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Becky
26-05-2016, 05:11 PM
Hi from Tashkent, Uzbekistan!!! In a few hours, the Asian Individual Chess Championship will take place. I'm playing in the Women's section, so wish me luck! It's a great honor for me to represent Australia!! I'm the only Aussie here, although there's a Kiwi (Stephen Lukey) in the open.

Here's the chess-results pages:

Open (or Men's): http://chess-results.com/tnr222019.aspx?lan=1
Women's: http://chess-results.com/tnr222020.aspx?lan=1

The top boards will be live: Open https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/asian-continental-2016/1/1/1 and Women https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/asian-womens-continental-2016/1/1/1

I'm the 32-nd seed in a 35-player tournament, so it's going to be a difficult tournament for me. Nevertheless, I'll be proudly waving the (metaphorical) Australian flag regardless of the outcome. Wish me luck!!! Maybe I can do a Steven Bradbury. (:

Andy009
26-05-2016, 06:52 PM
All the best and enjoy the tournament!

Becky
26-05-2016, 11:20 PM
Here's me (black) getting destroyed by WGM Bhakti Kulkarni (white) in round 1.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 Bg4 5.Nc3 e6 6.h3 Bh5 7.g4 Bg6 8.Qb3 Qb6 9.
c5 Qxb3 10.axb3 Ne4 11.Ne5 Nxc3 12.bxc3 Bc2 13.b4 Nd7 14.Nxd7 Kxd7 15.b5
Be7 16.bxc6+ bxc6 17.Ba6 Rhb8 18.Ba3 Rb1+ 19.Rxb1 Bxb1 20.Ke2 Bc2 21.Rc1
Bb3 22.Kd3 Rb8 23.Bb4 Bd8 24.Ra1 Bc7 25.Kd2 Ra8 26.Bb7 Rb8 27.Rxa7 Bc4 28.
Ba8 Rb5 29.g5 f6 30.f4 Bf1 31.h4 Bg2 32.Ra6 Rb8 33.Bxc6+ Kd8 34.gxf6 gxf6
35.Ba4 Bh3 36.Bc2 h6 37.f5 1-0

I thought I was going okay, but she seemed to have everything under control throughout the game.

MichaelBaron
27-05-2016, 06:24 PM
Here's me (black) getting destroyed by WGM Bhakti Kulkarni (white) in round 1.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 Bg4 5.Nc3 e6 6.h3 Bh5 7.g4 Bg6 8.Qb3 Qb6 9.
c5 Qxb3 10.axb3 Ne4 11.Ne5 Nxc3 12.bxc3 Bc2 13.b4 Nd7 14.Nxd7 Kxd7 15.b5
Be7 16.bxc6+ bxc6 17.Ba6 Rhb8 18.Ba3 Rb1+ 19.Rxb1 Bxb1 20.Ke2 Bc2 21.Rc1
Bb3 22.Kd3 Rb8 23.Bb4 Bd8 24.Ra1 Bc7 25.Kd2 Ra8 26.Bb7 Rb8 27.Rxa7 Bc4 28.
Ba8 Rb5 29.g5 f6 30.f4 Bf1 31.h4 Bg2 32.Ra6 Rb8 33.Bxc6+ Kd8 34.gxf6 gxf6
35.Ba4 Bh3 36.Bc2 h6 37.f5 1-0

I thought I was going okay, but she seemed to have everything under control throughout the game.

You were up against a GM...so all in all - not a bad effort!

Becky
27-05-2016, 10:11 PM
Oddly, I played Sarasadat Khademalsharieh in round 2, who is the top seed (rating 2459). I lost again; here is our game:

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bf4 c5 4.c3 b6 5.e3 Bb7 6.dxc5 bxc5 7.Bd6 Bxd6 8.Qxd6
Ne4 9.Qe5 O-O 10.Na3 d6 11.Qf4 f5 12.h4 Nd7 13.Ng5 Qe7 14.Rd1 Ndf6 15.Bc4
d5 16.Be2 e5 17.Qf3 Nd6 18.Qh3 Rab8 19.O-O Bc8 20.Rd2 h6 21.Nf3 f4 22.Qh1
fxe3 23.fxe3 Nde4 24.Rfd1 Nxd2 25.Rxd2 Bg4 26.g3 Ne4 27.Nxe5 Qxe5 0-1

It seems I over-evaluated 6.dxc5 bxc5 7.Bd6 and should have just played a developing move. I was intending 6.Nbd2 or 6.Bd2.

