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Ian Rout
24-08-2015, 02:32 PM
Can't see a thread for this so I started one.

FIDE has published the pairings and Max gets to play Harikrishna (Ind) in the first round - apparently missing out by one board on playing Boris Gelfand or Michael Adams, or two on playing Peter Svidler.

The official site is at http://www.bakuworldcup2015.com

Thebes
10-09-2015, 05:42 AM
Can't see a thread for this so I started one.

FIDE has published the pairings and Max gets to play Harikrishna (Ind) in the first round - apparently missing out by one board on playing Boris Gelfand or Michael Adams, or two on playing Peter Svidler.

The official site is at http://www.bakuworldcup2015.com

Has an Australian ever progressed to round 2?

Vlad
10-09-2015, 09:52 AM
Has an Australian ever progressed to round 2?

Yes, Gary Lane progressed to round 2.

His opponent did not show up...:)

ER
10-09-2015, 10:40 AM
His opponent was the Armenian GM Vladimir Akopian!

Kevin Bonham
10-09-2015, 01:44 PM
Apart from Gary's walkover the closest we've come is Smerdon drawing five times in a row against Dominguez.

As far as I can tell, games start 8 pm AEST with round 1 tomorrow night. Go Max!

ER
10-09-2015, 03:59 PM
No poll for this one?

I propose to have one with three favourites each entry and when it comes to the final we can tip one! (that's only if the player was included in our initial prediction).

If this is the case, I tip

Veselin
Alexander &
Vassily!

Go Chukie!

Ian Rout
11-09-2015, 04:43 PM
No poll for this one?

I propose to have one with three favourites each entry and when it comes to the final we can tip one! (that's only if the player was included in our initial prediction).

If this is the case, I tip

Veselin
Alexander &
Vassily!

Go Chukie!
If anyone is organising such a poll I will go for

Nakamura
Ding Liren
Karjakin

which I will attempt to justify later, if possible before all three are eliminated in the first round, but right now I have to dash to a folk-dancing convention (NB: not as a participant).

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2015, 05:03 PM
I'll try to put a poll up tonight and leave voting open until the end of the first round for those who wish to play safe in case their favourites get eliminated!

Under the 1-128 (etc) system the risk of the real heavies going out in round 1 is low.

Ian Rout
11-09-2015, 05:04 PM
If anyone is organising such a poll I will go for

Nakamura
Ding Liren
Karjakin

which I will attempt to justify later, if possible before all three are eliminated in the first round, but right now I have to dash to a folk-dancing convention (NB: not as a participant).
It transpires that I have a few spare minutes so here are my reasons.

It's an exaggeration to call this event a glorified blitz event but only a small exaggeration. You can't not take Nakamura in a blitz when you have three guesses. Of course you can be eliminated by one act of stupidity but these days he should have the experience to stay inside the line.

You also can't not have a Chinese player in your portfolio. Ding Liren is the top rated Chinese player, very experienced but young enough not to be physically disadvantaged in the faster events.

Finally there's usually an outsider in the final stages, but like the Melbourne Cup the 66/1 outsiders don't get up these days, it just means someone outside the top picks. Karjakin hasn't had a lot of big results (he was second in the Candidates but that was more right place right time) so he must be about due.

And you will note I've done my homework, it is mathematically possible for the final to feature two of those.

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2015, 06:52 PM
Poll's up. I've gone with the top 20 from the seeding list and the rest are wildcards. If you want to pick someone else you need to name them for your pick to count.

Rules are that whoever's tip lasts the longest wins. If two of a voter's tips make the final then that voter can pick a tip for the final at that time.

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2015, 08:23 PM
Illingworth - Harikrishna

https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/baku-world-cup-2015/1/53/1

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2015, 09:58 PM
Commentary is hopeless. They brought up Max's game and discussed it for a while, interspersed with gratuitous comments about "while we look at a nice view of Mariya Muzychuk" or something along those lines. They declared as of move 20 that Max's position was bad because the queens were on the board and with queens on the board the kings were too airy.

In fact the queens went off the board on move 23. Allowing this might have been an error by black but at least the ideas to keep them on were not straightforward and required a deal of courage.

Interesting game!

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2015, 10:27 PM
Anyone know why Ponomariov is not playing? He has a great record in these things.

Kevin Bonham
11-09-2015, 10:34 PM
Sorry, I've had to restart the poll because I forgot to make votes public. Please vote again if you've already voted.

Kevin Bonham
12-09-2015, 12:15 AM
Hrant Melkuyman (honorary Australian!) beats Kamsky with black!

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5
Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Rd1+ Ke8 10. h3 Ne7 11. Bf4 Nd5 12. Bh2 Bf5 13. c3 Rd8
14. Nbd2 c5 15. Re1 Be7 16. Ne4 Be6 17. Nfg5 Kd7 18. Rad1 Kc6 19. g4 h6 20.
Nxe6 fxe6 21. Bg3 b5 22. Kg2 a5 23. Rd2 Nb6 24. Rde2 c4 25. f4 g6 26. Nd2
Rd3 27. Ne4 b4 28. Rc1 b3 29. Ra1 a4 30. a3 Nd5 31. Rae1 Bc5 32. Nf6 Ne3+
33. Kh2 Nc2 34. Rf1 Rhd8 35. Ne4 Bxa3 36. bxa3 Rd1 37. Rxd1 Rxd1 38. f5
gxf5 39. gxf5 b2 40. Nd2 Rxd2 41. Rxd2 b1=Q 42. f6 Ne1 43. f7 Nf3+ 44. Kg2
Qf5 45. Rf2 Qxf7 46. Rxf3 Qe7 47. Rf6 Kd5 0-1

Kevin Bonham
12-09-2015, 12:51 AM
Illingworth 0-1 Harikrishna

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 b6 3.g3 c5 4.Bg2 Bb7 5.0-0 g6 6.Nc3 Bg7 7.d4 cxd4 8.Qxd4 d6 9.Rd1 Nbd7 10.Be3 Rc8 11.Rac1 0-0 12.Qh4 a6 13.b3 Re8 14.Bh3 Ba8 15.g4 b5 16.cxb5 Qa5 17.g5 Rxc3 18.Rxc3 Qxc3 19.gxf6 Nxf6 20.bxa6 Qc2 21.Re1 Qxa2 22.Qa4 Qxa4 23.bxa4 Nd5 24.Nd4 [24.Bd2] 24...f5 25.Nb5 Nxe3 26.fxe3 Bh6 27.Kf2 Rc8 28.Rb1 Kf7 29.a7 Rc4 30.a5 Ra4 31.Nc7 Ra3 32.Nxa8 Bxe3+ 33.Kg2 Rxa5 34.Rb7 Bxa7 35.Nc7 Bd4 36.Rb3 Rc5 37.Nb5 Be5 38.Rb4 Rc2 39.Kf2 Bxh2 40.Nd4 Rc3 41.Nf3 Be5 42.Nxe5+ dxe5 43.Bf1 h5 44.e3 Rc2+ 45.Be2 g5 46.Ke1 g4 47.Bc4+ Kg6 48.Rb6+ Kg5 49.Bf7 g3 50.Rg6+ Kh4 51.Bd5 Rf2 52.Rh6 Kg4 53.Bc4 Kf3 54.Rxh5 Kxe3 55.Rg5 f4 56.Bd5 e4 57.Re5 Re2+ 58.Kd1 Kf2 59.Rg5 f3 0-1

Garrett
12-09-2015, 04:43 AM
Interesting game, bad luck Max.

Did the box say Max was good at any point or miss any chance ?

Agent Smith
12-09-2015, 05:53 AM
Critter at 17 depth couldn't find anything.
Very entertaining game though

[Event "FICS unrated standard"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2015.09.12"]
[Round "?"]
[White "IMIllingworth"]
[Black "GMHarikrishna"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2514"]
[BlackElo "2737"]
[Time "05:41:44"]
[TimeControl "120/0"]
[Annotator "Critter 1.6a 64-bit"]
[Depth "17"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 b6 3. g3 c5 4. Bg2 Bb7 5. O-O g6 6. Nc3 Bg7 7. d4 cxd4 8. Qxd4 d6 9. Rd1 Nbd7 10. Be3 {+0.26 Move out of book (gm2600: b3 100%)} 10. ... Rc8 {+0.35} 11. Rac1 {+0.28} 11. ... O-O {+0.29} 12. Qh4 {+0.26} 12. ... a6 {+0.24} 13. b3 {+0.20} 13. ... Re8 {+0.20} 14. Bh3 {+0.20} 14. ... Ba8 {+0.34} 15. g4 {+0.37} 15. ... b5 {+0.35} 16. cxb5 {+0.18} 16. ... Qa5 {+0.22} 17. g5 {+0.27} 17. ... Rxc3 {+0.27} 18. Rxc3 {+0.27} 18. ... Qxc3 {+0.35} 19. gxf6 {+0.21} 19. ... Nxf6 {+0.08} 20. bxa6 {+0.23} 20. ... Qc2 {+0.17} 21. Re1 {+0.18} 21. ... Qxa2 {+0.57} 22. Qa4 {+0.50} 22. ... Qxa4 {+0.51} 23. bxa4 {+0.51} 23. ... Nd5 {+0.51} 24. Nd4 {+0.00} 24. ... f5 {+0.00} 25. Nb5 {+0.00} 25. ... Nxe3 {+0.00} 26. fxe3 {+0.00} 26. ... Bh6 {+0.00} 27. Kf2 {+0.00} 27. ... Rc8 {+0.00} 28. Rb1 {-0.08} 28. ... Kf7 {+0.00} 29. a7 {+0.00} 29. ... Rc4 {+0.17} 30. a5 {+0.26} 30. ... Ra4 {+0.00} 31. Nc7 {+0.00} 31. ... Ra3 {+0.00} 32. Nxa8 {+0.00} 32. ... Bxe3+ {+0.00} 33. Kg2 {-0.08} 33. ... Rxa5 {-0.08} 34. Rb7 {-0.27} 34. ... Bxa7 {-0.17} 35. Nc7 {-0.09} 35. ... Bd4 {-0.14} 36. Rb3 {-0.35} 36. ... Rc5 {-0.36} 37. Nb5 {-0.37} 37. ... Be5 {-0.50} 38. Rb4 {-0.44} 38. ... Rc2 {-0.68} 39. Kf2 {-0.68} 39. ... Bxh2 {-0.90} 40. Nd4 {-0.90} 40. ... Rc3 {-0.91} 41. Nf3 {-0.81} 41. ... Be5 {-0.96} 42. Nxe5+ {-0.94} 42. ... dxe5 {-0.94} 43. Bf1 {-1.08} 43. ... h5 {-1.08} 44. e3 {-1.32} 44. ... Rc2+ {-1.03} 45. Be2 {-1.60} 45. ... g5 {-1.82} 46. Ke1 {-1.98} 46. ... g4 {-2.10} 47. Bc4+ {-2.55} 47. ... Kf6 {-2.81} 48. Rb6+ {-2.67} 48. ... Kg5 {-2.67} 49. Bf7 {-2.55} 49. ... g3 {-2.60} 50. Rg6+ {-2.60} 50. ... Kh4 {-2.60} 51. Bd5 {-2.59} 51. ... Rf2 {-2.57} 52. Rh6 {-3.45} 52. ... Kg4 {-4.20} 53. Bc4 {-4.20} 53. ... Kf3 {-5.02} 54. Rxh5 {-5.79} 54. ... Kxe3 {-5.91} 55. Rg5 {-6.39} 55. ... f4 {-6.39} 56. Bd5 {-12.32} 56. ... e4 {-12.32} 57. Re5 {-12.32} 57. ... Re2+ {-12.32} 58. Kd1 {-17.86} 58. ... Kf2 {-11.49} 59. Rg5 {-14.15} 59. ... f3 {-14.15 White resigns}
( 59. ... f3 { 17:-14.15} 60. Rg4 g2 61. Bxe4 Rxe4 62. Rxe4 g1=Q+ 63. Kd2 Qg5+ 64. Kc3 Qe3+ 65. Rxe3 Kxe3 )
0-1

MichaelBaron
12-09-2015, 10:32 AM
Black pawns proved to be too strong. Surprised that play continued beyond move 55 or so

Kevin Bonham
12-09-2015, 12:12 PM
Interesting game, bad luck Max.

Did the box say Max was good at any point or miss any chance ?

24.Nd4 instead of 24.Bd2 is where the engines all seem to have white losing an advantage. If 24.Bd2 they have white better by about half a pawn. It seems to be about finding the right way to control the position in order to effectively make long-term use of white's passed a-pawns. In weakening his king-side while going for a quick ram-through on the queen-side I think Max underestimated Black's counterplay and might have missed the strength of the idea of giving up a piece for three pawns.

Agent Smith
12-09-2015, 03:37 PM
Yeah . But Max may have been wary of this continuation, but it's a tricky-tricky line that works for him.
1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 b6 3. g3 c5 4. Bg2 Bb7 5. O-O g6 6. Nc3 Bg7 7. d4 cxd4 8. Qxd4 d6 9. Rd1 Nbd7 10. Be3 Rc8 11. Rac1 O-O 12. Qh4 a6 13. b3 Re8 14. Bh3 Ba8 15. g4 b5 16. cxb5 Qa5 17. g5 Rxc3 18. Rxc3 Qxc3 19. gxf6 Nxf6 20. bxa6 Qc2 21. Re1 Qxa2 22. Qa4 Qxa4 23. bxa4 Nd5 24. Nd4
( 24. Bd2 Nc3 25. a7 Nxe2+ 26. Rxe2 Bxf3 27. Re3 Bc6
( 27. ... Ba8 28. Rb3 )
28. Bd7 Bxd7 29. Rxe7 Ra8 30. Rxd7 )
24. ... f5 25. Nb5

ER
12-09-2015, 04:29 PM
The team performed reasonable well, 2.5 / 3 in Round One. I rate us as 95% certain qualifiers for next stage!!.
Only please Alexander stop getting into these drawing positions!
Look at Vassily and Vesco how they go for the kill!

MIRKO
12-09-2015, 09:18 PM
Is Max out?or is it best out of two games?

