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Kevin Bonham
11-06-2014, 08:01 PM
FIDE Announcement:

http://www.fide.com/component/content/article/1-fide-news/8068-world-chess-championship-match-in-sochi.html

Capablanca-Fan
12-06-2014, 06:38 AM
When should we start a poll?

Agent Smith
12-06-2014, 06:39 AM
The Norwegian portal VG is reporting that the President of the Norwegian Chess Federation Joran Aulin-Jansson has expressed doubts about the decision: "I am not sure about it, and as far as I know the negotiations with the players are still ongoing." Aulin-Jansson drew attention to the fact that the European Union has imposed sanctions against Russia [because of the Ukraine crisis] and noted that Carlsen may not be able to visit Russia for political reasons. "We are still unaware of how the situation with Ukraine develops, but it's clear that if EU applies sanctions, both the players and the federations of the EU will have to follow them."
http://en.chessbase.com/post/breaking-news-world-championship-in-sochi

But later in the article, Carlsen's manager is more optimistic about it.

MichaelBaron
17-06-2014, 01:27 PM
No serious companies want to sponsor it under Illumzhinov, so all the fide events (world champs included) are hard to organize

Kevin Bonham
30-08-2014, 09:48 AM
There are now a number of reports around alleging doubts about the match and concerning the signing schedule. Issues in the air include adequacy of the prize fund, source of the prize fund, location of the event in view of the Ukraine situation, deadlines for Carlsen to sign, the AGON agreement.

http://en.chessbase.com/post/trouble-brewing-for-world-championship-2014

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/aug/29/world-chess-champion-magnus-carlsen-title-threat

However the Chessbase report notes a deadline for Carlsen to sign has been extended to September 7.

This letter from ACP raising concerns about the state of various FIDE title events is relevant: http://www.chessprofessionals.org/content/open-letter-fide-president-mrkirsan-ilyumzhinov

Garvinator
30-08-2014, 04:08 PM
This letter from ACP raising concerns about the state of various FIDE title events is relevant: http://www.chessprofessionals.org/co...an-ilyumzhinov
Hehe, just to float my own boat for a bit. I have long supported the 30 second time control for the major events. I see it is now supported for major events too ;) I knew they would come around eventually.

antichrist
30-08-2014, 04:57 PM
Hehe, just to float my own boat for a bit. I have long supported the 30 second time control for the major events. I see it is now supported for major events too ;) I knew they would come around eventually.

the link was not there so not sure where coming from. If from non increment to increment I don't understand because at top level increment time did not mean any meaningful change in results.

Kevin Bonham
08-09-2014, 11:08 AM
Carlsen has signed the contract to defend his title in Sochi.

Agent Smith
08-09-2014, 08:20 PM
Good luck to him.
Hopefully he wont have any problems with receiving any prize money re. EU/Russia sanctions.

Adamski
08-09-2014, 09:26 PM
Carlsen has signed the contract to defend his title in Sochi.It is good to see that the WC match will happen.

MichaelBaron
08-09-2014, 09:47 PM
Hopefully once Magnus wins, he will come up with ways of getting rid of illumzinov/fide. Will be perfect timing then.

Qbert
09-09-2014, 09:39 AM
It could make the world championship more interesting if Carlsen were not quite so dominant as he has been.
I think the November match with Anand will be much closer than the previous one. Caruana's amazing Sinquefield result will have dented Carlsen's armour-plated self-confidence, while Anand's convincing qualification for the rematch will have boosted his. The uncertainty around the Sochi venue and prizemoney will also be a factor.

Capablanca-Fan
09-09-2014, 12:45 PM
I think the November match with Anand will be much closer than the previous one. Caruana's amazing Sinquefield result will have dented Carlsen's armour-plated self-confidence, while Anand's convincing qualification for the rematch will have boosted his. The uncertainty around the Sochi venue and prizemoney will also be a factor.
I hope you're right, and what you say makes sense.

MichaelBaron
10-09-2014, 10:46 AM
With Carlsen, he appears to be losing confidence and feeling of ''invincibility'' recently. However, against Anand he is still a favorite. I have a feeling that Anand is still afraid of him.

Agent Smith
10-09-2014, 04:15 PM
Haha. He should be :)
But the thing is - can Carlsen keep his focus; what with the recent tough tournament, FIDE shenanigans and relatively hostile venue.

MichaelBaron
11-09-2014, 03:45 AM
My money is on Carlsen...despite all the factors outlined above

Capablanca-Fan
11-09-2014, 12:24 PM
My money is on Carlsen...despite all the factors outlined above

That's true as well. We should not underestimate his ability to pull himself together and fix his weaknesses (which of course is a relative term).

pax
11-09-2014, 01:06 PM
The recent candidates aside, Anand has not been in the top couple of players for a considerable period of time. Carlsen will win comfortably.

Kevin Bonham
01-11-2014, 08:49 PM
Poll added

Also just got an email from Agon saying that Peter Svidler and Sopiko Guramishvili will be the lead English speaking commentators.

MichaelBaron
02-11-2014, 11:15 PM
Putin is to make the opening move! According to the Russian chess-news website, someone is training him now in understanding the meaning of 1.c4 1.Nf3 etc.

ER
08-11-2014, 05:54 AM
Putin is to make the opening move! According to the Russian chess-news website, someone is training him now in understanding the meaning of 1.c4 1.Nf3 etc.

I guess Mr Putin's trainer is not a (an) Ukrainian! :P

ER
08-11-2014, 05:57 AM
Now, is this one of those who you do want to win or who you do think will win polls. In either case I go for Anand! (grey power etc)! :P

BTW not much interest about this WC match. Or is it my opinion?

Garvinator
08-11-2014, 08:35 AM
BTW not much interest about this WC match. Or is it my opinion?In chess circles and across the blogs I think there is a lot of interest, but at the moment there is a general feeling that Carlsen will win this quite comfortably. Of course if Anand makes this a real contest, or takes an early lead and starts to dominate the games, then the chess interest will explode, so at the moment I call it the excitement is lying dormant, just awaiting developments. For us here in Australia, the game times are horrible. 1am starts in Brisbane, 2am starts in Sydney etc.

Wish they were on foxtel iq hd, then you could use lookback feature and download each game when you wake up.

ER
08-11-2014, 09:12 AM
In chess circles and across the blogs I think there is a lot of interest, but at the moment there is a general feeling that Carlsen will win this quite comfortably. (...) Wish they were on foxtel iq hd, then you could use lookback feature and download each game when you wake up.

