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antichrist
11-12-2004, 11:50 AM
Kill Karl Haas and replace with CR, recently sidelined!

antichrist
09-02-2005, 03:21 PM
It's happened, I am dancing on his grave -- Karl Haas has died -- the man who tried to kill the music.

If only Clive R can take over the 9-10 slot there will be peace in heaven and earth.

antichrist
17-02-2005, 03:53 AM
It's happened, I am dancing on his grave -- Karl Haas has died -- the man who tried to kill the music.

If only Clive R can take over the 9-10 slot there will be peace in heaven and

earth.

There is not rest from the chap (KH) even when he has kicked the bucket, apparently his programmes must have been recorded well in advance, or worse still could be repeats. And with CR of the air -- classical music has surely died.

And just to provide proof that this thread is being read can comeone come up with an explanation of "glissando"?

Rincewind
17-02-2005, 07:32 AM
And just to provide proof that this thread is being read can comeone come up with an explanation of "glissando"?

My understanding (which could well be flawed) is that it is a a way of progressing from one note to another by sliding to that note, rather than just jumping straight to it. On an instrument like the guitar you have frets and so a steady progression between notes is not really possible, you can play a note progression ligardo (slurred) but as far as I knoe not truly glissando. I imagine unfretted stringed instuments like the violin sliding from one note to the other produces what is meant by the term glissando.

pax
17-02-2005, 08:35 AM
And just to provide proof that this thread is being read can comeone come up with an explanation of "glissando"?

A trombonist telling a joke..

Don_Harrison
17-02-2005, 08:43 PM
If performed on a piano not every semitone is played because the finger is drawn across only the white keys.

Listen to Gayne Suite No. 1, Sabre Dance, by Khatchaturian if you wish to listen to an example of glissando.

Cheers

And the only ability CR had as an announcer was to annoy. Having said that, I concede that CR was enthused about the music and the sheer talent displayed by the performers.

antichrist
17-02-2005, 09:12 PM
If performed on a piano not every semitone is played because the finger is drawn across only the white keys.

Listen to Gayne Suite No. 1, Sabre Dance, by Khatchaturian if you wish to listen to an example of glissando.

Cheers

And the only ability CR had as an announcer was to annoy. Having said that, I concede that CR was enthused about the music and the sheer talent displayed by the performers.

At last there is someone who can teach me and I respect and appreciate.

Unfortunately I have loved CR for about 30 years and his annoying capabilities could be on par with mine. You would be aware that the audience doubled when he took it on.

I was waiting for an arbituary on Karl Haas but I didn't notice one, what was his background? I must admit that he taught me a lot about music and I do miss his "Hello everyone".

My favourite instrument (listening only) is the piano, what is yours?

P.S. Was a two-handed glissando ever played, a hand on the white and black keys simultaneously? If not I will do one and make history.

Cat
17-02-2005, 09:22 PM
At last there is someone who can teach me and I respect and appreciate.

Unfortunately I have loved CR for about 30 years and his annoying capabilities could be on par with mine. You would be aware that the audience doubled when he took it on.

I was waiting for an arbituary on Karl Haas but I didn't notice one, what was his background? I must admit that he taught me a lot about music and I do miss his "Hello everyone".

My favourite instrument (listening only) is the piano, what is yours?

P.S. Was a two-handed glissando ever played, a hand on the white and black keys simultaneously? If not I will do one and make history.

Not so much an instrument, but I love the sounds of those ancient stringed instruments played by The Academy of Ancient Music with Christopher Hogwood in London, really earthy, imperfect sound captures the richness of the baroque period that you miss when listening to modern pitch-perfect instruments.

Rincewind
17-02-2005, 09:32 PM
Wikipedia (the font of all knowledge ;) ) makes the distinction between 'true' glissando and 'effective' glissando.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glissando

antichrist
18-02-2005, 07:53 AM
Not so much an instrument, but I love the sounds of those ancient stringed instruments played by The Academy of Ancient Music with Christopher Hogwood in London, really earthy, imperfect sound captures the richness of the baroque period that you miss when listening to modern pitch-perfect instruments.

I love the sitar and Chinese erhu. I consider the Indian music the purest of music, but that is from an musically-uneducated person. And I consider myself blessed to have Arabic music fed with the breastmilk. My old grandmother even into her nineties could do terrific belly-dancing. Her brother actually performed some of the Elvis Presley/Whacko Jacko routine from his youngster days, around year 1900.

antichrist
11-04-2005, 06:52 PM
I have finally found about Karl Haas. He did that "adventures in good music" radio program for about 40 years. Retiring only about two years before his recent death at 91. He had fled Nazi Germany to USA.

HappyFriend
11-04-2005, 08:03 PM
I know the sitar, but personally prefer the koto and shamisen to the erhu. However nothing is quite like a Gibson Explorer played through a Marshall stack!

arosar
11-04-2005, 08:04 PM
I have finally found about Karl Haas. He did that "adventures in good music" radio program for about 40 years. Retiring only about two years before his recent death at 91. He had fled Nazi Germany to USA.

You can still hear him everyday at 9AM on 2MBS.

AR

Spiny Norman
11-04-2005, 08:20 PM
However nothing is quite like a Gibson Explorer played through a Marshall stack!

Now you're talking! (although I play a Fender Strat myself, and I can't afford a full-on stack - I use a Marshall AVT100).

antichrist
22-08-2006, 03:13 PM
Racmenoff(?) Piano Symphony NO 1 I have been told is from Romantic era, but it sounds like modern or jass music to me?

four four two
22-08-2006, 04:34 PM
Here is a link for you AC....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Rachmaninoff

Chat
22-08-2006, 07:09 PM
music and sweets make passing guests pause.

greatness emerges flavourless and bland. :rolleyes:

antichrist
23-08-2006, 12:16 PM
Here is a link for you AC....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Rachmaninoff

Thanks very much, can't read all now as must go but loved this part about no 1 that I listen to daily:
Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 1 (Op. 13, 1896) premiered on 27 March 1897 in one of a long-running series of "Russian Symphony Concerts", but was torn apart by critics. In a particularly vitriolic review by César Cui, it was likened to a depiction of the seven plagues of Egypt and suggested that it would be admired by the "inmates" of a music conservatory in hell.

Will get back to rest later

antichrist
29-08-2006, 02:42 PM
Rachmaninoff No 1 had a mini climax about 20 minutes before the end, but never picks up the lead again to have a full climax - what a disappointment, should be re-written.

antichrist
04-02-2009, 08:59 PM
I think was Felix Mendollsson's (?) birthday the other day, 200 years ago. I think he was brilliant at everything he put his head to.

ER
05-02-2009, 11:40 AM
I think was Felix Mendollsson's (?) birthday the other day, 200 years ago. I think he was brilliant at everything he put his head to.

Some extra info about Felix, just in case you didn't know!

" ... Abraham Mendelssohn, the father of Felix. Abraham was a successful banker and businessman. Felix’s mother, the former Leah Salomon, came from a prominent German Jewish family of considerable means. Abraham and Leah produced four children: Fanny, Felix, Rebekah, and Paul..."

This is part from a very interesting sermon given February 20, 1998, by Rabbi Samuel M. Stahl.

http://www.beth-elsa.org/be_s0220.htm

Denis_Jessop
07-02-2009, 09:59 PM
Some extra info about Felix, just in case you didn't know!

" ... Abraham Mendelssohn, the father of Felix. Abraham was a successful banker and businessman. Felix’s mother, the former Leah Salomon, came from a prominent German Jewish family of considerable means. Abraham and Leah produced four children: Fanny, Felix, Rebekah, and Paul..."

