PDA

View Full Version : Gaioz Nigalidze kicked out of Dubai Open for cheating



Kevin Bonham
12-04-2015, 06:17 PM
Georgian GM Gaioz Nigalidze has been kicked out of the Dubai Open after being found guilty of cheating using a mobile phone hidden in a toilet during his 6th round game against Tigran Petrosian.

Nigalidze won the 2013 and 2014 Georgian championships and recently cleaned up the Al Ain Classic despite being seeded 28th. Petrosian said he became suspicious of his opponent's play in that event.

ER
12-04-2015, 07:39 PM
Sooner or later use of electronic anti - cheating devices will be necessary to tackle use of technologically advanced cheating.
GM Nigalidze's cheating method proved to be na´ve and easily detectable.
What could be done in the case of


One of the latest most popular methods of cheating in exams is with usage of a bluetooth spy earpiece and an inductive transmitter. This involves wearing a tiny micro earpiece that sits hidden inside the ear-channel.
is another story!

maybe a post mortem adjudication - analysis of suspect games could be a solution; however, even this cant' be an efficient method if the suspected player is a GM who could easily work out possible variations / sub - variations in a given position.

Kevin Bonham
12-04-2015, 07:51 PM
maybe a post mortem adjudication - analysis of suspect games could be a solution; however, even this cant' be an efficient method if the suspected player is a GM who could easily work out possible variations / sub - variations in a given position.

Yes FIDE have introduced methods of evaluating strength of play so that if an 1100 suddenly plays like a 2700 you can tell it from their games. But if a 2500 starts playing like a 2700 they might just be having a good tournament or getting better (especially if they are young).

The FIDE Anti-Cheating committee considered whether to declare that a certain standard of play was such clear evidence of cheating that no evidence bar the moves were required, but they decided not to. There has to be some sign of suspicious behaviour.

My big concern is the same as yours: that for now they are catching the dumb cheats and the smart ones (who may only cheat now and then - a few critical moves per game, say) are getting away.

Vlad
12-04-2015, 07:52 PM
Sooner or later use of electronic anti - cheating devices will be necessary to tackle use of technologically advanced cheating.
GM Nigalidze's cheating method proved to be na´ve and easily detectable.
What could be done in the case of

is another story!

maybe a post mortem adjudication - analysis of suspect games could be a solution; however, even this cant' be an efficient method if the suspected player is a GM who could easily work out possible variations / sub - variations in a given position.

Well, this is the difference between an elite GM and an average GM...:)

Kevin Bonham
13-04-2015, 02:04 AM
Very pleased to receive a bulletin from the Dubai Chess Club giving details of this issue:


When the officials initially checked Nigalidze, they did not find any device with him. Tournament Director and Chief Arbiter suspected he is using the same cubicle . When they checked the cubicle in question, they found a mobile phone and a headset hidden behind the pan and covered with toilet paper.

When confronted, Nigalidze denied he owned the device, but officials opened the smart phone and found it was logged into a social networking site under Nigalidze’s account. They also found his game being analyzed in one of the chess applications.
Nigalidze was back-to-back winner of the Georgian Chess Championship in 2013 and 2014, and was also crowned champion of the Al Ain Classic in Al Ain last December.

Abdul Rahim has removed Nigalidze from the tournament and will send a report about the incident to the International
Chess Federation, which has recently established a commission to deal with cheating in chess competitions. He said players
proven to have committed such an offence will be suspended for three years from all sanctioned tournaments, and up to 15
years in case of a repeat offence.

[..]

It was not the first time a player was caught cheating at the Dubai Open. In 2008, an Iranian player was also banned from
the tournament after he was found to be receiving help from someone who was watching the game’s live broadcast on the
internet and was sending the moves through text messages. Tournaments sanctioned by the International Chess
Federation, including the Dubai Open, do not allow players to carry with them mobile phones and other electronic devices during their games.

antichrist
13-04-2015, 10:45 AM
I suppose customised sign and body language will be used one day by a helper amongst the spectators

Kevin Bonham
13-04-2015, 11:30 AM
I suppose customised sign and body language will be used one day by a helper amongst the spectators

Quite likely, although this would probably be fairly easy to catch. In the Feller cheating case at a previous Olympiad, moves were signalled in code by a team staff member with access to the playing hall standing behind various opposing players in an order that spelled out a move. Now team captains and so on are not allowed to stand behind opposing players.

