hacked McClymont's kingside (18.Nf5! - haven't checked it with an engine but doesn't look like the pawn can take it) but McClymont's norm chance is still alive for now (needs 3.5/4).Not looking good for Brodie then, since he still has to play two strong GMs who have been in excellent form.

Kevin Bonham
18-12-2019, 07:24 PM
Kuybokarov wins again for 5/5! I used to play the line his opponent played all the time (6...Qc7 Winawer), but now only play it rarely because I am not convinced my defensive skills are good enough for holding off against aggressive players of reasonable strength when white opens the position with c4. In this case black managed to get down to a 2R+OCB endgame a pawn up but with what looks like a lost position, which is not a way I ever found to lose in this line, so it was quite instructive to see.

As well as McClymont needing 3.5/4 for a GM norm, the only other norm still on the table in the GM event is Wallis needing 3/4 for an IM norm.

In the IM norm, Winkelman, Levi and Maguire all need 4/4.

MichaelBaron
18-12-2019, 07:57 PM
Great defensive effort by Bobby!

Kevin Bonham
18-12-2019, 08:03 PM
Great defensive effort by Bobby!

Frankenstein-Dracula variation. Can't remember seeing that too much lately!

Capablanca-Fan
19-12-2019, 01:34 AM
Not looking good for Brodie then, since he still has to play two strong GMs who have been in excellent form.

That's a pity; on his day he can beat several of Australia's GMs convincingly. Unfortunately he was on the back foot almost from the opening:

Urkedal, Frode Olav Olsen (2545) – McClymont, Brodie (2389)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (5.1) Melbourne
2019.12.18 1-0 E71

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.h3 O-O 6.Be3 Na6 7.g4 c5 8.Nge2 cxd4 9.Nxd4 b6 10.Qd2 Bb7 11.f3 Nc7 {these last few moves seem just too slow. The computer is already assessing White as +1 or more} 12.O-O-O a6 13.h4 h5 14.gxh5 Nxh5 15.Bh3 Ne8 16.Rdg1 Nef6
(16...e5)
17.Bh6 {already +2} 17...Bc8 18.Nf5 {this is good, but even better was:}
(18.Bxg7! Kxg7
(18...Nxg7 19.h5)
19.Bxc8 Rxc8
(19...Qxc8 20.Nf5+ Kh8 21.Nd5 Nh7 22.Nfxe7 Qe6 23.Qh6 Ra7 24.Rxg6 fxg6 25.Nxg6+ Kg8 26.Qxh5)
20.Rxg6+! fxg6
(20...Kxg6 21.Rg1+ Kh7 22.Nf5 Kh8 23.Qh6+ Nh7 24.Rg7 Nf6 25.Rxh7+ Nxh7 26.Qg7#)
21.Ne6+)
18...Bxf5
(18...Bh8 {giving up the exchange was the best chance of holding out, but White would have both a material advantage and a strong attack})
19.exf5 Qe8 20.fxg6 fxg6 21.Bxg7 Nxg7
(21...Kxg7 22.Bf5)
22.Qh6 Nfh5 23.Rxg6 Rf6 24.Rhg1 Rxg6 25.Rxg6 Kf7 26.Ne4 Qf8 27.Bg4 [27.Bg4 Nf6 28.Ng5+ Ke8 29.Rxg7{with a piece up and still raging attack, e.g.} 29... Nxg4 30.Qg6+ Kd7 31.Qe6+ Kd8 32.Rg8] 1-0

Meanwhile, Kuybokarov continues on his winning way:

Kuybokarov, Temur (2496) -- Liu, Xiangyi (2385)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (5.2) Melbourne
2019.12.18 1-0 C18