Kevin Bonham
12-09-2015, 09:22 PM
Is Max out?or is it best out of two games?

It's two games and game two is on now at:

https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/baku-world-cup-2015/1/53/2

Max needs to win with black and things are not going well.

Kevin Bonham
12-09-2015, 11:23 PM
The result of Max's second game is showing as a win to Harikrishna but this is presumably an error since it looks clear from the moves that it was a draw. The endgame was played at rapid pace by both players. A brave attempt to shake things up against very conservative play but White always had it under control.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be2 d6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.Be3 Be7 9.a4 0-0 10.Nxc6 bxc6 11.a5 c5 12.e5 dxe5 13.Qxd8 Rxd8 14.Na4 Rb8 15.Rfd1 Rd4 16.Bxd4 cxd4 17.c3 Bd8 18.cxd4 exd4 19.Rxd4 Bxa5 20.Nc5 Bb6 21.b4 Nd5 22.Rc4 Kf8 23.Kf1 Bd8 24.Nxa6 Bxa6 25.Rxa6 Nxb4 26.Ra1 Nd5 27.Bf3 Bf6 28.Rac1 Ne7 29.Ra4 g6 30.Ra8 Rxa8 31.Bxa8 h5 32.Be4 Ng8 33.Rc8+ Kg7 34.Rc7 Be5 35.Rb7 Nf6 36.Bc6 Kf8 37.h3 Bd4 38.Ke2 Bc5 39.g3 Kg7 40.f3 Bd6 41.Kf2 Bc5+ 42.Kg2 Bd6 43.h4 Kf8 44.Kh3 Bc5 45.g4 Bf2 46.Rb8+ Kg7 47.Rb2 Be1 48.Rb7 Kf8 49.g5 Ng8 50.Rb8+ Kg7 51.Rb1 Bf2 52.Rb2 Be1 53.Re2 Bc3 54.Kg3 Ne7 55.Be4 Be5+ 56.f4 Bc3 57.Kf3 Kf8 58.Rc2 Be1 59.Rc1 Bd2 60.Rd1 Ba5 61.Ra1 Bc3 62.Ra8+ Kg7 63.Ke2 Bb4 64.Re8 Bd6 65.Kf3 Bb4 66.Rd8 Ba5 67.Rd7 Kf8 68.Ke2 Bb4 69.Rd8+ Kg7 70.Rd7 Kf8 71.Rd8+ Kg7 72.Rd7

Kevin Bonham
12-09-2015, 11:53 PM
Melkuyman eliminates Kamsky!

Of the 2700+s, Moiseenko, Wang Hao, Radjabov, Navara, Tomashevsky, Fressinet all have playoffs tomorrow so far. Ni Hua and Dominguez both lost yesterday and need to win today to make playoffs.

ER
13-09-2015, 01:00 AM
Two of my favourites, Veselin and Vassily advance to the next stage! Alexander No. 10 in the world, and 7th seed in the tournament has been pushed to playoffs tomorrow against this unknown guy seeded 122 or something. And I warned him about it



Only please Alexander stop getting into these drawing positions!
!
Anyway, he will qualify tomorrow (later today that is) but he will miss on the rest day!

Kevin Bonham
13-09-2015, 01:16 AM
Yep Grischuk taken to playoffs! Ni Hua has been eliminated, Dominguez is still playing.

Kevin Bonham
13-09-2015, 02:30 AM
Dominguez Perez beats Perez Ponsa in 119 moves and off to playoffs. On move 113 Perez Ponsa missed a line that looks like it would have taken him to a technically drawn (but good luck holding it OTB) KR vs KRB.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.a4 Rb8 8.Nxe5 Nxe5 9.d4 Bxd4 10.Qxd4 d6 11.f4 Nc6 12.Qc3 Ne7 13.Qd3 0-0 14.Nc3 c5 15.axb5 axb5 16.Nxb5 Nxe4 17.Qxe4 Rxb5 18.Ra7 Bd7 19.Qd3 Nf5 20.Bc4 Rb8 21.Bd2 Qc8 22.Re1 Rxb2 23.Bc3 Rb8 24.g4 Nd4 25.Bxd4 cxd4 26.Re7 Rb7 27.Rxb7 Qxb7 28.f5 Qb1+ 29.Kf2 Ba4 30.Qxd4 Qxc2+ 31.Re2 Qd1 32.Qxd1 Bxd1 33.Re4 Rd8 34.Bd5 Kf8 35.Rb4 Ke7 36.Ke1 Bxg4 37.Rxg4 Kf6 38.Ra4 Re8+ 39.Kf2 Re5 40.Be4 g6 41.Rd4 Ra5 42.fxg6 hxg6 43.Bf3 Ke5 44.Re4+ Kf6 45.Rb4 Ke6 46.Kg3 Rc5 47.Bg4+ Kf6 48.Rb7 Rc3+ 49.Bf3 Rc5 50.h4 Ra5 51.Bd1 Re5 52.Bb3 Re7 53.Rb6 Rd7 54.Kf4 Kg7 55.Bd5 Ra7 56.Rb4 Kf6 57.Kg4 Kg7 58.Rf4 Rc7 59.Rd4 Re7 60.Bf3 Re6 61.Ra4 Re7 62.Kf4 Rc7 63.Rd4 Rd7 64.Kg5 Rd8 65.Rd5 Rd7 66.Rd3 Rd8 67.Rd4 Rd7 68.Rd5 Rd8 69.Bg4 Ra8 70.Bd1 Rb8 71.Rxd6 Rb5+ 72.Kg4 Rb4+ 73.Kg3 Rb7 74.Bf3 Ra7 75.Rb6 Rc7 76.Rb4 Ra7 77.Kf4 Re7 78.Bd5 Kf6 79.Rb6+ Kg7 80.Ra6 Kh6 81.Be4 Kg7 82.Bf3 Rc7 83.Be4 Re7 84.Rb6 Kf8 85.Rb8+ Kg7 86.Ra8 Rc7 87.Ra5 Re7 88.Rb5 Kh6 89.Rb1 Kg7 90.Rg1 Kf6 91.Ra1 Kg7 92.Bf3 Rc7 93.Ke5 Re7+ 94.Kd4 Rd7+ 95.Bd5 Re7 96.Rf1 Ra7 97.Ke5 Re7+ 98.Kd6 Ra7 99.Bc4 Rb7 100.Bd5 Ra7 101.Rf4 Ra6+ 102.Ke7 Ra7+ 103.Ke8 f6 104.Rb4 Kh6 105.Kf8 Ra5 106.Bf7 Re5 107.Rg4 g5 108.h5 Ra5 109.Rb4 Ra6 110.Rb5 g4 111.Rf5 Rb6 112.Bg6 Ra6 113.Kf7 Rb6 [113...Ra3 114.Rf1 g3 115.Rh1 f5 116.Bxf5 g2 117.Rg1 Kxh5 118.Rxg2] 114.Ra5 Rb3 115.Kxf6 g3 116.Ra7 Rb6+ 117.Kf5 Rb5+ 118.Kf4 Rb4+ 119.Be4 1-0

In Max's game, Max notes in the shoutbox:

" I played 15...Rd4 because I had missed that after 15...Rxd1 16.Rxd1 Nd5 17.Bxc5 Bxc5 18.Nxc5 Rxb2, I'm not losing a piece after 19.c4 because I can take on e2!"
"Obviously he won't take on c5, but then I can take on e3 and I remain a pawn ahead (though I'm not sure if I can do much with it)"

MichaelBaron
13-09-2015, 11:06 AM
Good effort by max defending exchange for a pawn down. His position was solid but his opponent's rating alone would make it psychologically difficult to defend in that endgame.

Vlad
13-09-2015, 12:40 PM
Good effort by max defending exchange for a pawn down. His position was solid but his opponent's rating alone would make it psychologically difficult to defend in that endgame.

Defending when the opponent is happy with a draw and does not want to risk too much is different from when some money could be lost if a draw is agreed.

I thought while Rd4 was questionable, next move cd was just bad. Why not ed and keep the centre?

Later in the game if white really wanted to win they would not exchange a for b pawns. They would just try to simply win a pawn and have a passer on b. I think this is what would have happened if white tried hard to win.

ER
13-09-2015, 01:52 PM
Talking about money! (*)



official World Cup website

3. 9. Prizes for the World Cup

3. 9. 1. Minimum Prize list

Round 1 losers: 64 x USD 6,000 (net 4,800) (**) USD 384,000

Round 2 losers: 32 x USD 10,000 (net 8,000) USD 320,000

Round 3 losers: 16 x USD 16,000 (net 12,800) USD 256,000

Round 4 losers: 8 x USD 25,000 (net 20,000) USD 200,000

Round 5 losers: 4 x USD 35,000 (net 28,000) USD 140,000

Round 6 losers: 2 x USD 50,000 (net 40,000) USD 100,000

Runner-up: 1 x USD 80,000 (net 64,000) USD 80,000

World Cup winner: 1 x USD 120,000 (net 96,000) USD 120,000

(*) Was originally thinking of posting this into the Money Matters thread,
then I thought it might interfere with Larry's latest tweeter venture so ... :P
(**) If you wondered about the "net" amount business, let me remind you.
It's FIDE's 20% share!

Let me also add that the total prize pool comes to US$ 1.6 million!
Do the math as they say in the US! :P

Vlad
13-09-2015, 05:05 PM
Not even 100 K to the winner. Amazing, when the world cups started I remember the discussions were about 1 mln to the winner. With the inflation the prizes are unbelievably low nowadays.

ER
13-09-2015, 06:40 PM
Not even 100 K to the winner... LOL FIDE get 3.3 times more than the prize of the World Cup winner without even making a move on the board! :) To be fair though I am not sure how much they have spent in remunerations, organising, guaranteeing, etc for the event!

Kevin Bonham
13-09-2015, 10:24 PM
Gelfand out in round 1, eliminated by Chilean IM Henriquez Villagra (2511)!

Grischuk held to another two draws.

ER
13-09-2015, 11:04 PM
Gelfand out in round 1, eliminated by Chilean IM Henriquez Villagra (2511)!

Grischuk held to another two draws.


Don't know what to say about Gelfand! Nothing much to say about Grischuk either, I still believe that he will go through though!

MichaelBaron
14-09-2015, 12:05 AM
Gelfand out in round 1, eliminated by Chilean IM Henriquez Villagra (2511)!

Grischuk held to another two draws.

Right now he is trying to win a slightly better endgame with rooks and opposite colour bishops with 1 min on his clock vs 5 mins for opponent

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2015, 01:01 AM
Not entirely delighted with the chess24 live coverage. Constantly keep having to reload stuff to get things up to the latest tiebreak round, often losing the video in the process. Also would prefer to have games listed in seeding order.

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2015, 01:05 AM
Grischuk through, winning both blitz games after six draws.

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2015, 01:36 AM
One match (Sargissian - Bartel) made it to Armageddon with Sargissian winning. In a drawn ending Sargissian (black) actually reached move 60 with 3 seconds on his clock, picking up the increment and guaranteeing he would make it.

In the poll, my "other (please name)" is Wei Yi.

ER
14-09-2015, 02:01 AM
Grischuk through, winning both blitz games after six draws.

phew!!! finally! :)

Kevin Bonham
14-09-2015, 01:39 PM
Kasimdzhanov was also eliminated in the first round so that's three former winners of the knockout format (the other two being Gelfand and Kamsky) to bite the dust in round 1. With Anand, Khalifman and Ponomariov not playing, only Kramnik, Svidler and Aronian remain in the field of the previous winners; no-one has won more than one of these things.

ER
14-09-2015, 02:51 PM
A tricky one for both Alexander and Vassily this time.
Vladimir is one of the rising stars of Russian Chesss
whereas one can never underestimate Israeli players like Maxim.
Vesko will have no probs vs Sergei. C'mon team!!!


Veselin Topalov (BUL)
Sergei Zhigalko (BLR)

Alexander Grischuk (RUS)
Vladimir Fedoseev (RUS)

Vassily Ivanchuk (UKR)
Maxim Rodshtein (ISR)

ER
15-09-2015, 02:39 PM
A tricky one for both Alexander and Vassily this time.
Vladimir is one of the rising stars of Russian Chesss
whereas one can never underestimate Israeli players like Maxim.
Vesko will have no probs vs Sergei. C'mon team!!!


Veselin Topalov (BUL)
Sergei Zhigalko (BLR)

Alexander Grischuk (RUS)
Vladimir Fedoseev (RUS)

Vassily Ivanchuk (UKR)
Maxim Rodshtein (ISR)

Actually, it was Veselin and Alexander who faced hard nuts to crack and they both drew!
On the other hand Vassily beat his Israeli opponent and advanced to the 3rd round without trouble!

Ian Rout
15-09-2015, 03:57 PM
On the other hand Vassily beat his Israeli opponent and advanced to the 3rd round without trouble!Not quite, it's best of two.

ER
15-09-2015, 04:34 PM
Not quite, it's best of two.
You are correct Sir! I let my enthusiasm get the better out of my eagerness to announce! :P :) Only a matter of a few hours though! :P
And it was a matter of few hours.
Vassily is through to the next stage
and so it Topalov!
Alexander keeps on his merry drawing way, obviously accepting or offering half points till he gets to the blitz stage!

Kevin Bonham
15-09-2015, 08:13 PM
I was too busy with the spill to follow last night's games at all. Highlights included Kramnik beating Bruzon with KRB vs KR (just in time!), and Karjakin, Navara and Adams are both one down and needing to win tonight. Topalov took an 11 move half-point bye with black. Wang Hao lost to a weaker Chinese player.

Kevin Bonham
16-09-2015, 12:00 AM
Navara out. Will be a cracker of a night tomorrow with all this mob off to playoffs already:

Nakamura, Giri, Karjakin, Aronian, Radjabov, Mamedyarov, Svidler, Adams

MichaelBaron
16-09-2015, 11:40 AM
Several Russian players escaped eliminiation by the skin of their teeth. Karjakin took revanshe on Onishuk and Yakovenko held very difficult (probably lost) endgame against Amin

Kevin Bonham
16-09-2015, 01:22 PM
Wang Hao and Harikrishna out as well. Tonight could be a bloodbath for the seeds.