9.Qf4 is a blunder, which I didn't play by sheer luck (I didn't calculate this line).

The computer gives 15.Nxe4 Nxe4 16.f3 e5 17.Bc4+ which I thought was refuted by 17...d5 but the computer gives 18.Rxd5 exf4 19.Rd7+ Qf7 20.Rxb7. It seems 17...Kh8 18.Qh2 Nf6 is still better for black, though.

Also, I simply did not see that 15...e5 was possible until after it was played. Unfortunately, 16.Qxf5 Bc8 17.Qf3 Bg4 and bye bye queen.

Becky
29-05-2016, 10:32 PM
In round 4, I was black against Sitora Saparova from Uzbekistan (rating 1761). I misplayed a king+pawn endgame and a win slipped between my fingers. Overall, though, I was happy with this game: I feel like I played it as I like to play the Caro-Kann, aiming for an endgame with a better pawn structure.

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Bf5 5.Ng3 Bg6 6.Bf4 e6 7.Nf3 Nd7 8.Bd3
Bxd3 9.Qxd3 Ngf6 10.O-O Be7 11.c4 O-O 12.Rfe1 Rc8 13.Rad1 Re8 14.a3 Nf8
15.Ne4 Ng6 16.Bg3 Nh5 17.Ne5 Nxg3 18.Qxg3 Qc7 19.b4 Red8 20.Nxg6 hxg6 21.
Qe3 Rd7 22.Nc5 Bxc5 23.dxc5 Rcd8 24.Rxd7 Qxd7 25.Kf1 Qd3+ 26.Qxd3 Rxd3 27.
Re3 Rxe3 28.fxe3 Kh7 29.b5 Kh6 30.Ke2 Kg5 31.Kd3 Kf5 32.Kd4 f6 33.a4 a5
34.h3 e5+ 35.Kd3 Kg5 36.g3 Kf5 37.e4+ Kg5 38.Ke3 Kh5 39.Kf3 Kg5 40.Ke3 Kh6
41.Kf3 Kh5 42.Ke3 g5 43.Kf2 g4 44.h4 g5 45.hxg5 Kxg5 46.Ke3 Kg6 47.Kd3 Kf7
48.Ke3 Ke6 49.Kd3 Kd7 50.Kc3 Kc7 51.Kd3 Kd7 52.Ke3 Ke6 53.Kd3 Ke7 54.Ke3
Ke6 1/2-1/2

The bad move was 44...g5 which I calculated gave me a passed pawn, which I was intending to use as a distraction while I gobble up the other pawns. The correct move was 44...g6 followed by 44...f5. I miscalculated this, fearing (a) that white could end up with a passed h-pawn tying up my king, or (b) if white doesn't capture on f5 and instead defends the d4 pawn, there will be a pawn race after 45...f4 46.gxf4 exf4 (the computer suggests something along the lines of 44...g6 45.Ke2 f5 46.Ke3 f4+ 47.gxf4 exf4+ 48.Kxf4 Kxh4 49.e5 g3 50.e6 g2 51.e7 g1=Q 52.e8=Q Qf1+ 53.Ke5 Qe1+ 54.Kd6 Qxe8 so there would have been a pawn race). As a result, I chose what I thought was the less risky win (unfortunately, it wasn't a win---but it was less risky).

Nobody has a score of 0 for the tournament now. (:

Frank
29-05-2016, 11:14 PM
(:

Capablanca-Fan
30-05-2016, 01:29 AM
In round 4, I was black against Sitora Saparova from Uzbekistan (rating 1761). I misplayed a king+pawn endgame and a win slipped between my fingers. Overall, though, I was happy with this game: I feel like I played it as I like to play the Caro-Kann, aiming for an endgame with a better pawn structure.