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e5 c5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 Qc7 7.Qg4 f5 8.Qg3 Nc6 9.Nf3 h6 10.h4 Kf7 11.dxc5 Qa5 12.Bd2 Qxc5 13.Bd3 Nge7 14.h5 Bd7 15.Qh4 Raf8
[15...Rae8] {the computer prefers this move. Perhaps it holds the base of the P structure more strongly}
16.O-O {now White has a clear advantage, ~1} 16...Qb6 17.Rab1 Qc7 18.c4 dxc4 19.Bxc4 Rd8 20.g4 Bc8 21.gxf5
[21.g5]
21...Nxf5 22.Qg4 Ncd4
[22...Nce7] {= Black covers the weak spots, and White has weak queen-side Ps}
23.Nxd4 Nxd4 24.Bd3 Qxe5 25.Rfd1 {a subtle move that the computer comes around to liking} 25...Nf5?!
[25...Qf6 26.Bg6+ Kg8 27.Be3 e5 28.Qg2] {with a clear advantage to White, because Black's Rh8 is out of play and his K is restricted}
26.Qg6+ Kg8 27.Bxf5 {the game move leads to a clear advantage because the R is boxed in and the K is vulnerable to back-rank mates. The computer takes a while to realize how bad Black's game is. But White had a better move, whichexchanges Black's minors, so the difference between the majors is accentuated}
[27.Bc3! Qxc3 28.Bxf5 Rf8 29.Bxe6+ Bxe6 30.Qxe6+ Kh7 31.Qg6+ Kg8 32.Rxb7] {+-}
27...Qxf5 28.Bc3 Qxg6+ 29.hxg6 Re8 30.Be5 h5 31.Kh2 h4 32.Rd4 Rh6
[32...Rh5 33.f4]
33.Rg1 h3
[33...b5 34.Rd3 Rh5 35.f4 Rh6 36.Rc3 Bb7 37.Rc7 Be4 38.Rxg7+ Kf8 39.Rf7+ Kg8 40.Rd7] {White has a big advantage, but at least Black's B is out and annoying the Pg6}
34.Rc4 {+-} Rh5 35.f4 Rd8 36.Rd1! Re8 37.Rc7 Rh6 38.Rg1 Rd8 39.Rxg7+ Kf8 40.Rh7 Rd2+ 41.Kh1 Bd7 42.g7+ {White queens with either direct or discovered check; Black's B emerged just too late.} 1-0

I don't know why the second game is not playing through.

Ian CCC
19-12-2019, 06:44 AM
Kuybokarov, Temur (2496) -- Liu, Xiangyi (2385)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (5.2) Melbourne
2019.12.18 1-0 C18

Notes by Capablanca-Fan

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e5 c5 5.a3 Bxc3+ 6.bxc3 Qc7 7.Qg4 f5 8.Qg3 Nc6 9.Nf3 h6 10.h4 Kf7 11.dxc5 Qa5 12.Bd2 Qxc5 13.Bd3 Nge7 14.h5 Bd7 15.Qh4 Raf8
[15...Rae8] {the computer prefers this move. Perhaps it holds the base of the P structure more strongly}
16.O-O {now white has a clear advantage ~1} Qb6 17.Rab1 Qc7 18.c4 dxc4 19.Bxc4 Rd8 20.g4 Bc8 21.gxf5
[21.g5]
21...Nxf5 22.Qg4 Ncd4
[22...Nce7] {= Black covers the weak spots, and White has weak queen-side Ps}
23.Nxd4 Nxd4 24.Bd3 Qxe5 25.Rfd1 {a subtle move that the computer comes around to liking} 25...Nf5?!
[25...Qf6 26.Bg6+ Kg8 27.Be3 e5 28.Qg2] {with a clear advantage to White, because Black's Rh8 is out of play and his K is restricted}
26.Qg6+ Kg8 27.Bxf5 {the game move leads to a clear advantage because the R is boxed in and the K is vulnerable to back-rank mates. The computer takes a while to realize how bad Black's game is. But White had a better move, which exchanges Black's minors, so the difference between the majors is accentuated}
[27.Bc3! Qxc3 28.Bxf5 Rf8 29.Bxe6+ Bxe6 30.Qxe6+ Kh7 31.Qg6+ Kg8 32.Rxb7] {+-}
27...Qxf5 28.Bc3 Qxg6+ 29.hxg6 Re8 30.Be5 h5 31.Kh2 h4 32.Rd4 Rh6
[32...Rh5 33.f4]
33.Rg1 h3
[33...b5 34.Rd3 Rh5 35.f4 Rh6 36.Rc3 Bb7 37.Rc7 Be4 38.Rxg7+ Kf8 39.Rf7+ Kg8 40.Rd7] {White has a big advantage, but at least Black's B is out and annoying the Pg6}
34.Rc4 {+-} Rh5 35.f4 Rd8 36.Rd1! Re8 37.Rc7 Rh6 38.Rg1 Rd8 39.Rxg7+ Kf8 40.Rh7 Rd2+ 41.Kh1 Bd7 42.g7+ {White queens with either direct or discovered check; Black's B emerged just too late.} 1-0

Capablanca-Fan
19-12-2019, 09:21 AM
Much obliged ↑↑↑

Kevin Bonham
19-12-2019, 07:50 PM
McClymont and Wallis now need 3/3 for norms. Kuybokarov leads Cheng by 1 point after both drew. Kuybokarov-McClymont is on tomorrow.

In the IM norm, only Winkelman still has a norm chance, and needs 3/3. He is actually co-leader with IMs Morris and Dale after Dale lost to the third IM Khamatgaleev.