Rincewind
13-04-2015, 11:50 AM
Quite likely, although this would probably be fairly easy to catch. In the Feller cheating case at a previous Olympiad, moves were signalled in code by a team staff member with access to the playing hall standing behind various opposing players in an order that spelled out a move. Now team captains and so on are not allowed to stand behind opposing players.

My understanding is that the Seb Feller case was only discovered because the French Chess Administration was suspicious of the number of text messages sent from a French Chess Federation mobile phone. If the person paying the mobile phone bill had been a confederate it might not have been uncovered at all. So some other codified way to pass information to players remains a viable cheating method that is difficult to detect.

Perhaps this would be made a little more difficult by enforcing a time delay on web broadcasting of games.

Ian Rout
13-04-2015, 03:01 PM
This appears to be the game. The accused is Black.

1. Nf3 c5 2. g3 Nc6 3. c4 e5 4. Nc3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. a3 a5 7. O-O d6 8. Ne1 Be6
9. d3 Nge7 10. Nc2 Qd7 (10... d5) 11. Ne3 Bh3 12. Ned5 Bxg2 13. Kxg2 Nxd5 14.
cxd5 Nd4 15. a4 Nf5 16. Nb5 h5 17. h3 O-O 18. Na3 Qe7 19. Nc4 e4 20. Ra2 h4 21.
b3 hxg3 22. fxg3 Rad8 23. Bf4 b6 24. g4

I say "appears" because the scoresheet at chess.com (http://www.chess.com/news/grandmaster-caught-cheating-banned-from-dubai-open-2319) stops at 23.Bf4 and the report at the Telegraph (UK) (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/chess/11531055/Grandmaster-makes-bad-move-after-being-caught-cheating-at-chess-in-a-lavatory.html) shows the board with pawns exchanged on d3 and the Rook having captured on f4 (but without the subsequent moves). At least I think that's what's happening.

It's not quite clear why a GM needs a computer to play these moves, but my computer likes 10...Qd7 whereas amongst humans it is rare and 10...d5 is the favourite.

MichaelBaron
13-04-2015, 04:28 PM
This may explain Nigalidze's erratic results..from outstanding performances to very average ones

ChesSOS
13-04-2015, 06:31 PM
The scoresheet and phone.

2882

From: https://chess24.com/en/read/news/wesley-so-another-forfeit-and-a-cheater-caught

Kaitlin
13-04-2015, 06:52 PM
Three years is not enough, it should be seven if proven. And fourteen for a second and twenty one for three. Then hopefully when they are 50 - 60'ish they won't do it again.

Patrick Byrom
14-04-2015, 05:02 PM
This incident has now made the Guardian online. (http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/apr/13/chess-toilet-scandal-cheating-gaioz-nigalidze)

pax
14-04-2015, 05:27 PM
The challenge is how to deter more sophisticated cheats. One way would be to delay "live" game relays. 15 minutes delay should be enough to make systematic cheating via live game feeds impractical without inconveniencing the audience too much.

antichrist
14-04-2015, 05:45 PM
The challenge is how to deter more sophisticated cheats. One way would be to delay "live" game relays. 15 minutes delay should be enough to make systematic cheating via live game feeds impractical without inconveniencing the audience too much.

I think I have noticed some moves taking longer then that, half hour would be safe.

ElevatorEscapee
14-04-2015, 08:59 PM
There are devices, albiet currently illegal, such as mobile phone jammers that can theoretically stop signals coming through to a certain area.

I suspect this will begin to gain traction as a suggested technological solution to a technological problem as more people start abusing their technological devices to cheat (at chess and exams!).

However this wouldn't necessarily stop all forms of cheating (such as Nigalidze's phone hidden under toilet paper behind the cistern). If I was Nigalidze, I'd be more worried about my expensive device being kicked around, stepped on, thrown in the bowl, picked up by one of the cleaners, or giving itself away by suddenly ringing than winning a game by cheating.

PS I am deeply impressed that A/C has posted two comments on this thread, and has not once mentioned "arbiters perving over toilet walls". :P

antichrist
14-04-2015, 09:52 PM
There are devices, albiet currently illegal, such as mobile phone jammers that can theoretically stop signals coming through to a certain area.