This is part from a very interesting sermon given February 20, 1998, by Rabbi Samuel M. Stahl.

http://www.beth-elsa.org/be_s0220.htm

Felix was born on 3 February 1809 so AC was right. There is an extensive biographical note on him in Wikipedia which looks pretty accurate. His sister Fanny was also a gifted musician and the family was very well-off. Among his accomplishments, Felix was, in 1835, appointed the conductor of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra to which he made a major contribution (in talent, not money) and which is still one of the best orchestras in Germany. He had enormous gifts as a composer but was never able completely to fulfil his potential dying at the age of 38. Nevertheless he produced many masterpieces in symphonic, chamber, instrumental and choral music. His sister Fanny also died young, both suffering similar health failures that afflicted their parents too.

DJ

arosar
07-02-2009, 10:29 PM
Great Composers, Lousy Reviews (http://www.slate.com/id/2210339/), in Slate.

AR

ER
08-02-2009, 02:18 PM
thanks Denis for the interesting information.
thanks Ar for the very informative website!

AzureBlue
22-06-2009, 10:24 AM
My favourite instrument (listening only) is the piano, what is yours?

P.S. Was a two-handed glissando ever played, a hand on the white and black keys simultaneously? If not I will do one and make history.
Lol, Piano and Flute, the ones I play :)
I don't know, though double glissandos do exist (chord glissandos), and apparently they hurt heaps lol :lol:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaaRXiVNBFk
and octave glissandos are in:
* Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 21 "Waldstein" (3rd movement)
* Carl Maria von Weber: Konzertstück in F minor
* Johannes Brahms: Variations on a Theme of Paganini.
* Mily Balakirev: Islamey
* Johann Nepomuk Hummel: Piano Concerto No. 2 in A minor
* Igor Stravinsky: Three Movements from Petrushka
* Georges Cziffra: Fantasy on William Tell (100th measure)

But yes, I guess you could make a two-handed glissando lol

Capablanca-Fan
22-06-2009, 11:04 AM
Karl Haas had a lot of interesting information in his programs, and his linguistic abilities helped too.

ER
22-06-2009, 12:57 PM
and octave glissandos are in:
* Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 21 "Waldstein" (3rd movement)
* Carl Maria von Weber: Konzertstück in F minor
* Johannes Brahms: Variations on a Theme of Paganini.
* Mily Balakirev: Islamey
* Johann Nepomuk Hummel: Piano Concerto No. 2 in A minor
* Igor Stravinsky: Three Movements from Petrushka
* Georges Cziffra: Fantasy on William Tell (100th measure)
Impressed, very impressed!!! Classical (as well as electric, and bass) guitar and piano here!

AzureBlue
22-06-2009, 01:31 PM
Impressed, very impressed!!! Classical (as well as electric, and bass) guitar and piano here!
Lol, actually I got that off wikipedia (as usual)
Though I do know about half of those...
I don't know all that many pieces outside flute, piano and concertos. Mainly just pieces by Bach, Haydn, Chopin & Bartok (cos I needed to study them for my associate exam) and Debussy, Rach and Schubert, Mendelssohn (Musicianship) and random stuff off the AMEB and ABRSM syllabuses. :P :)

ER
22-06-2009, 01:47 PM
Lol, actually I got that off wikipedia (as usual)
Though I do know about half of those...
I don't know all that many pieces outside flute, piano and concertos. Mainly just pieces by Bach, Haydn, Chopin & Bartok (cos I needed to study them for my associate exam) and Debussy, Rach and Schubert, Mendelssohn (Musicianship) and random stuff off the AMEB and ABRSM syllabuses. :P :)
even more impressed now!!!:clap: :clap: :clap:

AzureBlue
22-06-2009, 02:22 PM
even more impressed now!!!:clap: :clap: :clap:
Lol thanks :)
Do you play any instruments?

ER
22-06-2009, 04:57 PM
Lol thanks :)
Do you play any instruments?

:doh: :hmm: :wall: :rolleyes:
Jenny you didn't only miss my original in #27 you missed your own quoation of my original in #28!!! :wall: :P

AzureBlue
22-06-2009, 05:14 PM
:doh: :hmm: :wall: :rolleyes:
Jenny you didn't only miss my original in #27 you missed your own quoation of my original in #28!!! :wall: :P
Oh, woops! :doh:
:lol:
Wow, you play so many guitars :)
I've always wanted to try classical guitar :)
might get one for my bday, which is as always, ages away :(

ER
22-06-2009, 05:32 PM
might get one for my bday, which is as always, ages away :( mine is either just passed or ages away too! so have you done any guitar before???

AzureBlue
22-06-2009, 05:50 PM
mine is either just passed or ages away too! so have you done any guitar before???
Well, not really, in year 8 i tried to play it, but the fingering's so hard (only tried it for 2 minutes). Is it a relatively difficult instrument?

ER
22-06-2009, 06:16 PM
Two minutes??? wow! that's a lifetime, how did you manage??? :P Seriously now, as with all fretted insturments you need to have your fingertips getting used to them which usually causes a bit of discomfort. The instrument's quality has a lot to do with it. Fingering is a matter of understanding key positions initially I,IV, and V . Scale con***ruction is conceptually very much like the piano. If you are actually interested I would suggest you listen now as much as you can to get a feel of the music you like to play later.
I would suggest works by
I. ALbeniz
F. Tarrega
JS Bach
J. Rodrigo and
G. Sanz, just to start with.
Also it very much depends on your teacher.
Goodl luck, let me know if and when you start so I can be of some help!

AzureBlue
23-06-2009, 08:39 AM
Two minutes??? wow! that's a lifetime, how did you manage??? :P Seriously now, as with all fretted instruments you need to have your fingertips getting used to them which usually causes a bit of discomfort. The instrument's quality has a lot to do with it. Fingering is a matter of understanding key positions initially I,IV, and V . Scale construction is conceptually very much like the piano. If you are actually interested I would suggest you listen now as much as you can to get a feel of the music you like to play later.
I would suggest works by
I. ALbeniz
F. Tarrega
JS Bach
J. Rodrigo and
G. Sanz, just to start with.
Also it very much depends on your teacher.
Goodl luck, let me know if and when you start so I can be of some help!
Lol, the first time I tried I played with that strummer thingo (piece of plastic or something) so I didn't need to touch the strings! No, I didn't mean properly learn it, i just want to self-learn, try it out every now and then. I'd be too busy to play so many instruments atm...

Miranda
23-06-2009, 10:18 AM
I have attempted guitar briefly in the past.. but I just stick to cello, piano and percussion for now :)

Sinister
23-06-2009, 10:31 AM
I have attempted guitar briefly in the past.. but I just stick to cello, piano and percussion for now :)
I have not got a single artistic sub-atomic particle in my body.
I failed "the arts" at school

AzureBlue
23-06-2009, 10:46 AM
I have attempted guitar briefly in the past.. but I just stick to cello, piano and percussion for now :)
Yeah, I've also tried percussion and violin for about 2 mins each. :lol:
For now I'll stick to trying out awesome pieces (for piano, that is):
ie. Hommage a Rameau (from Images Book I) - Debussy (REALLY nice piece) -
^http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LP7o4HHp0A&feature=channel_page
Ballade Op 38 No 2 - Chopin ( :wall: OUCH!!!!) Ballade No. 1's even harder!
^http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsoUIBcl7iw&feature=channel_page
Rhapsody in Blue - Gershwin
Excursions - Barber
Chopin Etudes
and any other nice piece I can find, though I normally just sight-read for ten minutes, ditch the piece, find another one, then revert to it. :lol: :lol: :lol: since I am only casually playing instruments now :) I don't think I want to do my Licentiate exam, at least not just yet...

Rincewind
23-06-2009, 10:46 AM
I have not got a single artistic sub-atomic particle in my body.

Quarky.

Miranda
23-06-2009, 10:51 AM
I have not got a single artistic sub-atomic particle in my body.
I failed "the arts" at school
I've never thought of music as 'art'. I've been learning cello and piano since I was 4, and the way I've been taught is not creative.. you just have to learn the pieces you're told to exactly right, learn scales and exercises, and do everything as it's written on the music. There is no room for improvisation.

