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Kevin Bonham
04-03-2015, 02:58 AM
I don't consider this to be a meaningful world title because of the use of the knockout system (among other issues) but it's an interesting event all the same.

The big news is that Hou Yifan is not playing because of a prior commitment to play a tournament in Hawaii, yet although FIDE's disorganisation has left her unable to defend her title without breaking commitments, she will be stripped of that title anyway.

Dzagnidze and Lagno are also not playing but the rest of the top ten are. Koneru is top seed.

Australia's Irina Berezina plays Kosteniuk in the first round!

Agent Smith
04-03-2015, 11:02 PM
I dare say Hou is glad to have an excuse to avoid such a shambles.
And she has officially over taken Polgar as the world's no. 1.

MichaelBaron
07-03-2015, 09:28 AM
Anyway, as Hou won the the GP, she will be able to get her title back by winning WC match against the nockout winner.

Kevin Bonham
07-03-2015, 04:17 PM
Anyway, as Hou won the the GP, she will be able to get her title back by winning WC match against the nockout winner.

I will continue to regard her as the champion until and unless she loses that match (or doesn't contest it) anyway.

aelfric
08-03-2015, 10:06 AM
Anyway, as Hou won the the GP, she will be able to get her title back by winning WC match against the nockout winner.
/quote

Kevin Bonham
17-03-2015, 04:35 PM
Could get a few Armageddons in this thing:


If the match score is tied, its winner is determined on tiebreak: two rapid games of 25 minutes + 10 seconds per move. If the score remains equal, the players proceed to another two games with a slightly faster time control – 10 minutes + 10 seconds per move. If these games do not determine the winner as well, then there are two blitz games: 5 minutes + 3 seconds per move. Finally, if the score is still even, there is an Armageddon game: White has five minutes, Black has four minutes, and a three-second increment per move after the move 61.

Irina vs Kosteniuk tonight - starts 11 pm our time.

Official site http://sochi2015.fide.com/en/schedule

I have not been able to find information on the outcome of the draw for colours and so I don't know if Irina is white or black tonight.

flushfyre
17-03-2015, 05:57 PM
I find it unlikely that any Armageddon game will reach the move 60 increment - to do so would require an average move time of 4 seconds by black and 5 seconds by white, which leaves almost no thinking time.

Kevin Bonham
17-03-2015, 10:29 PM
I find it unlikely that any Armageddon game will reach the move 60 increment - to do so would require an average move time of 4 seconds by black and 5 seconds by white, which leaves almost no thinking time.

Maybe not so unlikely. The infamous Socko-Foisor armageddon game in the same event in 2008 (6 minutes vs 5 no increment) ending in a win on time for Socko with KN vs KN was at least 90 moves long and probably around 100. (As far as I know no complete reconstruction of the game exists, but the first 60 moves are known plus there are another 21 in a video fragment starting from a substantially different position to move 60.)

The increment is mainly there to avoid Appendix G situations and repeats of what happened in Socko-Foisor.

I won a 5/0 in 103 moves (by move counter) the other day but that was not a game of the class of the WWCC; I was ahead from about move 20 and just fending off rook checks in a won endgame.

Kevin Bonham
18-03-2015, 12:35 AM
Easy win by Kosteniuk.

Kosteniuk - Berezina

1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4.Be3 Bg7 5.Qd2 0-0 6.Nf3 c6 7.Bh6 Qc7 8.h4 Bxh6 9.Qxh6 Ng4 10.Qd2 e5 11.h5 b5 12.hxg6 fxg6 13.a4 d5 14.axb5 Qg7 15.dxe5 Nxe5 16.Nxe5 Qxe5 17.0-0-0 a6 18.bxc6 dxe4 19.Bc4+ Kh8 20.Nxe4 [20.Rxh7+ Kxh7 21.Rh1+ Qh5 22.Rxh5+ gxh5 23.Qd6 is a complete smash but less obvious] 20...Ra7 21.f4 Qxf4 22.Qxf4 Rxf4 23.Rd8+ with mate to follow 1-0

Kevin Bonham
18-03-2015, 02:39 AM
Big upset.

Yuanling Yuan (Canada, 2267) - Mariya Muzychuk (Ukraine, 2526)

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nf6 5. Nxf6+ exf6 6. Nf3 Bd6 7. Bd3
O-O 8. O-O Bg4 9. h3 Bh5 10. Be4 Na6 11. c3 Nc7 12. Qd3 Bg6 13. Bxg6 hxg6
14. c4 Qd7 15. Be3 g5 16. Nd2 g4 17. hxg4 Qxg4 18. Ne4 Be7 19. Ng3 g6 20.
Qe4 Qd7 21. Rad1 Kg7 22. d5 cxd5 23. cxd5 Nb5 24. Qf3 Rh8 25. Ne4 f5 26.
Ng3 Rh4 27. Bf4 Rah8 28. Rfe1 Bd6 29. Bg5 Rg4 30. Bc1 Qc7 31. Rd3 Rgh4 32.
Bg5 Rg4 33. Bd2 Qd8 34. b3 Qh4 35. a4 Nc7 36. Bc3+ f6 37. Kf1 Rf4 38. Qd1
Bc5 39. Rf3 Qg4 40. d6 Rxf3 41. Re7+ Kf8 42. gxf3 Qh3+ 43. Ke2 Qg2 44. Be1
Ne8 45. Qd5 Nxd6 46. Qe6 1-0

Agent Smith
18-03-2015, 07:31 AM
Easy win by Kosteniuk.

Kosteniuk - Berezina
A.K's attacking prowess just too much this game.

MichaelBaron
18-03-2015, 09:44 AM
Unfortunately Kostenyuk victory is not that surprising. We really need the new generation of female chess-players to come through!

antichrist
18-03-2015, 10:16 AM
Unfortunately Kostenyuk victory is not that surprising. We really need the new generation of female chess-players to come through!

Don't hold your breath with some current attitudes.

Kevin Bonham
18-03-2015, 10:34 AM
On current scheduling the winner of this tournament gets to enjoy their title for six months and four days before they start defending it against Hou.

Agent Smith
18-03-2015, 06:16 PM
The irony/real-story is, Hou has a greater chance of keeping her "real" world title, because the "candidate" , decided by this short knockout tournament, is quite possibly not the best one.

Kevin Bonham
18-03-2015, 07:12 PM
The irony/real-story is, Hou has a greater chance of keeping her "real" world title, because the "candidate" , decided by this short knockout tournament, is quite possibly not the best one.

Yes, and unfortunately that also increases the chance that the match will be boring and lopsided like the one with Ushenina was.

A Hou-Dzagnidze match might be interesting but Dzagnidze isn't playing this tournament either.

Kevin Bonham
18-03-2015, 10:19 PM
After beating M Muzychuk yesterday, Yuan Yuanling has for whatever reason allowed this:

1.d4 f5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4.h4 Bg7 5.h5 Nxh5 6.e4

If allowed White will sac on h5 with a very dangerous position. I'm familiar with this in reverse (1.f4 d5 2.g3 h5!?) and wouldn't want to be going there as black a move behind.

Agent Smith
18-03-2015, 11:44 PM
After beating M Muzychuk yesterday, Yuan Yuanling has for whatever reason allowed this:
That looks like something a computer might do ... Very ugly line.
...
It does get nasty
[Event "FICS unrated standard"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2015.03.18"]
[Round "?"]
[White "IMMariyaMuzychuk"]
[Black "WIMYuan"]
[Result "*"]
[WhiteElo "2526"]
[BlackElo "2257"]
[TimeControl "120/0"]

1. d4 f5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. h4 Bg7 5. h5 Nxh5 6. e4 fxe4 7. Rxh5 gxh5 8. Qxh5+ Kf8 9. Bh6 e6 10. Nxe4 Qe7 11. Bxg7+ Kxg7 12. O-O-O d6 *

Kevin Bonham
19-03-2015, 12:27 AM
That looks like something a computer might do ... Very ugly line.

Yes I think black needed to try 9...d6 not 9...e6. Anyway it is the sort of position no-one should go near without thorough preparation so poor decision by black to go there.

Kevin Bonham
19-03-2015, 12:30 AM
Irina is giving Kosteniuk a much better game in game 2 but is getting into time trouble.

Kevin Bonham
19-03-2015, 01:22 AM
Berezina - Kosteniuk. 7.Re1 is an uncommon line. Around move 22 things were getting more interesting but Irina was just too short of time and was outplayed from then on.

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 d5 4.Nf3 dxc4 5.Bg2 Nc6 6.0-0 Rb8 7.Re1 Be7 8.e4 0-0 9.Nc3 b5 10.a3 Na5 11.Bf4 Nb3 12.Rb1 a6 13.Qe2 Bb7 14.Rbd1 Re8 15.h3 Qd7 16.g4 Rbd8 17.g5 Nh5 18.Be3 g6 19.Ne5 Qc8 20.Bf3 Ng7 21.Ng4 c5 22.dxc5 Qc6 23.Nh6+ Kf8 24.Rxd8 Rxd8 25.h4 Bxc5 26.Bxc5+ Qxc5 27.Bg4 Rd3 28.Qf1 Nd2 29.Qg2 Nf5 30.Nxf5 exf5 31.Be2 Rd6 32.Bf3 Qe5 33.Rd1 fxe4 34.Bg4 a5 35.Re1 b4 36.axb4 axb4 0-1

Kevin Bonham
19-03-2015, 01:57 AM
Most of the top seeds are through round 1. Mariya Muzychuk has a playoff tomorrow and it's possible Zhao Xue will too (she's currently exchange down but won her first game).