I was talking about here actually but I didn't specify.
Yes, apart from the tyranny of distance we have to endure the tyranny of time.
Unfortunately, it will be a long time before foxtel covers chess events live.
On the other hand we can always download games online after they are played

MichaelBaron
08-11-2014, 10:36 AM
But somehow I feel, Anand will crack at some point in the match...

Kevin Bonham
08-11-2014, 10:42 AM
Now, is this one of those who you do want to win or who you do think will win polls.

The latter.

Kevin Bonham
08-11-2014, 10:48 AM
Looks like start time is 11 pm for those in eastern daylight savings states.

Desmond
08-11-2014, 02:37 PM
BTW not much interest about this WC match. Or is it my opinion?The wrong player qualified.

ER
08-11-2014, 08:59 PM
One of the two Magnus's seconds in this World Championship Match will be the Dane GM Peter Heine Nielsen.
I have to add that Nielsen had also been ex world champion Vishy Anand's second as well.
One of the conditions set in the previous WCC event was that the Dane (as he is known in international chess circles) should not be included in either camp.
I met the GM last year in Copenhagen at Henrik Mortensen's birthday party and thanks to Macho's assistance, I interviewed him.
GM Nielsen was one of the current World Champion's coaches and he possesses a deep knowledge of Magnus's chess achievements and personality!
You can read what the GM had to say in the An Interview thread!
http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?5069-An-interview-Added-FM-Doug-Hamilton/page42&highlight=an+interview

http://i1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee481/jak_jak1/IMG_0870_zps1f832d1c.jpg (http://s1230.photobucket.com/user/jak_jak1/media/IMG_0870_zps1f832d1c.jpg.html)
GM Peter Heine Nielsen. Photo: Elliott Renzies

Agent Smith
08-11-2014, 09:04 PM
The wrong player qualified.
Hmmm... Perhaps unfortunately, Anand smashed the rest of the field in the qualifing tounrament.

1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 gm 45 IND 8.5 / 14 XX == == == 1= == 1= =1 2850 +15 (+3 -0 =11)
2: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 gm 24 RUS 7.5 / 14 == XX 01 == == =1 01 == 2799 +7 (+3 -2 =9)
3: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 gm 39 RUS 7.0 / 14 == 10 XX == 1= =0 == 01 2767 -4 (+3 -3 =8)
4: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 gm 24 RUS 7.0 / 14 == == == XX 0= 0= 1= 1= 2779 +14 (+2 -2 =10)
5: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 gm 29 AZE 7.0 / 14 0= == 0= 1= XX 1= 01 == 2772 +4 (+3 -3 =8)
6: Svidler, Peter 2758 gm 38 RUS 6.5 / 14 == =0 =1 1= 0= XX 0= 10 2743 -3 (+3 -4 =7)
7: Aronian, Levon 2830 gm 32 ARM 6.5 / 14 0= 10 == 0= 10 1= XX == 2732 -20 (+3 -4 =7)
8: Topalov, Veselin 2785 gm 39 BUL 6.0 / 14 =0 == 10 0= == 01 == XX 2718 -14 (+2 -4 =8)
But I'm looking forward to this match still. Surely the old guy will crack again like last year. But you cant write him off, especially with his good form this year.

Kevin Bonham
08-11-2014, 09:24 PM
If Caruana had won this 19-move repetition draw against Dominguez with black we might now be watching Carlsen-Caruana:

http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?15022-Paris-FIDE-Grand-Prix&p=368741&viewfull=1#post368741

But it was not to be. Actually the level of play Anand displayed in the Candidates he might well have disposed of Caruana (at that time) too.

Still it's a World Championship match and I will watch it and be glad that these days we only have one such and it isn't at the end of a stupid knockout tournament.

Kevin Bonham
08-11-2014, 10:38 PM
About half an hour ago Giri tweeted:

"Very strange opening choice by Magnus, he probably regrets it already. #CarlsenAnand"

Garvinator
08-11-2014, 10:54 PM
The wrong player qualified.
I do not share this opinion. I wanted Anand to qualify and get 'his' rematch. I am not part of the doomsayers who think this will be an easy win for Carlsen, as can be seen by my vote :) I think the fact that they are not playing in India will have a large effect on the match, no matter how much Anand tried to claim this did not affect his performance.

Kevin Bonham
08-11-2014, 11:51 PM
I believe the time control is 40/120 then 20/60 then 15+30 secs.

Kevin Bonham
09-11-2014, 06:35 AM
Game 1. Great to see a real game rather than a boring one first up. Anand probably could have made more of his position and in the end was a little bit fortunate to get out of this as 42...Re3 would have been quite unpleasant.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Bd2 Bg7 6. e4 Nxc3 7. Bxc3 O-O
8. Qd2 Nc6 9. Nf3 Bg4 10. d5 Bxf3 11. Bxg7 Kxg7 12. gxf3 Ne5 13. O-O-O c6
14. Qc3 f6 15. Bh3 cxd5 16. exd5 Nf7 17. f4 Qd6 18. Qd4 Rad8 19. Be6 Qb6
20. Qd2 Rd6 21. Rhe1 Nd8 22. f5 Nxe6 23. Rxe6 Qc7+ 24. Kb1 Rc8 25. Rde1
Rxe6 26. Rxe6 Rd8 27. Qe3 Rd7 28. d6 exd6 29. Qd4 Rf7 30. fxg6 hxg6 31.
Rxd6 a6 32. a3 Qa5 33. f4 Qh5 34. Qd2 Qc5 35. Rd5 Qc4 36. Rd7 Qc6 37. Rd6
Qe4+ 38. Ka2 Re7 39. Qc1 a5 40. Qf1 a4 41. Rd1 Qc2 42. Rd4 Re2 43. Rb4 b5
44. Qh1 Re7 45. Qd5 Re1 46. Qd7+ Kh6 47. Qh3+ Kg7 48. Qd7+ 1/2-1/2

antichrist
09-11-2014, 08:44 AM
I thought that Anand's isolated pawns left open files to attack Carlsen's king but not that simple of course. Interesting to see queen side castle in first game

Desmond
09-11-2014, 09:07 AM
I do not share this opinion. I wanted Anand to qualify and get 'his' rematch. I am not part of the doomsayers who think this will be an easy win for Carlsen, as can be seen by my vote :) I think the fact that they are not playing in India will have a large effect on the match, no matter how much Anand tried to claim this did not affect his performance.I don't necessarily think it will be an easy win for Carlsen either (though I think that there is a good chance it will be). I also don't question that Anand did qualify correctly and deserves to be there. But the match would be a much better one if at this moment it was between Carlsen and Caruana. From a marketing, interest, excitement, topical, and probably chess point of view.

antichrist
09-11-2014, 10:01 AM
http://new.livestream.com/accounts/7928738/events/3553668/

where the action is

Ian Rout
09-11-2014, 12:44 PM
I don't necessarily think it will be an easy win for Carlsen either (though I think that there is a good chance it will be). I also don't question that Anand did qualify correctly and deserves to be there. But the match would be a much better one if at this moment it was between Carlsen and Caruana. From a marketing, interest, excitement, topical, and probably chess point of view.
Realistically, Carlsen would go in as a reasonably warm favourite against anyone this time around.