Capablanca-Fan
20-12-2019, 01:50 AM
McClymont and Wallis now need 3/3 for norms. Kuybokarov leads Cheng by 1 point after both drew. Kuybokarov-McClymont is on tomorrow.
Here is a win from the Kiwi who is also an occasional ChessChatter:

Liu, Xiangyi (2385) Lukey, Stephen G (2163)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (6.4) Melbourne
2019.12.19 0-1 C00
1.e4 e6 2.Nf3 d5 3.e5 c5 4.g3 Nc6 5.Bg2 f6 6.exf6 Nxf6 7.O-O Bd6 8.d3 O-O 9.c4 d4 10.Bg5 e5 11.Nh4 Qc7 12.Bxf6 Rxf6 13.Nd2 Be7 14.Bd5+ Kh8 15.Qh5 Be6 16.Bxe6 Rxe6 17.Qg4 Rh6 18.Nf5 Rg6 19.Qe4 Rf8 20.Rae1
(20.Nxe7 Qxe7 21.Rae1 {Almost equal. It looks strange to exchange a good N for bad B, but there is precedent in a famous Fischer v Petrosian game, and before that Petrosian had done it himself. The game continuation leaves the N a bit forlorn })
20...Bd8 21.Nf3 Rgf6
(21...Re6 {=+})
22.N5h4 Qf7 23.Ng5
(23.Nxe5 Nxe5 24.Qxe5 Rxf2 25.Nf5 Rxf1+ 26.Rxf1 b6 {maybe a slight advantage to W} )
23...Qh5 24.f4 exf4 25.Ne6 Rxe6 26.Qxe6 Bxh4 27.gxh4 h6 28.Re4 Qxh4 29.Qg6 Ne7
(29...Qg5+ 30.Qxg5 hxg5 {=})
30.Qg3! Qh5 31.Rexf4 Rf5 32.Qf3
(32.Rxf5 Nxf5 33.Qb8+ Kh7 34.Qxb7 {+/-})
32...Qg6+ 33.Kh1 Rxf4 34.Qxf4 Qxd3 35.Rg1 Nf5 36.Qb8+ Kh7 37.Qxb7 Qxc4 38.Qe4 Qf7 39.b4? cxb4
(39...c4 {-/+})
40.Rc1?! Qg6! {score ends here, so presumably White resigned or his flag fell} 41.Qd3 a5 {Black has three Ps for the exchange, but the computer assesses this at only -1, so too early for White to resign}


In the IM norm, only Winkelman still has a norm chance, and needs 3/3.
He is actually co-leader with IMs Morris and Dale after Dale lost to the third IM Khamatgaleev.
He certainly won quickly against the new QLD star:

Winkelman, Albert (2283) Maguire, Tom (2139)
2019 Australasian Masters IM Norm Tournament (6.1) Melbourne Chess Club
2019.12.19 1-0

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Bf5 5.Ng3 Bg6 6.Nh3 Nf6 7.c3 Nbd7 8.Bc4 e5 9.f4 exd4 10.O-O Nb6?! 11.f5! Bc5 12.Qe2+
(12.fxg6 dxc3+ 13.Kh1 hxg6 14.Qe2+ Qe7 15.Bb3 {and White's B is worth more than Black's 3Ps} )
12...Kf8
(12...Qe7 13.Kh1 Qxe2 14.Bxe2 O-O-O 15.fxg6 hxg6 16.Bg5 {+/-})
13.Kh1 d3 {An ingenious way of avoiding piece loss, but it turns out to lose even more} 14.Bxd3 Bh5 15.Nxh5 Nxh5 16.Qxh5 Qxd3 17.Bh6!! gxh6 18.Qxh6+ Ke8 19.Rfe1+ Be7
(19...Kd7 20.Rad1)
20.Qf6 Qf1+ {A good try perhaps, but this is not draughts, so White doesn't need to take.}
(20...Qd8 21.Rad1 Nd5 22.Qxh8+)
21.Ng1! Qxg1+ 22.Kxg1 {mate in 5} 1-0

Kevin Bonham
20-12-2019, 07:25 PM
All over for norms in the GM norm with McClymont beaten by Kuybokarov who played a fine combination and also a nice finishing move:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 Nbd7 7.Bc4 e6 8.Qe2 h6 9.Bh4 Ne5 10.Bb3 g5 11.Bg3 Qc7 12.0-0-0 Bd7 13.h4 g4 14.f4 gxf3 15.gxf3 Rg8 16.Rhg1 Rc8 17.f4 Nc4 18.Rd3 b5 19.e5 dxe5 20.fxe5 Nxe5 21.Rdd1 Bd6 22.Nf5!! exf5 23.Bxe5 Bxe5 24.Nd5 Nxd5 25.Rxg8+ Ke7 26.Rxc8 Bxc8 27.Bxd5 Kf6 28.Qh5 Bf4+ 29.Kb1 Be6 30.Bxe6 fxe6 31.Qe8 Qf7 32.Qd8+ Qe7 33.Qd4+ Be5 34.Qe3 f4 35.Qe4 Qe8 36.Rg1 Qh5 37.Qh7 f3 38.Rg8 [38.Qd3 for instance seems stronger, because of the note to the following] 38...Bd6 [Black could have put up a lot more resistance after 38...Qf7 39.Qxh6+ Ke7 40.Rg1 f2 41.Rf1 but white should still win eventually] 39.Rg5! 1-0

Cheng is still just one point back, so it's not quite over yet for the victory. This event is not just a norm opportunity but also an important chance to impress Olympiad selectors with the Olympiad coming early this year.