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Bf5 5.Ng3 Bg6 6.Bf4 e6 7.Nf3 Nd7 8.Bd3
Bxd3 9.Qxd3 Ngf6 10.O-O Be7 11.c4 O-O 12.Rfe1 Rc8 13.Rad1 Re8 14.a3 Nf8
15.Ne4 Ng6 16.Bg3 Nh5 17.Ne5 Nxg3 18.Qxg3 Qc7 19.b4 Red8 20.Nxg6 hxg6 21.
Qe3 Rd7 22.Nc5 Bxc5 23.dxc5 Rcd8 24.Rxd7 Qxd7 25.Kf1 Qd3+ 26.Qxd3 Rxd3 27.
Re3 Rxe3 28.fxe3 Kh7 29.b5 Kh6 30.Ke2 Kg5 31.Kd3 Kf5 32.Kd4 f6 33.a4 a5
34.h3 e5+ 35.Kd3 Kg5 36.g3 Kf5 37.e4+ Kg5 38.Ke3 Kh5 39.Kf3 Kg5 40.Ke3 Kh6
41.Kf3 Kh5 42.Ke3 g5 43.Kf2 g4 44.h4 g5 45.hxg5 Kxg5 46.Ke3 Kg6 47.Kd3 Kf7
48.Ke3 Ke6 49.Kd3 Kd7 50.Kc3 Kc7 51.Kd3 Kd7 52.Ke3 Ke6 53.Kd3 Ke7 54.Ke3
Ke6 1/2-1/2

The bad move was 44...g5 which I calculated gave me a passed pawn, which I was intending to use as a distraction while I gobble up the other pawns. The correct move was 44...g6 followed by 44...f5. I miscalculated this, fearing (a) that white could end up with a passed h-pawn tying up my king, or (b) if white doesn't capture on f5 and instead defends the d4 pawn, there will be a pawn race after 45...f4 46.gxf4 exf4 (the computer suggests something along the lines of 44...g6 45.Ke2 f5 46.Ke3 f4+ 47.gxf4 exf4+ 48.Kxf4 Kxh4 49.e5 g3 50.e6 g2 51.e7 g1=Q 52.e8=Q Qf1+ 53.Ke5 Qe1+ 54.Kd6 Qxe8 so there would have been a pawn race). As a result, I chose what I thought was the less risky win (unfortunately, it wasn't a win---but it was less risky).

Nobody has a score of 0 for the tournament now. (:
I prefer following Capablanca's principle of advancing the majority P that is unopposed, i.e. 28... f5, then bringing the K towards the centre behind it. Advancing the other pawns as per the game increases the danger that the position will become too blocked for K penetration, as happened.

Becky
30-05-2016, 03:57 PM
I prefer following Capablanca's principle of advancing the majority P that is unopposed, i.e. 28... f5, then bringing the K towards the centre behind it. Advancing the other pawns as per the game increases the danger that the position will become too blocked for K penetration, as happened.

Interesting. After 27.Re3 I sat for about half an hour deciding between 27...Rd4, and 28...Kh7, 28...f5. I eventually decided to go with the king+pawn endgame despite being unable to calculate it to the end, expecting the king+rook+pawn endgame was drawish, seeing no winning chances for white, and seeing no obvious way for white to prevent the creation of a passed pawn. Unfortunately, the spent time also played a role later on. I went for the 28...Kh7 line because I was afraid of white's king getting to d4 and e5. If I was aware of Capablanca's principle, maybe I could have chosen the 28...f5 line, and also saved time in the process. Although, even then, the computer doesn't calculate a simple win.

Becky
31-05-2016, 12:03 AM
Round 5, I was white vs. Sharmin Shirin Sultana from Bangladesh (rating 2047). It was a bit of a blunderfest (particularly just before the 40 move increment), and I lost in the end.