Agent Smith
19-03-2015, 06:11 PM
http://www.fide.com/images/stories/NEWS_2015/FIDE_News/WWCC/R1G1/IMG_3661.JPG

Does Irina read CC ?
How did it go playing the worlds number 9 ?

Kevin Bonham
19-03-2015, 07:48 PM
Eleven playoffs tonight. Zhao Xue (7) and M Muzychuk (8) involved, the rest are well down the seeding list.

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2015, 02:33 AM
Zhao Xue and Muzychuk both through in the first set of rapids easily.

Six matches went on to the second stage (10/10) and all of them had a winner in game 1. Of those who had to win game 2, five had white. Two of those won. Should have been four though - Luhan against Galliamova and Paehtz against Arabidze were winning but both lost to massive blunders.

Mkrtchian - Goryachkina and Gomes - T Kosintseva both to the next stage (5/3).

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2015, 02:56 AM
Ouch, Kosintseva flagged in a pretty good position in the first 5/3.

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2015, 03:23 AM
Kosintseva played a fine Rossolimo in the second 5/3 and won. Both matches to Armageddon.

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2015, 03:49 AM
Gee, they weren't used to playing without the increment at all. Mkrtchian got a poor position out of the opening and was busted on the clock quite early, eventually blundered anyway. In Gomes-Kosintseva, black got the minute back with an OK position early, but then got in trouble and had to drop a piece to bail out. However Gomes wasn't fast enough dealing with the risk of running out of time and got flagged on only move 40. There was a bit of a scramble when Gomes queened a pawn with seven seconds left but it was dealt with smoothly and immediately by the arbiters.

flushfyre
20-03-2015, 12:13 PM
Sounds exciting, but is there a way to watch the round 1 tiebreaks now? When I go to the Live Video link on the official site, it only tells me to wait for the next round's broadcast.

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2015, 12:51 PM
I can't see a replay video option anywhere. Most likely some video highlights will surface somewhere, perhaps on Chessbase when they finally get around to putting something up (they seem to be on a lag of about a day).

Saw this article on chess24 that possibly gives some insight into why some men like this format deciding the WWCC:

https://chess24.com/en/read/news/women-s-wch-1-comebacks-nerves-playoffs


Evgeny Miroshnichenko: [..]

In my opinion, this is possibly the best format for the Women's World Championship. Girls get bored playing a 12-game match, and the knock-out is so emotional! Women don't play against the opponent's pieces. Their brand of chess is different – it’s clearly a clash of personalities, both on and off the board. It’s harder for them to focus their minds on a long match, and it’s not such a thrilling spectacle either.

Urgh.

ER
20-03-2015, 01:26 PM
We discussed this matter (qualification format) before.
Players - both male and female do not wish to participate in long match candidate events anymore.
On the one hand they have profitable arrangements such as well sponsored club competitions and tournaments, keeping their own coaching activities, commentating, program and book authoring etc
On the other hand just a lengthy and uncertain cycle of qualification process.
No hard to decide what system they chose.
Some claim the main reason for the almost (*) continuous chess success monopoly by Iron Curtain countries (ed) after 1948 was the state sponsoring of their star players.
After their collapse, private sponsoring took over and don't be surprised if you see more drastic changes in the near future.
(*) Bobby Fischer 1972 - 1975
(ed. repetition of "chess success")

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2015, 01:38 PM
We discussed this matter (qualification format) before.
Players - both male and female do not wish to participate in long match candidate events anymore.

Indeed, but there is a discrepancy.

For men, the World Cup knockout is one of many qualification routes to the World Champs. You can qualify via the knockout, via the Grand Prix, or by rating, and this gets you into a Candidates Tournament to challenge the reigning champion in a match every two years.

For women, the knockout is every second World Championships. This means that if you are Women's World Champion and wish to remain such, you have to defend your title every single year, or maybe even twice in one year, and half the time you have to defend it in a series of short knockout matches in which you are statistically likely to be eliminated even if you are the best player. Moreover, FIDE can't get its act together to reliably organise the knockout event on time.

This situation is grossly unfair to Hou Yifan and is why I don't recognise this as a title.

I think the knockout event is a good idea as a qualifier, as it is for the men. Just not as a world title in its own right.

Kevin Bonham
20-03-2015, 04:10 PM
Blunder of the day from the playoffs.

Daulyte-Socko.

3Q4/kb6/8/1P6/8/6P1/5P2/4qBK1 w - - 0 1

White to move needs a draw to progress and played Qa5+?? which she thought was perpetual. Slightly better was ...

Agent Smith
20-03-2015, 04:41 PM
ouch. Awful when one blunders a major piece like that

ER
20-03-2015, 06:03 PM
Indeed, but there is a discrepancy.

For men, the World Cup knockout is one of many qualification routes to the World Champs. You can qualify via the knockout, via the Grand Prix, or by rating, and this gets you into a Candidates Tournament to challenge the reigning champion in a match every two years.

For women, the knockout is every second World Championships. This means that if you are Women's World Champion and wish to remain such, you have to defend your title every single year, or maybe even twice in one year, and half the time you have to defend it in a series of short knockout matches in which you are statistically likely to be eliminated even if you are the best player. Moreover, FIDE can't get its act together to reliably organise the knockout event on time.

This situation is grossly unfair to Hou Yifan and is why I don't recognise this as a title.

I think the knockout event is a good idea as a qualifier, as it is for the men. Just not as a world title in its own right.

I couldn't agree more. In each and every point. I was only referring to qualification procedures. BTW I got interested in the matter after I 'd read an Alexander Grischuk interview during which he had made a couple of valid points.

Garvinator
20-03-2015, 07:05 PM
I think this type of event is a very good tool for promotion of the sport and wish there would more of them throughout the year. But not being paraded as a World Championship of any sort. Unless maybe rapid or blitz, where 8 to 12 games could be played in one day at the main time control.

ChesSOS
21-03-2015, 03:42 PM
Blunder of the day from the playoffs.

Daulyte-Socko.

3Q4/kb6/8/1P6/8/6P1/5P2/4qBK1 w - - 0 1

White to move needs a draw to progress and played Qa5+?? which she thought was perpetual. Slightly better was ...

I downloaded the PGN for this from the official site ( http://sochi2015.fide.com/en/component/turnuva/?task=fileview&kid=4 ) and was puzzled that the blunder is not included. The final move is shown as 56. Qd8+ 0-1 while many articles say that this was followed by 56... Ka7 57. Qa5+ 0-1.

It's the same on Chess24: https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-tournaments/fide-womens-world-championship-2015/1/6/4
However it's shown correctly on Chessdom: https://arena.chessdom.com/#/game/stream/78323

Is this some kind of censorship?

Kevin Bonham
21-03-2015, 06:03 PM
Is this some kind of censorship?

Hopefully just some technical issue (common enough with game endings) rather than someone deliberately trimming the game but can't tell. There doesn't seem to be much doubt the blunder actually happened (and no reason for 0-1 if it didn't, since it wasn't flagfall) - even the FIDE website reports it.

I didn't watch last night as I wanted to get up today but there were some good games. No upsets but a fair few of the favourites held to draws.

Gunina - Girya

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 Be7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O dxc4 7. Qc2 a6 8. Qxc4
b5 9. Qc2 Bb7 10. Bg5 Nbd7 11. Nbd2 Rc8 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 13. Nb3 c5 14. dxc5 Be4
15. Qc3 Bd5 16. Rac1 Bxb3 17. Qxb3 Bxc5 18. e3 Qb6 19. Rc2 Rc7 20. Ne5 Rfc8 21.
Rd1 g6 22. Rcd2 Be7 23. g4 Rc5 24. Nd3 Rg5 25. h3 h5 26. gxh5 Rxh5 27. Nf4 Rhc5
28. Nxg6 fxg6 29. Rd6 Bxd6 30. Qxe6+ Kh7 31. Rxd6 Rc1+ 32. Kh2 Qc7 33. Qxf6 Rc2
34. Qxg6+ Kh8 35. Qh5+ Kg8 36. Bd5+ Kg7 37. Qh6# 1-0

Kevin Bonham
21-03-2015, 10:13 PM
Interview with Socko further confirms that the blunder in which her opponent hung a queen instead of mating in one happened:

http://sochi2015.fide.com/en/main-page/371-monika-socko-and-drama-in-the-first-round

Kevin Bonham
22-03-2015, 02:25 AM
Second seed Ju Wenjun eliminated by Pogonina.

Koneru, Cmilyte, Kosteniuk (nice exchange sac to kill game), Gunina all through among others and A Muzychuk and Zhao Xue should join them.

Not a lot of playoffs this round. Probably five or six.

