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Kevin Bonham
15-06-2015, 05:35 PM
Awesome field! Includes top six FIDE-rated in the world. Blitz tournament to determine pairings. Blitz tonight, round 1 tomorrow night, rest day after round 4. Single round robin.

Kevin Bonham
15-06-2015, 05:40 PM
Another unusual detail of this event is the "confession box" that will be used. In Norway the players will be able to speak in front of the camera... during the game! This was something that the organizers tried out in the EnterCard Qualifier (the qualifier to Norway chess).

None of the other players will be able to hear him while this happens, and the players that are in the confession box do not have interaction with other people. According to the main organizer, Joran "JJ" Aulin-Jansson, this is completely legal according to the rules of chess. The use of the confession box, is, of course, completely voluntary.

That's quite a strange idea. Hope none of the players get distracted from their games by spending too much mental energy confessing!

Agent Smith
15-06-2015, 09:26 PM
I hope no-one makes a fool of themselves. Not that they would as of course as they are professionals,
but it's a real invitation to have a gloat before the game is over.

I'm keen to see how Giri and Lev are going. It's a tough comp alright,

MichaelBaron
16-06-2015, 06:26 PM
The blitz was interesting to follow. Carlsen managed 3d equal only.

Agent Smith
16-06-2015, 08:19 PM
Yeah, Magnus equal third with Anand and Giri. Anand loss to both of the other two in interesting games, after having strong positions but going awol.

What a strong field!

MichaelBaron
17-06-2015, 01:41 PM
Amazing start to the tournament! Carlsen losing on time in a winning position...cause he did not realize what the time limit was!

Jesper Norgaard
17-06-2015, 04:05 PM
It seems to have gone down hill with the level of information from the Norway Chess tournament. In 2013, the tournament regulation was a submenu in the main web site. They used 1 h 40 min for 40 moves + 50 min for 20 moves + 15 min for the rest of the game with an increment of 30 seconds per move, starting from the first.

In 2014, you had to use "SuperTournament" and from here use the bizarre menu item "Arbiters" to find this information, here you will find "Regulations" as a third menu item. They used 120 min for 40 moves + 60 min for 20 moves + 15 min for the rest of the game with an increment of 30 seconds per move, starting from move 61.

In 2015, I have not been able to find the regulations at all in their menu system, I suppose it doesn't exist. If it does, it is not present where one would look based on previous years web habits. Supposedly it is 120 min for 40 moves + 60 min for 20 moves + nothing for the rest of the game?? And the increment is 30 seconds per move, but no idea when it starts?? Week in chess kinda hints that the 30 seconds increment starts after move 40, but that could be my misinterpretation. Even then I think it is a complete disgrace not to keep this information in the web site, and it is unprecedented to work with a third period with no time extra?? Why is it not 60 minutes to the rest of the game, instead of until move 60, no reason to have a time control at move 60 if you get no extra time after the time control. Who invented this curious and dysfunctional time control? Is it only part of Norway Chess, or the whole "Grand Tour" or whatever it's called? It's totally weirdly designed, like a main court with first salmon, then steak, and then a strawberry as dessert?

Chessbase writes that Magnus came late to the round, and the arbiters reminded players of the change in the time control at the round start, and therefore he did not hear that. Way to treat your prodigy, Norway! Too silly.

I am sure Magnus is kicking himself for not reading the contract one extra time, but this whole side of the tournament looks dysfunctional to me. Why would you have 3 different time controls in 3 consecutive years? And what is the idea of having a time control at move 60, if there is no extra time? Totally illogical.

Magnus was totally winning from a 16-move sequence, that was difficult but not impossible to see. Unfortunately he still thought that there was 15 minutes extra for the rest of the game, as the past two years. Pffft.

Jesper Norgaard
17-06-2015, 06:36 PM
Although I haven't find any official confirmation of this, Chessvibes confirms unofficially that the time control is the never before tried concept of 2 hours for 40 moves, then 1 hour for the rest of the game, with no time for additional moves beyond move 60, but 30 seconds per move from move 41. This gets weirder and weirder. I must admit then that my original criticism that there was a time control at move 60 as being illogical, is not fair to the organizers as there is no time control at move 60 (as Magnus obviously thought). Still incredible that there hasn't been more debate and interaction with the players on this apparently completely new time control from the organizers. I wonder if any other tournament has been played with it?