However, with percussion (depending on the type of music) there's a lot more room for improvisation... which has its good and bad aspects!

AzureBlue
23-06-2009, 10:52 AM
I have not got a single artistic sub-atomic particle in my body.
I have not got a single sight-reading sub-atomic particle in my body.
Quote:
"The technical work was secure in all areas. Well done. The list pieces formed a balanced and interesting programme. Thoroughly rehearsed with much to commend and encourage. WORK ON S. READING!!! :wall: :wall: "
LOL
So glad there isn't any sight reading in diploma exams
because otherwise I would have to sight-read Grade 7-8 level pieces, which I cannot do unless I am familiar/have heard it before (my aural is much better).

AzureBlue
23-06-2009, 10:59 AM
I've never thought of music as 'art'. I've been learning cello and piano since I was 4, and the way I've been taught is not creative.. you just have to learn the pieces you're told to exactly right, learn scales and exercises, and do everything as it's written on the music. There is no room for improvisation. However, with percussion (depending on the type of music) there's a lot more room for improvisation... which has its good and bad aspects!
Well, it depends. For some composer's manuscripts, they do not include the dynamics etc... therefore you need to interpret it by yourself (unless you have a teacher that puts everything in). And in Romantic era music, there's this thing called "rubato" (slight alteration of speed in areas, though the main beat still stays the same). Scales aren't necessary, as they are just a waste of time when you get up to the high levels, but they do provide a solid foundation which will facilitate your learning of pieces that require lots of technical skill (eg. Bach, CHOPIN BALLADES :wall: :wall: ). Though, admittedly, I didn't play any scales after Grade 7 and the only scale I can play properly now is C# Melodic minor, everyone's favourite scale :) However, this is understandable because diploma exams don't require scales or sight-reading (OH the JOY!!). Practising the pieces and refining them gave me lots of technical endurance (ow) LOL
And I randomly improvise and compose all the time :)
The reason as to why it's best to follow the music, is because it makes the piece logical and the emotions of the piece flow. The composer has these ideas for the piece which make it suitable for the genre etc... though there is some room for interpretation. For example, if the composer intended this piece to be a nocturne, you can't make it all jumpy and non-legato. Composers add dynamics, and markings to make the piece sound more logical.
Music is definitely an art.

Sinister
23-06-2009, 11:00 AM
I'm failing Health and Physical Education because I told the teacher I hate the subject so she failed me on the physical part and then failed me on the theory and attitude towards HPE, now it's a D+ on my report card

AzureBlue
23-06-2009, 05:28 PM
I have attempted guitar briefly in the past.. but I just stick to cello, piano and percussion for now :)
Percussion's pretty fun :)
:lol:

ER
23-06-2009, 08:36 PM
I have attempted guitar briefly in the past.. but I just stick to cello, piano and percussion for now :)
Miranda, I didn't know about the cello and piano part!!! :clap: :clap: :clap: By the way how's the jazz band going?

Miranda
23-06-2009, 08:57 PM
Miranda, I didn't know about the cello and piano part!!! :clap: :clap: :clap: By the way how's the jazz band going?
I moved schools last year, so had to leave the band :( Last I heard they were still doing well, though :)

Schu
23-06-2009, 09:14 PM
I'm studying classical composition (have written mostly chamber music, lieder and choral music), but I play clarinet and piano too, and when my voice hasn't been wrecked by sickness like it is now, I sing (bass/baritone).

AzureBlue
24-06-2009, 09:38 AM
I moved schools last year, so had to leave the band :( Last I heard they were still doing well, though :)
:(
Doesn't MLC have a jazz band as well?

Miranda
24-06-2009, 10:01 AM
:(
Doesn't MLC have a jazz band as well?
I assume so; however the band I was previously in was with a few close friends, only about 5 people. I used to also be in concert band and string orchestra, but have found recently I just don't have enough time to committ to everything.

AzureBlue
24-06-2009, 11:06 AM
I assume so; however the band I was previously in was with a few close friends, only about 5 people. I used to also be in concert band and string orchestra, but have found recently I just don't have enough time to committ to everything.
Wow, that's such a small band, even the one at my school has a fair amount of people! Did you guys make up the jazz band yourself or was it already there as an auditioned school group?

Miranda
24-06-2009, 11:17 AM
Wow, that's such a small band, even the one at my school has a fair amount of people! Did you guys make up the jazz band yourself or was it already there as an auditioned school group?
We made it ourselves. The school also had several large bands.

AzureBlue
24-06-2009, 11:23 AM
We made it ourselves. The school also had several large bands.
Cool :)
Yeah, since MLC's such a massive school (in student number) it probably would have large groups, are u in the symphony orchestra?

AzureBlue
24-06-2009, 11:36 AM
Listen to Gayne Suite No. 1, Sabre Dance, by Khatchaturian if you wish to listen to an example of glissando.
.
Whoa... that's an awesome piece! :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjTwVI_jyK8

Denis_Jessop
24-06-2009, 04:36 PM
...

Listen to Gayne (sic) Suite No. 1, Sabre Dance, by Khatchaturian if you wish to listen to an example of glissando.

Cheers

..

Or Bartok's String Quartet No.3, for example.

DJ

Schu
25-06-2009, 02:38 AM
Or Bartok's String Quartet No.3, for example.

DJ

Or, if it's done right, Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue has a true clarinet glissando (and, playing clarinet myself, I know what kind of oral flexibility this requires, and let me tell you it isn't easy! It means you bend the pitch of the note using just your mouth and throat and lungs, not your fingers shortening/lengthening the length of the tube)

Another fun true gliss. is in Shostakovich's Cello sonata, 2nd movement, where I believe it is scored as a glissando sul ponticello (you bow near the bridge, giving a weird flutey sound, while sliding your fingers along the string).

AzureBlue
25-06-2009, 01:03 PM
Or, if it's done right, Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue has a true clarinet glissando (and, playing clarinet myself, I know what kind of oral flexibility this requires, and let me tell you it isn't easy! It means you bend the pitch of the note using just your mouth and throat and lungs, not your fingers shortening/lengthening the length of the tube)
hahah that piece is awesome! :)
I've only attempted to sight-read a page or two of it (it's about 20-30 pages in total) on piano, but I never knew it was a clarinet piece too! Bending a note sounds quite fun though :lol:

Schu
25-06-2009, 02:09 PM
hahah that piece is awesome! :)
I've only attempted to sight-read a page or two of it (it's about 20-30 pages in total) on piano, but I never knew it was a clarinet piece too! Bending a note sounds quite fun though :lol:

It's actually an orchestral piece. It has solos for clarinet (right at the start with the glissando), saxophone and piano. What you're playing is called an orchestral reduction for piano.

AzureBlue
25-06-2009, 04:48 PM
It's actually an orchestral piece. It has solos for clarinet (right at the start with the glissando), saxophone and piano. What you're playing is called an orchestral reduction for piano.
Yeah, so is it a clarinet concerto, sax concerto, piano concerto or just random orchestral piece?

Sinister
25-06-2009, 06:53 PM
translation needed

Schu
25-06-2009, 08:47 PM
Yeah, so is it a clarinet concerto, sax concerto, piano concerto or just random orchestral piece?

A bit of all of them ;)

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
25-06-2009, 11:37 PM
satie
elgar
dvorak
rachmaninov
snoop dogg

AzureBlue
26-06-2009, 09:08 AM
satie
elgar
dvorak
rachmaninov
snoop dogg
Chopin
Debussy
Tchaikovsky
Rachmaninov
Liszt
Faure
:)

ER
26-06-2009, 09:26 AM
translation needed
classical music = listen and be quiet! :whistle: :owned: :lol:

AzureBlue
26-06-2009, 05:05 PM
A bit of all of them ;)
Cool :lol:
"Rhapsody in Blue is a musical composition by George Gershwin for solo piano and jazz band".
Nice glissando: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/18/Rhapsody_in_Blue_bb1-2.png

antichrist
26-06-2009, 06:20 PM
one of my favourite piano pieces is "Inferno" and I can't remember who the composer was. A very stirring piece with great climatic ending. I heard William Chen play it as Ashfield Town Hall a few years back.