Agent Smith
22-03-2015, 06:40 AM
Hmmm... Only one loss and you are out. (Ju Wenjun).
Hopefully we won't have another second tier winner like last time.
It's a little embarassing come time to play Hou Yifan.

Kosteniuk's draw looked very easy for her.
Tatiana Kosintseva is gone.

Kevin Bonham
22-03-2015, 04:24 PM
The one game that I thought might be a draw and go to playoffs but didn't was this one, and it should have gone the other way:

Javakhishvili - Tan

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bh4 c5 8. dxc5
Nbd7 9. Qa4 Bxc3+ 10. bxc3 O-O 11. Qb4 a5 12. Qd4 Re8 13. Nd2 Qe7 14. e3 g5 15.
Bg3 Nxc5 16. h4 Ne6 17. Qe5 Ng4 18. Qd6 Qxd6 19. Bxd6 d4 20. Ne4 dxe3 21. f3 f5
22. fxg4 fxe4 23. hxg5 Nxg5 24. Bb5 Bd7 25. Bxd7 Red8 26. Bf4 Rxd7 27. Rxh6 Nf7
28. Re6 Rc8 29. g5 Nd8 30. Rxe4 Rxc3 31. Rxe3 Rc4 32. g3 Nc6 33. Rd1 Nd4 34. Kf1
Rh7 35. Kg1 Rd7 36. Kf1 Rh7 37. Kg1 Rd7 38. Rd2 Rc2 39. Rxc2 Nxc2 40. Re5 a4 41.
Ra5 a3 42. g6 Kg7 43. Rg5 Nd4 44. Be5+ Kg8 45. Kg2 Nc6 46. Bf6 Rd2+ 47. Kf1 Rd6
48. Rf5 b5 49. g4 b4 50. g5 b3 51. axb3 a2 52. Kg2 Rd1 53. Rc5 Rd6 54. Rc1 Re6
55. Rh1 1-0

Here is the position after 51...a2. Black has done well to get this after being a pawn down with little compensation for a while.

6k1/8/2nr1BP1/5RP1/8/1P6/p7/5K2 w - - 0 52

White fails to realise the danger and plays 52.Kg2.

Now black can win with 52...Rxf6 and queens but missed it. Once it is missed there is a problem: she's two pawns down, and promoting costs a pawn.

Kevin Bonham
22-03-2015, 10:33 PM
Ushenina late to the board vs Sebag, forfeits game 1 of tiebreak.

Phone alarm incorrectly set apparently.

Kevin Bonham
23-03-2015, 12:45 AM
Ushenina draws game 2 of the tiebreak (it reached a fairly drawn ending of king vs king) and eliminated.

FIDE site has been showing Gaponenko winning tiebreak but Stefanova won.

Koneru - Galliamova
M Muzychuk - Stefanova
Cmilyte - Arabidze
Kosteniuk - Harika
Pogonina - Sebag
Zhao Xue - Khotenashvili
A Muzychuk - Javakhishvili
Gunina - Cramling

Kevin Bonham
23-03-2015, 02:48 AM
Strange blunder by Huang in a won position in the last blitz game before Armageddon results in Khotenashvili going through. Not a good tournament for China so far.

Agent Smith
24-03-2015, 06:56 AM
Lots of decisive games last night.
A.K. made a nasty mistake that cost her the game.
22. axb4 was necessary.. or 27. Rxa3
[Event "WCh Women 2015"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2015.03.23"]
[Round "3.1"]
[White "Kosteniuk, Alexandra"]
[Black "Harika, Dronavalli"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2529"]
[BlackElo "2492"]
[ECO "C19"]
[EventDate "2015.03.17"]
[Board "5"]
[WhiteTitle "GM"]
[BlackTitle "GM"]
[Opening "French"]
[Variation "Winawer, advance, 6...Ne7"]
[WhiteFideId "4128125"]
[BlackFideId "5015197"]
1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 Ne7 7. h4 Qa5 8. Bd2 Qa4 9. h5 b6 10. h6 gxh6 11. Nf3 Ba6 12. Rh4 Bxf1 13. Kxf1 Nbc6 14. dxc5 Qb5+ 15. c4 dxc4 16. Qe2 Ng6 17. Re4 bxc5 18. Bxh6 Rd8 19. Qxc4 a6 20. Qxb5 axb5 21. Rb1 b4 22. Rc4
( 22. axb4 cxb4 23. Bg7 Rg8 24. Bf6 Rd5 25. c3 bxc3 26. Rc4 Nge7 27. Rxc3 )
22. ... bxa3 23. Rxc5 Nge7 24. Ra1 Ra8 25. Nd2 Kd7 26. Nc4 Nd5 27. Rb5 Nd4 28. Rxd5+ exd5 29. Nb6+ Ke6 30. Nxa8 Rxa8 31. c3 Nc6 32. Bc1 a2 33. Ke2 Nxe5 34. Kd2 h5 35. Kc2 Kf5 36. Kb3 Nd3 37. Ba3 Nxf2 38. Rxa2 Ne4 39. Re2 Kg4 40. c4 dxc4+ 41. Kxc4 Rxa3 42. Rxe4+ Kg3 43. Re5 h4 44. Rg5+ Kh2 45. Rg7 Rg3 46. Rxf7 Kxg2 47. Rd7 Rg4+ 48. Kc3 h3 49. Rd2+ Kg3 50. Rd3+ Kh4 51. Rd2 Rg3+ 52. Kc4 Rg2 53. Rd8 h2 54. Kd3 Rg5 0-1

Kevin Bonham
24-03-2015, 01:54 PM
Cmilyte was pretty lucky to hold against Arabidze so it was nearly seven wins out of eight.

Kevin Bonham
25-03-2015, 02:27 AM
Kosteniuk struck back against Harika so off to playoffs.
Anna Muzychuk beat Javakhishvili so through.
Koneru about to win and go through (with 6/6!)

Looks like Cramling, M Muzychuk and Zhao Xue should go through barring blunders.

Cmilyte-Arabidze maybe drawn which would be a playoff but Cmilyte still has a bit of play.
Pogonina has to win against Sebag and although she's a pawn up in the rook ending it's hard (edit: Sebag made a mistake so looks like Pogonina will win and make a playoff)

Agent Smith
25-03-2015, 06:38 AM
Here's hoping Koneru can win this

Kevin Bonham
25-03-2015, 11:17 PM
In the first game one rapids it was looking like all three games might be draws but then they all ended up being wins, for Harika, Pogonina and Arabidze.

So now Kosteniuk, Sebag and Cmilyte all have to win or they are out.

Kevin Bonham
26-03-2015, 12:30 AM
Harika to my delight played a French Closed Tarrasch against Kosteniuk who didn't know all that much about it, lost time on the clock and wasn't threatening to win for most of the game (indeed for a while was losing). Harika did get nervous in the ending but Kosteniuk didn't have enough.

It does look though like 29.b3 could have won a pawn

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.Bd3 c5 6.c3 Nc6 7.Ne2 cxd4 8.cxd4 f6 9.exf6 Nxf6 10.Nf3 Bd6 11.0-0 0-0 12.Bf4 Bxf4 13.Nxf4 Ne4 14.Qc1 Ng5 15.Nxg5 Qxg5 16.Ne2 Qf6 17.Qc5 Bd7 18.Rad1 Rac8 19.Qd6 Be8 20.Rd2 Kh8 21.Bb5 Na5 22.Bd3 Bg6 23.Qb4 b6 24.Bxg6 Qxg6 25.Nc3 Qf6 26.Nb5 a6 27.Nc3 Nc4 28.Rdd1 Rf7 29.Rd3 Qe7 30.Qxe7 Rxe7 31.b3 Na3 32.h4 Kg8 33.Na4 Rc6 34.Re1 Rec7 35.Kh2 Nb5 36.h5 Rf7 37.Kg3 Rf5 38.h6 gxh6 39.f4 Kf7 40.Kf3 h5 41.Rh1 Ke7 42.Nb2 Rc2 43.Nd1 Rxa2 44.Ne3 Rf7 45.Rxh5 Nd6 46.Rc3 Ne4 47.Rc7+ Ke8 48.Rxf7 Kxf7 49.Rxh7+ Kg6 50.Rb7 Rf2+ 51.Kg4 Re2 52.f5+ exf5+ 53.Kf4 Rf2+ 54.Ke5 Nc3 55.Rxb6+ Kg5 56.Rf6 Re2 57.Rxf5+ Kg6 58.Rf3 Nd1 59.Kf4 Nxe3 60.Rxe3 Rxg2 61.Re6+ Kf7 62.Rxa6 Re2 63.Kf5 Re4 64.Ra7+ Ke8 65.Ra5 Rxd4 66.Ke6 Re4+ 67.Kxd5 Rb4 68.Ra3 Kd7 69.Kc5 Rh4 70.Kb6 Rb4+ 71.Kc5 Rh4 72.b4 Kc7 73.Ra7+ Kb8 74.Re7 Rh5+ 75.Kb6 Rh6+ 76.Ka5 Rg6 77.Rf7 Rh6 78.Rf8+ Kb7 79.Rf5 Ra6+ 80.Kb5 Rb6+ 81.Kc4 Rc6+ 82.Kb3 Rh6 83.Rc5 Rg6 84.Rf5 Rh6 85.Rf7+ Kb6 86.Ka4 Rg6 87.Rf8 Rh6 88.Rb8+ Ka7 89.Rb5 Rg6 90.Ra5+ draw