Kaspy was there on time to perform Magnus' first move, and since Magnus was not on time, organizer Jøran Jansson joked with "The Boss" that maybe he had to stick around to play a few more moves for Magnus! Apparently the joke was highly appreciated by Kasparov.

Magnus commented later on twitter that the hotel fire alarm went off in the middle of the night - "but it wasn't my fault!"
Just in case somebody thought he was fuming at that point.

Kevin Bonham
17-06-2015, 06:57 PM
That time control is really strange. Can't see the logic in it at all.

Jesper Norgaard
17-06-2015, 09:10 PM
That time control is really strange. Can't see the logic in it at all.

Well on paper it doesn't really seem that much different. Let's assume a game of 100 moves. Each player will then have

2013: 100 + 50 + 15 + (50 increment) = 215 minutes or 3½ hours and 5 minutes, in total 7 hours and 10 minutes for the game (both players)

2014: 120 + 60 + 15 + (20 increment) = 215 minutes

2015: 120 + 60 + (30 increment) = 210 minutes

It's just that in the 2015 version, you need to reserve time for any lengthy endgame, so that you have to manage conservatively the fixed time which you are getting already at move 40, because after move 60, there is no additional 15 minutes. Those 15 minutes are already received after move 40. Instead you don't have to meat a deadline at move 60, you just need to avoid going below 0:00 at any point. And then you are getting 5 minutes less time in total, of course, which shouldn't be a problem if you just manage it well.

Of the three versions I would probably prefer the 2013 version because you have a smooth 30 seconds for each and every move you make, for instance it means that the rhythm of all moves is similar.

Perhaps a fourth could be suggested
100 + 60 + (50 increment) = 210 minutes
So for the first 40 moves you receive 100 minutes, and a 30 second increment from move 1, and 60 minutes for the rest of the game. For a 100 move game it will last just about 7 hours give or take a few minutes, depending of course if both players are using all their time (not saving up and not using time).

Ivanchuk will not lose on time in a frantic time trouble up to move 40 trying to make 5-10 moves in a minute. On the other hand he might be riding a 30 seconds increment at some point. On the other hand it seems nice to me to retract time from the big pool of time, and give it after 60 moves, not to force a check on players if they make move 60, but rather to give them 15 minutes so they can go to the toilet at least one time in the game (and one other chance after move 40).
The toilet break theory would suggest the original 2013 time control is the best.

Bill Gletsos
17-06-2015, 11:44 PM
The FIDE website tournament registration shows the time control as:

120 minutes for first 40 moves and 30 minutes with 30 seconds increment from move 40

http://ratings.fide.com/tournament_details.phtml?event=115334

So it looks like the registration page is wrong too.

Adamski
18-06-2015, 12:04 PM
Magnus lost a second game. His worst start for years. Trust me to choose the wrong time to pick him in a poll. I normally pick someone else to come through and win but not this time. If he wins from here it will be remarkable.

MichaelBaron
18-06-2015, 02:14 PM
Aronian agreed to a draw against Grishuk too early. In the final position he could play h5 and play on for win.
Also, Hammer was hammering Lagrave but let the victory slip away

Agent Smith
18-06-2015, 08:07 PM
^^^
Hmmm...

Chess is cruel. It looked like Hammer was well winning... but it just wasn't so, and Grishuk found the saving move when a piece down.
h5!
3K4/5pk1/7p/8/3p1PPp/8/8/5B2 b - - 0 47

MichaelBaron
18-06-2015, 11:45 PM
^^^
Hmmm...