Kevin Bonham
16-09-2015, 09:43 PM
Aronian missed one draw in an otherwise lost knight ending vs Areshchenko

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Bc4 c5 8.Ne2 Nc6 9.Be3 0-0 10.0-0 Bg4 11.f3 Bd7 12.Rb1 Qc7 13.Qd2 Rad8 14.Rfc1 Na5 15.Bd3 e5 16.Bh6 b6 17.Bxg7 Kxg7 18.f4 f6 19.fxe5 fxe5 20.Qg5 cxd4 21.cxd4 Qd6 22.Bb5 h6 23.Qg3 Bxb5 24.Rxb5 exd4 25.Rc7+ Kg8 26.Qxd6 Rxd6 27.Rd5 Rxd5 28.exd5 d3 29.Nc3 d2 30.d6 Rd8 31.d7 Kf7 32.Kf2 a6 33.Ke2 Ke6 34.Kxd2 Rxd7+ 35.Rxd7 Kxd7 36.Nd5 b5 37.h4 Nc6 38.Nf4 Ne5 39.Kc3 a5 40.Kd4 Kd6 41.a3 Nc6+ 42.Ke4 Ne7 43.h5 gxh5 44.Nxh5 Kc5 45.Kd3 Nd5 46.g3 b4 47.axb4+ Kxb4 48.Kc2 a4 49.Ng7 Ne3+ 50.Kb2 a3+ 51.Ka2 Nd5 52.Nf5 h5 53.Nd4 Ka4 54.Ka1 Nc3 55.Nf5 Ne2 56.Ka2 Kb4 57.Kb1 Nc3+ 58.Kc2 Ne4 59.Kb1 Kb3 60.Nd4+ Kc3 61.Nf5 Kb4 62.Ka1 Nc3 63.Nd4 Kc4 64.Nf5 Ne2 65.Ka2 Kb4 66.Ne3 Nxg3 67.Nd5+ Kc4 68.Nf4 h4 69.Kxa3 Kd4 70.Kb2 Ke4 71.Nh3 Kf3 72.Kc3 Ne4+ 73.Kd4 Nf2 74.Ng1+ Kf4 75.Kd5 Nd1 76.Kd4 Nf2 77.Kd5 Kg4 78.Kd4 Nh3 79.Ne2 Kf3 80.Kd3 Kf2 81.Kd2 Ng5 82.Nf4 Kf3 83.Ne2 Kf2 84.Nf4 Kf3 85.Ne2 Nh3 86.Ke1 [86.Nd4+ draws] 86...Kg2 87.Nd4 Ng5 88.Nf5 h3 89.Ne3+ Kf3 90.Nf1 Ne4 91.Nh2+ Kg2 92.Ng4 Nf6 93.Ne3+ Kg1 94.Nf1 Nh5 95.Ke2 Nf4+ 96.Ke1 Kg2 97.Ne3+ Kf3 98.Nf1 Nd3+ 99.Kd2 Kf2 100.Ne3 Ne5 101.Nd1+ Kf3 0-1

Lysyj - Yu Yangi epic currently holding up the playoff. [drawn in 161, f+h pawn rook ending]

Kevin Bonham
16-09-2015, 10:58 PM
Aronian is out.

The commentators have practically ignored the Nakamura - Shankland match.

Nakamura, Svidler, Giri, Jakovenko are all through.

Adams, Karjakin, Wei Yi, Yu Yangyi, Grischuk all go to the next tiebreak.

Vitiugov out to Le Quang Liem.

Kevin Bonham
16-09-2015, 11:24 PM
Tomashevsky (white) stuffed this won knight ending and is also going to 10+10. The last win was 72.Nh8! In the KNP vs KN one of the commentators incessantly (at least 20 times, probably more) stated that it must be winning but his less overbearing colleague was not convinced and rightly not - tablebase draw.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.h3 0-0 6.Be3 c5 7.Nf3 Qa5 8.Bd3 cxd4 9.Nxd4 Nc6 10.0-0 Be6 11.Nxe6 fxe6 12.Rc1 Kh8 13.Be2 Rad8 14.Qb3 Qc7 15.Rfd1 Nd7 16.Qa3 a5 17.Na4 b6 18.Qb3 Nc5 19.Qxb6 Qxb6 20.Nxb6 Bxb2 21.Rb1 Ba3 22.f4 Rb8 23.e5 dxe5 24.fxe5 Rfd8 25.Rb5 Rxd1+ 26.Bxd1 Nd3 27.Bg4 Bc1 28.Bxc1 Nxc1 29.a4 h5 30.Bf3 Nd4 31.Nd7 Rd8 32.Rb8 Rxb8 33.Nxb8 Nd3 34.Nd7 Nxf3+ 35.gxf3 Kg7 36.c5 Kf7 37.c6 Ke8 38.Nb6 Kd8 39.Nc4 Kc7 40.Nxa5 h4 41.Nb7 Nf4 42.Kh2 Kxc6 43.Nd8+ Kb6 44.Nf7 Ka5 45.Ng5 Kxa4 46.Kg1 Kb4 47.Kf2 Kc4 48.Ke3 Nd5+ 49.Ke4 Nc3+ 50.Kf4 Kd5 51.Nf7 Ne2+ 52.Kg4 Nd4 53.f4 Ke4 54.Nh8 Nf3 55.Nxg6 Nh2+ 56.Kg5 Nf3+ 57.Kg4 Nh2+ 58.Kxh4 Kf5 59.Kh5 Nf1 60.Kh6 Ng3 61.Kg7 Nh5+ 62.Kf7 Ng3 63.Nxe7+ Kxf4 64.Kxe6 Ne4 65.Ng6+ Kg5 66.Kf7 Kh6 67.Nf4 Kg5 68.Ng6 Nc5 69.h4+ Kh5 70.Kg7 Ne6+ 71.Kf6 Nd8 72.Nf4+ Kxh4 73.Ne2 Kg4 74.Nd4 Kg3 75.Kf5 Kh4 76.Nf3+ Kh5 77.Kf6 Kg4 78.Ng5 Nc6 79.e6 Kf4 80.Nf7 Ke4 81.Ne5 Nb4 82.Kf7 Nd5 83.Nc6 Kf4 84.Nb4 Nb6 85.Kf6 Nc8 86.Nc6 Ke4 87.Na7 Nb6 88.Kf7 Nd5 89.Nc6 Kf4 90.Ne7 Nb6 91.Ng6+ Kf5 92.Nh4+ Kg4 93.Ng2 Nc8 94.Kf6 Kf3 95.Nh4+ Ke4 96.Nf5 Nb6 97.Nd6+ Kf4 98.Kf7 Nd5 99.Nc4 Kg5 100.Ne5 Kf5 101.Nc6 Kg5 102.Nb4 Nb6 103.Nc2 Nd5 104.Nd4 Kf4 105.Nc6 Kg5 106.Ne7 Nc7

ER
17-09-2015, 12:11 AM
Thanks for the updates Kev, BTW there are complaints about the commentators' "style" all over the net!

Results prove my theory that in competitions like these everyone can beat everyone else despite rating difference! None is safe! GO ALEXANDER!!!

Kevin Bonham
17-09-2015, 01:02 AM
Grischuk, Karjakin, Tomashevsky through.

Yu Yangi through after Lysyj flags in an apparently, but not actually, dead lost position.

To blitz:

Nepomniatchi - Fressinet
Adams - Laznicka
Wei Yi - Vovk. Vovk had a nice win in the first 10/10 and has been very impressive; he was winning the second but it got away and he lost it.

Kevin Bonham
17-09-2015, 01:21 AM
Lucky escape for Adams in blitz 1 as Laznicka takes perpetual instead of winning a bishop!

Kevin Bonham
17-09-2015, 01:44 AM
Nepomniatchi and Wei Yi through.

Adams and Laznicka to Armageddon.

Kevin Bonham
17-09-2015, 02:02 AM
Laznicka just totally froze on the clock and was eliminated.

Well nowhere near as many upsets from the tiebreaks as expected - only Aronian and Vitiugov out.

ER
18-09-2015, 01:22 AM
Deep worries about the team.
Alexander lost his game with White and tomorrow he has to fight an uphill battle since he needs to win to stay alive.
He's got the ability to do it but he comes through as seriously déformé!
Topalov and Ivanchuk drew their games! C'mon team let's do it!

Kevin Bonham
18-09-2015, 03:00 AM
Only Caruana, Mamedyarov, Karjakin and Eljanov (with black vs Grischuk) won. 12 draws.

MichaelBaron
18-09-2015, 03:40 AM
Grischuk's game (truly facinating to watch) became a comedy of errors at one point.

ER
18-09-2015, 01:44 PM
Grischuk's game (truly facinating to watch) became a comedy of errors at one point.

As the great Oscar stated in his famous work The Decay of Lying "Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life"!
However, I still have faith in Alexander.
I must admit, however, that my early conviction that he, along with Kramnik, Morozevich and other youngsters of the first decade of the 21st century
would contribute to the revival of the great Russian tradition and reclaim the top, is fading fast!

MichaelBaron
18-09-2015, 05:05 PM
As the great Oscar stated in his famous work The Decay of Lying "Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life"!
However, I still have faith in Alexander.
I must admit, however, that my early conviction that he, along with Kramnik, Morozevich and other youngsters of the first decade of the 21st century
would contribute to the revival of the great Russian tradition and reclaim the top, is fading fast!

The Russian dominance is no longer there. Asian players are rising instead!

ER
18-09-2015, 06:41 PM
The Russian dominance is no longer there. Asian players are rising instead!

Double fold repetition just in case I didn't come through the first time!


I must admit, however, that my early conviction that he, along with Kramnik, Morozevich and other youngsters of the first decade of the 21st century
would contribute to the revival of the great Russian tradition and reclaim the top, is fading fast!

btw really interesting encounters tonight. I will be away partying though so I will check results in the morning! :)

MichaelBaron
18-09-2015, 07:10 PM
Double fold repetition just in case I didn't come through the first time!



btw really interesting encounters tonight. I will be away partying though so I will check results in the morning! :)

Yes, we are in agreement :)

Kevin Bonham
18-09-2015, 10:24 PM
I'll post some results in this post and edit in others later:

Off to playoffs:
Nakamura - Nepomniatchi
Svidler - Radjabov
So - Le
Dominguez - Adams
Topalov - Lu
Tomashevsky - Vachier-Lagrave
Kramnik - Andreikin

Through
Caruana over Kovalyov
Jakovenko over Ivanchuk
Wei Yi over Areshchenko
Ding Liren over Guseinov
Wojtaszek over Granda Zuniga
Mamedyarov over Sethuraman
Eljanov over Grischuk
Karjakin over Yu Yangyi
Giri over Leko

ER
19-09-2015, 02:24 AM
Talking about money! (*)


3. 9. Prizes for the World Cup

3. 9. 1. Minimum Prize list

Round 1 losers: 64 x USD 6,000 (net 4,800) (**) USD 384,000

Round 2 losers: 32 x USD 10,000 (net 8,000) USD 320,000

Round 3 losers: 16 x USD 16,000 (net 12,800) USD 256,000

Round 4 losers: 8 x USD 25,000 (net 20,000) USD 200,000

Round 5 losers: 4 x USD 35,000 (net 28,000) USD 140,000

Round 6 losers: 2 x USD 50,000 (net 40,000) USD 100,000

Runner-up: 1 x USD 80,000 (net 64,000) USD 80,000

World Cup winner: 1 x USD 120,000 (net 96,000) USD 120,000

(*) Was originally thinking of posting this into the Money Matters thread,
then I thought it might interfere with Larry's latest tweeter venture so ... :P
(**) If you wondered about the "net" amount business, let me remind you.
It's FIDE's 20% share!

Let me also add that the total prize pool comes to US$ 1.6 million!
Do the math as they say in the US! :P

Good on you organisers!!!

from the official site:

The players are getting 100% of their prizes, not 80% as most are quoting.
This is because the Organizers paid the FIDE share on top of the Prize Fund.

ER
19-09-2015, 02:30 AM
Both Alexander and Vassily are out of the competition.
According to the news bulletin, Vassily resigned a not so ... resignable position!
Regardless, two of my favourite players are no more in the cup.
The only surviving member of my team is Veselin Topalov.
He is playing for his life right now and he needs all the luck he can get!
Go Vesko Go!!!

Desmond
19-09-2015, 09:36 AM
Good on you organisers!!!

from the official site:

The players are getting 100% of their prizes, not 80% as most are quoting.
This is because the Organizers paid the FIDE share on top of the Prize Fund.


Ah is that what that meant. Thanks.

ER
19-09-2015, 11:04 AM
In round 4
Chinese derby Ding Liren - Wei Yi!

MichaelBaron
19-09-2015, 12:10 PM
Nakamura's and Svidler's play-offs are promising to be particularly interesting

Kevin Bonham
19-09-2015, 10:41 PM
On to 10/10:

Nakamura - Nepomniatchi
Dominguez - Adams
Tomashevsky - Vachier-Lagrave

Through:
Svidler over Radjabov
So over Le
Andreikin over Kramnik (revenge!)

Lu is currently trying to win the very rare ending of R+N vs B+N against Topalov to square their match! (No cigar - Lu out)

ER
19-09-2015, 11:53 PM
Our last home for a place in the grand final!
The lion of the Balkans still there fighting for the team's pride!
Well he's bloody top seed after all!
:) :P

MichaelBaron
20-09-2015, 12:31 AM
Amazing escape by Nepo against Naka right now in the 2nd rapid game! Now blitz is starting. Promising to be fun!

Kevin Bonham
20-09-2015, 12:44 AM
Shame I couldn't watch it, busy with Canning by-election which is over for the night now.

Vachier-Lagrave eliminates Tomashevsky.

Kevin Bonham
20-09-2015, 12:49 AM
Uh-oh. Nakamura loses to Nepomniatchi in blitz 1.

Amazing win by Adams vs Dominguez. Adams was exchange down with no compensation at all. Dominguez tried too hard to win it and lost. Adams is a cool customer!