Undoubtedly it's true that a Carlsen - Caruana match would generate more excitement, but that feeling derives mainly from one result. If Caruana had not put in such an outstanding performance at the Sinquefield Cup (and commentators seem to think that it was exaggerated by less than stellar resistance in some games) then he would just be one of several next-rank players.

The positive is that Caruana, having not played and therefore not failed in either the title match or the Candidates can wear the mantle of The Guy Who Might Have Won for two years and the next match will be even more eagerly awaited.

MichaelBaron
09-11-2014, 03:16 PM
Anand had some minor issues to deal with in game 1..but held comfortably

Garvinator
09-11-2014, 04:02 PM
The positive is that Caruana, having not played and therefore not failed in either the title match or the Candidates can wear the mantle of The Guy Who Might Have Won for two years and the next match will be even more eagerly awaited.And that is the main point of any of this. It is easy to say, oh this guy who gave a great performance in a general high level tournament would have given the title holder a much better match. It is whole different thing entirely to actually do it.

Of course, if we go back in history, the question for those who did follow the original qualifications rules was, is that Caruana should have been selected in the eight instead of a couple of the players and got his candidate shot. And then all these debates would be history. Either he would have been good enough, or not.

Of course a whole new series of debates will begin if Anand wins this in a close match, or in the tie breaks.

MichaelBaron
09-11-2014, 07:07 PM
We can never be too sure Caruana will win the next candidates tournament. Last few GP events, he has not played that well.

Kevin Bonham
09-11-2014, 08:05 PM
Of course, if we go back in history, the question for those who did follow the original qualifications rules was, is that Caruana should have been selected in the eight instead of a couple of the players and got his candidate shot.

Yes. Things like the "organiser wild card" and possibly the place for the losing World Cup finalist can deprive the Candidates Final of its full possible strength.

All the same Caruana had every chance to qualify by coming first or second in the Grand Prix but finished behind Topalov and Mamedyarov, the latter of whom is hardly world title match strength. It's partly down to lag, that at the time the qualification cycle was held Caruana just wasn't as good as he is now.

MichaelBaron
10-11-2014, 12:56 AM
Game 2 - Anand appears to be in trouble

Kevin Bonham
10-11-2014, 01:00 AM
Nigel Short just now:

"I am at loss to suggest anything sensible for Black. This is gruesome suffering #CarlsenAnand"

Kevin Bonham
10-11-2014, 01:53 AM
This one is not a good sign for the competitiveness of the rest of the match. A bad loss for Vishy after Magnus whipped up a king-side hack out of not very much. Black's 34th is a blunder but his position was bad anyway.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. O-O d6 6. Re1 O-O 7. Bxc6 bxc6
8. h3 Re8 9. Nbd2 Nd7 10. Nc4 Bb6 11. a4 a5 12. Nxb6 cxb6 13. d4 Qc7 14.
Ra3 Nf8 15. dxe5 dxe5 16. Nh4 Rd8 17. Qh5 f6 18. Nf5 Be6 19. Rg3 Ng6 20. h4
Bxf5 21. exf5 Nf4 22. Bxf4 exf4 23. Rc3 c5 24. Re6 Rab8 25. Rc4 Qd7 26. Kh2
Rf8 27. Rce4 Rb7 28. Qe2 b5 29. b3 bxa4 30. bxa4 Rb4 31. Re7 Qd6 32. Qf3
Rxe4 33. Qxe4 f3+ 34. g3 h5 35. Qb7 1-0

MichaelBaron
10-11-2014, 09:59 AM
Very impressive play by Magnus. Almost computer-like

pax
10-11-2014, 11:38 AM
Very impressive play by Magnus. Almost computer-like

These days "computer-like" is merely a synonym for playing a lot of accurate moves, and not making any mistakes. One could just as easily say "almost World-Champion-like".

Adamski
10-11-2014, 11:42 AM
So it has only taken 2 games for Magnus to hit the front. And he did so very impressively.

antichrist
10-11-2014, 11:52 AM
shame Anand could not win with white when according to KB he may have had a chance. I like to begin a series with black and at least draw to draw a line in the sand that am going to win with white

Kevin Bonham
10-11-2014, 12:16 PM
shame Anand could not win with white when according to KB he may have had a chance.

I wouldn't say he had a clear winning chance in game 1. Just that the position was interesting at points (it seemed maybe very slightly better for white but unclear because it was so unbalanced - a common situation in a range of openings) and somehow Anand slipped into a position where only Carlsen was still able to play for the win.

Agent Smith
10-11-2014, 04:26 PM
http://en.chessbase.com/Portals/4/files/news/2014/events/worldchampionship/game02-07anand.jpg

Anand looked disappointed during the press conference.
He will have a rest day tomorrow to figure out how to recover.

It must hurt to lose games with such a rank blunder. :eh:

Tony Dowden
10-11-2014, 05:34 PM
I meant to vote Carlsen plus 3 but I forgot, so now with the benefit of seeing Games 1 & 2, I'll say Carlsen plus 4 or 5.

BTW, I think some commentators are reading too much into Carlsen's losses over the last 12 months. A couple of losses were in the Gashimov Memorial (where he paid homage by playing super aggressively) and a couple more were in the Tromso Olympiad (which he doesn't seem capable of taking seriously - a definite psychological weakness, by the way - but not applying to a WCh). And at the Sinquefield, where he seemed less than gladiatorial, it seems fair to say he was preoccupied by the WCh contract.

Vlad
10-11-2014, 06:34 PM
At the end of game 1 Carlsen had a clear winning chance that he did not use. Well, scoring one out of two opportunities is not that bad for Carlsen. For Anand, on the other hand, if he is giving chances to his opponent in every game, there is not much to say.

Kevin Bonham
12-11-2014, 01:42 AM
Well, this makes things more interesting! 20.fxe4 was a known improvement on Aronian-Adams 2013 (drawn soon after) and clearly Anand was much better prepared for this one than Carlsen.