Chess is cruel. It looked like Hammer was well winning... but it just wasn't so, and Grishuk found the saving move when a piece down.
h5!
3K4/5pk1/7p/8/3p1PPp/8/8/5B2 b - - 0 47

In the Grishuk game, check out the final position. if black plays h5 instead of continuing to check, white can probably still draw with best play but black had some chances

Agent Smith
19-06-2015, 07:03 AM
(Oops, "Vachier" played Hammer, pictured above)
Re Grishuk's game, hmmm maybe, but i'd defer to the GMs and computer analysis. Computer doubles rooks on G file, and exchanges 2 Rooks for Queen + passed pawn.
Round three table

1: Nakamura, Hikaru 2802 28 USA 2.5 / 3 X = . . . 1 1 . . . 3033 +8 (+2 -0 =1)
2: Topalov, Veselin 2798 40 BUL 2.5 / 3 = X . . 1 . . . . 1 3073 +10 (+2 -0 =1)
3: Giri, Anish 2773 21 NED 2.0 / 3 . . X = . . . 1 . = 2945 +7 (+1 -0 =2)
4: Anand, Viswanathan 2804 46 IND 1.5 / 3 . . = X . = . = . . 2786 -1 (+0 -0 =3)
5: Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2723 25 FRA 1.5 / 3 . 0 . . X . = . 1 . 2751 +1 (+1 -1 =1)
6: Caruana, Fabiano 2805 23 ITA 1.5 / 3 0 . . = . X . . . 1 2827 +1 (+1 -1 =1)
7: Hammer, Jon Ludvig 2677 25 NOR 1.0 / 3 0 . . . = . X . = . 2643 -1 (+0 -1 =2)
8: Grischuk, Alexander 2781 32 RUS 1.0 / 3 . . 0 = . . . X = . 2660 -5 (+0 -1 =2)
9: Aronian, Levon 2780 33 ARM 1.0 / 3 . . . . 0 . = = X . 2602 -8 (+0 -1 =2)
10: Carlsen, Magnus 2876 25 NOR 0.5 / 3 . 0 = . . 0 . . . X 2519 -14 (+0 -2 =1)

Adamski
19-06-2015, 09:17 AM
A long time since Magnus was running last after 3 rounds.

MichaelBaron
19-06-2015, 10:44 AM
And Carlsen missed win against Giri. This is definitely not his tournament. Also Caruana vs. Naka game was sailing towards a draw before Caruana stuffed it up.

Agent Smith
19-06-2015, 07:30 PM
38. Bf7+
2r3k1/1b6/1q1p2B1/1r1Pp3/1Q3n2/4RN1P/5PP1/4R1K1 w - - 0 38
That is a lovely move, but a very tough, complicated line and near time control. Critter takes a while to find it.
Well - it'll make a change for someone besides Carlsen to win a tournament.

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. c3 Nf6 5. Qe2 a6 6. Ba4 b5 7. Bc2 e6 8. d4 Bb7 9. O-O Be7 10. Re1 O-O 11. Nbd2 cxd4 12. cxd4 Rc8 13. Nf1 Re8 14. Ng3 Bf8 15. Be3 Rc7 16. Bd3 e5 17. d5 Nc5 18. Bc2 b4 19. a3 b3 20. Bxc5 Rxc5 21. Bxb3 Qb6 22. Bc4 Rec8 23. Bd3 g6 24. Nf1 Bh6 25. Ne3 a5 26. b4 axb4 27. axb4 R5c7 28. b5 Qc5 29. h3 Nh5 30. Qb2 Qb6 31. Qb4 Bxe3 32. Rxe3 Rc3 33. Rae1 f5
34. exf5 Nf4 35. Be4 R3c5 36. fxg6 hxg6 37. Bxg6
( 37. Nh4 )
37. ... Rxb5
( 37. ... Nxg6 38. Qg4 Kf7 39. Ng5+ )
( 37. ... Bxd5 38. Nxe5 dxe5 39. Bf5 Be6 40. Bxe6+ Nxe6 41. Rxe5 Rxe5 42. Rxe5 Rf8 43. Qh4 )
38. Qe4
( 38. Bf7+ Kxf7 39. Qe4 Kg7 40. Ng5 Bxd5 41. Qf5 Rb3 42. Rxb3 Qxb3 43. Qxc8 Qb4 )
38. ... Rf8 39. Nxe5
( 39. Nh4 Bxd5 40. Qa4 Bb3 41. Qa3 Be6 42. Rg3 Ra5 43. Qc1 Ra7 44. Bf5+ )
39. ... dxe5 40. Rg3 Rxd5 41. Qb1 Qxb1 42. Bxb1+ Kh8 43. Be4 Rd7 44. Bxb7 Rxb7 45. Rxe5 Rh7 46. Re4 Rhf7 47. Kh2 Kh7 48. Rf3 Kg6 49. h4 Nh5 50. Rxf7 Rxf7 51. Re2 Nf4 52. Rd2 Nh5 53. g3 Nf6 54. Kg2 Rd7 55. Ra2 Rd5 56. Ra4 Re5 57. g4 Re4 58. Rxe4 Nxe4 59. Kf3 Nd6 60. Kf4 Nf7 61. Ke4 Kf6 62. f4 Nd6+ 63. Kd5 Nb5 64. h5 Nc3+ 65. Kd4 Nb5+ 66. Kc4 Nd6+ 67. Kc5 Ke6 68. Kc6 Nf7 69. Kc7 Nh6 70. g5 Nf7 71. g6 Nh6 72. Kd8 Kf5 73. Ke7 Kxf4 74. Kf8 Kg5 75. g7 Kxh5 76. g8=Q Nxg8
( 76. ... Nxg8 77. Kxg8 )
1/2-1/2