Kevin Bonham
26-03-2015, 12:44 AM
Arabidze - Cmilyte. This was a great attempt by Cmilyte to win with black playing a Benko and keeping the position messy and it looked like it might work until she blundered a pawn on move 61

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6 5.bxa6 g6 6.Nc3 Bg7 7.e4 Qa5 8.Bd3 0-0 9.a7 Na6 10.Bd2 Qb6 11.Rb1 e6 12.Nge2 Nb4 13.Bc4 Nxe4 14.dxe6 Nd6 15.exf7+ Kh8 16.Nd5 Qb7 17.Bxb4 cxb4 18.Bb3 Nxf7 19.0-0 Ne5 20.Qd2 Qxa7 21.Qe3 Qb8 22.f4 Ng4 23.Qb6 Qxb6+ 24.Nxb6 Ba6 25.Nxa8 Bxe2 26.Rfe1 Bd4+ 27.Kh1 Nf2+ 28.Kg1 Nd1+ 29.Kh1 Nf2+ 30.Kg1 Nd3+ 31.Kh1 Nxe1 32.Rxe1 Rxf4 33.h3 Bf1 34.Nc7 Rf2 35.Bd5 Be2 36.Ne8 Bxb2 37.Nd6 Bc3 38.Rc1 Rf4 39.Ne4 Be5 40.Re1 Rf1+ 41.Rxf1 Bxf1 42.Kg1 Bb5 43.Kf2 Kg7 44.Ke3 d6 45.Kf3 h6 46.Ke3 g5 47.Kf3 Kg6 48.Nd2 Kf6 49.Ne4+ Kg6 50.Nd2 h5 51.Nc4 Kf6 52.Ke4 Bg3 53.Kf3 h4 54.Ke4 Bd7 55.Ne3 Kg6 56.Kf3 Bf4 57.Nc4 Kf6 58.Ke4 Bf5+ 59.Kd4 Bb1 60.Na5 Bh2 61.Bc4 Bg1+ 62.Kd5 Bc5 63.Nb7 Bg1 64.Nxd6 Kg6 65.Ke6 Bc5 66.Nb7 Bg1 67.Nd6 Bc5 68.Nb7 Bf8 69.Bd5 Bf5+ 70.Ke5 Bg7+ 71.Kd6 g4 72.hxg4 Bxg4 73.Kc5 Bf8+ 74.Kd4 Bg7+ 75.Ke4 Kg5 76.Nc5 Bc3 77.Ne6+ Kf6 78.Nf4 Bf5+ 79.Kf3 Ke5 80.Bf7 Be4+ 81.Kg4 Bd2 82.Ne2 Be1 83.Nf4 Bf2 84.Nh3 Bg3 85.Ng5 Bxg2 86.Nf3+ Kf6 87.Bb3 Bf2 88.Nxh4 Bxh4 89.Kxh4 Ke5 90.Kg3 Be4 91.Kf2 Kd4 92.Ke2 Kc3 93.Ke3 Bb1 94.Be6 Bc2 95.Bf7 Bh7 96.Be6 Bb1 97.Bf7 Bd3 98.Be6 Bb1 99.Bf7 Kb2 100.Kd4 Bxa2 101.Kc5 draw

And Sebag also seemed to have conjured a win but missed it.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Ba6 5. b3 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Be7 7. Bg2 c6 8.
O-O d5 9. Qc2 O-O 10. Rd1 Nbd7 11. a4 Ne4 12. Be3 f5 13. Nc3 Rc8 14. Qb2
Bd6 15. Nxe4 fxe4 16. Ne5 Nf6 17. Bh3 Qe8 18. a5 b5 19. cxd5 Nxd5 20. Rac1
Kh8 21. Bg2 Nf6 22. h3 b4 23. Qd2 Bb5 24. Nc4 Be7 25. Bf4 Nd5 26. e3 Nc3
27. Re1 Rd8 28. Rxc3 bxc3 29. Qxc3 c5 30. dxc5 Bxc5 31. Bxe4 Qe7 32. Be5
Rf7 33. Rf1 Rdf8 34. Bd4 Bxd4 35. Qxd4 Qc7 36. Bg2 Rd7 37. Qe4 Bxc4 38.
bxc4 e5 39. a6 Rd2 40. Qb7 Qc5 41. Qb5 Qxb5 42. cxb5 Rb2 43. Bc6 g6 44. f4
exf4 45. gxf4 Rd8 46. Rf2 Rb3 47. Re2 Kg7 48. Kf2 Rdd3 49. Be4 Rdc3 50. Bc6
Kf6 51. h4 Ke6 52. Kf3 Ra3 53. Kf2 Kd6 54. Rd2+ Kc5 55. Rd5+ Kc4 56. Rd4+
Kc5 57. Rd5+ Kb6 58. Re5 h6 59. Re7 Kc5 60. Rxa7 Rxe3 61. Rd7 Reb3 62. Rd2
Kb6 63. Kg2 Rg3+ 64. Kf2 Rh3 65. Kg2 Rxh4 66. Rf2 Rg4+ 67. Kh2 Ra4 68. f5
g5 69. Bd7 Rgf4 70. Rc2 Rac4 71. Ra2 Ra4 72. Rc2 Rfc4 73. Re2 Rc3 74. Bc6
Rf4 75. Ra2 Rfc4 76. Ra1 Rc2+ 77. Kg3 R2c3+ 78. Kf2 Rf4+ 79. Ke2 Rb4 80.
Kd2 Rh3 81. a7 Rb2+ 82. Kc1 Rf2 flag 1-0

So ...

Koneru (+6 standard, no tiebreaks) vs M Muzychuk (+2=3-1 standard, +3=1 tiebreaks)
Arabidze (+1=5 standard, +3=3 tiebreaks) vs Harika (+3=2-1 standard, +2=2 tiebreaks)
Pogonina (+3=2-1 standard, +2 tiebreaks) vs Zhao Xue (same)
A Muzychuk (+3=3 standard, no tiebreaks) vs Cramling (+4=2 standard, no tiebreaks)

I had never heard of Arabidze before this tournament.

Kevin Bonham
26-03-2015, 11:52 PM
Arabidze and Harika both exhausted after yesterday (don't blame them), boring draw in 15 moves for them today. Harika will be well rested with white tomorrow.

Agent Smith
27-03-2015, 07:00 AM
Oh no.... Humpy made a huge blunder and was mated
[Event "WWCC2015"]
[Site "Sochi"]
[Date "2015.03.26"]
[Round "22.1"]
[White "Muzychuk, Mariya (UKR)"]
[Black "Koneru, Humpy (IND)"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C45"]
[LiveChessVersion "1.4.3"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Be3 Qf6 6. c3 Nge7 7. g3 d5 8. Bg2 dxe4 9. O-O O-O 10. Nd2 Bb6 11. Re1 Nxd4 12. Nxe4 Qf5 13. Bxd4 Nc6 14. Bxb6 axb6 15. f4 Be6 16. b3 h6 17. h3 Ra3 18. Qd2 Qa5 19. b4 Qa4 20. g4 Rd8 21. Qf2 Rxa2 22. Rxa2 Bxa2 23. b5 Na7 24. g5 hxg5 25. Nxg5 f6
( 25. ... Rd1 )
26. Qd2 Rf8 27. Bd5+ Bxd5 28. Qxd5+ Kh8 29. Qf7 1-0

Kevin Bonham
27-03-2015, 10:19 AM
Staggering. I went to bed around move 20; Koneru had seemingly outplayed her opponent with Black and I thought was on course for 7/7.

It looks like ...Na7 wasn't the best move, and then ...f6 actually gets mated in every line.

Zhao Xue one up vs Pogonina.