1. d4 Nf6
2. c4 e6
3. Nf3 d5
4. Nc3 Be7
5. Bf4 O-O
6. e3 Nbd7
7. c5 c6
8. Bd3 b6
9. b4 a5
10. a3 Ba6
11. Bxa6 Rxa6
12. b5 cxb5
13. c6 Qc8
14. c7 b4
15. Nb5 a4
16. Rc1 Ne4
17. Ng5 Ndf6
18. Nxe4 Nxe4
19. f3 Ra5
20. fxe4 Rxb5
21. Qxa4 Ra5
22. Qc6 bxa3
23. exd5 Rxd5
24. Qxb6 Qd7
25. O-O Rc8
26. Rc6 g5
27. Bg3 Bb4
28. Ra1 Ba5
29. Qa6 Bxc7
30. Qc4 e5
31. Bxe5 Rxe5
32. dxe5 Qe7
33. e6 Kf8
34. Rc1 1-0

Garvinator
12-11-2014, 02:53 AM
Now the big question becomes. Can Anand solve the issues he has been having with the black pieces for now both matches, where Carlsen has been able to get a nice, quiet stable long lasting initiative and just grinding him down in excellent fashion?

Agent Smith
12-11-2014, 05:43 AM
[Event "FICS unrated standard"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2014.11.12"]
[Round "?"]
[White "GMAnand"]
[Black "GMCarlsen"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2792"]
[BlackElo "2863"]
[TimeControl "120/0"]
[Annotator "Critter 1.6a 64-bit"]
[Depth "16"]

1.d4 Nf6 {+0.19} 2.c4 {+0.17} 2...e6 {+0.20} 3.Nf3 {+0.16} 3...d5 {+0.19} 4.Nc3 {+0.18} 4...Be7 {+0.22} 5.Bf4 {+0.28} 5...O-O {+0.28} 6.e3 {+0.25} 6...Nbd7 {+0.24} 7.c5 {+0.16} 7...c6 {+0.29} 8.Bd3 {+0.29} 8...b6 {+0.38} 9.b4 {+0.35} 9...a5 {+0.26} 10.a3 {+0.38} 10...Ba6 {+0.28} 11.Bxa6 {+0.28} 11...Rxa6 {+0.25} 12.b5 {-0.25} 12...cxb5 {-0.28} 13.c6 {-0.28} 13...Qc8 {-0.28} 14.c7 {-0.14} 14...b4 {-0.14} 15.Nb5 {-0.07} 15...a4 {-0.05} 16.Rc1 {+0.01} 16...Ne4 {-0.22} 17.Ng5 {+0.12} 17...Ndf6 {+0.02} 18.Nxe4 {-0.10} 18...Nxe4 {+0.12} 19.f3 {+0.20} 19...Ra5 {+0.28} 20.fxe4 {+0.37}
( 20.Qe2 Qd7 21.fxe4 Rc8 22.exd5 exd5 23.axb4 Rxb5 24.O-O Rxb4 25.Qa6 h6 26.Rc6 Bg5 27.Bxg5 hxg5 28.Rfc1 Rc4 29.R1xc4 dxc4 30.Qxb6 a3 31.Rxc4 a2 32.Qa5 Qe6 33.Qxa2 Rxc7 34.Qa8+ Kh7 35.Rxc7 Qxe3+ 36.Kf1 Qf4+ 37.Qf3 Qxc7 38.Qh5+ Kg8 39.Qxg5 Qc4+ 40.Kf2 Qxd4+ {1/2-1/2 Aronian, Levon (2795) - Adams, Michael (2753) / 6th Final Masters (3.1), Bilbao ESP 2013} )
20...Rxb5 {+0.47} 21.Qxa4 {+0.37} 21...Ra5 {+0.31} 22.Qc6 {+0.45} 22...bxa3 {+0.44} 23.exd5 {+0.49} 23...Rxd5 {+0.37} 24.Qxb6 {+0.49} 24...Qd7 {+0.46} 25.O-O {+0.39} 25...Rc8 {+0.42} 26.Rc6 {+0.33} 26...g5 {+0.78} 27.Bg3 {+0.57} 27...Bb4 {+0.59} 28.Ra1 {+0.57} 28...Ba5 {+1.50}
( {[Critter 1.6a 64-bit] 16:+0.65} 28...h5 29.h3 g4 30.h4 Bf8 31.Be5 Be7 32.g3 Bf8 33.Qb7 Be7 34.Bf4 Ra5 35.Ra2 Ra7 36.Qb5 Qd5 37.Qxd5 exd5 )
29.Qa6 {+1.69} 29...Bxc7 {+2.13} 30.Qc4 $201 {+2.26} 30...e5 $6 $18 {+3.62 / +2.26}
( 30...Ra5 31.Rxc7 Rxc7 32.Qxc7 Qxc7 33.Bxc7 Ra7 34.Bd8 h6 35.Ra2 g4 36.Bf6 Kh7 37.Be5 Ra6 38.Kf2 Kg6 39.Ke2 f6 40.Bf4 h5 41.Kd2 Kf5 42.Kc3 Ke4 43.Kb3 $16 )
31.Bxe5 {+3.80} 31...Rxe5 {+4.60} 32.dxe5 {+4.60} 32...Qe7 {+4.60} 33.e6 {+4.82} 33...Kf8 {+5.12} 34.Rc1 {+5.49 Black resigns}
( 34.Rc1 { 16:+5.49} 34...Kg7 35.Qd4+ Kg6 36.exf7+ Kxf7 37.Qc4+ Kf8 38.Rxc7 Rxc7 39.Qxc7 Qxe3+ 40.Kh1 Qd3 41.Qc8+ Kg7 42.Rc7+ )
1-0

antichrist
12-11-2014, 05:52 AM
What could be the first weakish move by Carlsen? Maybe 10. ...Ba6 getting the black rook off the back rank. Or move 6 letting the white c pawn pass?

Jesper Norgaard
12-11-2014, 07:46 AM
Well, this makes things more interesting! 20.fxe4 was a known improvement on Aronian-Adams 2013 (drawn soon after) and clearly Anand was much better prepared for this one than Carlsen.