Agent Smith
20-06-2015, 05:20 AM
Lovely play by Anand to take Magnus apart!


[White "GMAnand"]
[Black "GMCarlsen"]
[Result "*"]
[WhiteElo "2804"]
[BlackElo "2876"]
[TimeControl "120/0"]
[Annotator "Critter 1.6a 64-bit"]
[Depth "16"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 d6 7. c3 O-O 8. Nbd2 Re8 9. Re1 b5 10. Bc2 Bf8 11. Nf1 g6 12. h3 Bb7 13. Ng3 Nb8 14. d4 Nbd7 15. a4 c5 16. d5 c4 17. Bg5 Bg7 18. Qd2 Rb8 19. Nh2 Bc8 20. Ng4 Nc5 21. Nh6+ Bxh6 22. Bxh6 bxa4 23. Ra2 a3 24. bxa3 Nfd7 25. f4 a5 26. Rf1 f6 27. f5 Nd3 28. Bxd3 cxd3 29. Qd1 Re7 30. Raf2 Rf7 31. Qxd3 Nc5 32. Qf3 Ba6 33. Qg4 g5 34. h4 Bxf1 35. Rxf1 Qd7 36. hxg5 fxg5 37. Qh5 Kh8 38. f6 Rg8 39. Bg7+ Rfxg7 40. fxg7+ Qxg7 41. Nf5 Qg6 42. Qxg6 Rxg6 43. Ne7 Kg7 44. Nxg6 Kxg6 45. Rf8 a4 46. c4 h5 47. Kf2
( 47. Kf2 Kg7 48. Rd8 Nxe4+ 49. Ke3 Ng3 50. Ra8 g4 51. Rxa4 Kf6 52. Ra8 Nf5+ 53. Ke4 )

Kevin Bonham
20-06-2015, 11:59 AM
Could be another fabulous tournament for the CC tipping crew with nobody tipping either Topalov or Nakamura, though there is a long way to go.

Aronian walked into a vintage Topalov sneaky trap.

MichaelBaron
20-06-2015, 11:59 AM
Carlsen on 0.5/4 and in the last place - and it all started with that unfortunate first round loss. Hopefully he will bounce back by beating Grishuk

Agent Smith
20-06-2015, 01:42 PM
who would have thought ! :uhoh:
Anand and Topalov (almost) leading the way, with Lev and Magnus at the bottom.

Vishy would love to win a tournament on Carlsen's home turf.