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2015, 02:11 AM
Zhao Xue lost the plot against Pogonina and then blundered allowing mate with loads of time on her clock. Pogonina survives again and match to playoffs:

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 b5 4. cxb5 a6 5. bxa6 g6 6. Nc3 Bg7 7. g3 O-O 8.
Bg2 d6 9. Nf3 Nxa6 10. O-O Qb6 11. Re1 Nc7 12. e4 Nd7 13. a4 Ba6 14. Ra3
Rfb8 15. Qc2 Ne5 16. Nxe5 Bxe5 17. Nd1 e6 18. Bd2 Bd4 19. Bc3 e5 20. Bh3
Ra7 21. Bg4 Rab7 22. Be2 c4 23. Bxd4 Qxd4 24. Ra2 Ne8 25. Nc3 Rb4 26. Rd1
Qb6 27. a5 Qc7 28. Rda1 Nf6 29. Na4 Nd7 30. Nb6 Rb7 31. Ra4 Rxa4 32. Qxa4
Nxb6 33. axb6 Rxb6 34. Rc1 Qc5 35. b3 Bb5 36. Qa8+ Kg7 37. bxc4 Ba6 38. Re1
Qb4 39. Kf1 Bxc4 40. Bxc4 Qxc4+ 41. Kg2 Rb1 42. Qa5 Qd3 43. Kh3 Rb2 44. Qc7
Rxf2 45. Qxd6 Qc3 46. Rb1 Qc8+ 0-1

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2015, 02:57 AM
Koneru really had to work hard to unbalance the position after Mariya Muzychuk played the opening very well. Eventually rewarded with a mistake on move 40. Playoff.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Nf3 Nbd7 6.Qc2 Bd6 7.Bd2 0-0 8.h3 e5 9.g4 e4 10.Nh4 g6 11.0-0-0 Re8 12.Ng2 h6 13.Be2 dxc4 14.f3 Qe7 15.Bxc4 Nb6 16.Bb3 Be6 17.Bxe6 Qxe6 18.f4 Nfd5 19.f5 Qe7 20.Rdf1 a5 21.Kb1 Nc4 22.Bc1 a4 23.h4 b5 24.g5 h5 25.Ne2 Bc7 26.a3 Qd7 27.Rf2 Nd6 28.fxg6 fxg6 29.Ngf4 Kg7 30.Rhf1 Nc4 31.Nxd5 cxd5 32.Rf7+ Qxf7 33.Rxf7+ Kxf7 34.Nc3 Ke6 35.Nxb5 Bd6 36.Nc3 Rec8 37.Ka2 Nb6 38.Qf2 Rf8 39.Qe2 Ra5 40.Bd2 Nc4 41.Nxe4 Rb5 42.Bc3 Rfb8 43.Nxd6 Nxd6 44.Qc2 Ne4 45.Bb4 Kf5 46.Qc6 Kg4 47.Qxg6 Kxh4 48.Qf5 Ng3 49.Qf4+ Kh3 50.g6 R5b7 51.Qe5 h4 52.g7 Kh2 53.Qg5 Rg8 54.Qxh4+ Kg2 55.Bf8 Rgxg7 56.Bxg7 Rxg7 57.Qd8 Ne4 58.Qxd5 Kf3 59.Qe5 Rg4 60.Qf5+ Kg3 61.d5 Rh4 62.d6 1-0

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2015, 03:29 AM
Harika somehow gets something out of nothing; even so the KRP v KR was a tablebase draw but Arabidze was too short of time to hold it (even after Harika missed the win with Ra8 the first time). Harika gets a day off to recover from this epic while the other six go to playoffs.

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bg5 c5 4.e3 d5 5.Nbd2 Be7 6.c3 Nbd7 7.Bd3 b6 8.0-0 Bb7 9.Ne5 Nxe5 10.dxe5 Nd7 11.Bxe7 Qxe7 12.f4 0-0 13.Qh5 f5 14.exf6 Nxf6 15.Qg5 Rae8 16.Nf3 Nd7 17.Bb5 Qxg5 18.Nxg5 Bc8 19.Rad1 Re7 20.Bxd7 Bxd7 21.Nf3 Be8 22.Ne5 Bg6 23.Nxg6 hxg6 24.g3 Rd8 25.Rd2 e5 26.Rfd1 exf4 27.exf4 Red7 28.Kf2 Kf7 29.Kf3 Kf6 30.h4 Rd6 31.Rd3 R8d7 32.Kg4 Rd8 33.Re1 d4 34.cxd4 cxd4 35.Kf3 Kf7 36.Re5 Rc8 37.Re4 Rcd8 38.b3 R8d7 39.a4 Rd5 40.b4 a6 41.g4 Rd8 42.Re5 R5d6 43.Ke4 R8d7 44.f5 gxf5+ 45.Rxf5+ Kg8 46.h5 Kh7 47.Rg5 Kh6 48.Kf4 Kh7 49.Re5 g6 50.Ke4 Kg7 51.Rg5 Re7+ 52.Kf4 a5 53.bxa5 bxa5 54.Rxg6+ Rxg6 55.hxg6 Rd7 56.Ke5 Kxg6 57.Rxd4 Rb7 58.Kd5 Kg5 59.Kc5 Kh4 60.Rc4 Rb8 61.Kd5 Rb7 62.Rc5 Rb4 63.Rc4 Rb8 64.Ke5 Kg5 65.Rc5 Rb4 66.Rxa5 Rxg4 67.Ra6 Kh5 68.a5 Rg5+ 69.Kd4 Rg4+ 70.Kc5 Rg5+ 71.Kb6 Rg6+ 72.Kb7 Rg7+ 73.Kc8 Rg5 74.Kd7 [74.Ra8 wins] 74...Rg7+ 75.Ke8 Rg5 76.Kf7 Rc5 77.Kg7 Rc7+ [77...Rd5 draws] 78.Kf6 Rc5 79.Ra8 Kh4 80.a6 Rc6+ 81.Kf5 Rc5+ 82.Kf4 Rc4+ 83.Ke3 Rc7 84.Rb8 Kg5 85.Rb7 Rc4 86.Kd3 Ra4 87.Rb6 Kf5 88.Kc3 Ke5 89.Kb3 Ra1 90.Kc4 Ra2 91.Rh6 Ra1 92.Kc5 Ra2 93.Kb6 Rb2+ 94.Kc7 Ra2 95.Kb7 1-0

Capablanca-Fan
28-03-2015, 02:58 PM
Should have been a classic Vančura draw (http://en.chessbase.com/post/karsten-mueller-understanding-the-vancura-draw), but Black's K was badly misplaced.

Kevin Bonham
28-03-2015, 11:06 PM
In the first rapid in the tiebreaks Cramling has beaten A Muzychuk with black, Pogonina has done the same and M Muzychuk was in trouble against Koneru but looks like drawing a pawn down.

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2015, 12:27 AM
Mariya Muzychuk eliminates Koneru in second rapid. 35.Qc1 was the blunder in an otherwise strong but messy position.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Nf3 Nbd7 6.Qc2 Bd6 7.Be2 0-0 8.0-0 e5 9.cxd5 cxd5 10.Nb5 Bb8 11.dxe5 Nxe5 12.Bd2 a6 13.Nbd4 Ne4 14.Rad1 Qd6 15.Qb3 Nc5 16.Qa3 b6 17.Nxe5 Qxe5 18.f4 Qf6 19.Bb4 Bd6 20.Nb5 Bb7 21.Nxd6 Qxd6 22.Bf3 Rfe8 23.e4 Rac8 24.exd5 a5 25.Be1 Ba6 26.Rf2 Rcd8 27.Rfd2 Qxf4 28.Bg3 Qf6 29.Bc7 Rd7 30.d6 Bb7 31.Bg4 Qg5 32.Bxd7 Re3 33.b3 Rd3 34.Re1 Re3 35.Qc1 Nd3 36.Bd8 Rxe1+ 37.Qxe1 Qc5+ 38.Kf1 Nxe1 39.Kxe1 Qc1+ 40.Ke2 Ba6+ 41.Ke3 Qe1+ 0-1

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2015, 12:31 AM
Anna Muzychuk beats Cramling so they go on to 10/10.

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2015, 01:16 AM
Cramling wins the first one.

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 c5 4. d5 d6 5. Nc3 exd5 6. cxd5 g6 7. e4 Bg7 8.
h3 O-O 9. Bg5 Re8 10. Bd3 h6 11. Be3 a6 12. a4 Nbd7 13. O-O Rb8 14. Re1 Qe7
15. Qd2 g5 16. a5 Nf8 17. e5 dxe5 18. d6 Qe6 19. Bxc5 N6d7 20. Ba3 f5 21.
Nd4 exd4 22. Rxe6 dxc3 23. Qc2 Nxe6 24. bxc3 Ndf8 25. Bxf5 Bd7 26. Bb4 Nf4
27. Bxd7 Nxd7 28. g3 Nh5 29. Qd2 Nhf6 30. Re1 Rxe1+ 31. Qxe1 b6 32. Qe2
bxa5 33. Bxa5 Rb5 34. Bc7 Rc5 35. c4 a5 36. Qa2 Ne4 37. Qa4 Nef6 38. Bxa5
Ne5 39. Bc3 Ned7 40. Bd4 Rc8 41. Qa6 Rd8 42. c5 Ne8 43. Qc4+ Kh8 44. Bxg7+
Kxg7 45. Qe6 1-0

Agent Smith
29-03-2015, 04:03 AM
Mariya Muzychuk eliminates Koneru in second rapid. 35.Qc1 was the blunder in an otherwise strong but messy position.
Not really a blunder imho. Mariya had the attacking position, and Humpy couldn't hold.
Nice game :)

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2015, 10:21 AM
Not really a blunder imho. Mariya had the attacking position, and Humpy couldn't hold.
Nice game :)

I don't think, say, Rf1 and black has no real attack and will be exchange down is hard to see. That said a lot of players (perhaps including me) would play Ree2 which is also a mistake because of ...Bxg2!

As usual the knockout format has produced an outcome unsuitable for a world champs with the highest seeds knocked out in rapid meaning that the remaining contenders are:

Harika (12) vs M Muzychuk (8)
Cramling (11) vs Pogonina (31)

Pogonina isn't as much of an outsider as her seeding suggests; she's currently rated 15th in the world and I think has been similarly high if not higher in the past.

All four have shown impressive toughness to get this far but Hou shouldn't have any trouble with any of them.