I suspect this will begin to gain traction as a suggested technological solution to a technological problem as more people start abusing their technological devices to cheat (at chess and exams!).

However this wouldn't necessarily stop all forms of cheating (such as Nigalidze's phone hidden under toilet paper behind the cistern). If I was Nigalidze, I'd be more worried about my expensive device being kicked around, stepped on, thrown in the bowl, picked up by one of the cleaners, or giving itself away by suddenly ringing than winning a game by cheating.

PS I am deeply impressed that A/C has posted two comments on this thread, and has not once mentioned "arbiters perving over toilet walls". :P

I think they checked the cubicle when vacant and we know he did not have the device on him. I presume they checked those previous tourneys that Nigalidze won and traced what calls, messages and network sites were visited whilst the games were on. Peeping over walls could break OH & S regulations unless followed to a T

Kevin Bonham
15-04-2015, 12:34 AM
I presume they checked those previous tourneys that Nigalidze won and traced what calls, messages and network sites were visited whilst the games were on. T

I don't think there has been proof that his games in previous tournaments involved cheating though I expect they will now be engine-matched and close matching taken as proof.

Ian Rout
15-04-2015, 03:42 PM
This incident has now made the Guardian online. (http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/apr/13/chess-toilet-scandal-cheating-gaioz-nigalidze)
Yes, though a strange article:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/apr/13/chess-toilet-scandal-cheating-gaioz-nigalidze

Stephen Moss tries to suggest that there is some doubt about his guilt, based on two silly points. He then proceeds to philosophise about the motives for cheating at chess, which wouldn't be very interesting if it hadn't happened.

Kevin Bonham
24-12-2015, 08:07 PM
Banned for 3 years from playing, arbiting, organising and GM title revoked. Keeps IM title.

http://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/9305-fide-ethics-commission-judgement-in-case-of-gaioz-nigalidze.html

Thebes
24-12-2015, 09:33 PM
I agree with a 3 year ban, but the fact that he was remorseful about cheating shouldn't be an answer to keep his title, he was only remorseful and cooperative because it wasn't an allegation, there was proof.
Shouldn't allow him to represent an elite level of chess with such a horrible attitude,
Compare him to the Australian IM's who've worked sooo hard for their title and it's not known how long he's been cheating for.

MichaelBaron
24-12-2015, 09:36 PM
I agree with a 3 year ban, but the fact that he was remorseful about cheating shouldn't be an answer to keep his title, he was only remorseful and cooperative because it wasn't an allegation, there was proof.
Shouldn't allow him to represent an elite level of chess with such a horrible attitude,
Compare him to the Australian IM's who've worked sooo hard for their title and it's not known how long he's been cheating for.

He is a strong player even without cheating - certainly much stronger than the Australian IMs :). As many people pointed out, the ban is quite legit. However, stripping him of the GM title is unjustified as there is no evidence that he cheated while scoring his GM norms.

Thebes
24-12-2015, 09:52 PM
He is a strong player even without cheating - certainly much stronger than the Australian IMs :). As many people pointed out, the ban is quite legit. However, stripping him of the GM title is unjustified as there is no evidence that he cheated while scoring his GM norms.

Regardless of evidence of cheating or not, a FIDE title is a privelage you have to earn and it's not easy at all obviously, so why let FIDE be represented and have the same elite title as people who have earned and contributed to chess
You're forgetting this guy represented chess through international media and they loved emphasizing he was a GM.

Thebes
24-12-2015, 09:55 PM
I just googled his name and all the news headlines
"Chess grandmaster" pinned out in the headline.

Garvinator
25-12-2015, 07:36 PM
This decision is not the true test of the FIDE Ethics Commission in regards to these matters. This decision was rather cut and dried when the defendant was admitting his guilt after being confronted with the evidence.

The true test of the new process will be this case: http://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/8842-acc-statement.html

Unless I missed it, six months on. Nothing. Some of the accused are well known players and friends of fide officials.

Kevin Bonham
25-12-2015, 10:15 PM
This decision is not the true test of the FIDE Ethics Commission in regards to these matters. This decision was rather cut and dried when the defendant was admitting his guilt after being confronted with the evidence.