In the IM norm Winkelman won again and now has to beat FMs Gong (with white) and Levi for an IM norm. That would also guarantee him at least equal first if he could do it.

Patrick Byrom
20-12-2019, 07:59 PM
All over for norms in the GM norm with McClymont beaten by Kuybokarov who played a fine combination and also a nice finishing move: ... That game looked a lot like a Sicilian Dragon - if only Brodie had played the exchange sac 20 ... Rxg3!

ER
20-12-2019, 08:50 PM
That game looked a lot like a Sicilian Dragon - if only Brodie had played the exchange sac 20 ... Rxg3!

That's Frank Lekkas specialty! (where is Master Hackanovic when you need him?) :D

Capablanca-Fan
21-12-2019, 03:20 AM
All over for norms in the GM norm with McClymont beaten by Kuybokarov who played a fine combination and also a nice finishing move:

A pity for McClymont's many QLD admirers, but a fair win.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 Nbd7 7.Bc4 e6 8.Qe2 h6 9.Bh4 Ne5 10.Bb3 g5 11.Bg3 Qc7 12.0-0-0 Bd7 13.h4 g4 14.f4 gxf3 15.gxf3 Rg8 16.Rhg1 Rc8 17.f4 Nc4 18.Rd3 b5 19.e5 dxe5 20.fxe5 Nxe5 [20...Rxg3 {as PB points out} 21.Rdxg3 Qxe5 {Computer assesses this as +0.5, and Black's best option. As it is, Black's K is too open, and White wins the exchange much more favorably.} ]21.Rdd1 Bd6 22.Nf5!! exf5 23.Bxe5 Bxe5 24.Nd5 Nxd5 25.Rxg8+ Ke7 26.Rxc8 Bxc8 27.Bxd5 Kf6 28.Qh5 Bf4+ 29.Kb1 Be6 30.Bxe6 fxe6 31.Qe8 Qf7 32.Qd8+ Qe7 33.Qd4+ Be5 34.Qe3 f4 35.Qe4 Qe8 36.Rg1 Qh5 37.Qh7 f3 38.Rg8 [38.Qd3 for instance seems stronger, because of the note to the following] [38.Rf1 is almost as strong] 38...Bd6 [Black could have put up a lot more resistance after 38...Qf7 39.Qxh6+ Ke7 40.Rg1 f2 41.Rf1 but white should still win eventually] 39.Rg5! 1-0


Cheng is still just one point back, so it's not quite over yet for the victory. This event is not just a norm opportunity but also an important chance to impress Olympiad selectors with the Olympiad coming early this year.
Maybe Kuybokarov has a chance for a board above Cheng now? The only player who could reasonably selected over either is A.V. Smirnov.


In the IM norm Winkelman won again and now has to beat FMs Gong (with white) and Levi for an IM norm. That would also guarantee him at least equal first if he could do it.
A good clear-cut win where he exploited small inaccuracies and struck with a combo when given the chance.

Ang, Alphaeus Wei Ern (2195) – Winkelman, Albert (2283)
2019 Australasian Masters IM Norm Tournament (7.5) Melbourne Chess Club
2019.12.20 0-1
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.a3 Bxc3+ 5.bxc3 c5 6.f3 Nc6 7.e4 d6 8.Be3 b6 9.Bd3 e5 10.d5 Na5 11.Ne2 Ba6 12.Ng3 Qd7 13.Qe2 O-O-O 14.a4 Rdg8 15.h4 g6 16.Kd1 Nh5 {White is drifting} 17.Nf1 f5 18.Kc2 fxe4 19.fxe4 Rf8 20.Rh3 Nf4 21.Bxf4 Rxf4 22.Nd2 {White has played a few suboptimal moves and now Black has a substantial advantage, ~-1.3. White has no compensation for his weak Q-side Ps and bad B, and Black is also gaining on the K-side while White is taking care of the weak Ps.} 22...Rhf8 23.Rf3 Kc7 24.Kb2 Rxf3 25.Nxf3 Qg4 26.Ka3 Rf4 27.Rf1 Kd8 28.Rf2?
(28.Ng5 Qxe2 29.Bxe2 Ke7 30.g3 Rxf1 31.Bxf1 h5 32.Kb2 Bxc4 {-/+})
28...Bxc4! 29.Bxc4 Rxe4 30.Nxe5? {White was crumbling, but this is just desperation.} 30...dxe5 31.Rf8+ Ke7 32.d6+ Kxf8 33.d7 Nxc4+
(33...Ke7 {is even simpler, but the text move wins easily enough. White has no chance of perpetual check} )
34.Qxc4 Rxc4 35.d8=Q+ Kg7 36.Qe7+ Kh6 37.Qxe5 Rxa4+ 38.Kb2 Qxg2+ 39.Kb3 Qa2#