AzureBlue
27-06-2009, 05:08 PM
Thanks very much, can't read all now as must go but loved this part about no 1 that I listen to daily:
Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 1 (Op. 13, 1896) premiered on 27 March 1897 in one of a long-running series of "Russian Symphony Concerts", but was torn apart by critics. In a particularly vitriolic review by César Cui, it was likened to a depiction of the seven plagues of Egypt and suggested that it would be admired by the "inmates" of a music conservatory in hell.

Will get back to rest later
Listen to Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 - A masterpiece!! :) :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

AzureBlue
27-06-2009, 06:00 PM
Listen to Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 - A masterpiece!! :) :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2M6UBpPbbI

Schu
01-07-2009, 02:16 PM
Listen to Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 - A masterpiece!! :) :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

#2 is good, but Rach piano concerto #3 is where it's at. Martha Argerich playing this is possibly one of the most amazing recordings ever. Also Rach symphony #2 is one of the most polished works that he ever wrote, but it still has more than your average dose of Rach POWER! Seeing that live was one of my favourite musical experiences.

Rach is a bit of a thing for me. I'm no brilliant pianist, I can just play a few nice pieces here and there, but partly because Rach had massive hands (apparently with his left hand he could do a straight chord [non-arpeggiated) of, going up, C, Eb, G, C, G) he is considered one of the most difficult composers to play, and I can play his prelude in G# minor pretty well, because my hands, though not to the extremes I mentioned Rach's hands were, are still pretty huge.

Denis_Jessop
01-07-2009, 03:43 PM
#2 is good, but Rach piano concerto #3 is where it's at. Martha Argerich playing this is possibly one of the most amazing recordings ever. Also Rach symphony #2 is one of the most polished works that he ever wrote, but it still has more than your average dose of Rach POWER! Seeing that live was one of my favourite musical experiences.

Rach is a bit of a thing for me. I'm no brilliant pianist, I can just play a few nice pieces here and there, but partly because Rach had massive hands (apparently with his left hand he could do a straight chord [non-arpeggiated) of, going up, C, Eb, G, C, G) he is considered one of the most difficult composers to play, and I can play his prelude in G# minor pretty well, because my hands, though not to the extremes I mentioned Rach's hands were, are still pretty huge.

A propos of which, as they say, see:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifKKlhYF53w

DJ

Schu
01-07-2009, 03:55 PM
A propos of which, as they say, see:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifKKlhYF53w

DJ

hehe, yeah, seen that video a few times before, pretty awesome :D

AzureBlue
01-07-2009, 04:15 PM
#2 is good, but Rach piano concerto #3 is where it's at. Martha Argerich playing this is possibly one of the most amazing recordings ever. Also Rach symphony #2 is one of the most polished works that he ever wrote, but it still has more than your average dose of Rach POWER! Seeing that live was one of my favourite musical experiences.

Rach is a bit of a thing for me. I'm no brilliant pianist, I can just play a few nice pieces here and there, but partly because Rach had massive hands (apparently with his left hand he could do a straight chord [non-arpeggiated) of, going up, C, Eb, G, C, G) he is considered one of the most difficult composers to play, and I can play his prelude in G# minor pretty well, because my hands, though not to the extremes I mentioned Rach's hands were, are still pretty huge.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZRbko3UsnQ&feature=channel_page
I reckon Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3 is more technically difficult than No. 2, but No. 2's more musical I reckon. Why does no one know Rach no. 1?
Yes, I was thinking he had huge hands, the chords at the start of no. 2 are massive...
Anyway, Piano Concerto No.2 is AMAZING, my favourite concerto :)
Tchaikovsky No. 1's pretty good too :)
and the Chopin Ballades, Scherzos, Waltzes, Etudes, Polonaises, Mazurkas, Nocturnes, Sonatas, Impromptus, Preludes and Piano Concertos LOL

AzureBlue
01-07-2009, 04:21 PM
A propos of which, as they say, see:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifKKlhYF53w

DJ
LOL
massive hands

Schu
01-07-2009, 07:37 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZRbko3UsnQ&feature=channel_page
I reckon Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3 is more technically difficult than No. 2, but No. 2's more musical I reckon. Why does no one know Rach no. 1?
Yes, I was thinking he had huge hands, the chords at the start of no. 2 are massive...
Anyway, Piano Concerto No.2 is AMAZING, my favourite concerto :)
Tchaikovsky No. 1's pretty good too :)
and the Chopin Ballades, Scherzos, Waltzes, Etudes, Polonaises, Mazurkas, Nocturnes, Sonatas, Impromptus, Preludes and Piano Concertos LOL

What does "more musical" mean? I hear people say it sometimes but I never quite know what it means... I usually assume it means "I like it more" :P which usually makes more sense.

One of my favourite of Rach's works are his variations on a theme by paganini for piano and orchestra. You should check that out if you like his piano concerti :) Personally, my favourite concerto isn't even for piano, it's Tchaikovsky's violin concerto (with Dvorak's cello concerto close behind, and Mozart's clarinet concerto not far behind that).

But my overall favourite piece of music is Tchaikovsky's 6th symphony. A close second to Janacek's 2nd string quartet. Janacek is one of those composers that everyone that hears him just loves, but still somehow doesn't get the recognition he deserves.

Denis_Jessop
01-07-2009, 09:09 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZRbko3UsnQ&feature=channel_page
I reckon Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3 is more technically difficult than No. 2, but No. 2's more musical I reckon. Why does no one know Rach no. 1?
Yes, I was thinking he had huge hands, the chords at the start of no. 2 are massive...
Anyway, Piano Concerto No.2 is AMAZING, my favourite concerto :)
Tchaikovsky No. 1's pretty good too :)
and the Chopin Ballades, Scherzos, Waltzes, Etudes, Polonaises, Mazurkas, Nocturnes, Sonatas, Impromptus, Preludes and Piano Concertos LOL

For sheer grandeur from the listener's point of view I'd go for Brahms 1 and 2. There are monumental recorded performances of both by Emil Gilels and the Berliner Philhamoniker conducted by Eugen Jochum from the 70s. I quite like the Rachmanov concertos but he is not my favourite composer by a long way. I was attracted to no.2 when I was a teenager in the mid 20th century :) so maybe it's young persons' music (meant in the best way and not at all derogatory).

There is a great swag of good piano concertos from the late 18th and 19th century. Among those not so far mentioned are all of Mozart's and Beethoven's, the two by Liszt, those of Mendelssohn, the Schumann and Weber's.

If you are getting into solo piano works, the Beethoven sonatas are unbeatable, I think. I also very much like Schubert and Schumann and some Brahms but enjoyment of their piano works depends a lot on the performer ( that is, much more so than usual) as they are very personal works that can be ruined by insensitive interpretation. That's just my view of course directed at operformances at the highest level. There is so much piano music around that you can spend years getting around it.



DJ

ER
01-07-2009, 09:24 PM
Yes, I was thinking he had huge hands, the chords at the start of no. 2 are massive...
Anyway, Piano Concerto No.2 is AMAZING, my favourite concerto
Tchaikovsky No. 1's pretty good too
and the Chopin Ballades, Scherzos, Waltzes, Etudes, Polonaises, Mazurkas, Nocturnes, Sonatas, Impromptus, Preludes and Piano Concertos LOL

Is that all???:doh: :wall:


There is a great swag of good piano concertos from the late 18th and 19th century. Among those not so far mentioned are all of Mozart's and Beethoven's, the two by Liszt, those of Mendelssohn, the Schumann and Weber's.
If you are getting into solo piano works, the Beethoven sonatas are unbeatable, I think. I also very much like Schubert and Schumann and some Brahms
Is that all??? :doh: :wall:



One of my favourite of Rach's works are his variations on a theme by paganini for piano and orchestra. You should check that out if you like his piano concerti Personally, my favourite concerto isn't even for piano, it's Tchaikovsky's violin concerto (with Dvorak's cello concerto close behind, and Mozart's clarinet concerto not far behind that).