Kevin Bonham
20-09-2015, 01:46 AM
Nakamura wins blitz 2 and eliminates Nepomniatchi in a thrilling Armageddon game (though slightly less thrilling for the damn video stopping working halfway through again!)

No mugs left in this field:

Topalov - Svidler
Ding Liren - Wei Yi
Giri - Wojtaszek
So - Vachier-Lagrave
Nakamura - Adams
Eljanov - Jakovenko
Caruana - Mamedyarov
Andreikin - Karjakin

Max Illingworth
20-09-2015, 02:49 AM
On checking the poll, only myself, Kevin and Ian still have all three choices alive in the tournament. However one of my picks (Ding Liren) is playing one of Kevin's picks (Wei Yi). It's interesting that no one made a conventional 'seed 1, seed 2, seed 3' pick or similar - I guess we Australians like the underdog :)

Also there are four surviving players who have not had to play a tiebreak - Pavel Eljanov (who is the only one on a perfect 6/6), Ding Liren (won all three matches 1.5-0.5), Radoslaw Wojtaszek and Fabiano Caruana.

Kevin Bonham
20-09-2015, 09:44 PM
Nepo launched a protest cause Naka used both hands to castle (apparently he touched the king first though). I all happend after the game was finished. No wonder his protest failed.

Posts moved

The quoted post and all replies to it will be moved to Arbiters Corner, threadname "Nakamura-Nepomniatchi incidents in 2015 World Cup"

Kevin Bonham
21-09-2015, 12:37 AM
Wins for Nakamura, Mamedyarov (over Caruana!) and Ding Liren, all with white. Svidler pushing for a win against Topalov.

Kevin Bonham
21-09-2015, 01:06 AM
Svidler wins! At one stage the box says Topalov could draw but mostly Svidler was on top.

Kevin Bonham
21-09-2015, 01:09 AM
All the wins

Svidler - Topalov

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. O-O Nf6 5. Re1 a6 6. Bf1 b6 7. d4 cxd4 8.
Nxd4 Bb7 9. c4 e6 10. Nc3 Be7 11. f3 Rc8 12. Be3 O-O 13. Qd2 Qc7 14. Rac1
Qb8 15. Kh1 Rfe8 16. a3 Bd8 17. Bg1 h5 18. b3 Ne5 19. f4 Ned7 20. b4 Qa8
21. Bd3 Be7 22. h3 Rc7 23. Re2 h4 24. Bf2 Nh5 25. Nf3 Ng3+ 26. Bxg3 hxg3
27. Qe1 Nf6 28. Qxg3 Nh5 29. Qg4 Nf6 30. Qg3 Nh5 31. Qg4 Nf6 32. Qh4 g6 33.
Ng5 Qd8 34. Rd1 Nh5 35. Qg4 e5 36. Nd5 Bxd5 37. exd5 Bxg5 38. fxg5 Nf4 39.
Rc2 b5 40. c5 Nxd3 41. Rxd3 e4 42. Rd4 e3 43. c6 Re5 44. h4 Rce7 45. Re2
Qb6 46. g3 a5 47. Kg2 axb4 48. axb4 Qa7 49. Rd3 Re4 50. Qc8+ Kh7 51. Qd8
Rxb4 52. Rd1 Rbe4 53. Qxd6 Qa4 54. Rde1 Qc4 55. h5 gxh5 56. Qh6+ Kg8 57. g6
fxg6 58. Qxg6+ Rg7 59. Qxh5 Qd4 60. Ra2 Rf4 61. Ra8+ Rf8 62. Rxf8+ Kxf8 63.
Qh8+ Kf7 64. Rf1+ Ke7 65. Qf8#

Mamedyarov - Caruana

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Bg5 Ne4 4. Bf4 c5 5. Qc2 Qa5+ 6. Nd2 f5 7. f3 Nf6 8.
d5 d6 9. e4 Na6 10. Ne2 fxe4 11. fxe4 Bg7 12. Nc3 O-O 13. Be2 Nh5 14. Bg5
Qd8 15. Bxh5 gxh5 16. Nf3 h6 17. Be3 Bg4 18. O-O e6 19. Qd2 Kh7 20. Rad1 e5
21. Rf2 Nc7 22. Rdf1 Rb8 23. h3 Bd7 24. Ne2 h4 25. Kh2 b6 26. g3 hxg3+ 27.
Nxg3 Rg8 28. Nh5 Ne8 29. Nxg7 Nxg7 30. Bxh6 Nh5 31. Ng5+ Kg6 32. Rg1 Qe7
33. Nf7+ Kh7 34. Bg5 Qe8 35. Qe2 Ng7 36. Rf6 Rf8 37. Rh6+ Kg8 38. Bf6 Rxf7
39. Qh5 1-0

Ding Liren - Wei Yi

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. h4 Bg7 6. h5 Nc6 7. g3 Bg4 8.
h6 Bxc3 9. dxc3 Qd6 10. Bg2 O-O-O 11. Ng5 Ne5 12. Qa4 Nb6 13. Qd4 f6 14.
Bf4 Qxd4 15. cxd4 Nc6 16. Nf7 Nxd4 17. Rc1 e5 18. Rh4 exf4 19. Nxd8 f3 20.
exf3 Nxf3+ 21. Bxf3 Re8+ 22. Kd2 Bxf3 23. Nf7 Bc6 24. b4 a6 25. a4 Nxa4 26.
Re1 Nb6 27. Rg4 Rg8 28. Re7 Nd5 29. Nd6+ cxd6 30. Rxh7 g5 31. Re4 Rg6 32.
Re6 g4 33. Rxd6 Nxb4 34. Rh8+ Kc7 35. Rd4 Nd5 36. h7 Rh6 37. Rxg4 Ne7 38.
Rg7 Kd7 39. Rf8 1-0

Nakamura - Adams

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O Nbd7
8. Nc3 dxc4 9. e4 c5 10. Bf4 Nb6 11. a4 cxd4 12. Nxd4 Bc5 13. Ndb5 Qxd1 14.
Raxd1 Bd7 15. Nc7 Rac8 16. a5 Na4 17. e5 Nxc3 18. bxc3 Nd5 19. Nxd5 exd5
20. Bxd5 Bc6 21. Bxc6 Rxc6 22. Rd7 Ra6 23. Rxb7 Rxa5 24. e6 g5 25. Bxg5
fxe6 26. Bf4 Rf7 27. Rb8+ Rf8 28. Rb2 Ra3 29. Be5 Rb3 30. Re2 Rb5 31. Bf4
Kf7 32. Rd1 Rb7 33. Rde1 Rb6 34. Kg2 Rc8 35. Re4 Rb2 36. Be3 Bxe3 37. R1xe3
Rc5 38. Rxe6 Rf5 39. Re7+ Kf8 40. Re8+ Kf7 41. R3e7+ Kg6 42. Rg8+ Kf6 43.
Rf8+ Kxe7 44. Rxf5 Kd6 45. Ra5 Rb7 46. g4 Kc6 47. Ra4 Kc5 48. h4 Rd7 49. g5
Kb5 50. Rb4+ Kc5 51. Rb8 a5 52. Ra8 Kb6 53. h5 Rd3 54. h6 1-0

Kevin Bonham
21-09-2015, 11:08 PM
I'll do the same thing as before, editing in the outcomes as we go:

Off to playoffs
Giri - Wojtaszek
Andreikin - Karjakin
Eljanov - Jakovenko
Ding Liren - Wei Yi

Through
Mamedyarov over Caruana
Nakamura over Adams
Svidler over Topalov
Vachier-Lagrave over So

ER
21-09-2015, 11:47 PM
How's Veselin going to hold this now? I was sure that while he was about to make the time control that he would be defending soon. There was nothing he could do against Black's set up! Peter has to blunder now to give Topalov any chance! :(

ER
21-09-2015, 11:51 PM
Actually, if he manages to regroup the Knight on b3 he has some tactics with the other Knight! But Peter has to help too! :P :) anyway I am about to concede for the Bulgarian! OK draw agreed, curtains for my favourites. Next time!

Kevin Bonham
21-09-2015, 11:54 PM
Svidler agreed a draw with Topalov rather than play the winning ...Qe1!

MichaelBaron
22-09-2015, 12:20 AM
Actually, if he manages to regroup the Knight on b3 he has some tactics with the other Knight! But Peter has to help too! :P :) anyway I am about to concede for the Bulgarian! OK draw agreed, curtains for my favourites. Next time!

Topa did have a big advantage at one point..but let it sleep. Important to note though that he already qualified for the Candidates matches based on his rating and is therefore less motivated of the 2.

Kevin Bonham
22-09-2015, 12:25 AM
Important to note though that he already qualified for the Candidates matches based on his rating and is therefore less motivated of the 2.

This isn't actually certain yet but it's extremely likely that he will. He'd have to play a few tournaments extremely badly to miss out.

Tomashevsky is out of the Candidates unless he gets the wild card (he was actually out when he was eliminated, because Caruana and Nakamura couldn't both make the final).

Jakovenko needs to either make the final or have Nakamura make the final. The winner of his match with Eljanov plays Nakamura in the quarter-final.

ER
22-09-2015, 01:19 AM
Topa did have a big advantage at one point..but let it sleep. Important to note though that he already qualified for the Candidates matches based on his rating and is therefore less motivated of the 2.

LOL I know he is quite rich but prize money's not to be scorned in any case! Actually, he got his expenses covered out of this one since he pocketed 25 grand just to play a few games and see around Baku!

MichaelBaron
22-09-2015, 01:22 AM
Facinating ending to Wei vs Ding. Black was losing for many moves...then in the end suddenly got a chance to go into a drawn endgame...then blundered and lost :)

Kevin Bonham
22-09-2015, 01:29 AM
Yes, 72...Kh4 was the fatal mistake. Wei Yi had got very short of time and allowed the drawn ending in the first place.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8.
a3 O-O 9. Nc3 h6 10. h3 Re8 11. Bd2 Bf8 12. a4 Rb8 13. axb5 axb5 14. Re1
Be6 15. Nd5 Nd7 16. c3 Ne7 17. Ne3 Bxb3 18. Qxb3 Ng6 19. g3 Nc5 20. Qc2 Qd7
21. b4 Ne6 22. d4 exd4 23. cxd4 c5 24. d5 Nd4 25. Nxd4 cxd4 26. Nf5 Ne5 27.
Kg2 Rbc8 28. Qb3 d3 29. Ra2 Ra8 30. Rea1 Rxa2 31. Rxa2 Qc8 32. Ne3 g6 33.
Bc3 h5 34. Bxe5 Rxe5 35. Qxd3 Qe8 36. Re2 Bg7 37. Nc2 f5 38. f3 fxe4 39.
fxe4 Re7 40. Nd4 Bxd4 41. Qxd4 Re5 42. Qd3 Kh7 43. Qc2 Qe7 44. h4 Kg7 45.
Qd3 Kh7 46. Kh2 Kg7 47. Qd4 Kh7 48. Re3 g5 49. hxg5 Qxg5 50. Rf3 Re7 51.
Rf4 Qg6 52. Rf6 Qg5 53. Qf2 Kg7 54. Rxd6 h4 55. Kh3 hxg3 56. Qf5 Qxf5+ 57.
exf5 Re4 58. Rg6+ Kf7 59. Rxg3 Rxb4 60. Rd3 Rc4 61. d6 Rc8 62. Kg4 Kf6 63.
Kf4 b4 64. Ke4 Rb8 65. Kd5 b3 66. d7 b2 67. Rb3 Rxb3 68. d8=Q+ Kxf5 69.
Qd7+ Kg5 70. Qe7+ Kg4 71. Qe4+ Kg3 72. Qg6+ Kh4 73. Qb1 Kg5 74. Kc4 Rb8 75.
Qg1+ Kf5 76. Qc5+ Kg4 77. Qd4+ Kf3 78. Qf6+ Ke4 79. Qe6+ Kf3 80. Qf5+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
22-09-2015, 10:40 PM
Karjakin, Giri and Eljanov are all through; Jakovenko now needs Nakamura to make the final in order to qualify for the Candidates.

MichaelBaron
22-09-2015, 11:39 PM
Karjakin, Giri and Eljanov are all through; Jakovenko now needs Nakamura to make the final in order to qualify for the Candidates.

Good job by Eljanov knocking out Jakovenko by his solid play

Kevin Bonham
22-09-2015, 11:55 PM
Wei Yi beats Ding Liren in this rapid tiebreak. He was in all kinds of trouble on both the board and the clock.

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 c5 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. e3 O-O 6. Nge2 e6 7. b3 d5 8.
Ba3 Qa5 9. Na4 Nbd7 10. O-O a6 11. Qc1 Ne4 12. d4 b6 13. Bb2 cxd4 14. cxd5
exd5 15. Bxd4 b5 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Nac3 Bb7 18. Qb2 Ndf6 19. Nxe4 dxe4 20.
Rfd1 Qb6 21. Rd4 Rad8 22. Rad1 Kg8 23. Nc3 Rxd4 24. Rxd4 Rd8 25. Qd2 Rxd4
26. exd4 Qe6 27. Qf4 Qc6 28. h3 Kg7 29. Nd1 Qc2 30. Ne3 Qxa2 31. Qc7 Ba8
32. Qb8 Qa1+ 33. Kh2 Qe1 34. Qf4 Qc3 35. Nf5+ gxf5 36. Qg5+ Kf8 37. Qxf6
Bc6 38. Qd6+ Kg7 39. d5 Be8 40. b4 Qf6 41. Qc7 h6 42. h4 f4 43. Bxe4 fxg3+
44. Kxg3 Kf8 45. Qc5+ Kg8 46. d6 Bd7 47. f3 Qg7+ 48. Kf2 Qf6 49. h5 Qf4 50.
Qd4 Qh2+ 51. Ke1 Qxh5 52. Qf6 Qg5 53. Qe7 Qxe7 54. dxe7 Kg7 55. Bf5 Bc6 56.
Be4 Be8 57. Bb7 Kf6 58. Bxa6 Kxe7 59. Bb7 Kd6 60. Kf2 Bc6 61. Bc8 Kd5 62.
f4 Kc4 63. f5 Kxb4 64. f6 Bd5 0-1

Kevin Bonham
22-09-2015, 11:57 PM
Mamedyarov - Karjakin
Nakamura - Eljanov
Svidler - Wei Yi
Giri - Vachier-Lagrave

ER
23-09-2015, 02:36 AM
Good job by Eljanov knocking out Jakovenko by his solid play

Would I be wrong to suggest that Eljanov is the player to beat in these final stages?