1. d4 Nf6
2. c4 e6
3. Nf3 d5
4. Nc3 Be7
5. Bf4 O-O
6. e3 Nbd7
7. c5 c6
8. Bd3 b6
9. b4 a5
10. a3 Ba6
11. Bxa6 Rxa6
12. b5 cxb5
13. c6 Qc8
14. c7 b4
15. Nb5 a4
16. Rc1 Ne4
17. Ng5 Ndf6
18. Nxe4 Nxe4
19. f3 Ra5
20. fxe4 Rxb5
21. Qxa4 Ra5
22. Qc6 bxa3
23. exd5 Rxd5
24. Qxb6 Qd7
25. O-O Rc8
26. Rc6 g5
27. Bg3 Bb4
28. Ra1 Ba5
29. Qa6 Bxc7
30. Qc4 e5
31. Bxe5 Rxe5
32. dxe5 Qe7
33. e6 Kf8
34. Rc1 1-0

I agree, and I think walking into this kind of minefield was not only unwise from a practical point of view, but was actually allowing the deep preparation Anand is known for, allowing a clean victory with great preparation. Perhaps Magnus' prep team was too confident that this was OK for Black after the draw Levonian-Adams 2013. Tomashevsky-Riazantsev is a complete copy of the current game (including the dubious Rxd5 for Black) and shows where the preparation team faltered in a very concrete way not to warn Magnus about this. I predict we won't see the position after 10...Ba6 ever again in the match, as the positions allowing the pawn to c7 is really dangerous stuff to be playing around with if having to rely on the seconds' work to survive. Since Magnus is doing so well in quiet positions (especially against Anand) he should strive for them in every single game.

In the second game we saw Magnus playing 4.d3 against the Berlin Ruy Lopez, just getting a playable position and quickly thereafter getting Anand to outplay himself soon after with the moves Qh5, Nf5 and Rg3 in the second game shows Magnus' strengths and Vishy's weaknesses, although also the first game showed Anand's weak points with Anand just wobbling around from a level situation to a very critical position (allowing a5-a4 and the later Re3).

Clearly entering this variation with the white pawn on c7 was a strategic error for Magnus for the match. It was exactly how Botvinnik lost his first match against Tal - allowing too complicated positions to arise, which favored Tal's kind of intuition and not Botvinnik's kind of intuition.

Tony Dowden
12-11-2014, 08:14 AM
I generally agree with JN. Carlsen's error was to get an 'unplayable' position. The pawn on c7 was just huge. The match has definitely taken a fascinating turn!

Jesper Norgaard
12-11-2014, 09:27 AM
"When something goes wrong it is always my fault" – Carlsen answering the question how much influence his seconds had in choosing this opening.

I think this quote shows Magnus' class and that he has had serious thoughts before the match on how to react in the press conferences on different match issues. It is like an episode of the British "Yes, Minister" series. A politician asked if he would like to become prime minister, who says "Oh, yeah, I would love that" clearly hasn't given much thought to the issue. Instead if he answers "I certainly would not push myself in the front line like that, but if the public <needs> me there, I would perhaps consider it" then you know he/she has prepared the answer well so to not step on anybody's aching toes and appear wise and mature.

Kevin Bonham
12-11-2014, 09:42 AM
What could be the first weakish move by Carlsen? Maybe 10. ...Ba6 getting the black rook off the back rank. Or move 6 letting the white c pawn pass?

Certainly not as early as move 6 as this is a position that has arisen hundreds of times at least in GM games and a deviation on move 20 in an obscure line is hardly going to blow up the whole line. 11.Bxa6 isn't that common and it might be that this game shows it's more dangerous than it's previously seemed, but more likely the mistake by black was much later. I'll have a go and say that maybe 18...Nxe4 is wrong and 18...dxe4 is OK.

As Jesper points out it's not only about what moves are objectively good or bad. It's also about the right kind of positions and the wrong kind of positions from a match strategy view. We know Anand loves this sort of stuff and we know Anand is good on remembering and preparing complex theory so why go there? It seems the first move Anand did not see coming was move 27 by which time black is already in terrible trouble.

MichaelBaron
12-11-2014, 10:57 AM
Too much opening theory :(

pax
12-11-2014, 01:32 PM
Too much opening theory :(

This is the World Championship! Deep preparation is a very big part of the game..

Kevin Bonham
12-11-2014, 02:25 PM
Been looking at various 18...dxe4 lines in depth and yet to find anything for white that the engine rates better than 0.00. So any suggestions for how white might get a real advantage against that move would be interesting. It is interesting that Carlsen played ...Nxe4 copying Adams against Aronian when it looks like the move is a mistake. Radjabov at the time said black had to take with the pawn "otherwise after Nxe4 f3 he has to solve hard problems."

Garvinator
12-11-2014, 08:26 PM
Been looking at various 18...dxe4 lines in depth and yet to find anything for white that the engine rates better than 0.00. So any suggestions for how white might get a real advantage against that move would be interesting. It is interesting that Carlsen played ...Nxe4 copying Adams against Aronian when it looks like the move is a mistake. Radjabov at the time said black had to take with the pawn "otherwise after Nxe4 f3 he has to solve hard problems."
Game 3 does seem to have some similarities, with the term, same but different, being the choice saying, from Game 8 in Kramnik-Leko 2004. In that game, Kramnik home prepared a whole opening variation by computer as white which he thought was winning. He studied and prepared it all the way into the move 30 range and then stopped the analysis, thinking the game was won at that point. Leko at the board, who was not aware of much of it and so had to work out a lot on his own during the game, realised that Kramnik's teams preparation had not quite gone far enough and was able to bust the variation at the board.

Hence my same but different comment here. Carlsen seems to have relied on a previous game that turned out alright and got a draw, but as other GM's had pointed out, it did contain a large flaw in the game and Anand took full advantage through home preparation.

Garvinator
12-11-2014, 08:33 PM
As for Michael Baron's comment about too much opening theory. This is where a lot of us criticise the match length. With only twelve games, it might test the depth of both players opening and middle choices, but it did not test their breadth of choices.

Also by only being 12 or so games, the back and forth flow of the matches is lessened. There is no more, one player gains a two game lead, holds that lead for a few games, then the other player starts to gain an advantage in match initiative and starts winning a couple of games. That drama is much lessened in 12 game matches. The drama of the all the great matches of 85, 86, 87, Kasparov/Anand in 95 etc would be much different if held over only 12 games.

I think it is actually probably likely that had matches originally being held only over such a short length, the idea of the match format probably would have died long ago. It is only the romance of the past, and the memories of all the great matches and battles, either under the first to six format, or the called off match that has kept the format alive.

Kevin Bonham
12-11-2014, 10:04 PM
Game 3 does seem to have some similarities, with the term, same but different, being the choice saying, from Game 8 in Kramnik-Leko 2004.

I was thinking exactly the same thing. (I can well remember how amazing it was watching that game online here - the efforts to refute Kramnik's prep OTB were such that Leko nearly lost on time.) A key difference is that Kramnik thought it was winning because the flawed engines of the time told him so, but I'm not sure Carlsen's squad had even subjected this line to full engine checking.