But my overall favourite piece of music is Tchaikovsky's 6th symphony. A close second to Janacek's 2nd string quartet. Janacek is one of those composers that everyone that hears him just loves, but still somehow doesn't get the recognition he deserves.

Finally we are getting somewhere! :P

You are all so so so utter utter utter utter classicists! :P

I mean no Ravel, no Debussy, no Stravinsky???

I mean you are all worse than my harmony teacher she wouldn't go pass Haydn, she even thought of bloody Ludwig Van as modernist, I mean MERCY! :P

Schu
01-07-2009, 09:57 PM
For sheer grandeur from the listener's point of view I'd go for Brahms 1 and 2. There are monumental recorded performances of both by Emil Gilels and the Berliner Philhamoniker conducted by Eugen Jochum from the 70s.

Emil Gilels is awesome - shame he died so young! Have you heard Clifford Curzon's recording of Brahms #1 with George Szell? Not a big virtuosic performance, but a beautiful, sensitive performance.

Denis_Jessop
01-07-2009, 09:58 PM
JAK

I am a great fan of classical music from the beginning to the present. I tried to keep my last post short and so stopped before the 20th century. In piano music alone there we have Debussy and Ravel as you mentioned plus my favourite 20th C composer, Bela Bartok. I'll listen to almost anything once (though Stravinsky only reluctantly:( )and even my favourites list would cover pages. I'm never prepared to say that one work or another is my favourite a la ABC FM as I think that is a question that is unanswerable. There are myriads of possible opinions, all justifiable. For example I agree about the excellence of Janacek's music but, as for his quartets, I'd prefer Smetana's No1 and even No2 not to mention several of Dvorak's and that is just in the Czech league :)

DJ

Schu
01-07-2009, 10:02 PM
Finally we are getting somewhere! :P

You are all so so so utter utter utter utter classicists! :P

I mean no Ravel, no Debussy, no Stravinsky???

I mean you are all worse than my harmony teacher she wouldn't go pass Haydn, she even thought of bloody Ludwig Van as modernist, I mean MERCY! :P

It's funny that so many of the most popular 20th century composers used extensive modality (especially Debussy, Janacek, Sibelius, Vaughan Williams) and though the later ones were considered less avant-garde, Debussy and Janacek were certainly considered rule-breakers, all just for using some modes which by several centuries predated even the staves we use these days :P

AzureBlue
02-07-2009, 08:53 AM
Is that all???:doh: :wall:


Is that all??? :doh: :wall:




Finally we are getting somewhere! :P

You are all so so so utter utter utter utter classicists! :P

I mean no Ravel, no Debussy, no Stravinsky???

I mean you are all worse than my harmony teacher she wouldn't go pass Haydn, she even thought of bloody Ludwig Van as modernist, I mean MERCY! :P
DEBUSSY IS AWESOME!!!!
Images Book I - Reflets dans l'eau & HOMMAGE A RAMEAU
La fille aux cheveux de lin, Voiles
Preludes
Syrinx
everything... :lol:

AzureBlue
02-07-2009, 08:57 AM
JAK

I am a great fan of classical music from the beginning to the present. I tried to keep my last post short and so stopped before the 20th century. In piano music alone there we have Debussy and Ravel as you mentioned plus my favourite 20th C composer, Bela Bartok. I'll listen to almost anything once (though Stravinsky only reluctantly:( )and even my favourites list would cover pages. I'm never prepared to say that one work or another is my favourite a la ABC FM as I think that is a question that is unanswerable. There are myriads of possible opinions, all justifiable. For example I agree about the excellence of Janacek's music but, as for his quartets, I'd prefer Smetana's No1 and even No2 not to mention several of Dvorak's and that is just in the Czech league :)

DJ
Bartok's ok... I guess.
:lol: maybe cos I hated his Romanian Folk Dances which I played for my exam, though I don't really mind them now.
Mikrokosmos!!
and Bulgarian Folk Dances (love the last one, and there are really weird rhythms like 3+3+2/8)
CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA (because each instrument in the orchestra displays its own virtuoso part)
6 String Quartets
Cantata Profana
Music for Strings, percussion and celesta
Sonata for two pianos and percussion
and that's all I remember from my general knowldge...:P

AzureBlue
02-07-2009, 08:58 AM
Is that all??? :doh: :wall:

Well, apart from the fact that I counted the Fantasie-Impromptu an Impromptu I suppose probably not. The Chopin ballades are the best though! :)

AzureBlue
02-07-2009, 09:00 AM
If you are getting into solo piano works, the Beethoven sonatas are unbeatable, I think. I also very much like Schubert and Schumann and some Brahms but enjoyment of their piano works depends a lot on the performer ( that is, much more so than usual) as they are very personal works that can be ruined by insensitive interpretation. That's just my view of course directed at operformances at the highest level. There is so much piano music around that you can spend years getting around it. DJ
Yes, the Beethoven sonatas are awesome! Op. 2 No. 3 (or is it the other way around?) is great, especially the second movement.... so sombre.
and there are really fun broken octaves as well LOL :lol: :clap: :clap:

AzureBlue
02-07-2009, 09:02 AM
What does "more musical" mean? I hear people say it sometimes but I never quite know what it means... I usually assume it means "I like it more" :P which usually makes more sense.

One of my favourite of Rach's works are his variations on a theme by paganini for piano and orchestra. You should check that out if you like his piano concerti :) Personally, my favourite concerto isn't even for piano, it's Tchaikovsky's violin concerto (with Dvorak's cello concerto close behind, and Mozart's clarinet concerto not far behind that).

But my overall favourite piece of music is Tchaikovsky's 6th symphony. A close second to Janacek's 2nd string quartet. Janacek is one of those composers that everyone that hears him just loves, but still somehow doesn't get the recognition he deserves.
Melodiousness, sensitivity, sounding better I guess...
Yeah, and a bit of I like it more. :lol:

ER
02-07-2009, 09:05 AM
lol ok to all
Schu modal music is just great!
I once had to study parts of M. Praetorious Syntagma Musicum and was amazed by the richness, etc.
Jenny, good work to know all this stuff and enjoying it too!
Denis, you are so solid! wow, I didn't know you were so involved in music!
By the way I know personally some of the people involved in ABC FM programming. You 'd love to meet them!
Cheers to all!
PS youngsters do your scales and be quiet! :P

AzureBlue
02-07-2009, 09:26 AM
lol ok to all
Schu modal music is just great!
I once had to study parts of M. Praetorious Syntagma Musicum and was amazed by the richness, etc.
Jenny, good work to know all this stuff and enjoying it too!
Denis, you are so solid! wow, I didn't know you were so involved in music!
By the way I know personally some of the people involved in ABC FM programming. You 'd love to meet them!
Cheers to all!
PS youngsters do your scales and be quiet! :P
Lol, yeah ABC FM's pretty good in Classical music :)
What scales? I haven't played a single proper scale since Grade 7 (which was when I was in year 5).
LOL
no need for scales when you could be sight-reading awesome pieces instead :lol: :lol: :lol:

ER
02-07-2009, 09:50 AM
(...)
What scales? I haven't played a single proper scale since Grade 7 (which was when I was in year 5).
LOL
no need for scales when you could be sight-reading awesome pieces instead :lol: :lol: :lol:
What scales? No need for them??? You have another thing coming younsgster!!! I don't mean the simple single note scales up and down dah dah di dah dah da style!!! he he I mean the really complicated ones ie ascending with atonal quadriple arpegios and descending with say mixolydian augmented (or diminished) ones again in arpeggio form!:owned: give it a go, you 'll have fun! Schu, that includes you too! :owned:

AzureBlue
02-07-2009, 10:16 AM
What scales? No need for them??? You have another thing coming younsgster!!! I don't mean the simple single note scales up and down dah dah di dah dah da style!!! he he I mean the really complicated ones ie ascending with atonal quadriple arpegios and descending with say mixolydian augmented (or diminished) ones again in arpeggio form!:owned: give it a go, you 'll have fun! Schu, that includes you too! :owned:
Oh.. those boring ones.
Yeah, course I did them for Grade 7 (which I didn't even do an exam for).
And yes, I had to study the ancient Greek modes (Aeolian, Dorian, Mixolydian etc...) because Bartok's 6 Romanian Folk Dances were all based on those modes, as many folk tunes are. I assure you scales = boredom. :lol:

Schu
02-07-2009, 07:21 PM
Scales, arpeggios etc. are important, but only a tool, not an end unto themselves.