Jesper Norgaard
23-09-2015, 09:26 AM
Would I be wrong to suggest that Eljanov is the player to beat in these final stages?

It seems Wei Yi is the player to beat in these final stages, because he has proven to have more lives than a cat! :)

That said, I agree with you that Eljanov has played very convincingly and business-like. I would favor his chances against Nakamura if he can get the scalp in the two classical games. If they proceed to the tiebreaks though, my favorite is Nakamura, and even more so the less time is assigned per game. However, if they play an Armageddon, I would again give equal chances to both at this moment, but I think that for an Armageddon to appear would be pretty unlikely.

MichaelBaron
23-09-2015, 11:16 AM
Wei Yi beats Ding Liren in this rapid tiebreak. He was in all kinds of trouble on both the board and the clock.

1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 c5 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. e3 O-O 6. Nge2 e6 7. b3 d5 8.
Ba3 Qa5 9. Na4 Nbd7 10. O-O a6 11. Qc1 Ne4 12. d4 b6 13. Bb2 cxd4 14. cxd5
exd5 15. Bxd4 b5 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Nac3 Bb7 18. Qb2 Ndf6 19. Nxe4 dxe4 20.
Rfd1 Qb6 21. Rd4 Rad8 22. Rad1 Kg8 23. Nc3 Rxd4 24. Rxd4 Rd8 25. Qd2 Rxd4
26. exd4 Qe6 27. Qf4 Qc6 28. h3 Kg7 29. Nd1 Qc2 30. Ne3 Qxa2 31. Qc7 Ba8
32. Qb8 Qa1+ 33. Kh2 Qe1 34. Qf4 Qc3 35. Nf5+ gxf5 36. Qg5+ Kf8 37. Qxf6
Bc6 38. Qd6+ Kg7 39. d5 Be8 40. b4 Qf6 41. Qc7 h6 42. h4 f4 43. Bxe4 fxg3+
44. Kxg3 Kf8 45. Qc5+ Kg8 46. d6 Bd7 47. f3 Qg7+ 48. Kf2 Qf6 49. h5 Qf4 50.
Qd4 Qh2+ 51. Ke1 Qxh5 52. Qf6 Qg5 53. Qe7 Qxe7 54. dxe7 Kg7 55. Bf5 Bc6 56.
Be4 Be8 57. Bb7 Kf6 58. Bxa6 Kxe7 59. Bb7 Kd6 60. Kf2 Bc6 61. Bc8 Kd5 62.
f4 Kc4 63. f5 Kxb4 64. f6 Bd5 0-1

I thinke Wei had upper hand for most of the game - at least according to computer.

MichaelBaron
23-09-2015, 11:17 AM
Would I be wrong to suggest that Eljanov is the player to beat in these final stages?

I think all 8 of them are players to watch! No weak players left. Even relatively low-rated ones (also well over 2700) are more than capable!

Kevin Bonham
24-09-2015, 12:52 AM
Would I be wrong to suggest that Eljanov is the player to beat in these final stages?

Apparently not.

Eljanov - Nakamura

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. g3 Be7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8.
a4 Bd7 9. Qxc4 Bc6 10. Bg5 Bd5 11. Qc2 Be4 12. Qc1 h6 13. Bxf6 Bxf6 14. Rd1
a5 15. Nbd2 Bh7 16. Nb3 c6 17. Qc3 Be7 18. Nc5 Qc7 19. Ne5 Na6 20. Nxb7
Qxb7 21. Bxc6 Qc7 22. Bxa8 Qxc3 23. bxc3 Rxa8 24. Nc6 Bd8 25. Nxd8 Rxd8 26.
f3 Rc8 27. Ra3 Bg6 28. Kf2 Rb8 29. Rd2 f6 30. Raa2 Rb3 31. Rab2 Rxc3 32.
Rb5 Bc2 33. Rxa5 Nc7 34. Ra7 f5 35. a5 Kh7 36. Rb7 Rc4 37. Rb6 Ba4 38. a6
Bc6 39. a7 Bd5 40. Ra2 Rxd4 41. Rc2 Na8 42. Ra6 Rd1 43. h4 h5 44. Ke3 Rg1
45. Kf4 Rg2 46. Rd6 Rg1 47. Rc8 Ra1 48. Kg5 Rxa7 49. Rdd8 g6 50. Rh8+ Kg7
51. Rcg8+ Kf7 52. Rxg6 Ra6 53. Rh7+ Kf8 54. Kxh5 Nb6 55. Kg5 Nc4 56. h5 Nd6
57. Rf6+ Kg8 58. Rd7 1-0

MichaelBaron
24-09-2015, 01:04 AM
What a torture for Naka this endgame was! Eljanov missed a forced mate and several easy ways to finish off the game ..but his position remained totally winning throughout!

Kevin Bonham
24-09-2015, 01:28 AM
Great fight Mamedyarov - Karjakin. Black suffered a lot but just survived.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. e3 Bb7 6. Bd3 O-O 7. O-O d5 8.
cxd5 exd5 9. a3 Bd6 10. b4 a6 11. Qb3 Qe7 12. Ra2 Nbd7 13. Re2 b5 14. Nd2
Ne4 15. Nxd5 Bxd5 16. Qxd5 Nc3 17. Qc6 Nxe2+ 18. Bxe2 Nb6 19. e4 a5 20.
Bxb5 axb4 21. a4 Qe6 22. Qc2 Bf4 23. d5 Qe7 24. Bc6 Ra7 25. g3 Be5 26. Nf3
Bc3 27. Bg5 Qd6 28. Be3 Ra5 29. Nd4 Nc4 30. Bf4 Qf6 31. Nb3 Ra6 32. Bb5 Na3
33. Qe2 Nxb5 34. Qxb5 Rfa8 35. Bxc7 Rxa4 36. d6 Be5 37. Nc5 Bxd6 38. Bxd6
Ra2 39. Bf4 Qc3 40. Be3 h6 41. Rc1 Ra1 42. Rxa1 Rxa1+ 43. Kg2 Kh7 44. Qe8
Qc4 45. Nd7 Qf1+ 46. Kf3 Qd1+ 47. Kf4 Qd6+ 48. Kf3 Qd1+ 49. Kf4 Qd6+ 50. e5
g5+ 51. Kg4 Qe6+ 52. Qxe6 fxe6 53. Nc5 Kg6 54. Kf3 Kf7 55. Ke2 Rh1 56. Bd2
Rb1 57. Kd3 b3 58. Be3 Kg6 59. Nxe6 Kf5 60. Nd4+ Kxe5 61. Kc3 Ke4 62. Nxb3
Rh1 63. Nd2+ Kf5 64. Nf3 Ke4 65. Nd2+ Kf5 66. Kd3 Rxh2 67. Ke2 Rh1 68. Nf1
h5 69. f3 h4 70. g4+ Kg6 71. f4 gxf4 72. Bxf4 Rg1 73. Ne3 Ra1 74. Nf5 h3
75. Nh4+ Kf6 76. Nf3 Ra2+ 77. Ke3 Rg2 78. Nh2 Kg6 79. Kf3 Rg1 80. Be3 Rg2
81. Nf1 Kh7 82. Bf2 Kg6 83. Ne3 Rh2 84. Kg3 Rh1 85. Nf5 h2 86. Nh4+ Kh7 87.Nf3 Rg1+ 88.Kxh2 Rxg4 1/2-1/2

Vlad
24-09-2015, 09:54 AM
Lucky Sergey that Shah is an attacker not an endgame master.

Interesting discussion Sergey Shipov had yesterday with Australian representative Nastya Sorokina.

First, according to Shipov the ability to defend a lost endgame is an entry card into the high echelon of the world chess. Well, this is what Sergey Karyakin demonstrated yesterday.

Second, according to both of them the Australian open Olympic team consists of only Chinese and Russians. Well, that is a very strong exaggeration...:)

Agent Smith
24-09-2015, 04:42 PM
What a torture for Naka this endgame was! Eljanov missed a forced mate and several easy ways to finish off the game ..but his position remained totally winning throughout!
Geez - it was an obvious mate too.
50. Kf6 51. ... Rh8
I wonder if he was drawing it out because Naka hadn't resigned earlier ? :)
n1RR4/r6k/4p1p1/3b1pKp/7P/5PP1/4P3/8 w - - 0 50

MichaelBaron
24-09-2015, 06:38 PM
I do not think so. Pretty sure he just did not notice it. Can happen to anyone!

Vlad
24-09-2015, 08:00 PM
I do not think so. Pretty sure he just did not notice it. Can happen to anyone!

Rh8 is not a mate as there is Kh6 and Rh7. However, there is no defence against Rg8 and Rg6.

Desmond
24-09-2015, 09:45 PM
Rh8 is not a mate as there is Kh6 and Rh7.
Can happen to anyone!

Kevin Bonham
24-09-2015, 10:36 PM
Karjakin - Mamedyarov 14 move draw.

Chicken Factor (http://www.chessninja.com/migonchess/migonchess116.htm) For Karjakin-Mamedyarov

1. Piece value 37 each minus moves 14 each =23
2. Colour Karjakin +10 Mamedyarov -10
3. Not applicable
4. Rating Karjakin +3 Mamedyarov -3
5. Not applicable

6. Not applicable
7. Not applicable
8. Not applicable (barely); they actually exceeded theory by five and a half moves
9. Short draw penalty +30 for both
10. Not applicable

Total Mamedyarov +40 ("Spineless Sparrow")
and ... Karjakin +66 ("Chicken Supreme (a.k.a. King of the Barnyard, Colonel Sanders, Foghorn Leghorn, El Pollo Loco, Cock-a-doodle-doo etc)")

I hold Mamedyarov blameless, can't fault him for knocking back a draw in a match in what the box says is an inferior position!

Kevin Bonham
24-09-2015, 11:27 PM
Wei Yi - Svidler draw. Playoffs for them.

Nakamura's situation looks hopeless in terms of winning the game and avoiding elimination. Vachier-Lagrave needs to hold a rook ending a pawn down against Giri.

MichaelBaron
25-09-2015, 12:04 AM
Karjakin - Mamedyarov 14 move draw.

Chicken Factor (http://www.chessninja.com/migonchess/migonchess116.htm) For Karjakin-Mamedyarov

1. Piece value 37 each minus moves 14 each =23
2. Colour Karjakin +10 Mamedyarov -10
3. Not applicable
4. Rating Karjakin +3 Mamedyarov -3
5. Not applicable

6. Not applicable
7. Not applicable
8. Not applicable (barely); they actually exceeded theory by five and a half moves
9. Short draw penalty +30 for both
10. Not applicable

Total Mamedyarov +40 ("Spineless Sparrow")
and ... Karjakin +66 ("Chicken Supreme (a.k.a. King of the Barnyard, Colonel Sanders, Foghorn Leghorn, El Pollo Loco, Cock-a-doodle-doo etc)")

I hold Mamedyarov blameless, can't fault him for knocking back a draw in a match in what the box says is an inferior position!

Exactly! Black's position looked quite risky...+0.50 or so according to chess engines...and unstead center according to me :)

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2015, 12:51 AM
Nakamura out, which also means Jakovenko out of the Candidates unless he gets the wildcard.

It also means nobody now has more than one tip in the poll out of the remaining players.

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2015, 01:31 AM
Giri through.

MichaelBaron
25-09-2015, 11:36 AM
I am not a big fant of Giri's chess but out of the remaining players, he and the winner of Karjakin-Mamedyarov got to be regarded as favourites. So far, Eljanov is playing the best chess of all. Hopefully he will not run out of steam...but it may happen

MichaelBaron
25-09-2015, 11:37 AM
Noticed right now there was a poll to guess the winner - Eljanov and Wei Yi are not even on the list! :whistle:

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2015, 12:13 PM
Noticed right now there was a poll to guess the winner - Eljanov and Wei Yi are not even on the list! :whistle:

Yes, there is an option to vote for and name another player, but nobody used it to pick Eljanov. Also nobody picked Svidler who is still in the tournament.

The board software limits the poll to 30 choices.

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2015, 08:48 PM
Rapid tiebreaks on now. Karjakin-Mamedyarov game 1 boring draw. Svidler - Wei Yi is more interesting. [but also eventually drawn]

ER
25-09-2015, 09:49 PM
Peter will tear him apart if he (Wei Yi) plays like that!

LOL Ok seems like he knows what he's doing.!
How could he find counter-attacking moves in such position!!!!

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2015, 10:26 PM
Both rapid-2 games drawn (but interesting games) so both matches onto 10/10.

Re post above, Wei Yi was facing a half-open f-file and had a knight defensively parked on g1 for much of the game. At times he may even have been better; eventually it went into a queen ending with Svidler a pawn up but not really with winning chances, and a draw was agreed.

Bill Gletsos
25-09-2015, 10:52 PM
The board software limits the poll to 30 choices.Tou can change it in the Admin Control Panel.

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2015, 11:07 PM
Tou can change it in the Admin Control Panel.

Aaah. I might do that next time (though I don't think I'll type in all 128 names).

Mamedyarov has lost on time in the first 10/10 to Karjakin, flagging while a pawn down in a pretty miserable looking double rook end game. Svidler - Wei Yi drawn again.

Kevin Bonham
25-09-2015, 11:57 PM
Svidler through - after getting many good positions against Wei Yi and not converting them, he finally converted a worse position instead. ;)

Kevin Bonham
26-09-2015, 12:14 AM
Mamedyarov spent 85 moves trying to break through without success then blundered.

So it's Svidler vs Giri and Eljanov vs Karjakin.

The winners of the semis become Candidates though Giri also has a fairly good chance on rating should he be knocked out.

Saturday is a rest day, and there is another rest day after the semis (two rest days should both end without tiebreaks.)