Kevin Bonham
21-12-2019, 10:30 AM
Posts moved

My fault for mentioning the O-word; posts entirely concerning Olympiad selections have been moved here:

http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?17815-2020-Olympiad-selections-speculation-(sf-Aus-Masters)

A poll will be added later if the list of applicants for selection becomes known to me, which won't be for a few months.

Desmond
21-12-2019, 12:45 PM
All over for norms in the GM norm with McClymont beaten by Kuybokarov who played a fine combination and also a nice finishing move:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 Nbd7 7.Bc4 e6 8.Qe2 h6 9.Bh4 Ne5 10.Bb3 g5 11.Bg3 Qc7 12.0-0-0 Bd7 13.h4 g4 14.f4 gxf3 15.gxf3 Rg8 16.Rhg1 Rc8 17.f4 Nc4 18.Rd3 b5 19.e5 dxe5 20.fxe5 Nxe5 21.Rdd1 Bd6 22.Nf5!! exf5 23.Bxe5 Bxe5 24.Nd5 Nxd5 25.Rxg8+ Ke7 26.Rxc8 Bxc8 27.Bxd5 Kf6 28.Qh5 Bf4+ 29.Kb1 Be6 30.Bxe6 fxe6 31.Qe8 Qf7 32.Qd8+ Qe7 33.Qd4+ Be5 34.Qe3 f4 35.Qe4 Qe8 36.Rg1 Qh5 37.Qh7 f3 38.Rg8 [38.Qd3 for instance seems stronger, because of the note to the following] 38...Bd6 [Black could have put up a lot more resistance after 38...Qf7 39.Qxh6+ Ke7 40.Rg1 f2 41.Rf1 but white should still win eventually] 39.Rg5! 1-0
Yes a very nice, puzzle-like move to finish. At first I was wondering what White does if black just chucks his Queen with 39... f2, threatening 40... f1=Q#, and 40... Qd1#, but then I realised that White has a mate threat of his own. :)

Capablanca-Fan
21-12-2019, 02:01 PM
Here is a win from the Kiwi who is also an occasional ChessChatter:

Liu, Xiangyi (2385) – Lukey, Stephen G (2163)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (6.4) Melbourne
2019.12.19 0-1 C00
1.e4 e6 2.Nf3 d5 3.e5 c5 4.g3 Nc6 5.Bg2 f6 6.exf6 Nxf6 7.O-O Bd6 8.d3 O-O 9.c4 d4 10.Bg5 e5 11.Nh4 Qc7 12.Bxf6 Rxf6 13.Nd2 Be7 14.Bd5+ Kh8 15.Qh5 Be6 16.Bxe6 Rxe6 17.Qg4 Rh6 18.Nf5 Rg6 19.Qe4 Rf8 20.Rae1
(20.Nxe7 Qxe7 21.Rae1 {Almost equal. It looks strange to exchange a good N for bad B, but there is precedent in a famous Fischer v Petrosian game, and before that Petrosian had done it himself. The game continuation leaves the N a bit forlorn })
20...Bd8 21.Nf3 Rgf6
(21...Re6 {=+}) (21...Qc8 22.N5h4
(22.Nxe5 Nxe5 23.Qxe5 Rg5 24.Nd6 Rxe5 25.Nxc8 Rxe1 26.Rxe1 Ba5 27.Re7 Rxc8)
22...Rh6 23.Nxe5 Nxe5 24.Qxe5 Bxh4 25.gxh4 Qh3)
22.N5h4 Qf7 23.Ng5
(23.Nxe5 Nxe5 24.Qxe5 Rxf2 25.Nf5 Rxf1+ 26.Rxf1 b6 {maybe a slight advantage to W} )
23...Qh5 24.f4 exf4 25.Ne6 Rxe6 26.Qxe6 Bxh4 27.gxh4 h6 28.Re4 Qxh4 29.Qg6 Ne7
(29...Qg5+ 30.Qxg5 hxg5 {=})
30.Qg3! Qh5 31.Rexf4 Rf5 32.Qf3
(32.Rxf5 Nxf5 33.Qb8+ Kh7 34.Qxb7 {+/-})
32...Qg6+ 33.Kh1 Rxf4 34.Qxf4 Qxd3 35.Rg1 Nf5 36.Qb8+ Kh7 37.Qxb7 Qxc4 38.Qe4 Qf7 39.b4? cxb4
(39...c4 {-/+})
40.Rc1?! Qg6! {score ends here, so presumably White resigned or his flag fell} 41.Qd3 a5 {Black has three Ps for the exchange, but the computer assesses this at only -1, so too early for White to resign}
Stephen informs me that after 40... Qg6, White moved his R somewhere that failed to deal with Black's threat of 41... Ng3+ discovering an attack on the WQ. He points out 21...Qc8 as a better way of taking advantage of White's hobbled horses (try to avoid Ns protecting each other), and I've inserted some analysis above. On White's part, 30.Qg3! was an impressive move.