What is really interesting is to get people to try to sing modally. Tell someone to sing a locrian scale and see how frustrated they'll get!

AB - they're usually called the byzantine modes, they aren't really from ancient greece, just the names are ;) and given your definition of more musical, I'll have to disagree and say that I think #3 is more musical (meaning I like it more ;) )

justaknight - have you heard Vaughan Williams' mass in G minor? One of my favourites, all modal, and for double choir. The fun part is that he was an atheist, and even a descendant of Darwin! I got to sing the bass solos in that a couple of times in performances.

AzureBlue
03-07-2009, 08:49 AM
Scales, arpeggios etc. are important, but only a tool, not an end unto themselves.

What is really interesting is to get people to try to sing modally. Tell someone to sing a locrian scale and see how frustrated they'll get!

AB - they're usually called the byzantine modes, they aren't really from ancient greece, just the names are ;) and given your definition of more musical, I'll have to disagree and say that I think #3 is more musical (meaning I like it more ;) )

justaknight - have you heard Vaughan Williams' mass in G minor? One of my favourites, all modal, and for double choir. The fun part is that he was an atheist, and even a descendant of Darwin! I got to sing the bass solos in that a couple of times in performances.
The technical work (scales, arpeggios, chromatic, octaves, sevenths, thirds, dominant diminshed etc..) are for a solid technical foundation (as well as being a bore). Then, after enough of them, you just ditch them :)
Byzantine? I've never heard of it before... must've not done my general knowledge properly, I just called them Ancient Greek modes. :wall:

ER
03-07-2009, 10:14 AM
Byzantine? I've never heard of it before... must've not done my general knowledge properly, I just called them Ancient Greek modes. :wall:
oh it's only about 1000 years break (give or take a few centuries) :)

justaknight - have you heard Vaughan Williams' mass in G minor?
A masterpiece!

The technical work (scales, arpeggios, chromatic, octaves, sevenths, thirds, dominant diminshed etc..) are for a solid technical foundation (as well as being a bore). Then, after enough of them, you just ditch them :lol:
Jenny go tell that to Dave Brubeck or to Miles Davis! :P lol don't forget your helmet when you do! NOT! they are/were (Brubeck still alive and grooving at 89) the nicest guys! But they would tell you the same thing: DO YOUR SCALES JENNY! :P

AzureBlue
03-07-2009, 11:26 AM
Jenny go tell that to David Brubeck or to Miles Davis! :P lol don't forget your helmet when you do! NOT! they are/were (Brubeck still alive and grooving at 89) the nicest guys! But they would tell you the same thing: DO YOUR SCALES JENNY! :P
Ok, maybe on flute, but not on piano ;)
Who are David Brubeck and Miles Davis anyway?

Schu
03-07-2009, 02:46 PM
OK I can get not knowing who David Brubeck is but surely EVERYONE's heard of Miles Davis?

And y'know, you still need to play exercises every now and then (and all good musicians will agree about this), mainly so your skills don't atrophy, but partly so your intuitive understanding of theory, harmony etc. stay in good nick.

ER
03-07-2009, 03:22 PM
lol ok I rephrase that! How about Dave Brubeck?

AzureBlue
03-07-2009, 04:06 PM
OK I can get not knowing who David Brubeck is but surely EVERYONE's heard of Miles Davis?
Yeah I guess I've heard of Miles Davis but I don't exactly know who he is, and what type of musician he is...
Never heard of Brubeck though.

Denis_Jessop
03-07-2009, 04:48 PM
Yeah I guess I've heard of Miles Davis but I don't exactly know who he is, and what type of musician he is...
Never heard of Brubeck though.

Dave Brubeck was very big in the 1950s and 60s and his jazz was "sort of classical " style - there were jokes that he celebrated Mozart's birthday. He had a quintet in which he played piano but I can't remember who the other personnel were. One of his better known compositions was "Take Five". There are no doubt re-issues of his recordings available as almost all the big jazz names from that era have been re-issued on CD. (So have the classical musicians.)

DJ

ER
03-07-2009, 04:50 PM
...Never heard of Brubeck though.
well take five instead of one! :) that was a cryptic hint! LOL after Denis' post hint no more! :P

AzureBlue
03-07-2009, 05:16 PM
Ahh ok, a jazz pianist. His music is known for employing unusual time signatures, and superimposing contrasting rhythms, meters, and tonalities.

antichrist
05-07-2009, 03:49 PM
A few years back Clive Robson used to work for ABC classica musical station. He made jokes and irreverentcies and make happy people laugh, but the serious type weren't amused and he even received death threats. So he lost his job over it but he had doubled the ratings coz he changed it from being a stuffy serious station.

That is what I was doing in linking Womens LIb post re Joan Sutherland to this thread a few days ago.

May I ask Classic Music lovers did you appreciate the humour or do you agree with KB that I should be crucified over it. Denis, I esp would apprec your comments coz I am still laughing over that trodydite post of yours.

AzureBlue
06-07-2009, 02:11 PM
A few years back Clive Robson used to work for ABC classica musical station. He made jokes and irreverentcies and make happy people laugh, but the serious type weren't amused and he even received death threats. So he lost his job over it but he had doubled the ratings coz he changed it from being a stuffy serious station.

That is what I was doing in linking Womens LIb post re Joan Sutherland to this thread a few days ago.

May I ask Classic Music lovers did you appreciate the humour or do you agree with KB that I should be crucified over it. Denis, I esp would apprec your comments coz I am still laughing over that trodydite post of yours.
Yeah humour's always great in a radio station, but I never knew this station existed til... a few months ago. What kind of jokes? :lol:

antichrist
06-07-2009, 06:24 PM
Yeah humour's always great in a radio station, but I never knew this station existed til... a few months ago. What kind of jokes? :lol:

It was years ago so how can I remember an actual joke, maybe Denis can remember. BUt they were mainly irreverencies as stated - did you see my post in Women LIb referring to OPERA - probably the first mention of opera on this board. You did not mind did you. It was my last post there and what I got barred for - so it must be reading for that reason alone. Pavarotti even got a mention.

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:05 PM
PS youngsters do your scales and be quiet! :P
:lol: Scales aren't very quiet are they... more like <> shape.
OMG I just tried to play the school piccolo today, and it actually worked for the duration of a whole piece after half an hour of frustration, lol! It's so tiny and cute but when you play it for the first time ever, it can take a while to get used to, and you really need to tighten your embouchure alot, well, more than I expected anyhow! But anyway, it's cute and awesome and can play G4 and really high notes; another new instrument, horray! :)
Hmm wonder what instrument il try next...
Does anyone know if the oboe has the same fingering as the flute or the clarinet? :hmm:

Axiom
22-07-2009, 08:20 PM
Bai-j91Ddpc

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:22 PM
Nice, what's the actual piece called?

Axiom
22-07-2009, 08:25 PM
Nice, what's the actual piece called?
This is Eminence Symphony Orchestra's playing of the Betrayer and the Sun King.