1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.Nf3 e6 4.c3 d5 5.exd5 Qxd5 6.cxd4 Nc6 7.Nc3 Qd6 8.
Bc4 Nf6 9.O-O a6 10.Re1 b5 11.Bb3 Na5 12.Bc2 Bb7 13.Bg5 Be7 14.Qd3 Nd5
15.Ne4 Qd8 16.Bd2 Nc4 17.Qb3 Nxd2 18.Nfxd2 Nb4 19.Nc5 Bxc5 20.dxc5
Qxd2 21.Rxe6+ Kf8 22.Rae1 Bd5 23.Qg3 fxe6 24.Qd6+ Kf7 25.Qd7+ Kg8 26.
Rd1 Qg5 27.Be4 Qd8 28.Rxd5 Qxd7 29.Rxd7 Nd5 30.Rxd5 exd5 31.Bxd5+ Kf8
32.Bxa8 Ke7 33.Be4 Rd8 34.g3 h6 35.a4 Rd4 36.Bb7 Rxa4 37.Kg2 a5 38.b3
Rb4 39.Bd5 a4 40.bxa4 bxa4 41.Kf3 a3 42.h4 Rb2 43.Kg4 Rxf2 44.Kh5 Kf6
45.g4 a2 46.c6 a1=Q 47.c7 Rc2 48.g5+ hxg5 49.hxg5+ Ke7 50.Kg6 Rxc7 51.
Kh7 Qb1+ 52.g6 Kf6 53.Bf7 Qh1+ 0-1

I guess nobody can argue that I resign too early. (:

I was pleased with the outcome of the opening, with a safe king and my opponent struggling to castle.

I felt unhappy after playing 16.Bd2. The simple 16.Bxe7 Qxe7 17.a3 is a better way at protecting the b4-square [and sets a trap: 17...Nf4 18.Qd2 with a double attack 18...Qc7 holds on, but it's not great]. I was a bit afraid of 17...Nc4, but it doesn't seem so bad post-mortem. I wanted to play 17.Nc5 but rejected it because of 17...Nxb2. Stockfish thinks it's okay to play, but I'm not convinced. The computer thinks 18.Nexd2 is better, as I don't trade both bishops for knights.

19.Nc5 was a blunder; I missed that the pawn was pinned. Oops! After this, I'm playing for complications; we were both low on time. My opponent made some blunders and I ended up with a bishop and two pawns for a rook. Without much time to think, I hastily played up to move 40 (where the extra 30 minutes kicked in) but didn't immediately get out of the mindset that there was a time scramble. 44.Kh5 was laughable mistake (I would have resigned after 44...Rf5+), but my opponent was also still in time scramble mode and hastily played 44...Kf6. Nevertheless, I was lost, and it only took a few moves before I was aiming only for a swindle.

Becky
01-06-2016, 12:11 AM
Round 6 I was black against WIM Iman Hasan Mohammed Al-Rufaye from Iran (rating 2017; who is my room-mate at the moment)


1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.Bd3 Nc6 5.c3 Nf6 6.Bf4 Bg4 7.Qb3 Qd7 8.Nd2
e6 9.Ngf3 Bd6 10.Bxd6 Qxd6 11.O-O O-O 12.Rfe1 a6 13.Ne5 Bh5 14.Qxb7 Ne7
15.Qb4 Qc7 16.Qb3 Rfb8 17.Qc2 Rb6 18.Nb3 Rab8 19.Rab1 Bg6 20.Nc5 Bxd3 21.
Ncxd3 Ne4 22.f3 Nd6 23.Nc5 Nc4 24.Nxc4 dxc4 25.Qa4 Nd5 26.Qxc4 Rb5 27.b4
a5 28.a4 R5b6 29.b5 Rc8 30.Qd3 Rd6 31.Ne4 Nf4 32.Qd2 Rd5 33.Rbc1 e5 34.g3
Ne6 35.Qa2 Rcd8 36.dxe5 Rxe5 37.Red1 Re8 38.Qf2 Nc5 39.Nxc5 Rxc5 40.Qd4
Rc4 41.Qd7 Re1+ 42.Kg2 Re2+ 43.Kf1 Qxd7 44.Rxd7 Re8 45.Rd4 Rcc8 46.c4 Re3
47.Kf2 Rb3 48.c5 Kf8 49.c6 Rc7 50.Re1 Rb2+ 51.Re2 Rxe2+ 52.Kxe2 Ke8 53.Kd3
f5 54.Kc4 Re7 55.b6 1-0

It was going reasonably well until 13...Bh5, which loses a pawn. I thought I should have played ...Bxf3 earlier, as the bishop doesn't seem to have a bright future (and Iman indicated that it's a book move in some lines).