Kevin Bonham
21-12-2019, 09:33 PM
Temur Kuybokarov wins again and wins the GM tournament (since Cheng lost to Ikeda), 7.5/8 with one to play vs Wallis.

MichaelBaron
21-12-2019, 10:16 PM
Kuybokarov-Lukey was an interesting struggle!

Kevin Bonham
21-12-2019, 11:05 PM
Kuybokarov-Lukey was an interesting struggle!

Yes, some of the computer lines are rather amazing but 16.Ke2 could have been the losing move as Black missed two wins on move 17, and remained better for a few moves after that. A hairy game.

1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e6 3.e4 d5 4.cxd5 exd5 5.e5 Nfd7 6.d4 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.Qxd5 0-0 9.Nf3 Qb6 10.Ne4 Bb4+ 11.Bd2 Bxd2+ 12.Qxd2 Nc6 13.Qc3 Ndxe5 14.Nxe5 Nxe5 15.Qxe5 Qb4+ 16.Ke2? [16.Nc3 is fine 16...Bg4 17.Bb5! a6 18.0-0 axb5 19.Nd5] 16...Bg4+ 17.Ke3 Rad8 [17...Rae8 18.Qd4 Rxe4+ 19.Qxe4 Qc5+ 20.Kd2 Rd8+ 21.Ke1 Qa5+ 22.b4 Qxa2! winning][17...f5 18.f3 fxe4 19.fxg4 Rad8 20.Rd1! Qb6+ 21.Rd4 Rfe8 winning the queen] 18.f3 Rfe8 19.Qc3 Qb6+ 20.Kf4 Rxe4+ 21.fxe4 Bh5 [21...h5 22.Kg3 Rc8 23.Qd2 Rc2!! 24.Qf4 Qxb2 25.Re1 Rc3+ 26.Bd3 Rxd3+ 27.Re3 Rd2 28.Rg1 Rf2! black is slightly better] 22.Kg3 Qg6+ 23.Kf2 Qb6+ 24.Ke1 Re8 25.e5 [25.Be2 is better] 25...Qf6 26.Kd2 Qf4+ [26...Qf2+ is more dangerous but white is still better eg 27.Kc1 Bg4 28.Bc4 Qf4+ 29.Kb1 Rc8 30.b3 b5 31.Qg3 Qd4 32.Bd3 Rc3 33.e6 Bxe6 34.Rd1 g6 35.Bc2 Qc5 36.Qd6 Rxc2 37.Qxc5 Rxc5] 27.Kc2 Qa4+ 28.b3 Qa3 29.Bd3 b5 30.b4 Qa4+ 31.Kb2 Rd8 32.Rhc1 a5 33.a3 1-0

Kevin Bonham
21-12-2019, 11:42 PM
IM norm results haven't updated on the site for me - either that or someone is playing a 300-move game or something.

MichaelBaron
21-12-2019, 11:46 PM
IM norm results haven't updated on the site for me - either that or someone is playing a 300-move game or something.

Results are on FB already.
Winkelman drew so no IM norm.
Morris and Khamatgaleev are on 5.5/8

Kevin Bonham
21-12-2019, 11:50 PM
Results are on FB already.
Winkelman drew so no IM norm.
Morris and Khamatgaleev are on 5.5/8

Thanks. I believe Winkelman will be an IM, at least, in future as his best tournaments are so strong; he's been close to two norms already. Still a shot at the tournament win too.

Max Illingworth
22-12-2019, 04:41 PM
Congratulations to Temur on winning the Australasian Masters with 8.5/9!! :clap: :clap: :clap: This is the highest winning score for the tournament that I know of - has anyone won with a perfect score in the past?

I was curious to know the rating gain and performance rating for the tournament, so I looked it up for myself. Based on the ratings given at https://newzealandchess.nz/2019/Vega/wwwAustralasianMasters/www2019GMNorm/standing.html, I have Temur's rating gain at 27.3. Temur's performance rating for the tournament is 2905 logistic/2867 normal.