Kevin Bonham
27-09-2015, 10:02 PM
Took the commentators a long time to realise how risky Karjakin's ...d4 push was.

MichaelBaron
27-09-2015, 11:33 PM
Karjakin may survive the endgame...but Giri that many picked as a favourite over Svidler is in a totally lost position as white!

Kevin Bonham
27-09-2015, 11:45 PM
Svidler played strongly with black and Giri went to pieces and lost badly. Giri now has to win with black tomorrow or he's out.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8.
c3 d6 9. h3 Bb7 10. d4 Re8 11. Nbd2 exd4 12. cxd4 Nd7 13. Nf1 Na5 14. Bc2
Bf6 15. Rb1 c5 16. d5 Nc4 17. b3 Nce5 18. N3h2 Ng6 19. Ng3 Bc8 20. Rf1 Nb6
21. Ng4 Bxg4 22. hxg4 h6 23. Nf5 Ne7 24. Ne3 b4 25. g3 a5 26. Kg2 a4 27.
bxa4 Qd7 28. Qd3 Ng6 29. Nf5 Nxa4 30. Bxa4 Rxa4 31. Rh1 Ne7 32. g5 hxg5 33.
Ne3 Rxa2 34. Bd2 Ng6 35. Nf5 Ne5 36. Qe2 g6 37. Nh6+ Kg7 38. Nf5+ Kg8 39.
Nh6+ Kg7 40. Nf5+ gxf5 41. Qh5 Ng6 0-1

Kevin Bonham
27-09-2015, 11:57 PM
Giri offered a draw after 30.Bxa4.

ER
28-09-2015, 12:34 AM
Giri offered a draw after 30.Bxa4.

Peter repeated a couple of times in order to come as near to the time control as possible.
I am sure he knew that White had nothing for the Knight but he just wanted
to have a clearer view of the continuation. After he captured on f5 ... Ng6 completes the defence!
Excellent performance by GM Svidler - a very popular
and charismatic player who is still quite young to perform even better in future events.
BTW isn't this way of handling the Spanish opening a reminiscent
of Anatoly Karpov's style?

Kevin Bonham
28-09-2015, 01:03 AM
I find Svidler's post-mortems compulsive viewing. He said that he didn't prepare against 1.e4 at all and picked the line because he thought it was risky but interesting.

The view in the post-commentary seemed to be more that it was Giri lost the game than Svidler won it.

Kevin Bonham
28-09-2015, 01:25 AM
Eljanov - Karjakin. I found this game rather painful to watch as for some of the game from 17...d4 (?) on it seemed that Eljanov was playing to draw and Karjakin was playing to lose. Eljanov declined what seemed like a free pawn (must have been spooked by something but I really cannot figure what) and then Karjakin drifted from a harmless position into losing a pawn. Whether Eljanov had real winning chances if he went for the 3 vs 2 is above my pay grade but the knight ending does not seem to have ever been a win. Towards the end Eljanov was down to the increment.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 Bb4+ 6.Bd2 Be7 7.Bg2 c6 8.Bc3 d5 9.Ne5 Nfd7 10.Nxd7 Nxd7 11.Nd2 0-0 12.0-0 Rc8 13.Re1 c5 14.cxd5 exd5 15.Rc1 cxd4 16.Bxd4 Nc5 17.Bb2 d4 18.Nf3 d3 19.exd3 Nxd3 20.Rxc8 Qxc8 21.Rxe7 Nxb2 22.Qd7 [22.Qd2 Nd3 23.Rxa7 Rd8 and white has many options including 24.Nd4! Nc1 25.Qf4 when he has the pawn and the compensation] 22...Qc1+ 23.Re1 Qc8 24.Qxc8 Rxc8 25.Bh3 Rd8 26.Ne5 g6 27.Bf1 Bxf1 28.Kxf1 a5 29.Re3 f6 30.Ng4 Kf7 31.Rc3 h5 32.Ne3 Nd3 33.Rc7+ Ke6 34.Rb7 Nc1 35.Rxb6+ Kf7 36.Rb7+ Ke6 37.Rb6+ Kf7 38.a4 Rd3 39.b4 axb4 40.Rxb4 Ra3 41.Nc4 [41.Rb7+ Kf8 (or 41...Ke6 42.Rb6+ Kf7 43.Nd5 Rxa4 44.Rxf6+) 42.Nd5 Rxa4 43.Nxf6 in either case might be normally expected to be drawn with pawns all on one side but there is some chance white will pick up a second pawn if black is not careful.] 41...Ra1 42.Kg2 Nd3 43.Rb7+ Ke6 44.Rb6+ Ke7 45.a5 Ra4 46.Rc6 Ne1+ 47.Kf1 Nf3 48.Rc7+ Ke6 49.Ke2 Nxh2 50.Kd3 Nf3 51.Rc6+ Kf5 52.Kc3 g5 53.Rc5+ Ke6 54.Kb3 Ra1 55.Kb2 Ra4 56.Kb3 Ra1 57.Kb2 Ra4 58.Nb6 Rb4+ 59.Ka3 Rb1 60.Ka2 Rb4 61.Rc6+ Kf5 62.a6 Ne5 63.Rxf6+ Kxf6 64.Nd5+ [I think black can hold 64.a7 Rxb6 65.a8Q but as all the KNP v KN endings white can reach seem to be draws maybe it would have been worth trying.] 64...Ke6 65.Nxb4 Nd7 66.Nd3 Kd6 67.a7 Nb6 68.Kb3 Kc7 69.Kc3 Kb7 70.Kd4 Kxa7 71.Ke4 Nc4 72.Ne5 Nb2 73.Nf7 h4 74.Nxg5 hxg3 75.fxg3 Kb7 76.g4 Kc8 77.Kf5 Nd1 78.Ke4 1/2-1/2

MichaelBaron
28-09-2015, 10:44 PM
The 2nd game in Karjakin-Eljanov game was a super-quick draw. Once black equalized - white decided he wants to play rapid. Rather disappointing :(.
On a positive note, Poikovsky tournament (strong 10-player round robin) started in Russia - so there are some other lovely games to watch online.

Kevin Bonham
28-09-2015, 11:42 PM
Nobody tipped Svidler in our poll (he did win last time!) but he is a Candidate again after eliminating Giri. And he has two days off.

Kevin Bonham
29-09-2015, 10:19 PM
Eljanov - Karjakin

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 c5 3. Bg2 Nc6 4. O-O e5 5. e4 Be7 6. Nc3 d6 7. d3 O-O 8. a4 Nb4
9. Nd2 h6 10. Nc4 Bg4 11. Qd2 Bd7 12. Nd1 Re8 13. Nde3 Bf8 14. c3 Nc6 15. f4
exf4 16. gxf4 Be6 17. Qf2 Bxc4 18. Nxc4 d5 19. exd5 Nxd5 20. Bd2 Nf6 21. Qf3 Na5
22. Ne5 Qb6 23. Rab1 Rad8 24. Kh1 Qb3 25. Be1 Qxa4 26. Bh4 Rd6 27. Ra1 Qb5 28.
c4 Qa6 29. d4 Rxd4 30. Qc3 Ne4 31. Qxa5 Qxa5 32. Rxa5 Nd2 33. Rd1 Bd6 34. Bf2
Bxe5 35. fxe5 Nxc4 36. Bxd4 Nxa5 37. Bc3 Nc4 38. e6 Rxe6 39. Rd8+ Kh7 40. Bd5 1-0

...but the Empire strikes back ...

Karjakin - Eljanov

1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Bg4 3. Bg2 c6 4. c4 e6 5. cxd5 Bxf3 6. Bxf3 cxd5 7. O-O Nc6
8. d4 Nf6 9. Nc3 Be7 10. e3 O-O 11. Bd2 Rc8 12. Rc1 Nd7 13. Ne2 Nb6 14. Nf4
Nc4 15. Bc3 Bb4 16. b3 Nb6 17. Bb2 Qe7 18. Nd3 Ba3 19. Bxa3 Qxa3 20. Nc5
Rc7 21. Nxb7 Rxb7 22. Rxc6 Qxa2 23. Qd3 Nd7 24. Rb1 a5 25. Bd1 Nf6 26. Bc2
g6 27. f3 Qa3 28. Qc3 Qb4 29. Qxb4 axb4 30. Ra1 h5 31. h4 Re8 32. Kf2 Ree7
33. Ke2 Rec7 34. Rxc7 Rxc7 35. Kd2 Rb7 36. Ra8+ Kg7 37. Bd3 Nd7 38. e4 dxe4
39. Bxe4 Rb6 40. Ra4 e5 41. Ke3 Kf6 42. dxe5+ Kxe5 43. Ra5+ Kd6 44. Kd4 Rb8
45. Bd5 f6 46. Ra6+ Ke7 47. f4 Nb6 48. Ra7+ Kd6 49. Bf7 Rc8 50. Ra6 Kc6 51.
Bxg6 Kb7 52. Ra5 Rc3 53. Be4+ Kb8 54. Rb5 Ka7 55. Rxh5 1-0

So on we go to 10+10.

Kevin Bonham
29-09-2015, 11:10 PM
Karjakin wins rapid 3 with black:

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 c5 3. Bg2 Nc6 4. O-O e5 5. e4 Be7 6. Nc3 d6 7. d3 O-O 8.
a4 Nb4 9. h3 Re8 10. Re1 Bd7 11. Nd2 Bc6 12. Nc4 Bf8 13. Bg5 h6 14. Bxf6
Qxf6 15. Na5 Bd7 16. Nb5 Qd8 17. Nc4 Be6 18. c3 Nc6 19. Ne3 a6 20. Na3 Rb8
21. Nd5 Ne7 22. Nc4 b5 23. axb5 axb5 24. Nce3 Nxd5 25. Nxd5 g6 26. Ra7 Bxd5
27. exd5 Qb6 28. Qa1 c4 29. dxc4 bxc4 30. Re2 Rb7 31. Ra6 Qb3 32. g4 Rb6
33. Ra5 Rb7 34. Be4 Qb6 35. Ra6 Qd8 36. Qa4 Qb8 37. Kg2 Rd8 38. Qxc4 Rxb2
39. Rxb2 Qxb2 40. Ra7 Qb6 41. Rc7 Bg7 42. h4 Bf6 43. h5 Bh4 44. Kh3 Qxf2
45. Qd3 gxh5 46. gxh5 Bg5 47. Qg3 Qf1+ 48. Qg2 Qf4 49. Qg4 Qe3+ 50. Kg2 Rb8
51. Rc8+ Rxc8 52. Qxc8+ Kg7 53. Qc4 Qd2+ 54. Kh3 Qd1 55. Qd3 Qxh5+ 56. Kg2
Qg4+ 57. Kh1 Bh4 58. Bf5 Qg5 59. Qf3 Be1 60. Bc2 Bd2 61. c4 Qh4+ 62. Kg2
Qxc4 63. Qf5 Qxd5+ 64. Be4 Qe6 65. Qh7+ Kf8 0-1

Good position for white but then h4 and h5 was a blunder spread over two moves and further inaccuracies killed any chance of grovelling a draw.

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2015, 12:04 AM
Eljanov all over Karjakin but Karjakin managed to bail into OCB two pawns down and Eljanov unintentionally repeated, which Karjakin jumped on immediately, and that was that.

1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 g6 3. d4 Bg7 4. d5 d6 5. Nc3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 f5 7. g3 Nf6 8.
Bg2 Qa5 9. Qb3 Nbd7 10. Nd2 Nb6 11. O-O Bd7 12. Re1 Qa4 13. Bf1 Ne4 14. e3
O-O-O 15. Bd3 Nxd2 16. Bxd2 e5 17. f4 e4 18. Be2 h6 19. Kf2 g5 20. h4 Rdg8
21. Rh1 gxf4 22. exf4 Rg7 23. h5 Rhg8 24. Rhg1 Qa6 25. a4 Be8 26. Be1 Nd7
27. Ke3 Nf6 28. Rh1 Qa5 29. Bf2 b6 30. Rh3 Kd8 31. Be1 Ke7 32. Bf2 Kf8 33.
Be1 Re7 34. Rh1 Rgg7 35. Ra3 Kg8 36. Bf2 Kh8 37. Be1 Rg8 38. Bf2 Reg7 39.
Rh3 Qa6 40. Qd1 Ng4+ 41. Bxg4 fxg4 42. Rh1 Qxc4 43. Qe2 Qxd5 44. Rd1 Qe6
45. c4 Rd7 46. Rd5 Bf7 47. Be1 Qe8 48. Rf5 Kh7 49. Bc3 Be6 50. Rf6 Rf7 51.
Rg6 Rxg6 52. hxg6+ Kxg6 53. Ra1 h5 54. Rd1 Rd7 55. Qh2 Qd8 56. Ba1 d5 57.
cxd5 Rxd5 58. Qb2 Rd3+ 59. Ke2 Qd4 60. Qxd4 cxd4 61. Rxd3 Bc4 62. Bxd4
exd3+ 63. Ke3 Kf5 64. Bc3 a5 65. Be1 Ke6 66. Bc3 Kf5 67. Be1 Kf6 68. Bd2
Kg6 69. Bc3 Kf5 1/2-1/2

Congrats to Ian Rout and Kuan for winning the poll, whatever happens in the final.

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2015, 12:16 AM
One day off, four game final starts Thursday, Svidler white in game 1.

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2015, 12:23 AM
Would even 69...h4 have won? Looks very hard to deal with.

[Edit: Seems white just holds in the line 70.gxh4 Kh5 71.Be1 Bb3 72.Kxd3 Bxa4 73.Bf2 b5 74.Bb6 g3 75.Bxa5 g2 76.Bb6 Kxh4 77.Bg1. Perhaps the final position is a draw; Eljanov was certainly winning earlier.]

ER
30-09-2015, 03:35 AM
Would even 69...h4 have won? Looks very hard to deal with.

[Edit: Seems white just holds in the line 70.gxh4 Kh5 71.Be1 Bb3 72.Kxd3 Bxa4 73.Bf2 b5 74.Bb6 g3 75.Bxa5 g2 76.Bb6 Kxh4 77.Bg1. Perhaps the final position is a draw; Eljanov was certainly winning earlier.]