1: Topalov, Veselin 2798 40 BUL 3.5 / 4 X = . . . . 1 . 1 1 3131 +15 (+3 -0 =1)
2: Nakamura, Hikaru 2802 28 USA 3.0 / 4 = X = . . 1 . 1 . . 2956 +8 (+2 -0 =2)
3: Giri, Anish 2773 21 NED 2.5 / 4 . = X = 1 . . . . = 2910 +8 (+1 -0 =3)
4: Anand, Viswanathan 2804 46 IND 2.5 / 4 . . = X = = . . . 1 2903 +6 (+1 -0 =3)
5: Grischuk, Alexander 2781 32 RUS 2.0 / 4 . . 0 = X . . 1 = . 2758 -2 (+1 -1 =2)
6: Caruana, Fabiano 2805 23 ITA 2.0 / 4 . 0 . = . X = . . 1 2801 +0 (+1 -1 =2)
7: Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2723 25 FRA 2.0 / 4 0 . . . . = X = 1 . 2765 +2 (+1 -1 =2)
8: Hammer, Jon Ludvig 2677 25 NOR 1.0 / 4 . 0 . . 0 . = X = . 2578 -5 (+0 -2 =2)
9: Aronian, Levon 2780 33 ARM 1.0 / 4 0 . . . = . 0 = X . 2551 -12 (+0 -2 =2)
10: Carlsen, Magnus 2876 25 NOR 0.5 / 4 0 . = 0 . 0 . . . X 2473 -20 (+0 -3 =1)

MichaelBaron
21-06-2015, 11:22 AM
Carlsen's round 1 unfortunate loss on time was not only disappointing for him...but also great start for Topalov who played good chess from their onwards. His victory with black against Lagrave was smashing.

antichrist
21-06-2015, 06:05 PM
In the Anand-Magnus game it was move 21 when the first capture finally took place

Agent Smith
22-06-2015, 07:04 AM
Hammer sacced a piece against Topalov, and fought all the way for a draw, but a huge blunder at the end cost him the game.
Carlsen outplayed Grishuk for his first win

[Event "3rd Norway Chess 2015"]
[Site "Stavanger NOR"]
[Date "2015.06.21"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Hammer, J"]
[Black "Topalov, V"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2677"]
[BlackElo "2798"]
[ECO "D12"]
[EventDate "2015.06.17"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 Bf5 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nh4 Bg6 7. Nxg6 hxg6 8. Bd2 Nbd7 9. Qc2 a6 10. O-O-O Be7 11. Kb1 Qc7 12. h3 Rd8 13. c5 e5 14. f4 exd4 15. exd4 Nh5 16. Ne2 Nhf6 17. Nc3 Nh5 18. Ne2 Nhf6 19. Ng3 Ng8 20. Bd3 f5 21. Nxf5 gxf5 22. Bxf5 Ndf6 23. Bg6+ Kf8 24. g4 Ne4 25. g5 Rh4 26. Bc1 Qd7 27. Qg2 b6 28. cxb6 Bd6 29. Bxe4 dxe4 30. d5 Ne7 31. dxc6 Qxc6 32. Rhe1 Qxb6 33. Qxe4 Bc5 34. Rxd8+ Qxd8 35. Qc4 Qd4 36. Qxa6 g6 37. Re5 Qd6 38. Qa8+ Kg7 39. Qf3 Bd4 40. Re2 Qd7 41. Qd3 Nc6 42. Rh2 Nb4 43. Qc4 Rxh3 44. Rd2 Qf5+ 45. Ka1 Bc5 46. a3 Nd3 47. Rd1 Nxc1 48. Rxc1 Bf8 49. Qd4+ Kg8 50. Rc7 Qe6 51. Qc4 Qxc4 52. Rxc4 Kf7 53. a4 Rb3 54. a5 Rb5 55. Ra4 Bg7 56. Ra2 Bd4 57. Ra4 Bxb2+ 58. Ka2 Bc1 59. a6 Rb2+ 60. Ka1 Rb8 61. Rc4 Be3 62. Rc7+ Kg8 63. Rc6 Bd4+ 64. Ka2 Kf7 65. Rd6 Bc3 66. Rc6 Bh8 67. Ka3 Bd4 68. Ka4 Rf8 69. Kb5 Kg7 70. Rc7+ Rf7 71. Rxf7+ Kxf7 72. Kc4 Ba7 73. Kd5 Ke7 74. Kc6
( 74. f5 gxf5 75. Ke5 Bb6 76. Kxf5 Kf7 77. g6+ Kg7 78. Ke6 Kxg6 79. Kd7 Ba7 )
74. ... Ke6 0-1

[Event "3rd Norway Chess 2015"]
[Site "Stavanger NOR"]
[Date "2015.06.21"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Carlsen, M"]
[Black "Grischuk, A"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2876"]
[BlackElo "2781"]
[ECO "B91"]
[EventDate "2015.06.17"]