Patrick Byrom
22-12-2019, 05:05 PM
Brodie finishes third overall on 6/9, just ahead of Cheng on 5.5, so he had a very good tournament as well.

Kevin Bonham
22-12-2019, 05:19 PM
That is an incredible score by GM Kuybokarov. :clap:

Morris and Winkelman finish =1st in the IM norm with 6.5/9 (don't know if this is tiebroken, if that's a word, for any reason).

MichaelBaron
22-12-2019, 06:07 PM
Also, great to see Ray Yang fighting on and winning his last round game. Great fighting spirit!

Zelgiusfan5000
22-12-2019, 10:10 PM
Also, great to see Ray Yang fighting on and winning his last round game. Great fighting spirit!

I agree. It can be hard to keep sane after losing 8 games in a row, to bounce back and win a game against a 2400 after all that is commendable

Metro
23-12-2019, 11:06 AM
Congratulations to Temur on winning the Australasian Masters with 8.5/9!! :clap: :clap: :clap:
Outstanding!:clap::clap::clap:

Capablanca-Fan
24-12-2019, 01:48 AM
Lukey, Stephen G (2163) -- McClymont, Brodie (2389)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (9.1) Melbourne
2019.12.22 0-1 A48

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.Bg5 Bg7 4.Nbd2 d6 5.c3 h6 6.Bh4 g5 7.Bg3 Nh5 8.e3
[8.e4]
8...e6 9.Bd3 Nd7 10.O-O Nxg3 11.fxg3 Qe7 12.g4 {computer goes from minute White plus to minute Black plus, but still not serious.} 12...h5 13.Ne4?! {White loses material and is driven back} 13...hxg4 14.Nfd2 f5 15.Ng3 Nf6 16.e4?! f4 17.e5 dxe5 18.Nge4 Nxe4
(18...exd4 {just keep on taking; at present, the Nd2 is what the late Dvoretsky called a superfluous piece, so exchanging means that Black trades a useful piece for a superflous one.} )
19.Nxe4 g3
(19...exd4)
20.Nxg3! exd4
(20...fxg3 21.Bg6+ Kd8 22.Rf7 {White is in the game again, and Black is on the back foot, albeit with only a small minus})
(20...Rh6! {guards the key square g6 so Black now threatens the N} )
21.Nf5?! Qf6?!
(21...exf5! 22.Re1 Be6 23.Bxf5 Rh6 24.Qg4 Kf7 {and Black can defend this B as much as it's attacked, retaining an extra B} )
22.Bb5+?!
(22.Nxg7+ Qxg7 23.Be4 {-/+})
22...c6 23.Nd6+?!
(23.Nxg7+)
23...Ke7 24.Nxc8+ Raxc8 25.Bc4 dxc3 {-+} {Black now has both material and the attack while his K is very safe} 26.Qe2 Qe5
(26...cxb2 27.Rad1 Qd4+!! 28.Rxd4? Bxd4+ 29.Kh1 Rxh2+)
27.Rae1
(27.bxc3)
27...Qxe2 28.Rxe2 Bd4+(28...Bd4+ 29.Kh1 Rxh2+) 0-1

Wallis, Christopher (2349) -- Kuybokarov, Temur (2496)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (9.2) Melbourne
2019.12.22 0-1 E62

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 O-O 5.Nc3 d6 6.Nf3 c6 7.O-O Bf5 8.b3 Ne4 9.Bb2 a5 10.e3 Nxc3 11.Bxc3 Be4 12.a3 d5 13.c5 Nd7 14.b4 a4 15.Nh4?! Bxg2 16.Nxg2 e5 17.Rb1 Re8 18.dxe5 Nxe5 19.Bxe5 Rxe5 20.Qd3 Qd7 21.Rfd1 Qg4 22.b5 Bf8 23.bxc6 bxc6 24.Rb6? Qd7?
(24...Bxc5 25.Rxc6 Bxa3! {-/+})
25.Qc3 Re4 26.f3 Ree8
(26...Rc4?? 27.Qxc4!)
27.e4?! {looks strong, exploiting the pin on the d-file, but it's actually weak because it opens the g1-a7 diagonal} 27...Qc7 {-/+} 28.exd5 cxd5 29.Rxd5 Rad8 30.Rxd8 Rxd8 31.Rb5 Qc6 32.Ra5?
(32.Rb1 Qxc5+ 33.Qxc5 Bxc5+ 34.Kf1 Rd3)
32...Bg7 {-+} 33.Qc2 Qxf3 34.h4 Bd4+ 35.Kh2 Bf2 0-1