MichaelBaron
29-03-2015, 11:08 AM
I can't see a replay video option anywhere. Most likely some video highlights will surface somewhere, perhaps on Chessbase when they finally get around to putting something up (they seem to be on a lag of about a day).

Saw this article on chess24 that possibly gives some insight into why some men like this format deciding the WWCC:

https://chess24.com/en/read/news/women-s-wch-1-comebacks-nerves-playoffs


Evgeny Miroshnichenko: [..]

In my opinion, this is possibly the best format for the Women's World Championship. Girls get bored playing a 12-game match, and the knock-out is so emotional! Women don't play against the opponent's pieces. Their brand of chess is different Ė itís clearly a clash of personalities, both on and off the board. Itís harder for them to focus their minds on a long match, and itís not such a thrilling spectacle either.

Urgh.

But then again, Hou got bored relying on ''luck'' and now simply skips the nock-out to win the WCC match against the nock-out winner next year.

MichaelBaron
29-03-2015, 11:09 AM
Good if Cramling wins - she has been one of the world's top female players for over 30 years but started playing with women only fairly recently

Kevin Bonham
29-03-2015, 12:20 PM
But then again, Hou got bored relying on ''luck'' and now simply skips the nock-out to win the WCC match against the nock-out winner next year.

As I understand it the issue was that this year's tournament was delayed by FIDE and by the time the new dates were announced Hou had committed to play in a tournament in Hawaii. A player can't be expected to put their whole playing schedule on hold when FIDE don't reliably say when the event will be.

But if Hou had got tired of the knockout format, I wouldn't blame her.

Garvinator
29-03-2015, 11:15 PM
As I understand it the issue was that this year's tournament was delayed by FIDE and by the time the new dates were announced Hou had committed to play in a tournament in Hawaii. A player can't be expected to put their whole playing schedule on hold when FIDE don't reliably say when the event will be.

But if Hou had got tired of the knockout format, I wouldn't blame her.
And most likely she would have signed a participation contract with Hawaii and to get out of that would have been a breach of contract. A bit of speculation on my part, but in the least, the Hawaii organisers have gone to great lengths to secure her participation and her last minute withdrawal with the format they have would have almost certainly meant great difficulties for the organisers.

I also wonder, with the fide KO, what happens if Hou Yifan had competed and won it?

Kevin Bonham
30-03-2015, 12:26 PM
I also wonder, with the fide KO, what happens if Hou Yifan had competed and won it?

She would then have played a match with the second-placed finisher in the GP, which was Koneru.

Cramling ground down Pogonina in a long rook ending to go one up in that semi-final while the other game was drawn.

Cramling never made the WWC final in the old days when it was a much less random event.

Garvinator
30-03-2015, 05:56 PM
She would then have played a match with the second-placed finisher in the GP, which was Koneru.
So no wonder she did not play in this event. It is not in her interest to win it. By avoiding the event, she is more likely to get a weaker opponent at equal odds, than win it and get a stronger opponent at equal odds. Well done fide.

Kaitlin
30-03-2015, 06:07 PM
So no wonder she did not play in this event. It is not in her interest to win it. By avoiding the event, she is more likely to get a weaker opponent at equal odds, than win it and get a stronger opponent at equal odds. Well done fide.

Ah.. the true tactics of chess ☺

(Clearly she saw this year's Doeberl T-shirt (on the facebook site) and knew it's meaning)

Kevin Bonham
30-03-2015, 07:17 PM
So no wonder she did not play in this event. It is not in her interest to win it. By avoiding the event, she is more likely to get a weaker opponent at equal odds, than win it and get a stronger opponent at equal odds. Well done fide.

That works if you assume she only or mainly cares about the match and not the knockout. If her aim is to maximise the number of titles then I suspect the chance of her winning the knockout exceeds the difference between her chance of beating Koneru and her chance of beating anyone else.

Garvinator
30-03-2015, 07:54 PM
That works if you assume she only or mainly cares about the match and not the knockout. If her aim is to maximise the number of titles then I suspect the chance of her winning the knockout exceeds the difference between her chance of beating Koneru and her chance of beating anyone else.
I am not so much talking about Yifan in herself, but more about the regulations and how they could be manipulated. Especially considering the title has to be defended each year. And it is not like the champion receives draw odds.

Kevin Bonham
31-03-2015, 03:32 AM
Pogonina strikes back (again) and so both semi-finals are off to playoffs.

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 a6 3. Be2 e6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nf6 6. Nc3 Bb4 7. e5 Nd5 8. O-O
Nxc3 9. bxc3 Be7 10. Bf4 O-O 11. Qd3 b6 12. Bf3 Ra7 13. Be4 g6 14. Rfd1 Bb7 15.
Bxb7 Rxb7 16. Rab1 Qc8 17. a4 Qc5 18. Nb3 Qc7 19. Nd2 Nc6 20. Qg3 Rc8 21. Ne4
Qd8 22. Bg5 Bxg5 23. Nxg5 Na5 24. Ne4 Nc4 25. Rd4 Kg7 26. Re1 h6 27. h4 Qc7 28.
f4 b5 29. h5 Qd8 30. axb5 axb5 31. Qg4 Qe7 32. Rd3 Rg8 33. Nf6 Rh8 34. Rg3 d5
35. hxg6 fxg6 36. Qxg6+ Kf8 37. Ra1 Ra7 38. Nd7+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
31-03-2015, 11:29 PM
Muzychuk one up over Harika

1. Nf3 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. b3 g6 4. Bb2 Bg7 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O d6 7. d4 c6 8. c4 Na6
9. Nbd2 Rb8 10. Qc2 b5 11. a3 Bd7 12. e3 Nc7 13. b4 e6 14. Rac1 Qe7 15. cxb5
Rxb5 16. Nb3 Ncd5 17. Nfd2 Rc8 18. Nc4 g5 19. Rfe1 Be8 20. f3 g4 21. fxg4 Nxg4
22. e4 Bh6 23. exf5 Nde3 24. Nxe3 Bxe3+ 25. Rxe3 Nxe3 26. Qe2 Nxg2 27. d5 Rxd5
28. Qg4+ Kf8 29. Nd4 Bf7 30. Nxc6 Rxc6 31. Rxc6 e5 32. Rc8+ Be8 33. Qf3 Qb7 34.
Rc2 Ne1 35. Qg4 Nxc2 36. Bc1 Bf7 37. f6 Qb6+ 38. Kh1 Ne3 0-1

Kevin Bonham
01-04-2015, 12:42 AM
Pogonina through to final; eliminates Cramling. Pogonina did miss 52.Re7+ which wins easily but managed to win it the hard way after that.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 e6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be2 Nf6 7.Be3 a6 8.0-0 Bb4 9.Na4 0-0 10.c4 Be7 11.Nc3 d6 12.Rc1 Nxd4 13.Qxd4 Nd7 14.Rfd1 b6 15.b4 Rd8 16.Na4 Rb8 17.a3 Qc6 18.Nc3 Bb7 19.f3 Ba8 20.Kh1 Nf6 21.Bf1 h6 22.Qd2 Nd7 23.Qf2 Rdc8 24.Qg3 Kf8 25.Bd4 g6 26.Be3 Kg7 27.Qh3 h5 28.Qg3 h4 29.Qf2 Ne5 30.h3 Qe8 31.Nb1 Rc6 32.Bd4 Kg8 33.f4 Nd7 34.Nd2 e5 35.Be3 exf4 36.Bxf4 Ne5 37.Nf3 Nxf3 38.Qxf3 Rbc8 39.Qd3 Bf8 40.Re1 b5 41.cxb5 Rxc1 42.Bxc1 axb5 43.Bb2 Kh7 44.e5 d5 45.e6 fxe6 46.Qd4 Bh6 47.Qxh4 Qf7 48.Bxb5 Rc2 49.Bd4 e5 50.Rxe5 Rc1+ 51.Bg1 Qf8 52.Re8 Qf4 53.Qxf4 Bxf4 54.g3 Be3 55.Rxa8 Rxg1+ 56.Kh2 d4 57.Rd8 Rb1 58.Kg2 Rb3 59.Be2 Rxa3 60.b5 Rb3 61.Rd6 Rb2 62.Kf3 Rb3 63.Ke4 Bf2 64.Bd3 Bxg3 65.Rxd4 Be1 66.Rd6 Bg3 67.Rc6 Kg7 68.Kd4 g5 69.Rg6+ Kf8 70.Rxg5 Bh2 71.h4 Rb4+ 72.Bc4 Rb1 73.h5 Rg1 74.Rf5+ Kg7 75.Kc5 Rc1 76.Rd5 Kh6 77.Kb4 Rb1+ 78.Kc3 Rc1+ 79.Kb3 Bf4 80.Rf5 Be3 81.Be2 Re1 82.Bf3 Bg5 83.Kc4 Re6 84.Rd5 Rf6 85.Rd3 Bh4 86.Kd5 Bg3 87.Rb3 Bf2 88.Ke5 Rb6 89.Bc6 Rb8 90.Rf3 Bc5 91.Kd5 Bg1 92.Rf5 Rd8+ 93.Ke6 Rd2 94.Bf3 Bd4 95.Rd5 Be3 96.Re5 Bd4 97.Rf5 Rf2 98.Kd5 Rd2 99.Ke4 Bc3 100.b6 Rd4+ 101.Ke3 Rb4 102.b7 Kg7 103.Kd3 Be1 104.Bc6 Kh6 105.Bb5 Bg3 106.Kc3 Rh4 107.Be2 Rh1 108.Rf6+ Kh7 109.Rf7+ Kg8 110.Rd7 Rb1 111.Bc4+ Kh8 112.h6 Be5+ 113.Kc2 Rb4 114.Bd3 Kg8 115.h7+ Kf8 116.h8=Q+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
01-04-2015, 12:46 AM
Harika strikes back and takes Maria to blitz. Harika was in trouble in this game but made a great comeback. Could have won earlier with 38...Bxg2!