My intended 26...Rxb2 is a tactical error, and I lost another pawn.

My spectacular-looking 41...Re1+ was played in haste (forgetting I just got another 30 minutes). It wasn't that great. 41...Qc5+ followed by 42...Qe3 attacks the f3 and c3 pawns and keeps the pieces on the board. After that, I was crushed.

Capablanca-Fan
01-06-2016, 01:25 AM
Interesting. After 27.Re3 I sat for about half an hour deciding between 27...Rd4, and 28...Kh7, 28...f5. I eventually decided to go with the king+pawn endgame despite being unable to calculate it to the end, expecting the king+rook+pawn endgame was drawish, seeing no winning chances for white, and seeing no obvious way for white to prevent the creation of a passed pawn. Unfortunately, the spent time also played a role later on. I went for the 28...Kh7 line because I was afraid of white's king getting to d4 and e5. If I was aware of Capablanca's principle, maybe I could have chosen the 28...f5 line, and also saved time in the process. Although, even then, the computer doesn't calculate a simple win.

Normally it is right to exchange into a K+P endgame if you are a P ahead for all practical purposes. And I think you were right here.

Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals (http://www.amazon.com/Chess-Fundamentals-Jose-R-Capablanca/dp/1497556554/ref=reader_auth_dp) really is required reading. A good-quality Kindle version is only $5 on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/review/create-review/ref=cm_cr_dp_wrt_btm?ie=UTF8&asin=B0154WKH8S&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=283155&store=books#).

Adamski
01-06-2016, 02:30 PM
Capablanca's Chess Fundamentals (http://www.amazon.com/Chess-Fundamentals-Jose-R-Capablanca/dp/1497556554/ref=reader_auth_dp) really is required reading. A good-quality Kindle version is only $5 on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/review/create-review/ref=cm_cr_dp_wrt_btm?ie=UTF8&asin=B0154WKH8S&channel=detail-glance&nodeID=283155&store=books#).Thanks for the link, Jono. I've bought it. $6.50 AUS. Always enjoy and profit from Capablanca's writing and game annotations.

Becky
02-06-2016, 01:55 PM
In round 7, I played white against Nilufar Yakubbaeva from Uzbekistan (rating 1947). It was an exercise at squandering a win on my part. I chose my opening from her game Gevorgyan vs. Yakubbaeva which she played in the Uzbekistan Women Championship, but with some updates.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 Bf5 5.cxd5 cxd5 6.Qb3 Qd7 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.Ne5
Qc7 9.Bb5 a6 10.Bxc6+ bxc6 11.O-O g6 12.Bd2 Bg7 13.Rac1 Be6 14.Na4 Ne4 15.
Rxc6 Qd8 16.Bb4 a5 17.f3 axb4 18.fxe4 Bxe5 19.dxe5 Qd7 20.Rfc1 dxe4 21.
Qxb4 O-O 22.b3 Qd3 23.R6c3 Qe2 24.Qxe4 Qxa2 25.Nc5 Bf5 26.Qh4 Qd2 27.Ne4
Qb2 28.Ng5 h5 29.Qf2 Qxf2+ 30.Kxf2 Ra2+ 31.Kf1 Rd8 32.e4 Bd7 33.R1c2 Bb5+
34.Ke1 Ra1+ 35.Rc1 Rxc1+ 36.Rxc1 Rd3 37.Rb1 f6 38.exf6 exf6 39.Nf3 Re3+
40.Kf2 Re2+ 41.Kg3 g5 42.Nd4 h4+ 43.Kf3 g4+ 44.Kf4 Rf2+ 45.Ke3 Rf1 46.Rxf1
Bxf1 47.b4 Kf7 48.g3 hxg3 49.hxg3 Ke7 50.Nf5+ Ke6 51.Kf4 Bd3 52.Ne3 Bb1
53.Nxg4 Bd3 54.Ke3 Bf1 55.Kd4 Be2 56.Ne3 Ba6 57.Nd5 Bb7 58.b5 f5 59.Nf4+
Kf6 60.e5+ Ke7 61.Kc5 Be4 62.Nd5+ Ke6 63.Nf4+ Kxe5 64.b6 Bb7 65.Kb5 Ke4
66.Ne6 Kf3 67.Nd4+ Kxg3 68.Nxf5+ Kf4 69.Nd4 Ke5 70.Kc5 Ba8 71.Nb5 Bb7 72.
Nd6 Bf3 73.Nc4+ Ke6 74.Na5 Kd7 75.Kb5 Kc8 76.Nc6 Be2+ 77.Kc5 Kb7 78.Nd8+
Kb8 79.Kc6 Bf3+ 80.Kb5 Bg2 81.Nc6+ Bxc6+ 82.Kxc6 Kc8 83.b7+ Kb8 84.Kb6 1/2-1/2

