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MichaelBaron
29-10-2016, 11:22 AM
Saw the following little article/blogpost today!
http://pathtochessmastery.blogspot.com.au/2012/12/analyzing-your-own-games-is-more-than.html

This is exactly what I keep telling my chess students, chess friends and all the other chess people I bump into! We really need to go through our own games if we need to improve. Certainly more productive activity than hours of opening study :).

Desmond
29-10-2016, 09:16 PM
Great idea!

I notice that the article recommends using computer programs. I guess that makes it easier to improve, huh. So if everyone has access, I guess the overall standard is likely to improve, huh.

MichaelBaron
30-10-2016, 11:11 AM
Great idea!

I notice that the article recommends using computer programs. I guess that makes it easier to improve, huh. So if everyone has access, I guess the overall standard is likely to improve, huh.

Step 1, analyze without computer. However, computers are great for checking the analysis. Spending hours on each game will pay off. I believe, the first person to go through his own games so deeply wss Botvinnik

Desmond
30-10-2016, 02:00 PM
Step 1, analyze without computer. Step one, enter the moves into your computer, even if you're not using an engine initially. It's quicker to play through the game, make annotations etc.


However, computers are great for checking the analysis.Great point! Every coach should incorporate computers into improving their students' play.

Adamski
30-10-2016, 04:21 PM
Saw the following little article/blogpost today!
http://pathtochessmastery.blogspot.com.au/2012/12/analyzing-your-own-games-is-more-than.html

This is exactly what I keep telling my chess students, chess friends and all the other chess people I bump into! We really need to go through our own games if we need to improve. Certainly more productive activity than hours of opening study :).

Compleyely agree. The challenge is making the time for deep analysis.

MichaelBaron
03-11-2016, 10:45 AM
Compleyely agree. The challenge is making the time for deep analysis.

Well, the challenge is indeed finding time and having desire to study chess. However, there are plenty of ''new generation'' players who spend endless hours analyzing openings. I think this time could be better-spent focusing on other aspects of the game - in particular analyzing their games.

ER
03-11-2016, 12:13 PM
Pre-game analysis. I worked out this trap based on lines from a real game vs a junior at MCC Allegro a couple of weeks ago.
This time I decided to play it against a much higher rated opponent:

Event 2016 Gosford Open
Site Gosford Leagues Club
Date 29/10/2016
Round 2
White Bevan Clouston
Black Elliott Renzies
Result 0-1


1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. c3 d5 4. exd5 Qxd5 5. cxd4 e5 6. Nf3 e4 7. Ng5 Bb4+ 8.
Nc3 Nc6 9. Qa4 Qxd4 10. Bd2

Black to play and win a piece!

Adamski
03-11-2016, 11:22 PM
...Bxc3 will do it.

ER
04-11-2016, 08:32 AM
...Bxc3 will do it.

Correct! this easy position, however, wasn't intended as a problem solving exercise
but as an example of what a bit of home preparation can achieve against seemingly
routine moves! :)

MichaelBaron
04-11-2016, 12:32 PM
...Bxc3 will do it.

Tempting for white to play 5. Nf3 with excellent development for the pawn.

ER
05-11-2016, 03:10 AM
Tempting for white to play 5. Nf3 with excellent development for the pawn.

5.Νf3 Bg4 maybe?