He (Eljanov) deserves a commendation though! He played formidably throughout the event! :clap:

Jesper Norgaard
30-09-2015, 07:02 AM
Quite a heartbreaking finish for Eljanov, who had a decisive advantage in the endgame of opposite colored bishops against Karjakin, but allowed the same position to occur three times, which was promptly claimed by Karjakin in his draw claim. To me this was not so heartbreaking since I didn't have a favorite between Karjakin and Eljanov, but I sure would have liked to see another Armageddon. Still if Eljanov would have won this game, they would have gone ahead to a 5+3 Blitz match first.


64.Bc3 a5 {first occurrence} 65.Be1 Bb3! [this wins quite convincingly with the further continuation shown here. What actually happened in the game was 65...Ke6 66.Bc3 Kf5 {second occurrence} 67.Be1 Kf6 68.Bd2 Kg6 69.Bc3 Kf5 {third occurrence} and here Karjakin claimed a draw since 70.Be1 would also be third occurrence of that position, but it has already happened the move before ½-½] 66.Kxd3 Bxa4 67.Bf2 Bb5+! 68.Kd2 Ke4! 69.f5! Kf3! 70.Bxb6 Kxg3 71.f6 Be8 72.Bxa5 h4 and Black will queen a pawn

ETA: I am sure it was also difficult for Eljanov to recognize the repetition because the first move 64...a5 was not identical to the two other moves 66...Kf5 and 69...Kf5, and they were also not sequential in numbers either. Indeed well spotted by the young Ukrainian (now Russian) prodigy Karjakin. All Russian Final!

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2015, 11:59 AM
He (Eljanov) deserves a commendation though! He played formidably throughout the event! :clap:

Yes it is sad he did not make the final after his play through the event. Karjakin on the other hand has been getting through but has had numerous close shaves and has twice had to win games to keep going. He's been very resilient and it was quite amazing he survived that final game. (Svidler, while saying he has not played nearly as well as in 2011, nonetheless hasn't lost a single game.)

MichaelBaron
30-09-2015, 12:22 PM
Karjakin showed that he has nerves of steel coming from behind once again. I am feelying sorry for Eljanov who has been playing best chess of all of the WC participants but faultered so close to the finishing line :(.

Bulldozer
30-09-2015, 01:46 PM
What a strange FIDE decision to play 4 games in the pretty much useless final instead of 1/2...

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2015, 02:57 PM
What a strange FIDE decision to play 4 games in the pretty much useless final instead of 1/2...

Yes it seems for the participants making the final and hence the Candidates is the bigger deal and the final is an anticlimax. Would be different if only the winner qualified.

Ian Rout
30-09-2015, 08:23 PM
To me this was not so heartbreaking since I didn't have a favorite between Karjakin and Eljanov, but I sure would have liked to see another Armageddon.
If enough people feel this way maybe somebody will organise an Armageddon tournament, or even an Armageddon world championship. At least nobody could complain there were too many draws.

Garvinator
30-09-2015, 09:42 PM
Yes it seems for the participants making the final and hence the Candidates is the bigger deal and the final is an anticlimax. Would be different if only the winner qualified.
In previous cycles, only the winner has qualified.

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2015, 10:09 PM
In previous cycles, only the winner has qualified.

This was only the case for the 2007 and 2009 World Cups (2007 qualified the winner to a challenge match against Topalov). In 2011 there were three qualifiers and in 2013 two.

Jesper Norgaard
01-10-2015, 05:15 AM
If enough people feel this way maybe somebody will organise an Armageddon tournament, or even an Armageddon world championship. At least nobody could complain there were too many draws.

An Armageddon tournament where every game was Armageddon, otherwise a normal tournament, was played here in Mexico. I'm not aware of the details, and didn't participate. I think one of the purposes was to evaluate how well the "1 minute extra" vs. "draw odds" clash to determine if it is a fair match.

Garvinator
01-10-2015, 07:30 AM
As I have said before, I think this type of format is a very good format for promotion of the sport and I wish it was used more often and would become more popular. Especially if the first round used swiss pairings instead of the standard knockout pairings.

MichaelBaron
01-10-2015, 10:57 AM
As I have said before, I think this type of format is a very good format for promotion of the sport and I wish it was used more often and would become more popular. Especially if the first round used swiss pairings instead of the standard knockout pairings.

Unfortunately you are right. Outcomes of such competition are sometimes influenced by lady luck more than with the traditional format but given how many people are following the World Cup games online - it is clearly far more exciting for the spectators. I believe there are more people watching World Cup than World Championship matches.

Kevin Bonham
01-10-2015, 12:18 PM
As I have said before, I think this type of format is a very good format for promotion of the sport and I wish it was used more often and would become more popular. Especially if the first round used swiss pairings instead of the standard knockout pairings.

I wonder if the reason they use 1-128, 2-127 (etc) instead of 1-65, 2-66 (etc) is to try to reduce the number of upsets of the top players in the early rounds.

Ian Rout
01-10-2015, 01:02 PM
I wonder if the reason they use 1-128, 2-127 (etc) instead of 1-65, 2-66 (etc) is to try to reduce the number of upsets of the top players in the early rounds.I can think of other reasons.

In practical terms, 1-128 etc gives a number of close pairings (64-65 etc). A consistent gap of 64 places may either still not produce close matches, or produce too many to follow with the added downside of potentially weakening the R2 field.

In philosophical terms, if you must deal somebody a softer pairing it seems nonsensical to give it to number 64 rather than number 1; it isn't normal to reward (relative) lack of achievment. In a competition which for whatever reason didn't have 2^n players you would seede the top players, not the middle, to the next round. It could even lead to "sandbagging", or at least to playing sitting out to protect mediocre ratings.

If there is to be change in the pairings (which I doubt) the only viable change would be to randomise the bottom half.

Kevin Bonham
01-10-2015, 02:50 PM
If someone desired the fairest possible system (eg in terms of the comparative chances of seeds 1 and 2), an option might be to alternate between highest-lowest and highest-middle rounds. But whereas I used to object to 1-128, 2-127 (etc) on the grounds that it gave the top seeds an unfair advantage, I'm now thinking it's a good system for a qualifying knockout because it gives the top seeds an unfair advantage. Not very fortunate from Australia's perspective though.

Ian Rout
01-10-2015, 05:00 PM
If someone desired the fairest possible system (eg in terms of the comparative chances of seeds 1 and 2), an option might be to alternate between highest-lowest and highest-middle rounds. But whereas I used to object to 1-128, 2-127 (etc) on the grounds that it gave the top seeds an unfair advantage, I'm now thinking it's a good system for a qualifying knockout because it gives the top seeds an unfair advantage. Not very fortunate from Australia's perspective though.I'm not sure how real the advantage is, apart from the first round or two, for several reasons including the fact that seedings are based purely on a time limit which only applies to the first of five stages. Even accepting that to be real, all players have the opportunity to get their rating/seeding up to claim this advantage. The fact that two players who were not supposed (on rating) to make the quarter-finals are in the final suggests that how well you play and the randomising effects of the system may be bigger issues.

Certainly in terms of getting to R2 before being eliminated the minnows are at a disadvantage relative to the medium-size fish, but that might be viewed as the quid pro quo for being there at all.

ER
01-10-2015, 06:28 PM
I was thinking about the advantages / disadvantages of this system too.

I only had the time to look at first round results.

Among the notable higher versus lower pairs the "expected"
outcome

(the higher rated seed losing to lower rated seed)

was disturbed 7 times


97/32
88/41
93/36
116/13
82/47
90/39
99/30

I only had a look at the results.
I did not examine the whole list to determine
In how many games the players' strength was

balanced / unbalanced

in the final we have
seed no. 11 versus seed no. 16

http://en.chessbase.com/Portals/4/files/news/2015/events/baku/karjakingsvidler011.jpg

Both GMs Karjakin (left) and Svidler
represent Russia!

(photo published on chessbase.com)

Kevin Bonham
01-10-2015, 11:21 PM
Svidler pounces in game 1, apparently getting nothing from the opening but then sacrificing a pawn. Karjakin had miscalculated the line and his position just collapsed.

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 e6 4.0-0 Be7 5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 8.Re1 b5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Ne4 Bb7 11.c3 a6 12.a4 b4 13.Bg5 f6 14.Bd2 e5 15.Rc1 Rf7 16.d4 bxc3 17.bxc3 cxd4 18.cxd4 Nxd4 19.Nxd4 exd4 20.Qb3 Rb8 21.Rb1 Qd7 22.Rec1 Qe6 23.Nc5 Bxc5 24.Rxc5 Rd8 25.Ba5 Rd6 26.Qc4 Nc3 27.Rxb7 Qe1+ 28.Bf1 Ne2+ 29.Qxe2 1-0

Kevin Bonham
02-10-2015, 11:30 PM
Unbelievable. Pressing for a win (don't think it was there) with his opponent in a bit of time trouble Karjakin trots out two massive blunders in a row.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.c3 d6 9.h3 Nb8 10.d4 Nbd7 11.Nbd2 Bb7 12.Bc2 Re8 13.a4 Bf8 14.Bd3 c6 15.Qc2 Rc8 16.axb5 axb5 17.b4 c5 18.bxc5 exd4 19.c6 dxc3 20.cxb7 cxd2 21.Qxd2 Rb8 22.Bxb5 Qb6 23.Rb1 Qxb7 24.Bd3 Qa8 25.Rxb8 Rxb8 26.Bb2 Qa2 27.Re2 h6 28.Qc1 Qb3 29.Bc4 Qb7 30.Qd1 Re8 31.Bxf6 Nxf6 32.e5 dxe5 33.Nxe5 Re7 34.Qd4 Nd7 35.Nxf7 Rxf7 36.Rb2 Qc6 37.Rb5?? Kh8 38.Rd5?? Nb6 0-1

MichaelBaron
02-10-2015, 11:34 PM
The position was already equal at the time of the blunder though.

Kevin Bonham
02-10-2015, 11:51 PM
It had probably been drawn for several moves, even if white looked "better".

ER
03-10-2015, 07:50 AM
I think that Svidler has elevated himself into a very serious threat to Magnus's dominance!
Provided he keeps this fighting style and Karlsen keeps on being out of form!
Also provided that he (Peter) wins the candidates!
Not an easy task!

MichaelBaron
03-10-2015, 09:51 AM
I think that Svidler has elevated himself into a very serious threat to Magnus's dominance!


I like Svidler (in my opinion, he is one of the smartest people among the top chess players as well as nice and with a great sense of humour) but I would not realistically see him as a threat to Carlsen even if he wins the candidates...but we never know.

Kevin Bonham
03-10-2015, 11:08 PM
Oh dear. Needing only a draw to win the World Cup and winning with 28.Qc3, Svidler follows Karjakin in blundering twice in a row and loses. (29.Qxe8 is still a draw.)

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 a6 5.c4 Nc6 6.Qe3 Nf6 7.h3 g6 8.Nc3 Bg7 9.Be2 Nd7 10.Rb1 Nde5 11.0-0 0-0 12.Rd1 Nxf3+ 13.Bxf3 f5 14.exf5 Bxf5 15.Be4 Qd7 16.Nd5 Qe6 17.Bxf5 Qxf5 18.Bd2 Rae8 19.Bc3 e6 20.Nb6 d5 21.Bxg7 Kxg7 22.Qc5 Rf6 23.b4 Ne5 24.cxd5 Nd3 25.Qe3 Nxf2 26.Rf1 Qe4 27.Rbe1 exd5 28.Rxf2?? Qh4 29.Qd2?? Rxf2 30.Qc3+ d4 0-1

ER
04-10-2015, 03:42 AM
Damn, I can't even win a couple of Rooks for the Queen after Qc7 check! Black's f-Rook is strategically
positioned for attack as well as for defence! Well it's getting more interesting now!

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2015, 12:34 AM
Karjakin wins again so off to the playoff.

1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 c5 3.c4 cxd4 4.cxd5 Nf6 5.Qxd4 Qxd5 6.Nc3 Qxd4 7.Nxd4 Bd7 8.Ndb5 Kd8 9.Be3 Nc6 10.f3 h5 11.0-0-0 Kc8 12.Bg5 g6 13.Nd6+ exd6 14.Bxf6 Rg8 15.e4 Be6 16.Kb1 Kd7 17.Nd5 Bg7 18.Bxg7 Rxg7 19.Bb5 Kd8 20.Rd2 Bxd5 21.Rxd5 Kc7 22.Rc1 Re8 23.Rd4 Re5 24.Ba4 b5 25.Bb3 Rc5 26.Rd5 Rxc1+ 27.Kxc1 a6 28.Rd3 g5 29.Kd2 h4 30.Rc3 Kb6 31.Rd3 Kc7 32.Ke3 f6 33.Rc3 Kb6 34.Rd3 Kc7 35.Rc3 Kb6 36.Bd5 Ne7 37.Kd4 Rh7 38.Be6 Rh8 39.a3 Rd8 40.Rc2 Rh8 41.Rf2 Ng6 42.Kd5 Rd8 43.Bf5 Nf4+ 44.Kd4 Re8 45.g3 Ne6+ 46.Bxe6 Rxe6 47.Kd5 Re5+ 48.Kxd6 hxg3 49.hxg3 g4 50.fxg4 Rxe4 51.Rf4 Re3 52.Rxf6 Rxg3 53.Ke5+ Kb7 54.Kf5 Rb3 55.g5 Rxb2 56.g6 Rg2 57.Ke6 1-0

Strong game by white; 44...d5 may have still held.

Jesper Norgaard
05-10-2015, 08:41 AM
Karjakin wins again so off to the playoff.