Attempting to win the pawn with 10.Nxd5 gives black counterplay after 10...Nxd5 11.Qxd5 e6

19...Bd7 went unnoticed by me (I didn't see this threat back at move 17). The computer gives 20.exd5 Bxc6 21.dxc6 O-O after which 22.Nc5 followed by 23. Nd7 wins back the exchange.

22.Qc2 was better than my 22.Rfc1 as is removes the queen from the firing line of the bishop while threatening the fork Nb6.

I didn't take 27.Qxe7 just because it looked risky; it's hard to get rid of the doubled major pieces on the second rank. The computer gives the striking 27.Qxe7 Ra2 28.Qg5 Bc2 winning a rook.

32...Rdd2 may have forced a draw. In post-mortem we looked at 33.Rf3 but the computer says black wins after 33...Bd7

The computer says 47...Bxg2 is better. Then 48.b5 g3! 49.hxg3 h3! and white needs to stop the h-pawn.

The (humanly possible) win was 62.Kb6 Kd7 63.Ka7 Kc7 64.b6+ Kc8 65.e6. I hastily played 62.Nd5+ concerned about time (and being a bit tired at this point). It's still a win for white after 63.Nb4, but I had lost momentum here. It seems drawn after 63.Nf4+.

Capablanca-Fan
03-06-2016, 02:04 AM
In round 7, I played white against Nilufar Yakubbaeva from Uzbekistan (rating 1947). It was an exercise at squandering a win on my part. I chose my opening from her game Gevorgyan vs. Yakubbaeva which she played in the Uzbekistan Women Championship, but with some updates.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 Bf5 5.cxd5 cxd5 6.Qb3 Qd7 7.Nf3 Nc6 8.Ne5
Qc7 9.Bb5 a6 10.Bxc6+ bxc6 11.O-O g6 12.Bd2 Bg7 13.Rac1 Be6 14.Na4 Ne4 15.
Rxc6 Qd8 16.Bb4 a5 17.f3 axb4 18.fxe4 Bxe5 19.dxe5 Qd7 20.Rfc1 dxe4 21.
Qxb4 O-O 22.b3 Qd3 23.R6c3 Qe2 24.Qxe4 Qxa2 25.Nc5 Bf5 26.Qh4 Qd2 27.Ne4
Qb2 28.Ng5 h5 29.Qf2 Qxf2+ 30.Kxf2 Ra2+ 31.Kf1 Rd8 32.e4 Bd7 33.R1c2 Bb5+
34.Ke1 Ra1+ 35.Rc1 Rxc1+ 36.Rxc1 Rd3 37.Rb1 f6 38.exf6 exf6 39.Nf3 Re3+
40.Kf2 Re2+ 41.Kg3 g5 42.Nd4 h4+ 43.Kf3 g4+ 44.Kf4 Rf2+ 45.Ke3 Rf1 46.Rxf1
Bxf1 47.b4 Kf7 48.g3 hxg3 49.hxg3 Ke7 50.Nf5+ Ke6 51.Kf4 Bd3 52.Ne3 Bb1
53.Nxg4 Bd3 54.Ke3 Bf1 55.Kd4 Be2 56.Ne3 Ba6 57.Nd5 Bb7 58.b5 f5 59.Nf4+
Kf6 60.e5+ Ke7 61.Kc5 Be4 62.Nd5+ Ke6 63.Nf4+ Kxe5 64.b6 Bb7 65.Kb5 Ke4
66.Ne6 Kf3 67.Nd4+ Kxg3 68.Nxf5+ Kf4 69.Nd4 Ke5 70.Kc5 Ba8 71.Nb5 Bb7 72.
Nd6 Bf3 73.Nc4+ Ke6 74.Na5 Kd7 75.Kb5 Kc8 76.Nc6 Be2+ 77.Kc5 Kb7 78.Nd8+
Kb8 79.Kc6 Bf3+ 80.Kb5 Bg2 81.Nc6+ Bxc6+ 82.Kxc6 Kc8 83.b7+ Kb8 84.Kb6 1/2-1/2