1.e4 g6 2.d4 d6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.Be3 a6 5.a4 b6 6.Qd2 Bb7 7.Bd3 Nd7 8.f4 e6 9.Nf3 Ne7 10.0-0 c5 11.dxc5 Nxc5 12.b4 Nxd3 13.cxd3 0-0 14.Bd4 e5 15.Be3 Rc8 16.Rac1 exf4 17.Bxf4 d5 18.e5 Qd7 19.Qf2 Qf5 20.Bg5 Rc7 21.Qxb6 Rfc8 22.Ne2 Qd7 23.Qd6 Nc6 24.Bf4 Qe8 25.b5 axb5 26.axb5 Bf8 27.Qxd5 Nb4 28.Qb3 Bd5 29.Qd1 Rxc1 30.Nxc1 Qxb5 31.d4 Rc4 32.Ne2 Rc2 33.Bd2 Qc4 34.Bxb4 Bxb4 35.Nf4 Be4 36.Ng5 Rd2 37.Qa1 Bc3 38.Qc1 Rc2 39.Qd1 Rd2 40.Qc1 Bxd4+ 41.Kh1 Rc2 42.Qd1 Bf5 43.e6 fxe6 44.Ngxe6 Rd2 45.Qc1 Qxc1 46.Rxc1 Be3 47.Re1 h6 48.h3 Bf2 49.Re2 Rd1+ 50.Kh2 Bg1+ 51.Kg3 g5 52.Re5 gxf4+ 53.Nxf4 Bh7 54.Re7 Bc5 55.Rb7 Bd6 56.Kg4 Rd4 57.g3 Bg6 58.Rd7 Be8 59.Ra7 Bb5 60.Kf5 Bxf4 61.gxf4 Bd3+ 62.Kg4 Rd5 63.Rc7 Be2+ 64.Kg3 Bb5 65.Ra7 Bd7 66.Ra6 Kg7 67.h4 Rd3+ 68.Kf2 Bf5 69.Ra5 Bg4 70.Ra7+ Kg6 71.Ra6+ Kh5 72.Rf6 Rf3+ 73.Kg2 Re3 74.Kf2 Re6 75.Rf8 Kxh4 76.f5 Re2+ 77.Kf1 Kg3 78.f6 Rd2 79.Re8 Rf2+ 80.Kg1 Rxf6 0-1

Kevin Bonham
01-04-2015, 01:52 AM
Huge escape for Mariya in the first 10/10. After getting into trouble out of nowhere in the endgame she got out of it when Harika liquidated into a pawn ending a pawn up ... which was drawn.

1.c4 f5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.d3 d6 6.e4 0-0 7.Nge2 e5 8.0-0 c6 9.h3 Be6 10.b3 d5 11.cxd5 cxd5 12.exf5 gxf5 13.d4 e4 14.Bg5 Nc6 15.Rc1 Rc8 16.Qd2 Qd7 17.Na4 b6 18.Rc2 Nh5 19.Rfc1 Qd6 20.Bf1 Bd7 21.Bg2 h6 22.Be3 Kh7 23.Nac3 Ne7 24.Nf4 Nxf4 25.Bxf4 Qe6 26.Ne2 Bb5 27.Rxc8 Rxc8 28.Rxc8 Qxc8 29.Bf1 Ng6 30.Be3 Bf8 31.a4 Bd3 32.Nf4 Bxf1 33.Kxf1 Nxf4 34.Bxf4 a5 35.Kg2 Kg6 36.Qe2 Qc6 37.Be5 Be7 38.Qa6 Bf6 39.Bxf6 Qxf6 40.Qc8 Qxd4 41.Qg8+ Qg7 42.Qxd5 h5 43.Qe6+ Qf6 44.Qe8+ Kh6 45.h4 Qd6 46.Qh8+ Kg6 47.Qg8+ Kf6 48.Qg5+ Ke5 49.Qxh5 Qd3 50.Qh8+ Ke6 51.Qh6+ Kf7 52.Qxb6 Qf3+ 53.Kh2 Qe2 54.Qe3 Qd1 55.Qf4 Ke6 56.Qh6+ Ke7 57.Qg7+ Ke6 58.Qg8+ Kf6 59.Qf8+ Ke6 60.Qe8+ Kf6 61.Qc6+ Kf7 62.Qc7+ Kg6 63.Qxa5 Qxb3 64.Qb5 Qa2 65.Qb6+ Kf7 66.a5 e3 67.Qxe3 Qxa5 68.Qf4 Kg6 69.Qg5+ Kf7 70.Qh5+ Kf6 71.Qh6+ Kf7 72.h5 Qc5 73.Qf4 Kg7 74.Qg5+ Kf7 75.Kg1 Qd5 76.Qg6+ Ke7 77.Qg7+ Ke8 78.Qg6+ Ke7 79.Qg5+ Kf7 80.h6 Qd1+ 81.Kg2 Qd5+ 82.Kh2 Qf3 83.Qe3 Qxe3 84.fxe3 Kg6 85.Kg2 Kxh6 86.Kf2 Kh5 87.Kf3 Kg5 88.Kf2 Kh5 89.Kg2 Kg4 90.Kf2 Kh5 91.Kg1 Kg5 92.Kh2 Kh5 93.Kh3 Kg5 94.Kg2 Kg4 95.Kf2 Kh5 96.Kf3 Kg5

Kevin Bonham
01-04-2015, 02:26 AM
Harika was so shocked that she played the Philidor in the second 10/10 and was eliminated. So it's Russia (Pogonina) vs Ukraine (Muzychuk) in the final!

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Be7 6. Bf4 O-O 7. Qd2 a6
8. O-O-O b5 9. f3 Bb7 10. Nf5 Ne8 11. g4 Nd7 12. Nxe7+ Qxe7 13. Nd5 Qe6 14.
Kb1 Ne5 15. Be2 Rb8 16. h4 Nc4 17. Qc3 Bxd5 18. Rxd5 Qf6 19. Qxf6 Nxf6 20.
Bxc4 bxc4 21. Rd4 c3 22. b3 Rb5 23. Rhd1 Re8 24. R4d3 h5 25. g5 Nd7 26.
Rxc3 Rc5 27. Kb2 f6 28. Rxc5 Nxc5 29. gxf6 gxf6 30. Rd5 Ne6 31. Bd2 Ng7 32.
Ra5 Ra8 33. b4 Kf7 34. a4 c6 35. c4 Ne6 36. b5 Nc5 37. Be3 Nd3+ 38. Kc3 Ne5
39. Rxa6 Rc8 40. b6 c5 41. Ra7+ Ke6 42. Rh7 Nc6 43. f4 Rb8 44. a5 f5 45.
Rh6+ Ke7 46. e5 Nxa5 47. exd6+ Kd7 48. Bxc5 Nb7 49. Bb4 Re8 50. c5 Nd8 51.
Rh7+ Kc6 52. Rc7+ Kb5 53. b7 Nc6 54. Rc8 Re3+ 55. Kd2 Rh3 56. Rxc6 1-0

MichaelBaron
01-04-2015, 09:22 AM
Pogonina has nerves of steel regularly coming from behind and winning 4 tie-breaks!

MichaelBaron
01-04-2015, 11:03 PM
Whoever wins this match (Particularly if its Pogonina) will have little if any chance in the WCC match against Hou next year.

Kevin Bonham
01-04-2015, 11:51 PM
The only female player who would have had much chance against Hou Yifan is Polgar who has retired. Hou beat Koneru +3=5 in 2011 when Koneru had a higher rating than her. Hou now outrates Koneru by over 100 points.

Chesslive.de reckons the two finalists have only played three times with Mariya winning one and two draws. Also, these games were 2010 and earlier. Not much of a history between them. (Two of those three games were blitz.)

Agent Smith
02-04-2015, 06:12 AM
I'd give Koneru a better chance than the others. Their last match wasn't a walkover.
But of course, Hou Yifan is the best women's player by a chinese mile. :)

I wonder if FIDE will ever address people sitting/retiring on their rating.
Surely some deprecation over time would be appropriate, and might help address ratings creep too ?