Axiom
22-07-2009, 08:27 PM
AVjhlSzyR7A&feature=related

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:29 PM
0LP7o4HHp0A&hl&feature=related

Hommage a Rameau from Images Book I - Debussy

5ZRbko3UsnQ&hll&feature=related
Piano concerto No. 2 - Rachmaninoff :)

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:30 PM
Erm... how do u post youtube vids here? :hmm: :wall:

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:32 PM
Wait.... dont worrry iv got it. :)

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:34 PM
JbsvPMbC55A&hl&feature=related
Piano Concerto No. 1 - Tchaikovsky

Axiom
22-07-2009, 08:34 PM
Erm... how do u post youtube vids here? :hmm: :wall:
just put the number etc after the "=" from the address into the youtube tabs

[youtube] .......[/youtbe]

Axiom
22-07-2009, 08:35 PM
[/youtube]JbsvPMbC55A[/youtube]
Piano Concerto No. 1 - Tchaikovsky
its the "/" at the start thats the problem

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:37 PM
its the "/" at the start thats the problem
Yeah, oops I thought it was the letters in the URL but found out eventually...:lol:

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:41 PM
Cantabile et Presto - Enesco
9UQJKN8Xkfc

AzureBlue
22-07-2009, 08:43 PM
MsoUIBcl7iw

Ballade Op 38 No 2 - Chopin :clap:

Schu
23-07-2009, 12:21 PM
Does anyone know if the oboe has the same fingering as the flute or the clarinet? :hmm:

Definitely not the same as the clarinet - the clarinet is a closed pipe, so it has odd numbered harmonics (so overblowing won't get you octaves like other instruments), meaning the fingering is fundamentally different to that of the saxophone, flute, oboe, basically all woodwinds. I'm pretty sure oboe has fairly unique fingering.

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 04:43 PM
Definitely not the same as the clarinet - the clarinet is a closed pipe, so it has odd numbered harmonics (so overblowing won't get you octaves like other instruments), meaning the fingering is fundamentally different to that of the saxophone, flute, oboe, basically all woodwinds. I'm pretty sure oboe has fairly unique fingering.
Nooooo, ok, well then does the alto flute have the same fingering as the flute and piccolo?
And how do reeds work? Don't play any reeded instruments, but I'm just interested... :) :hmm:

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 04:46 PM
mWIb_BzOwGA

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 04:48 PM
LLbpQl1cCl8

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 04:54 PM
7QY9Y95sgoo

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 05:06 PM
RR7eUSFsn28

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 05:09 PM
1surdCTKB9A

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 05:10 PM
fmbyI3_qRLw

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 05:22 PM
MswHKA4dako

AzureBlue
23-07-2009, 05:23 PM
2uXNM3FLd_U

Schu
11-08-2009, 11:34 AM
Since we're link-spamming, how about this:

What's the Opera game, doc? (http://schubomb.livejournal.com/47330.html)

It's my analysis of the Opera game that everyone knows (or at least should) but with a little bit of... let's call it operatic quirk ;)

AzureBlue
11-08-2009, 04:43 PM
Since we're link-spamming, how about this:

What's the Opera game, doc? (http://schubomb.livejournal.com/47330.html)

It's my analysis of the Opera game that everyone knows (or at least should) but with a little bit of... let's call it operatic quirk ;)
Yep we all love link-spamming! :)

antichrist
28-05-2010, 05:46 PM
I heard the climatic ending of a piano (and maybe violin) piece about a month ago. Does Rachmanoff(?) rhapsody no 43 make any sence?

AzureBlue
28-05-2010, 05:54 PM
I heard the climatic ending of a piano (and maybe violin) piece about a month ago. Does Rachmanoff(?) rhapsody no 43 make any sence?
Do you mean Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 - S. Rachmaninov?

antichrist
28-05-2010, 06:00 PM
Do you mean Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 - S. Rachmaninov?

It certainly sounds like it. Thanks very very much. Does it have a big climatic ending?

AzureBlue
28-05-2010, 06:24 PM
It certainly sounds like it. Thanks very very much. Does it have a big climatic ending?
It is a set of 24 variations, does that sound right? Not sure about the finale, though maybe search up variations 19-24 for the finale. "Although Rachmaninoff's work is performed in one stretch without breaks, it can be divided into three sections, corresponding to the three movements of a concerto: up to variation 11 corresponds to the first movement, variations 12 to 18 are the equivalent of a slow movement, and the remaining variations make a finale."

Denis_Jessop
28-05-2010, 09:33 PM
If the piece was for piano and orchestra it was likely to have been the Paganini Rhapsody as his only other well-known piano and orchestra compositions are the 4 piano concertos. It's a bit problematic whether the ending can be called climactic though as the last few notes are a quiet impish solo piano passage preceded by various ups and downs characterisitic both of a rhapsody and of Rachmaninov.

DJ

antichrist
06-06-2010, 06:52 PM
Schumann said something like: music is to lighten the heart in the dark heart of man

Janis Joplin does it for me

(somehow I have tech problems with this post??)

antichrist
13-06-2010, 06:22 PM
this arvo in Byron Theatre I seen the 2008 Sydney Piano Competition winner. when he played energetic pieces he was terrific. Other times very good but not that special. I like big climaxes of Beethoven.

antichrist
20-07-2010, 06:33 PM
about a year ago I was cycling around the Bay for a lengthy period, and began humming a classical tune I was composing as I was going. After a period of approx 40 mins I had a pretty impressive tune, with many variations. Then it hit me that the big composers are not that special. One just needs a bit of imaginaton and time to develop,edit, improve etc.

Before that I compared the greats like Beethoven on equal to our chess gods, but after that I consider our chess greats way above them. Those with the ability to play about 30 games blind simul are the champs.

Mephistopheles
22-07-2010, 08:37 AM
about a year ago I was cycling around the Bay for a lengthy period, and began humming a classical tune I was composing as I was going. After a period of approx 40 mins I had a pretty impressive tune, with many variations. Then it hit me that the big composers are not that special. One just needs a bit of imaginaton and time to develop,edit, improve etc.
Coming up with a tune is a tiny portion of the battle won. Consider the complex process of orchestration which has, if anything, become more difficult over time as the "rules" governing what people like to listen to have changed and expanded.

I barfed out two fairly derivative symphonies when I was in my late teens and, thanks to the marvels of computer technology, was able to enter my scores into an appropriate sequencer and listen to them in all their glory some years later. They had a coupla good tunes and the structure was there but the orchestration was pretty close to rubbish. Having a basic understanding of how an orchestra works isn't enough - it takes talent and not many of us have that.

My fairly extensive knowledge of musical theory has taught me how to stick together a passable piece of four part harmony for a given melody, it's unlikely to be anything more than merely competent because, at best, I have a limited talent for knowing when it will sound good to break what the accepted rules are. Bach, on the other hand, knew exactly what he was doing in that regard and produced magic.

Yet another example is contrapuntal keyboard composition. I've knocked out a fugue based on a simple subject but I could only stretch to two voices - the simple notion of trying for three made me break out in a sweat. Composition is more than "tune + mathematics = excellence"; it's a complex beast and if everyone could do it then there would have been more music composed that equalled that of the (few) recognised "great" composers.

Speaking of contrapuntal, this is just amazing. The choice of synthesiser timbres isn't as adventurous as Walter Carlos managed on Switched On Bach but they are definitely pleasing and appropriate. The use of the Korg DSS-1 struck me for some reason - perhaps because it's such a serious-looking instrument. The performance almost beggars comprehension for me as I've never been able to co-ordinate all of my limbs sufficiently well to play organ music of any reasonable difficulty. Enjoy:

The "Jig Fugue" on synthesisers (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdEGiELy7h0)

antichrist
23-07-2010, 11:34 AM
The performance almost beggars comprehension for me as I've never been able to co-ordinate all of my limbs sufficiently well to play organ music of any reasonable difficulty. Enjoy: - from above

AC
What? my mum only had 6 months of lessons when a kid (due to her young brother dying then lights off for 5 years) yet she ended up the main organist at local cathedral/church earning big bucks, and also conducting choir with ex-opera house stars in it. It is not what you have got but how you use it.