Attempting to win the pawn with 10.Nxd5 gives black counterplay after 10...Nxd5 11.Qxd5 e6

19...Bd7 went unnoticed by me (I didn't see this threat back at move 17). The computer gives 20.exd5 Bxc6 21.dxc6 O-O after which 22.Nc5 followed by 23. Nd7 wins back the exchange.

22.Qc2 was better than my 22.Rfc1 as is removes the queen from the firing line of the bishop while threatening the fork Nb6.

I didn't take 27.Qxe7 just because it looked risky; it's hard to get rid of the doubled major pieces on the second rank. The computer gives the striking 27.Qxe7 Ra2 28.Qg5 Bc2 winning a rook.

32...Rdd2 may have forced a draw. In post-mortem we looked at 33.Rf3 but the computer says black wins after 33...Bd7

The computer says 47...Bxg2 is better. Then 48.b5 g3! 49.hxg3 h3! and white needs to stop the h-pawn.

The (humanly possible) win was 62.Kb6 Kd7 63.Ka7 Kc7 64.b6+ Kc8 65.e6. I hastily played 62.Nd5+ concerned about time (and being a bit tired at this point). It's still a win for white after 63.Nb4, but I had lost momentum here. It seems drawn after 63.Nf4+.

A computer is very useful about picking up tactical oversights, but doesn't always help find the right plan and the reasons for it that you could apply to other games. In your last note, a computer is not necessary to note that the N on the same colour as the P makes a barrier against the enemy K approach, while 62.Nd5+ broke this coordination. The same applies for N on the same colour as your own B if you ever get a KBN v K endgame. Also, in general, the K needs to lead a passed P through to the queening square. So an important endgame technique is the K penetrating to such a square, as with 62. Kb6 and 63.Ka7.

Incidently, GM Averbakh pointed out long ago that a lot of endgame manuals get sidetracked by the "opposition" in P endgames, whereas this is merely a means to achieve K penetration, not an end in itself.

Becky
03-06-2016, 04:10 PM
Round 8 was embarrassing. I was black vs. Diana Omurbekova from Kyrgyzstan (a country which I'm still unable to pronounce). She's 1732 rated, so lower rated than me.

1.Nf3 c6 2.d3 d5 3.Nbd2 g6 4.g3 Bg7 5.Bg2 e5 6.c3 Ne7 7.e4 O-O 8.O-O Be6
9.Re1 f6 10.Qc2 Nd7 11.Nf1 Rc8 12.Be3 c5 13.exd5 Nxd5 14.Qd2 Re8 15.Bh6
Bh8 16.h4 c4 17.d4 exd4 18.Nxd4 Ne5 19.Nxe6 Rxe6 20.Bxd5 Qb6 21.Bxe6+ Qxe6
22.Nh2 Qc6 23.Rad1 Nd3 24.Re7 Qa4 25.b3 Qa3 26.Qe2 Ne5 27.Rxb7 cxb3 28.
axb3 Qa5 29.Qe4 Rd8 30.Rxd8+ Qxd8 31.Rxa7 1-0

I was well prepared for a piece sacrifice line in the Caro-Kann she had played earlier; she didn't play it. Nevertheless, it could come up in the future.

I was pleased with the opening, with a comfortable centre for black. The problem is, I'm terrible at these "keep everything on the board" games, ending up satisfied with my position "as is", and playing without a plan.