Kevin Bonham
03-04-2015, 01:59 PM
Game 1 Pogonina - M Muzychuk

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Nf3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O
dxc4 9. Bxc4 b5 10. Be2 a6 11. Rd1 Qc7 12. e4 e5 13. dxe5 Nxe5 14. h3 Re8 15.
Bg5 Nxf3+ 16. Bxf3 Be6 17. Rac1 Rad8 18. b3 Bh2+ 19. Kf1 Be5 20. Be3 h6 21. Ne2
Rxd1+ 22. Rxd1 Bc8 23. Kg1 Bb7 24. g3 Rd8 25. Rxd8+ Qxd8 26. Bg2 Bc7 27. Nf4 Nd7
28. Nd3 Bb6 29. Nc5 Bc8 30. Nxd7 Bxd7 31. Bc5 Bxc5 32. Qxc5 Qa5 33. a3 Be6 34.
e5 Qe1+ 35. Kh2 Bxb3 36. Bxc6 Be6 37. Bg2 Qe2 38. Qb6 Qxe5 39. Qxa6 Qc5 40. Qa8+
Kh7 1/2-1/2

flushfyre
03-04-2015, 11:46 PM
Also worth noting that the winner of this match gets an immediate GM title by virtue of being Women's World Champion.

Kevin Bonham
03-04-2015, 11:57 PM
Also worth noting that the winner of this match gets an immediate GM title by virtue of being Women's World Champion.

Yes, despite her 2526 rating Mariya Muzychuk isn't a GM already (she has at least one norm). Pogonina is not even an IM!

Muzychuk has actually lost ratings points so far in this event.

Ushenina also became a GM by winning the knockout.

Agent Smith
04-04-2015, 12:27 AM
GM for winning a knockout tournament. ?

Pogonina (black) is looking better in a teid-up position after 26 moves i think... but nothing in it really.

2rqrnk1/1b3p1p/p2p2p1/PpnPp3/2p1P1Pb/2P1BPNP/1PBN1QK1/R3R3 w - - 7 27

Kevin Bonham
04-04-2015, 02:57 AM
Yes rather positionally dodgy looking play by Muzychuk for a while but Pogonina couldn't capitalise and in the end Muzychuk got an attack going and some of the black pieces were spectators.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Be7 7. Re1 d6 8.
c3 O-O 9. h3 Nb8 10. d4 Nbd7 11. a4 Bb7 12. Nbd2 c5 13. d5 c4 14. Bc2 Nc5
15. Nf1 Re8 16. Ng3 g6 17. Be3 Qc7 18. Nd2 Bf8 19. Qe2 Nfd7 20. f3 Nb6 21.
a5 Nbd7 22. Nh1 Be7 23. g4 Qd8 24. Qf2 Bh4 25. Ng3 Rc8 26. Kg2 Nf8 27. Rf1
Bg5 28. f4 exf4 29. Bxf4 Rc7 30. Bxg5 Qxg5 31. Nf3 Qe7 32. Nd4 Qe5 33. h4
h6 34. Qd2 Bc8 35. Nc6 Qg7 36. Qf4 Rd7 37. Rf2 Bb7 38. Nd4 Re5 39. Nf3 Re8
40. g5 h5 41. Nd4 Qe5 42. Qd2 Rc7 43. Raf1 Ree7 44. Rf6 Red7 45. R6f4 b4
46. Nf3 Qg7 47. cxb4 Nd3 48. Rf6 Nh7 49. Nd4 Nxf6 50. gxf6 Qf8 51. Ba4 Ne5
52. Bxd7 Rxd7 53. Nf3 Ng4 54. Nxh5 gxh5 55. Qg5+ Kh8 56. Qxh5+ Nh6 57. Kh2
Qg8 58.Rg1 1-0

Agent Smith
04-04-2015, 07:06 AM
Interesting game. That win seems a little decisive to me, but still two regular games left.

I don't think Hou has even played Mariya too much ??
Only four games according to http://chesstempo.com/game-database.html,
and two of them at the SportAccord Blitz. Hou is +2-0=2

Agent Smith
04-04-2015, 09:52 AM
Mariya is ranked 658th in the world, Hou Yifan, ranked 62.
http://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=14114550
http://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=8602980
According to FIDE , Pogonina's rating is 2456 (?)
http://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=4147855

Kevin Bonham
04-04-2015, 10:15 PM
Last night was not a great game, though it was quite dramatic. We'll see if tonight is any sounder.

MichaelBaron
05-04-2015, 12:11 AM
Games 3, black has plenty of play for the piece! Hope she holds on!

Kevin Bonham
05-04-2015, 12:50 AM
Games 3, black has plenty of play for the piece! Hope she holds on!

Currently (move 33) white looks very passive and struggling to make progress.

Although 12...Bxh2+ was a new move, Pogonina played very quickly until about move 21 so I suspect a lot of white's game was prepared.

Kevin Bonham
05-04-2015, 12:54 AM
Mariya might even win this and finish it tonight.

Agent Smith
05-04-2015, 06:33 AM
Not quite.

Kevin Bonham
05-04-2015, 10:41 AM
1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5. Nf3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. Bd3 O-O 8.
O-O dxc4 9. Bxc4 b5 10. Be2 a6 11. Ng5 Qc7 12. e4 Bxh2+ 13. Kh1 c5 14. e5
cxd4 15. exf6 Nxf6 16. f4 Bg3 17. Qd3 dxc3 18. Qxg3 h6 19. Nh3 Ne4 20. Qe1
Bb7 21. Bf3 cxb2 22. Bxb2 Qc2 23. Bxe4 Bxe4 24. Rf2 Qd3 25. Kh2 Rfd8 26.
Rc1 Rac8 27. Rxc8 Rxc8 28. a3 Bd5 29. Rd2 Qg6 30. Qe5 f6 31. Qe3 Rc4 32.
Rf2 Qf5 33. Bc3 Ra4 34. Bd2 a5 35. Qc5 Qd3 36. Bc1 Qc4 37. Qxc4 Rxc4 38.
Bb2 b4 39. axb4 Rxb4 40. Bc3 Rb5 41. Rd2 a4 42. Bb2 Rb3 43. f5 a3 44. Bd4
Rb4 45. Nf4 a2 46. Nxd5 Rxd4 47. Nxf6+ gxf6 48. Rxa2 e5 49. Ra8+ Kf7 50.
Ra7+ Ke8 51. Ra6 Ke7 52. Ra7+ Rd7 53. Ra6 Kf7 54. Kg3 Kg7 55. Kg4 Re7 56.
Ra3 Kh7 57. Ra6 e4 58. Ra2 e3 59. Re2 Rg7+ 60. Kh4 Rg8 61. g4 Re8 62. Kg3
h5 63. gxh5 Kh6 64. Kf4 Re5 65. Rxe3 Rxe3 66. Kxe3 Kxh5 67. Kf4 1/2-1/2

Pogonina has to win with black to take the match to a playoff.

Kevin Bonham
05-04-2015, 10:09 PM
Mariya's draw-bully weapon of choice is the Scotch Four Knights. Pogonina took about six minutes to come up with 3...Nf6.

Kevin Bonham
06-04-2015, 02:52 AM
All over! Pogonina's 40th was a mistake and after using about half of the time top-up Muzychuk found Bxf7! and killed off black's winning chances. (The lead commentator thought she wouldn't play it!)


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4 Bc5 6. Be3 Bb4 7. Bd3 Ne5
8. O-O O-O 9. Nd5 Nxd5 10. exd5 Re8 11. Be2 Bf8 12. Qd2 d6 13. h3 h6 14.
Rae1 a6 15. f4 Nd7 16. Bf3 Nc5 17. Bf2 Rxe1 18. Rxe1 Bd7 19. g4 Be7 20. Kg2
Bh4 21. Bxh4 Qxh4 22. Qf2 Qf6 23. Kg3 a5 24. Qd2 g5 25. Bg2 b5 26. b3 Qg6
27. a3 gxf4+ 28. Qxf4 b4 29. axb4 axb4 30. Qd2 h5 31. Bf3 hxg4 32. hxg4 Rf8
33. Nc6 Bxc6 34. dxc6 Ne6 35. Qxb4 Qxc2 36. Qc4 Qb2 37. Bd5 Ng5 38. Qf4 Qg7
39. Re7 Ra8 40. Qe3 Qh6 41. Bxf7+ Nxf7 42. Qxh6 Nxh6 43. Rxc7 Nf7 44. b4
Ne5 45. b5 Rb8 46. Rb7 Rc8 47. Kf4 Nd3+ 48. Ke4 Nc5+ 49. Kd5 Nxb7 50. cxb7
Rd8 51. b6 Kf7 52. Kc6 Ke7 53. Kc7 Rd7+ 54. Kc6 Rd8 55. Kc7 Rd7+ 56. Kc6
Rd8 1/2-1/2

The commentary this event wasn't great but it is good that we do have live video broadcasts and reliable move feeds, much better than internet coverage of events 5-6 years ago.

Kevin Bonham
06-04-2015, 11:33 AM
According to Albert Silver on Chessbase 54...h5 was a missed win in game 3.

MichaelBaron
06-04-2015, 11:56 PM
Maria, fully deserved the win!

Agent Smith
07-04-2015, 07:58 AM
Womens World Champ

http://en.chessbase.com/post/mariya-muzychuk-is-the-15th-world-champion

http://en.chessbase.com/Portals/4/files/news/2015/events/wwcch/round%206%20-%20final/rd6-19.jpg