Kevin Bonham
12-11-2014, 11:30 PM
Tonight's game comes from my unofficial repertoire Boring Chess Openings. It's a line I will play sometimes if I want to play 2.Bb5 and black foils it with ...e6, so I then get him out of his prep as well. :lol:

Actually it has ended up rather like a French Open Tarrasch.

antichrist
13-11-2014, 09:35 AM
http://new.livestream.com/accounts/7928738/events/3553668/

Kevin Bonham
13-11-2014, 09:54 AM
Game 4

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.g3 Nc6 4.Bg2 d5 5.exd5 exd5 6.0-0 Nf6 7.d4 Be7 8.Be3 cxd4 9.Nxd4 Bg4 10.Qd3 Qd7 11.Nd2 0-0 12.N2f3 Rfe8 13.Rfe1 Bd6 14.c3 h6 15.Qf1 Bh5 16.h3 Bg6 17.Rad1 Rad8 18.Nxc6 bxc6 19.c4 Be4 20.Bd4 Nh7 21.cxd5 Bxd5 22.Rxe8+ Rxe8 23.Qd3 Nf8 24.Nh4 Be5 25.Bxd5 Qxd5 26.Bxe5 Qxe5 27.b3 Ne6 28.Nf3 Qf6 29.Kg2 Rd8 30.Qe2 Rd5 31.Rxd5 cxd5 32.Ne5 Qf5 33.Nd3 Nd4 34.g4 Qd7 35.Qe5 Ne6 36.Kg3 Qb5 37.Nf4 Nxf4 38.Kxf4 Qb4+ 39.Kf3 d4 40.Qe8+ Kh7 41.Qxf7 Qd2 42.Qf5+ Kh8 43.h4 Qxa2 44.Qe6 Qd2 45.Qe8+ Kh7 46.Qe4+ Kh8 47.Qe8+ Kh7 draw

Carlsen did seem a bit better but didn't make anything of it. 25.Bxe5 Rxe5 26.Qc3 might have a bit more in it than the game.

antichrist
13-11-2014, 10:32 AM
thanks KB, I actually looked for 15 mins in vain for the moves, even on other sites, then forgot about it.

Just checked not, at least they got into it and had a fight, one can only do what one's opponent lets one do.

MichaelBaron
13-11-2014, 11:08 AM
Vishi will probably try to hold with black and outbook Magnus with white from now onwards.

Adamski
13-11-2014, 11:23 AM
Vishi will probably try to hold with black and outbook Magnus with white from now onwards.I doubt if he will succeed with the latter. Magnus won't get caught twice.

MichaelBaron
14-11-2014, 09:59 AM
I doubt if he will succeed with the latter. Magnus won't get caught twice.

Probably you are right...but anything is possible. Btw, you have not wished good luck to both players yet :)

pax
14-11-2014, 12:37 PM
Vishi will probably try to hold with black and outbook Magnus with white from now onwards.

Hold with black, win with white. I'm sure nobody else has thought of that! :):):)

MichaelBaron
14-11-2014, 04:49 PM
Hold with black, win with white. I'm sure nobody else has thought of that! :):):)

Certainly not Carlsen, he is playing for win irrespectively of whether he has white pieces or not. In fact in game 1 he was quite close to victory at one point.

ER
15-11-2014, 12:01 AM
Looks like Vishy is winning this! (after ... gxf6) Magnus's only chance is a fighting draw!

Kevin Bonham
15-11-2014, 12:14 AM
If Black can get rid of a2 he ought to still hold it even if he goes a pawn down elsewhere in the process. Still seems to have been playing with fire to get into all this in the first place.

Kevin Bonham
15-11-2014, 12:27 AM
Not looking so difficult anymore (move 32).

Kevin Bonham
15-11-2014, 12:40 AM
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Nc3 Bb7 7. Bg2 c6 8.
e4 d5 9. exd5 cxd5 10. Ne5 O-O 11. O-O Nc6 12. cxd5 Nxe5 13. d6 Nc6 14.
dxe7 Qxe7 15. Bg5 h6 16. d5 Na5 17. Bxf6 Qxf6 18. dxe6 Qxe6 19. Re1 Qf6 20.
Nd5 Bxd5 21. Bxd5 Rad8 22. Qf3 Qxb2 23. Rad1 Qf6 24. Qxf6 gxf6 25. Re7 Kg7
26. Rxa7 Nc6 27. Rb7 Nb4 28. Bb3 Rxd1+ 29. Bxd1 Nxa2 30. Rxb6 Nc3 31. Bf3
f5 32. Kg2 Rd8 33. Rc6 Ne4 34. Bxe4 fxe4 35. Rc4 f5 36. g4 Rd2 37. gxf5 e3
38. Re4 Rxf2+ 39. Kg3 Rxf5 1/2-1/2

Carlsen now gets two whites in a row.

ER
15-11-2014, 02:26 AM
Not looking so difficult anymore (move 32).

Correct! All my calculations were based on Black's corralled Knight; nevertheless, Magnus managed to free it almost winning a tempo in the process!

Kevin Bonham
16-11-2014, 12:18 AM
Amazing double blunder! Really obvious too, I saw it in the minute it took Vishy to miss it.

Kevin Bonham
16-11-2014, 01:14 AM
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. c4 Nf6 6. Nc3 Bb4 7. Qd3 Nc6 8.
Nxc6 dxc6 9. Qxd8+ Kxd8 10. e5 Nd7 11. Bf4 Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 Kc7 13. h4 b6 14.
h5 h6 15. O-O-O Bb7 16. Rd3 c5 17. Rg3 Rag8 18. Bd3 Nf8 19. Be3 g6 20. hxg6
Nxg6 21. Rh5 Bc6 22. Bc2 Kb7 23. Rg4 a5 24. Bd1 Rd8 25. Bc2 Rdg8 26. Kd2?? a4??
27. Ke2 a3 28. f3 Rd8 29. Ke1 Rd7 30. Bc1 Ra8 31. Ke2 Ba4 32. Be4+ Bc6 33.
Bxg6 fxg6 34. Rxg6 Ba4 35. Rxe6 Rd1 36. Bxa3 Ra1 37. Ke3 Bc2 38.Re7+ 1-0

Kevin Bonham
16-11-2014, 01:33 AM
Oh the biggest blunder of this game was the press conference afterwards. Excruciating piece of repetitive pointless contractual-obligation bearbaiting. Scarcely an intelligent question asked. Should've been cut short with few if any questions about the blunder. Closet GM had some nice rants about it on Twitter calling them "pretend chess journos" and so on. Worse than reality television, The Bachelor possibly excepted.