1. Nf3 c5 2. e4 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. g3 e5 7. Nde2 Be7 8. Bg2 b5 9. Nd5 Nbd7 10. Nec3 Bb7 11. a4 Nxd5 12. Nxd5 Nf6 13. axb5 Nxd5 14. exd5 axb5 15. Rxa8 Qxa8 16. Qd3 O-O 17. O-O Bc8 18. Be3 Bd7 19. Rc1 h6 20. Qd1 Qb7 21. Ra1 Ra8 22. h4 Ra6 23. b3 Bd8 24. c4 bxc4 25. bxc4 Bb6 26. c5 Bxc5 27. Bxc5 dxc5 28. d6 Qb6 29. Rxa6 Qxa6 30. Bd5 Qc8 31. Qb3 Be8 32. Qc3 c4 33. Bxc4 Bd7 34. Qb3 Qe8 35. Qf3 Kf8 36. h5 Kg8 37. Qe4 Bc6 38. Bd5 Bd7 39. Kg2 Kh8 40. f4 exf4 41. Qxe8+ Bxe8 42. Bxf7 Bc6+ 43. Kf2 fxg3+ 44. Kxg3 Bd7 45. Bg6 1-0

Kevin Bonham
22-06-2015, 09:48 AM
f5 is such an obvious draw. Hammer must have been exhausted or in time trouble.

MichaelBaron
22-06-2015, 11:59 AM
Even more amazing how Grishuk fell apart in the Queen&B endgame. Amazing resolve by Carlsen to fight on in an equal endgame

pax
22-06-2015, 07:05 PM
This will be the first tournament in a very long time that Carlsen has finished lower than 2nd (I think).

ER
23-06-2015, 06:44 AM
DBRussell, Chess Base 6/22/2015 01:36
Caruana loses his second game. He only needs one more to catch Carlsen! :D

Bad luck they 've played each other already! :P :)

antichrist
23-06-2015, 12:49 PM
In the Hammer V Topalov game what could have been the first defining move by white that may have decided the result?

Kevin Bonham
23-06-2015, 10:10 PM
In the Hammer V Topalov game what could have been the first defining move by white that may have decided the result?

Not sure what you mean there. His very last move turned a simple draw into an obvious loss.

antichrist
23-06-2015, 10:25 PM
Not sure what you mean there. His very last move turned a simple draw into an obvious loss.

I thought move 6 for white, capturing black bishop on g6 opened a potential problem. The h rook has an open file, I presume causing white to castle the long side and needing another move to get king out of the way.

Kevin Bonham
23-06-2015, 10:52 PM
I thought move 6 for white, capturing black bishop on g6 opened a potential problem. The h rook has an open file, I presume causing white to castle the long side and needing another move to get king out of the way.

But also gaining the advantage of the minor exchange and making the black king potentially vulnerable to a piece sac on g6. Nxg6 is the most commonly played move in the position and has been played hundreds if not thousands of times; it is very well established theory. That there is some risk involved is often in the nature of playing for an advantage.

Hammer had a gorgeous position from the opening and should probably have beaten Topalov but the piece sac on 21 was unnecessary and incorrectly followed up (if correctly followed up with 23.g4 it should still be winning). Topalov's rook became the trump card only after Hammer wasted a pack full of them.

Agent Smith
25-06-2015, 07:21 AM
Pressure is a bit much for Hammer. Who cracked against Vishy too.
One round to go, and Anand only half point behind Topalov, who lost to Giri