14...Re8 and 15...Bh8 were pointless (although Re8 does add a defender to the bishop). I knew I should just let her exchange the bishop on g7, after which my king guards the h6 square. But I have no idea what to do at move 14. I suppose I could try 14...Nxe3 15.Nxe3 trading my knight (which I liked, because it's central and hard to boot) for the bishop, perhaps giving better long-term chances, but it does help free up white's game. I'm uncomfortable with the loose bishop on e6, but I want it there to defend the h3-to-c8 diagonal.

16...c4 was a mistake. Made, again, because I was unsure what to do. 17.d4 was a good response and 17...exd4 was an outright blunder (made mostly because I was demoralized by this point). I didn't realize how bad I would be after 18.Nxd4. Swapping off the key defender of the a2-to-g8 diagonal is deadly, and the only alternative is 18...Bf7 after which I was expecting 19.Rxe8 Qxe8 20.Nb5 (the computer thinks 20.Re1 is even better).

Becky
03-06-2016, 10:45 PM
Final round (round 9), I got my first win in the tournament; I was white versus Khalil Bashaer from the United Arab Emirates (rating 1599).

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 c6 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 Qa5 7.Nd2 Bb4 8.Qc2 Ne4
9.Ndxe4 dxe4 10.Bh4 e5 11.Be2 O-O 12.O-O exd4 13.Nxe4 dxe3 14.fxe3 Ne5 15.
a3 Bc5 16.Bg5 Qb6 17.Qc3 Re8 18.b4 Bf8 19.c5 Qc7 20.Bf4 Bf5 21.Ng5 h6 22.
Nf3 Nxf3+ 23.Rxf3 Qc8 24.Raf1 Qe6 25.Bc4 Qd7 26.Bxh6 Be6 27.Rg3 f6 28.Rxf6
Bxc4 29.Qxc4+ Kh8 30.Rf7 Re7 31.Bxg7+ Bxg7 32.Qh4+ 1-0

I recall playing James Morris vs. the Cambridge Springs opening way back when; he destroyed me. Nowadays, I'm fairly comfortable with the opening as white.

MichaelBaron
03-06-2016, 11:43 PM
Good to finish on high note! Very good effort! Keep it up in the events to come! Nd2 is my favourite way to respond to C-S.

Adamski
04-06-2016, 11:50 AM
Good to finish on high note! Very good effort! Keep it up in the events to come! Nd2 is my favourite way to respond to C-S.

I used to play Cambridge Springs but gave it up as I got inferior positions. Good to see Becky finished with a win.

Becky
04-06-2016, 01:35 PM
Overall, a really enjoyable tournament! The organization was very top-notch. (Although Stephen asked me the result of my game while his game was in progress, and I got asked to leave the playing hall. *grumbles*) Today we have a blitz tournament.

I was amazed at how much I came to like Tashkent (in Uzbekistan). I'm so glad I came, and I'm so honored to have this opportunity to represent Australia.

The lady I played in round one went on to win outright! I've seen her mentioned in the Indian online news. An Indian was also outright first in the men's tournament.

My impression was that getting a half point or a full point here was much harder than club tournaments.

It's also clear that my focus on improving tactics (via ChessTempo) is not enough in itself. Games aren't often decided by "white to move and win" positions, but rather "inch towards a better game, and don't make a significant blunder over the next 30 moves, even though you'll become tired and under time pressure". In this setting, it's beneficial to be familiar with the openings, along with the common themes and mistakes that occur in those openings, and the common resulting endgames from those openings. The advice I've had in the past is that openings can almost be ignored until you stop making tactical mistakes. Maybe that's true(-ish) early on, but it seems a more holistic approach would be better.

I regret not specializing in an opening earlier on. I worry that people will be able to prepare for me, so I've often played random openings. While they're all perfectly fine openings, I don't think anything can beat experience.

Frank
05-06-2016, 08:44 AM
A wonderful effort Becky!

Becky
06-06-2016, 08:50 PM
A wonderful effort Becky!

Thank you. Hahaha! I hope this was not the only chance I can appear at this event (although, hopefully I can improve before next time). It truly was a great experience.