Agent Smith
16-11-2014, 06:41 AM
Carlsen had just played 26.Kd2? presenting Black with the golden opportunity to play 26...Nxe5! turning tables completely around. The point is that after 27.Rxg8 Black has the zwischenzug 27...Nxc4+ securing a huge advantage.
Possibly he was saving up/thinking about Nxe5 for after Rxh6. eg 28. Rxh6 Nxe5 29.Rxg8 Rxg8 30.g3 Bf3+ 31.Ke1 Nxc4 when black is better

[Event "FICS unrated standard"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2014.11.16"]
[Round "?"]
[White "GMCarlsen"]
[Black "GMAnand"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2863"]
[BlackElo "2792"]
[TimeControl "120/0"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.c4 Nf6 6.Nc3 Bb4 7.Qd3 Nc6 8.Nxc6 dxc6 9.Qxd8+ Kxd8 10.e5 Nd7 11.Bf4 Bxc3+ 12.bxc3 Kc7 13.h4 b6 14.h5 h6 15.O-O-O Bb7 16.Rd3 c5 17.Rg3 Rag8 18.Bd3 Nf8 19.Be3 g6 20.hxg6 Nxg6 21.Rh5 Bc6 22.Bc2 Kb7 23.Rg4 a5 24.Bd1 Rd8 25.Bc2 Rdg8 26.Kd2
( 26.Kb2 Ka6 27.Rg3 a4 28.Bc1 Kb7 29.Bd2 Rd8 30.Be3 Rdg8 31.Bc1 Ka6 32.Bd2 Kb7 33.Ka3 Rd8 34.Be3 Rdg8 35.Bc1 Rg7 36.Be3 Rgg8 )
( 26.Kd1 )
( 26.Rxh6 Nxe5 )
26...a4
( 26...Nxe5 27.Rxg8 Nxc4+ 28.Kd3
( 28.Ke2 Rxg8 29.g3 )
28...Nb2+ 29.Ke2 Rxg8 30.Rxh6 Bb5+ 31.Kf3 Nd3 32.Bxd3 Bxd3 33.g3 Rd8 34.Bg5 Rd5 35.Bf6 Bc4 36.a3 Kc6 37.Ke3 Rd3+ 38.Ke4 Rd2 39.f3 Bd5+ 40.Kf4 )
27.Ke2 a3 28.f3
( 28.Rxh6 Nxe5 29.Rxg8 Rxg8 30.g3 Bf3+ 31.Ke1 Nxc4 )
28...Rd8 29.Ke1 Rd7 30.Bc1 Ra8 31.Ke2 Ba4 32.Be4+ Bc6
( 32...Ka7 33.Bxa8 Kxa8 34.Bxa3 Rd1 35.Kf2 Bc2 36.Rxh6 Nxe5 37.Rg8+ Kb7 38.Rh4 Bd3 39.Rd8 Rd2+ 40.Kg3 Rxa2 41.Bc1 Bxc4 42.Rh1 Nd3 43.Rd7+ Kc6 44.Rxf7 Rc2 45.Be3 Rxc3 )
33.Bxg6 fxg6 34.Rxg6 Ba4 35.Rxe6 Rd1 36.Bxa3 Ra1 37.Ke3 Bc2
( 37...Rxa2 38.Bc1 Re8 39.Rxe8 Bxe8 40.Rxh6 Rxg2 41.Bd2 Rg6 42.Rh8 Re6 43.f4 Bg6 44.Be1 Kc6 45.Bh4 Re8 46.Rh6 Re6 47.Bf6 Bf5 48.Kf3 Kd7 )
38.Re7+
( 38.Re7+ Ka6
( 38...Kb8 39.Rxh6 Bf5 40.Rxb6+ Kc8 41.Rf6 Rd1 42.Re8+ Kb7 43.Rxa8 Kxa8 44.Rxf5 )
39.Rxh6 Ka5 40.g4 Rxa2 41.Bc1 Bb3 42.Rh8 Ra6 43.Bd2 Bxc4 44.f4 Kb5 45.f5 R6a4 46.Rd8 Ra8 47.Rxa8 Rxa8 48.f6 Rf8 49.g5 Rf7 50.Re8 Rd7 51.g6 Rd3+ 52.Ke4 Rxd2 53.g7 Kc6 54.e6 Re2+ 55.Kf5 Bd3+ 56.Kg5 Rg2+ 57.Kf4 Rf2+ 58.Kg5 Rg2+ )
1-0

Ian Rout
16-11-2014, 10:00 AM
Oh the biggest blunder of this game was the press conference afterwards. Excruciating piece of repetitive pointless contractual-obligation bearbaiting. Scarcely an intelligent question asked. Should've been cut short with few if any questions about the blunder. Closet GM had some nice rants about it on Twitter calling them "pretend chess journos" and so on. Worse than reality television, The Bachelor possibly excepted.

On a related subject - is it just me or does anybody else watching the commentary get flashbacks to Viktor and Sveta on Fast Forward?

MichaelBaron
16-11-2014, 10:45 AM
Vishi did miss Nxe5 but to be fair, Carlsen had advantage throught the game so deserved to win more

Adamski
17-11-2014, 12:14 PM
Wow I have just seen the enormity of the double blunder. After the move Vishy missed 26...Nxe5!, ...Nc4+ would indeed have been a winning zwischenzug with the R left en prise!

MichaelBaron
17-11-2014, 03:48 PM
Wow I have just seen the enormity of the double blunder. After the move Vishy missed 26...Nxe5!, ...Nc4+ would indeed have been a winning zwischenzug with the R left en prise!

But overall, Carlsen did do more to deserve a win!

antichrist
17-11-2014, 05:32 PM
But overall, Carlsen did do more to deserve a win!

And did more to also deserve a loss - he got out of jail

Geelong Grizzle
17-11-2014, 09:44 PM
I don't know why Vishy, instead of playing 26...a4 then a3 and counterattacking on the Queenside, didn't just sit on his solid Kingside position. Magnus was probably trying to convince him that he was improving his own position by moving his Bishops and King around, but I seriously doubt that he was. I think the Vish just ran out of patience.

ER
17-11-2014, 11:27 PM
how do I get that Rook out of there?