She only had to hear a song once or twice on the radio and she could belt it out on the piano.

Unfortunately, due to chasing bucks she turned form blues to church music. She was a great sachmo imitator

Mephistopheles
23-07-2010, 11:42 AM
What? my mum only had 6 months of lessons when a kid (due to her young brother dying then lights off for 5 years) yet she ended up the main organist at local cathedral/church earning big bucks, and also conducting choir with ex-opera house stars in it. It is not what you have got but how you use it.
True but what you describe indicates that your dear old mum was blessed with scads of talent to start with. After all, virtuosity despite lack of training is more an indicator of true talent than virtuosity obtained through training.

antichrist
14-10-2010, 04:47 PM
Fancy no one mentioned Dame Joan Sutherland dying, ABC Classic FM had a whole day on her plus some of the next day. Plus the Herald had a few pages on her.

O'Farrell from NSW Libs wants to name the Opera Hall after her at the Syd Opera House, the funny part is that during interviews she really ran the hall down. Accoustics, space, building materials etc everything.

She had the same taste in architecture I had - no concrete brutalism thank you very much.

antichrist
10-01-2011, 06:47 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWh_2Iit3Ek&feature=related

antichrist
25-07-2011, 11:04 AM
I attended a piano concert put on by Oliver She all Chopin, and the guy seated next to me asked me to stop breathing through my nose but through my mouth - and we weren't kissing by the way. Then later I caught him doing exactly the same sin - thru his nose plus he coughed a few times

Desmond
25-11-2011, 07:48 PM
20 mins that you won't ask to get back. Promise.

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/benjamin_zander_on_music_and_passion.html

Mr. Pawn
24-05-2012, 10:32 AM
My favourite instrument (listening only) is the piano, what is yours?

Good; certainly worthy of a bump ;)


P.S. Was a two-handed glissando ever played, a hand on the white and black keys simultaneously? If not I will do one and make history.

I can't recall it in any pieces. However, 2-handed and 1-handed octave glisses are more popular (1-handed ones that spring to mind: Balakirev "Islamey" and Brahms Paganini Variations [Book 1?])

Rincewind
24-05-2012, 11:38 AM
This is worth looking at if you are Australian based and interested in opera.

http://www.themetinaustralia.info/

Denis_Jessop
24-05-2012, 12:03 PM
This is worth looking at if you are Australian based and interested in opera.

http://www.themetinaustralia.info/

Likewise, I was saddened to hear of the death of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau the other day at the age of 86.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/19/arts/music/dietrich-fischer-dieskau-german-baritone-dies-at-86.html?_r=2&pagewanted=1

DJ

Laserlite
27-06-2012, 11:23 PM
UDtBLRZgk68

Rincewind
04-04-2013, 08:29 PM
Sadly Tommy Tycho passed away this morning aged 84 from complications of pneumonia.

Rincewind
20-01-2014, 11:37 PM
Seems I only post in this thread now when a famous classical musician passes away.

Just heard that Claudio Abbado has died. RIP.

WCBwbQTDLKQ

antichrist
19-10-2014, 04:09 PM
http://video.mit.edu/watch/chopin-piano-concerto-no-1-in-e-minor-op-11-8645/

I can't recall hearing before

antichrist
19-10-2014, 04:13 PM
http://www.perthconcerthall.com.au/eventDisplay.aspx?ID=1466

I think this was the piece was listening to in arvo on ABC Classic which the announcer declared it was a fantastic recording - bulldust rubbish - through delicate parts there is pesistent coughing from an audience member, completely ruined the whole piece

when will they invent soundproof head bags

AzureBlue
19-10-2014, 05:50 PM
Chopin and Rachmaninov I like! :)
I especially love the second movement of Chopin's Op 11 concerto, immensely beautiful and relaxing... as well as Rach's 2nd.
My favourites are: Chopin's fourth and first ballades, Fantasie Op 49, Barcarolle Op 60, Grande Polonaise Brillante, Nocturnes Op 27/2, Op 62/1, 15/2, 9/1, 55/2 and Waltz 69/1. Actually... hard to think of a piece by Chopin that I dislike :P

aX7e6etJOSI
Chopin's Ballade #4, F minor, Op. 52
'The fourth ballade is considered the greatest of the four and generally the epitome of of romantic music, which can be compared to 'Mona Lisa' in painting. It is not overstating to say so. This ballade captures almost all elements of musical ideas and human expressions with just the piano; it also summarizes Chopin's lifetime creative experience.' http://www.ourchopin.com/analysis/ballade.html

Also stumbled upon a lovely Ian Clarke flute piece that I hadn't heard of before.
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antichrist
19-10-2014, 06:31 PM
http://www.abc.net.au/classic/music-listings/
19th Oct 2014
Sunday Afternoon Concert
with Damien Beaumont
2:00PM
Lucerne Festival 2014
Recorded in the Culture and Congress Centre, Lucerne
Lucerne Festival OrchestraMaurizio Pollini, pianoAndris Nelsons, conductor
Chopin
Piano Concerto No 1 in E minor, Op 11


Azureblue, this was the version I heard today at 2pm, it was so beautiful, the piano sounded very rich. can you actually find the link of the piece. thanks, I have to run

Adamski
20-10-2014, 12:10 PM
AzureBlue: "Chopin and Rachmaninov I like!"

Me too! The concert yesterday sounds like it was great, AC.

Denis_Jessop
20-10-2014, 05:05 PM
http://www.abc.net.au/classic/music-listings/
19th Oct 2014
Sunday Afternoon Concert
with Damien Beaumont
2:00PM
Lucerne Festival 2014
Recorded in the Culture and Congress Centre, Lucerne
Lucerne Festival OrchestraMaurizio Pollini, pianoAndris Nelsons, conductor
Chopin
Piano Concerto No 1 in E minor, Op 11


Azureblue, this was the version I heard today at 2pm, it was so beautiful, the piano sounded very rich. can you actually find the link of the piece. thanks, I have to run

It's no wonder you liked it. Not only is the concerto a beautiful work but Maurizio Pollini, now 72, is one of the truly great modern pianists. Try this link from which you can also get to some other great pianists. Krystian Zimerman, who is there, made an extremely fine recording of the 2 Chopin concertos for DGG a few years ago.

http://www.theguardian.com/music/maurizio-pollini

DJ

antichrist
09-11-2014, 09:55 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyAzlVwlETg

This Leon Berger song is a classical/rock combo - listen the whole way through how the classical strands give a magnificent uplifting and ending. They were brilliant performances at the Muso's Club in Sydney - when the popular and classical played tag team

antichrist
29-03-2015, 10:02 PM
On ABC classic the other day they played a composition by Malcolm Williamson titled Concerto for Two Pianos and String Orchestra (1972), well the piece was so slow, simple and thin on notes they would have only needed half of one piano and one hand to play it. Talk about false advertising.

antichrist
08-08-2015, 02:33 PM
Is Shostakovich's seventh symphony (The Leningrad) to classical music what Fischer Random is to chess?

antichrist
27-07-2018, 07:27 PM
Why is it only after listening to Stauss for about 50 years did ABC Classic begin referring to Johann Strauss as Johann Strauss Jnr?

William AS
27-07-2018, 11:56 PM
Why is it only after listening to Stauss for about 50 years did ABC Classic begin referring to Johann Strauss as Johann Strauss Jnr?

Sorry to learn you are having hearing difficulties AC. ;):D

antichrist
28-07-2018, 02:13 AM
Sorry to learn you are having hearing difficulties AC. ;):D

Recently I do have slight hearing difficulties but how come professional music commentators have had speaking difficulties for 50 years until now?

and your sign off line: A wise prince will also realise that this can be achieved more successfully by means other than rape, pillage, greed, lies, deceit or misinformation.

Surely was referring to Donald Trump as the unwise