Yang, Ray (2300) -- Ikeda, Junta (2439)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (9.5) Melbourne
2019.12.22 1-0 A81
1.d4 f5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.O-O O-O 6.b3 b6 7.Ne5 d5 8.c4 e6 9.Bg5 Bb7 10.Nc3 c6 11.b4 Qe8 12.c5 {too early} 12...Nfd7 13.Nxd7
(13.Nf3)
13...Nxd7 14.Qd2 bxc5
(14...e5)
15.bxc5 e5 {Black has at least equalized} 16.Be3 exd4 {no need to hurry with this} 17.Bxd4 Qe7?! 18.Rab1! Ba6?
(18...Bxd4 19.Nxd5! cxd5 20.Rxb7 Qxc5 21.Rxd7 Rad8 {+=})
19.Nxd5! {a well judged exchange of 2 minors for R+2P: Black's pieces are uncoordinated and White has a very strong passed P} 19... cxd5?!
(19...Qxe2 20.Qxe2 Bxe2 21.Ne7+ Kf7 22.Rfe1 Bxd4 23.Nxc6 Bxc5 24.Rxe2 {+/-})
20.Bxd5+ Kh8 21.Bxg7+ Qxg7 22.Bxa8 Rxa8 23.Qd6 {+-} Nxc5
(23...Bxe2 24.Rfe1 Re8 25.c6)
24.Rb8+ Rxb8 25.Qxb8+ Qg8 26.Qe5+ Qg7 27.Qxc5 Qf6 28.Rb1 Kg7 29.Qxa7+ Kh6 30.Qe3+ Kh5 31.Qf4 Bxe2 32.Qh4+ Qxh4 33.gxh4 Kxh4 34.a4 g5 35.a5 h5 36.Rb6

Cheng, Bobby (2529) -- Liu, Xiangyi (2385)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (9.4) Melbourne
2019.12.22 0-1 A04
1.Nf3 b6 2.g3 Bb7 3.Bg2 e5 4.O-O e4 5.Nh4 Nh6 6.Bh1 Be7 7.Ng2 d5 8.d3 Ng4 9.Nf4 Na6 10.c4 dxc4 11.Qa4+ Qd7 12.Qxc4 b5 13.Qc3 b4 14.Qd2? e3! -+ {Already Black has a winning attack, opening K-side lines while White's Q-side pieces can't move} 15.fxe3 Bxh1 16.Kxh1 h5 17.h4 g5 18.Ng2
(18.hxg5 h4 19.Kg2 hxg3)
18...gxh4 19.Qe1 O-O-O 20.e4 Rdg8
(20...Ne3! 21.Bxe3 Qh3+ 22.Kg1 hxg3 23.Rf3 h4 24.Nd2 Qh2+ 25.Kf1 Bc5! {destroying the defender of g1} )
21.Bf4 Ne3! 22.Bxe3 Qh3+ 23.Kg1 Rxg3 24.Rf2 Rhg8 25.Qf1 Rxg2+! 26.Rxg2 Qxe3+ 27.Qf2 Rxg2+ 28.Kxg2 h3+ 29.Kf1 Qc1+
(29...Qc1+ 30.Qe1 h2 31.Qxc1 h1=Q+ 32.Kf2 Qxc1)

Mikalsen, Erlend (2361) -- Urkedal, Frode Olav Olsen (2545)
2019 Australasian Masters GM norm (9.3) Melbourne
2019.12.22 1/2-1/2 C77
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.d3 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.Nc3 d6 8.Nd5 h6 9.c3 O-O 10.a4 b4 11.a5 Rb8 12.Bc4?! Nxd5 13.exd5 bxc3 14.bxc3 Ne7 15.O-O Bb7 16.d4 exd4 17.Nxd4 Nxd5 18.Nf5
(18.Bxh6 Qf6 {=}
(18...gxh6 19.Bxd5 Bxd5 20.Nf5 Qf6 21.Qxd5)
)
18...Nf6 {=+} 19.Bxh6?! gxh6 20.Nxh6+ Kg7
(20...Kh8 21.Nxf7+?! Rxf7 22.Bxf7 Qd7 23.Bb3 Qc6 24.Qf3 Qxf3 25.gxf3 Bxf3 {-+})
21.Ra4? Kxh6
(21...Qd7 {-+} 22.Bd3 Rh8 23.Nf5+ Kf8)
22.Qd2+ Kg7?
(22...Kh7 23.Bd3+ Ne4 24.Bxe4+ Bxe4 25.Rxe4 f5)
23.Qg5+ {=} Kh8 24.Bd3 Nh7 25.Qf5 Ng5 26.Rh4+ Kg7 27.Rh7+ Nxh7 28.Qxh7+ Kf6 29.Qf5+ Kg7 30.Qh7+ Kf6 31.Qf5+ Kg7 32.Qh7+