The true test of the new process will be this case: http://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/8842-acc-statement.html

Unless I missed it, six months on. Nothing. Some of the accused are well known players and friends of fide officials.

It was still listed as awaiting the appointment of an Investigatory Panel as at the September congress:

http://www.fide.com/images/stories/NEWS_2015/FIDE_News/2015_EB_Agenda__Annexes/Annex_52.pdf

MichaelBaron
26-12-2015, 12:16 AM
I just googled his name and all the news headlines
"Chess grandmaster" pinned out in the headline.

When a runner is caught taking steroids, nobody is going to take away his old medals unless it can be proved that he was on steroids at the time of the medals being accomplished.

Thebes
26-12-2015, 01:16 AM
When a runner is caught taking steroids, nobody is going to take away his old medals unless it can be proved that he was on steroids at the time of the medals being accomplished.

And if he cheats in one race, he's stripped of his wins previous races. If he is grandmaster level then he can easily just get his title back by playing, so it's not a punishment.
He should not be able to represent the international level with a prestigious title.
It's easy to make a false accusation like what happened to the lady going 7/7.
But when the proof is there, he doesn't deserve to be a grandmaster, he doesn't deserve to be the next tier over you or I because he cheated once, and he could of cheated at anytime during his career.

Thebes
26-12-2015, 01:19 AM
Also Lance Armstrong was stripped off all his titles, they didn't have proof he cheated in every single leg he competed in.

Kevin Bonham
26-12-2015, 12:03 PM
I'm in favour of the stripping of his GM title. Sends a message that the GM title - which is not just a result but also an effective license to obtain certain discounts and participate in certain tournaments - is not for life if you misbehave and that players are expected to behave in a sporting fashion after acquiring it.

Ian Rout
26-12-2015, 12:08 PM
I think the point of stripping the title is not necessarily because it is known or suspected that it was obtained illegally but that it's part of the punishment.

Comparisons with what happens to somebody who tests positive in a race aren't really useful because those relate to a specific medal rather than a rank that is carried around for life or an extended period. A better comparison might be when someone is convicted of driving offences and has their licence cancelled - there's no suggestion that they didn't earn it in the first place, but the punishment includes starting over and earning it again.

Having said that, there has to be a strong suspicion that at least the odd bit of help at key moments went into the norms. It certainly wouldn't be a good look for a convicted cheat to retain membership of the highest echelon of the game.

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
26-12-2015, 12:29 PM
Were public lashings ever considered ?

Desmond
26-12-2015, 02:45 PM
Should've bumped him down to CM.

Adamski
26-12-2015, 11:44 PM
FIDE for once made a good decision in stripping him of his GM title. But I expect he is laughing all the way to the bank with likely ill-gotten gains from the 2 Georgian championships and the Al Ain victory.

Thebes
27-12-2015, 12:20 AM
Also will be laughing in 3 years times when he gets the norms back and reaps all the GM benefits as pointed out.
Free accommodation, free entry and appearance fees

Kevin Bonham
27-12-2015, 12:37 AM
A three year ban could be a big thing for the sort of GM who basically has no work life outside chess (no idea if Nigalidze is such). Then again it could also be a big chance to diversify.

Sir Cromulent Sparkles
27-12-2015, 04:38 AM
A three year ban could be a big thing for the sort of GM who basically has no work life outside chess (no idea if Nigalidze is such). Then again it could also be a big chance to diversify.

Diversify into other fields of cheating perhaps ?

Maybe he will join that reputable french bicycle jaunt. :D

Ian Rout
10-04-2017, 02:49 PM
Not sure if this more recent occurrence is mentioned on some other thread but I can't see it:

https://en.chessbase.com/post/jeel-shah-cheating-incident-mobile-phone-under-the-sleeves

Unfortuntaely it's not specific on how the arbiters ascertained that he was cheating; for instance was he constantly dashing to the lavatory, or did he have some way to view or contact the phone? Also the moves of the game aren't reported. However he was allegedly carrying a phone in a funny place and being unhelpful in explaining why, which if true is sufficient grounds for reasonable suspicion of guilt.

MichaelBaron
12-04-2017, 10:27 PM
There is a fresh case that is currently under investigation in Russia. A participant in the St.Petersburg city championship has been accused by other participants in using his mob device to cheat. He is denying all!