1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 c5 3.c4 cxd4 4.cxd5 Nf6 5.Qxd4 Qxd5 6.Nc3 Qxd4 7.Nxd4 Bd7 8.Ndb5 Kd8 9.Be3 Nc6 10.f3 h5 11.0-0-0 Kc8 12.Bg5 g6 13.Nd6+ exd6 14.Bxf6 Rg8 15.e4 Be6 16.Kb1 Kd7 17.Nd5 Bg7 18.Bxg7 Rxg7 19.Bb5 Kd8 20.Rd2 Bxd5 21.Rxd5 Kc7 22.Rc1 Re8 23.Rd4 Re5 24.Ba4 b5 25.Bb3 Rc5 26.Rd5 Rxc1+ 27.Kxc1 a6 28.Rd3 g5 29.Kd2 h4 30.Rc3 Kb6 31.Rd3 Kc7 32.Ke3 f6 33.Rc3 Kb6 34.Rd3 Kc7 35.Rc3 Kb6 36.Bd5 Ne7 37.Kd4 Rh7 38.Be6 Rh8 39.a3 Rd8 40.Rc2 Rh8 41.Rf2 Ng6 42.Kd5 Rd8 43.Bf5 Nf4+ 44.Kd4 Re8 45.g3 Ne6+ 46.Bxe6 Rxe6 47.Kd5 Re5+ 48.Kxd6 hxg3 49.hxg3 g4 50.fxg4 Rxe4 51.Rf4 Re3 52.Rxf6 Rxg3 53.Ke5+ Kb7 54.Kf5 Rb3 55.g5 Rxb2 56.g6 Rg2 57.Ke6 1-0

Strong game by white; 44...d5 may have still held.

I believe Svidler resigned in his own time, after 56...Rg2, and the reason was definitely 57.Ke6, but that move was never played on the board. A small difference I admit. Some sites reported 57.Ke4 because that was what the DGT software concluded after the arbiter placed the kings on the white center squares e4 and d5, presumably with the white king on e4. Again I don't get why DGT could not invent a scenario where the result can always be entered without the software screwing up, which happens countless times on DGT handled boards.

Here is a manual about how to place the kings to register a result:
http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0SO82GbkBFW3qQAQ4LD8Qt.;_ylu=X3oDMTBzdmVvZml wBGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwMxMAR2dGlkAwRzZWMDc3I-/RV=2/RE=1444020507/RO=10/RU=http%3a%2f%2fwww.metrowestchess.org%2fCommunity %2fKnowledge%2fDGT_Boards%2f52-e-board-end-of-game-king-placement.pdf/RK=0/RS=pPHecrEx_OjxSOMHGCJ8HC4l4X8-

For instance in the position where 57.Ke4 is a possible move, you move the black king to e4, and then the white king to d5, and the software should register a white win 1-0. However that doesn't solve all problems. In this position

8/8/8/4K3/8/3k4/8/8 w - - 0 1
an arbiter would routinely pick up both kings and put them down on e4 and d5. But if it is Black's move 1...Ke4 would be registered. If it is White's move either 1.Kd5 or 1.Ke4 would be registered. In both cases you need to manipulate the PGN file later (or perhaps via software) and remove the last king move. Choosing what king to move first to the center square can reduce ambiguity, but not always, as in this case.

Following the software if you place the black king on d5, and then the white king on e4, then 1.Ke4 would not be registered, at least not if the black king was detected on d5 before the white king was detected on e4.

In my humble opinion DGT should have thought of another way of eliminating the problem, by defining a1,a8,h1,h8 as alternative squares. A black win can then be entered either with kings on d4+e5 or a1+h8. In the above position you simply put either king on a8, and the other king on h1. Since neither Ka8 nor Kh1 were possible moves with either player on move, the software should only register a white win. A black win would be either king on h8, and the other king on a1. A draw could be either king on h8, and the other on h1.

8/8/8/4k3/8/8/7K/8 w - - 0 1
In this position where 1...Ke4 is possible and 1.Kh1 is possible, you place the black king on h1 and then the white king on a8, and only the white win will be registered. I think adopting this definition there is no position where you can't place the kings to safely register the result.

I wonder how many years DGT has NOT come up with a reasonable solution to the ambiguity. That is not very proficient. And this could be fixed with a simple software change, e.g. you don't have to throw out the old DGT boards, just improve the software. Instead we see countless games ended with the random king move to either of the four central squares. Hoots!

Perhaps the problem has been that the arbiters think that placing the kings simultaneously on the squares, will eliminate the problem, however "simultaneous" in detecting a piece on a square is a relative and unreliable definition. Also often the arbiter does not know who is to move. I should note I have never actually experimented with a DGT board to see how it detects results. Comments?

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2015, 10:37 AM
I believe Svidler resigned in his own time, after 56...Rg2, and the reason was definitely 57.Ke6, but that move was never played on the board. A small difference I admit. Some sites reported 57.Ke4 because that was what the DGT software concluded after the arbiter placed the kings on the white center squares e4 and d5, presumably with the white king on e4. Again I don't get why DGT could not invent a scenario where the result can always be entered without the software screwing up, which happens countless times on DGT handled boards.

I was watching the video and Ke6 was played on the board with Svidler resigning about one minute later.

The issue with sites wrongly reporting Ke4 was a funny one in this case because Ke4 is actually a draw.

Yes, something should be done about this problem; it's annoying, and who knows how many PGN files are contaminated with incorrect final moves as a result.

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2015, 09:19 PM
Karjakin wins rapid 1 with white

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.e3 g6 4.d4 cxd4 5.exd4 d5 6.cxd5 Nxd5 7.Qb3 Bg7 8.Bc4 e6 9.Bg5 Qa5+ 10.Bd2 Qd8 11.Bg5 Qa5+ 12.Nc3 Nxc3 13.bxc3 Nc6 14.0-0 0-0 15.Bh4 Qc7 16.Bg3 Qd8 17.Qa3 b6 18.Rfd1 Na5 19.Be2 Bb7 20.Ne5 Rc8 21.Rac1 f6 22.Nf3 Qd5 23.Bf1 Bh6 24.Rc2 Rf7 25.Bd3 Qd7 26.h3 Bd5 27.Ba6 Bb7 28.Bd3 Nc4 29.Bxc4 Rxc4 30.Qxa7 b5 31.Ne1 Rf8 32.Qa3 Ra8 33.Qb2 Rca4 34.Qb1 Bd5 35.Nd3 Bf8 36.Rdd2 Qc6 37.f3 Bc4 38.Bf4 Qd5 39.Nf2 Rxa2 40.Rxa2 Bxa2 41.Qe1 Bc4 42.Ng4 Qf5 43.Qe4 Ra1+ 44.Kh2 h5 45.Qxf5 exf5 46.Nxf6+ Kf7 47.Nd7 Bg7 48.Be5 Bh6 49.f4 Ra2 50.Rxa2 Bxa2 51.Kg3 Bf8 52.Bc7 Ba3 53.Ne5+ Kf6 54.Bd8+ Kg7 55.Kh4 Bd6 56.Kg5 Bxe5 57.fxe5 Kf7 58.g3 Be6 59.Kf4 Bd5 60.Ke3 Ke6 61.Kd2 Bg2 62.h4 Bd5 63.Kc2 Kd7 64.Ba5 Kc6 65.Kd3 Kd7 66.Kc2 Kc6 67.Kb2 Be6 68.Ka3 Bd5 69.Kb4 Be6 70.Bd8 Bd5 71.Ka5 Be6 72.Ka6 Bc8+ 73.Ka7 Be6 74.Bg5 Bd7 75.Bf4 Be6 76.Kb8 Bd7 77.Bg5 Be6 78.Bh6 Bd7 79.Bf4 Be6 80.d5+ Bxd5 81.Kc8 Bb3 82.Kd8 Bc4 83.Ke7 Bb3 84.e6 Bc4 85.Kf6 Bb3 86.Bc1 Bc4 87.Ba3 Bb3 88.e7 Kd7 89.Kxg6 1-0

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2015, 10:33 PM
Svidler strikes back winning rapid 2! On we go ...

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.g3 d5 3.Bg2 e6 4.0-0 Be7 5.d3 0-0 6.Nbd2 c5 7.e4 Nc6 8.Re1 b5 9.e5 Nd7 10.Nf1 b4 11.h4 a5 12.N1h2 Re8 13.h5 h6 14.Ng4 Bf8 15.Bf4 a4 16.a3 bxa3 17.bxa3 Rb8 18.Ne3 Bb7 19.c4 dxc4 20.Nxc4 Nb6 21.Nxb6 Qxb6 22.Qxa4 Ra8 23.Qc2 Ra6 24.Reb1 Qa7 25.Be3 Ba8 26.Qc3 Rd8 27.Nd2 Nd4 28.Bxd4 cxd4 29.Qc2 Bxg2 30.Kxg2 Rxa3 31.Rxa3 Qxa3 32.Ne4 Qa6 33.Rb3 Qa5 34.f4 Ra8 35.Qb1 Qd5 36.Rb5 Qc6 37.Kf3 Ra3 38.Rb8 Ra8 39.Qb7 Qxb7 40.Rxb7 Ra3 41.Rb8 Rxd3+ 42.Kf2 g6 43.Nc5 Rd2+ 44.Ke1 Rb2 45.Rxb2 Bxc5 46.hxg6 fxg6 47.Ke2 d3+ 48.Kxd3 h5 49.Kc4 Be3 50.Rb3 Bf2 51.Rf3 Bg1 52.Kb5 Kf7 53.Kc6 Ke7 54.Rb3 Bh2 55.Rb7+ Kf8 56.Kd6 Bxg3 57.Kxe6 Bxf4 58.Rf7+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2015, 11:00 PM
Svidler wins again! Now Karjakin has to win with black to stay in it again!

1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.e3 g6 4.d4 Bg7 5.d5 0-0 6.Nc3 d6 7.h3 e6 8.Be2 Re8 9.Nd2 Na6 10.dxe6 Bxe6 11.0-0 d5 12.cxd5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 Bxd5 14.Qc2 Nb4 15.Qb1 Qe7 16.a3 Nc6 17.a4 Qe6 18.Ra3 c4 19.Re1 Rad8 20.a5 Bf8 21.Ra4 Ne5 22.e4 Bc6 23.Rxc4 Rxd2 24.Bxd2 Nxc4 25.Bc3 Nd6 26.f3 Bg7 27.Bxg7 Kxg7 28.Qd3 Qe5 29.Qd2 a6 30.Rd1 Nb5 31.Qb4 Nc7 32.Qb6 f5 33.Bd3 Rd8 34.exf5 gxf5 35.Kf2 Qd4+ 36.Qxd4+ Rxd4 37.Ke3 Ne6 38.Rc1 f4+ 39.Ke2 Rb4 40.Bxa6 bxa6 0-1

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2015, 11:32 PM
...which of course happens as Svidler plays the opening terribly.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Nd7 4.d4 cxd4 5.Qxd4 a6 6.Bxd7+ Bxd7 7.c4 Nf6 8.Nc3 g6 9.0-0 Bg7 10.Qd3 0-0 11.a4 Rc8 12.Rb1 Bc6 13.Re1 Nd7 14.b4 Nb6 15.b5 Bd7 16.Nd2 Be6 17.Nd5 Nxa4 18.Ba3 Qd7 19.h3 Rfe8 20.Rb3 a5 21.Qc2 Bh6 22.Nf3 Bxd5 23.exd5 Nb6 24.Re4 Nxd5 25.Bb2 Nf6 26.Bxf6 exf6 27.Rxe8+ Qxe8 0-1

MichaelBaron
05-10-2015, 11:40 PM
Nerves are letting Svidler down - otherwise hard to explain such play with white in an important game...

MichaelBaron
05-10-2015, 11:55 PM
Omg..and rook blunder in winning position in the next game... :(

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2015, 11:57 PM
Oh dear. Svidler bashed out 17 moves of theory in 12 seconds. Karjakin then spent two minutes playing a blunder. Svidler spent over two and a half minutes missing it. Then he started losing, then swindled his way back, only to blunder a rook in Karjakin's time trouble.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 0-0 8.c3 d5 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Nxe5 Nxe5 11.Rxe5 c6 12.d3 Bd6 13.Re1 Bf5 14.Qf3 Re8 15.Rxe8+ Qxe8 16.Nd2 Qe1+ 17.Nf1 Bg6 18.Bc2 b4 19.c4 b3 20.Bd1 Nb4 21.Bd2 Qe5 22.Bc3 Qc5 23.Bxb4 Qxb4 24.Bxb3 Qb6 25.Re1 Bc5 26.Ba4 Rd8 27.Rd1 Qxb2 28.Bxc6 Bh5 29.Rb1 Qxb1 30.Qxh5 Bxf2+ 31.Kxf2 Qb6+ 32.Ne3 Qxc6 33.Nd5 Qd6 34.g3 h6 35.Qe2 Rb8 36.Kg2 Kh8 37.h4 Qa3 38.Kh3 Qc1 39.Nf4 Qb2 40.Qe7 Qb7 41.Qe5 Qd7+ 42.Kh2 Kg8 43.Qxb8+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
06-10-2015, 12:00 AM
Ian Rogers in a dehydration suit would mop the floor with either of these guys at the moment.

Kevin Bonham
06-10-2015, 12:19 AM
Karjakin wins!

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d3 d6 6.Nbd2 0-0 7.h3 Ne7 8.0-0 Ng6 9.Bb3 a6 10.Re1 Ba7 11.Nf1 Be6 12.d4 Bxb3 13.Qxb3 Qc8 14.Ng3 Re8 15.Bg5 Nd7 16.Nf5 Ndf8 17.h4 h6 18.h5 hxg5 19.hxg6 Nxg6 20.Nxg5 Qd7 21.g3 d5 22.Qxd5 Qxd5 23.exd5 Rad8 24.Kg2 Rxd5 25.f4 f6 26.Ne4 Rdd8 27.fxe5 fxe5 28.d5 Rxd5 29.Nh6+ Kf8 30.Rf1+ Nf4+ 31.gxf4 gxh6 32.f5 Kf7 33.Rad1 Rg8+ 34.Kf3 c6 35.c4 Rd4 36.Rxd4 exd4 37.Rh1 Rh8 38.Rg1 Rd8 39.f6 Ke6 40.Rg7 Rd7 41.Rg8 d3 42.Re8+ Kf7 43.Rh8 Ke6 44.Rxh6 d2 45.f7+ Ke7 0-1

idledim
06-10-2015, 12:20 AM
I cannot remember a crazier match .... crazier even than the NRL Grand Final.

Agent Smith
06-10-2015, 06:17 AM
Lots of crazy alright