1: Topalov, Veselin 2798 40 BUL 6.0 / 8 X . 0 = = 1 1 1 1 1 2970 +18 (+5 -1 =2)
2: Anand, Viswanathan 2804 46 IND 5.5 / 8 . X = = = 1 1 = = 1 2918 +12 (+3 -0 =5)
3: Giri, Anish 2773 21 NED 5.0 / 8 1 = X = . = = = 1 = 2875 +11 (+2 -0 =6)
4: Nakamura, Hikaru 2802 28 USA 5.0 / 8 = = = X 1 = = . = 1 2874 +7 (+2 -0 =6)
5: Caruana, Fabiano 2805 23 ITA 3.5 / 8 = = . 0 X 1 = 0 = = 2737 -8 (+1 -2 =5)
6: Carlsen, Magnus 2876 25 NOR 3.5 / 8 0 0 = = 0 X = 1 1 . 2740 -15 (+2 -3 =3)
7: Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime 2723 25 FRA 3.5 / 8 0 0 = = = = X 1 . = 2746 +3 (+1 -2 =5)
8: Aronian, Levon 2780 33 ARM 3.0 / 8 0 = = . 1 0 0 X = = 2692 -10 (+1 -3 =4)
9: Grischuk, Alexander 2781 32 RUS 3.0 / 8 0 = 0 = = 0 . = X 1 2702 -8 (+1 -3 =4)
10: Hammer, Jon Ludvig 2677 25 NOR 2.0 / 8 0 0 = 0 = . = = 0 X 2590 -8 (+0 -4 =4)

Kevin Bonham
26-06-2015, 10:30 AM
Carlsen loses badly to Hammer and finishes on a staggeringly poor 3.5/9. Topalov wins the tournament, which will also do his already strong chances of making the Candidates tournament on rating plenty of good.

MichaelBaron
26-06-2015, 11:08 AM
My God, the worst game by Carlsen in a while. 4...f6?! - Even Carlsen himself struggled to explain this decision after the game.

ER
26-06-2015, 12:33 PM
Carlsen loses badly to Hammer and finishes on a staggeringly poor 3.5/9. Topalov wins the tournament, which will also do his already strong chances of making the Candidates tournament on rating plenty of good.

Only an insignificant dent in Carlsen's short but spectacular domination. On the other hand, I think it's good for chess to disrupt oligarchy monopoly patterns even momentarily! Yet no new real challengers in the horizon to seriously threaten Magnus!

I just received the following message from Magnus to his friends in Facebook:


Finished Norway Chess with a loss to Jon Ludvig Hammer, congrats! Nothing went according to plan in this tournament. It's just extremely frustrating not to be able to show anything close to what I am capable of in my home country, making decisions during games that I cannot even explain to myself. Anyway, I have not lost belief in my ability to play chess and I hope neither have you guys! My next tournament will be in Saint Louis in August

Agent Smith
26-06-2015, 05:35 PM
My God, the worst game by Carlsen in a while. 4...f6?! - Even Carlsen himself struggled to explain this decision after the game.
Losing to the bunny :) Yeah - his game doesnt stand up well to analysis.
Hammer and Topalov owe him a big shout.

Ian Rout
26-06-2015, 07:19 PM
Only an insignificant dent in Carlsen's short but spectacular domination. On the other hand, I think it's good for chess to disrupt oligarchy monopoly patterns even momentarily! Yet no new real challengers in the horizon to seriously threaten Magnus!These things tend to turn around pretty quickly. At the start of the year Grischuk was ranked number 3 and since then has had three negative and one 50% score in this event, the World Teams and two GPs. A little earlier Anand was considered no chance against Carlsen and it was a pity that Caruana didn't make the Candidates; now Anand is ranked higher than Caruana and Carlsen can't even beat other Norwegians.

ER
27-06-2015, 12:08 PM
These things tend to turn around pretty quickly. At the start of the year Grischuk was ranked number 3 and since then has had three negative and one 50% score in this event, the World Teams and two GPs. A little earlier Anand was considered no chance against Carlsen and it was a pity that Caruana didn't make the Candidates; now Anand is ranked higher than Caruana and Carlsen can't even beat other Norwegians.

Maybe you 're right, maybe you 're not! we 'll wait and see! btw how many 'other Norwegians' can't Carlsen 'even' beat?

pax
29-06-2015, 12:11 PM
Losing to the bunny :) Yeah - his game doesnt stand up well to analysis.
Hammer and Topalov owe him a big shout.

Hmm, I wonder if Indian syndicates take bets on chess games?

Agent Smith
29-06-2015, 08:01 PM
haha

Ian Rogers reported in Sundays paper - that Topalov isn't even sure he'll attend the Candidates tournament, after investing so much energy into it last year and having a bad result. (He came last, with 6/14).

His victory this tournament was pretty lucky. Gifted 1-1/2 points by Magnus and Ludvig.