Kevin Bonham
18-11-2014, 03:51 AM
Game so far, should be drawn soon.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5
Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. h3 Ke8 10. Nc3 h5 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Rad1 Be6 13. Ng5 Rh6
14. g3 Bxg5 15. Bxg5 Rg6 16. h4 f6 17. exf6 gxf6 18. Bf4 Nxh4 19. f3 Rd8
20. Kf2 Rxd1 21. Nxd1 Nf5 22. Rh1 Bxa2 23. Rxh5 Be6 24. g4 Nd6 25. Rh7 Nf7
26. Ne3 Kd8 27. Nf5 c5 28. Ng3 Ne5 29. Rh8+ Rg8 30. Bxe5 fxe5 31. Rh5 Bxg4
32. fxg4 Rxg4 33. Rxe5 b6 34. Ne4 Rh4 35. Ke2 Rh6 36. b3 Kd7 37. Kd2 Kc6
38. Nc3 a6 39. Re4 Rh2+ 40. Kc1 Rh1+ 41. Kb2 Rh6 42. Nd1 Rg6 43. Ne3 Rh6
44. Re7 Rh2 45. Re6+ Kb7 46. Kc3 Rh4 47. Kb2 Rh2 48. Nd5 Rd2 49. Nf6 Rf2
50. Kc3 Rf4 51. Ne4 Rh4 52. Nf2 Rh2 53. Rf6 Rh7 54. Nd3 Rh3 55. Kd2 Rh2+
56. Rf2 Rh4 57. c4 Rh3 58. Kc2 Rh7 59. Nb2 Rh5 60. Re2 Rg5 61. Nd1 b5 62.
Nc3 c6 63. Ne4 Rh5 64. Nf6 Rg5 65. Re7+ Kb6 66. Nd7+ Ka5 67. Re4 Rg2+ 68.
Kc1 Rg1+ 69. Kd2 Rg2+ 70. Ke1 bxc4 71. Rxc4 Rg3 72. Nxc5 Kb5 73. Rc2 a5 74.
Kf2 Rh3 75. Rc1 Kb4 76. Ke2 Rc3 77. Nd3+ Kxb3 78. Ra1 *

antichrist
18-11-2014, 04:31 AM
http://www.hindustantimes.com/sports-news/othersports/chess-live-carlsen-vs-anand-world-championship-game-7/article1-1287048.aspx

The Hindu Times site isn't too bad.

Kevin Bonham
18-11-2014, 11:34 AM
Game so far, should be drawn soon.

Or not soon. Carlsen pressed on til move 122 presumably in the hope of exhausting his opponent for today's game.

Garrett
18-11-2014, 12:28 PM
to be honest I've seen R+N Vs R pop up a few times and the stronger side does not just agree a draw straight away.

Kevin Bonham
18-11-2014, 12:39 PM
to be honest I've seen R+N Vs R pop up a few times and the stronger side does not just agree a draw straight away.

Carlsen beat L'Ami in it in 2011 - rather easily too - so that may have given him extra reason to give it a try.

Adamski
18-11-2014, 12:48 PM
So far Vishy is exceeding my expectations!

ER
18-11-2014, 01:24 PM
Carlsen beat L'Ami in it in 2011 - rather easily too - so that may have given him extra reason to give it a try.

Giving it a try combined with grinding down the older opponent's stamina is part of the general plan I think! Expect another marathon tonight! Anand will come out with all guns firing but not so easy to knock Magnus out fast!

antichrist
18-11-2014, 02:42 PM
Giving it a try combined with grinding down the older opponent's stamina is part of the general plan I think! Expect another marathon tonight! Anand will come out with all guns firing but not so easy to knock Magnus out fast!

Maybe part of Carlsen grinding him down last night was to leave him too tired for tonight to launch a strong, long and hard attack off white.

Jesper Norgaard
18-11-2014, 04:20 PM
Or not soon. Carlsen pressed on till move 122 presumably in the hope of exhausting his opponent for today's game.

I don't think that was the main reason, but it might have been an added benefit. He didn't stop winning attempts just because all pawns had been exchanged, but continued. He only stopped when he did not find moves to continue progress. I am sure if Anand had allowed him to drive his king to the eighth rank, Magnus would have continued in hope of further progress. When no further progress could be made, he decided to stop the game, even if he could have set a World Championship record up to 154 moves when Anand would surely have claimed the draw. The fact that he stopped only 2 moves short of the record shows he wasn't interested in that, perhaps not even aware of it, but only went after the position.

Here is the full game by the way:

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8
9. h3 Ke8 10. Nc3 h5 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Rad1 Be6 13. Ng5 Rh6 14. g3 Bxg5 15. Bxg5 Rg6 16. h4 f6
17. exf6 gxf6 18. Bf4 Nxh4 19. f3 Rd8 20. Kf2 Rxd1 21. Nxd1 Nf5 22. Rh1 Bxa2 23. Rxh5 Be6 24. g4 Nd6
25. Rh7 Nf7 26. Ne3 Kd8 27. Nf5 c5 28. Ng3 Ne5 29. Rh8+ Rg8 30. Bxe5 fxe5 31. Rh5 Bxg4 32. fxg4 Rxg4
33. Rxe5 b6 34. Ne4 Rh4 35. Ke2 Rh6 36. b3 Kd7 37. Kd2 Kc6 38. Nc3 a6 39. Re4 Rh2+ 40. Kc1 Rh1+
41. Kb2 Rh6 42. Nd1 Rg6 43. Ne3 Rh6 44. Re7 Rh2 45. Re6+ Kb7 46. Kc3 Rh4 47. Kb2 Rh2 48. Nd5 Rd2
49. Nf6 Rf2 50. Kc3 Rf4 51. Ne4 Rh4 52. Nf2 Rh2 53. Rf6 Rh7 54. Nd3 Rh3 55. Kd2 Rh2+ 56. Rf2 Rh4
57. c4 Rh3 58. Kc2 Rh7 59. Nb2 Rh5 60. Re2 Rg5 61. Nd1 b5 62. Nc3 c6 63. Ne4 Rh5 64. Nf6 Rg5
65. Re7+ Kb6 66. Nd7+ Ka5 67. Re4 Rg2+ 68. Kc1 Rg1+ 69. Kd2 Rg2+ 70. Ke1 bxc4 71. Rxc4 Rg3 72. Nxc5 Kb5
73. Rc2 a5 74. Kf2 Rh3 75. Rc1 Kb4 76. Ke2 Rc3 77. Nd3+ Kxb3 78. Ra1 Kc4 79. Nf2 Kb5 80. Rb1+ Kc4
81. Ne4 Ra3 82. Nd2+ Kd5 83. Rh1 a4 84. Rh5+ Kd4 85. Rh4+ Kc5 86. Kd1 Kb5 87. Kc2 Rg3 88. Ne4 Rg2+
89. Kd3 a3 90. Nc3+ Kb6 91. Ra4 a2 92. Nxa2 Rg3+ 93. Kc2 Rg2+ 94. Kb3 Rg3+ 95. Nc3 Rh3 96. Rb4+ Kc7
97. Rg4 Rh7 98. Kc4 Rf7 99. Rg5 Kb6 100. Na4+ Kc7 101. Kc5 Kd7 102. Kb6 Rf1 103. Nc5+ Ke7 104. Kxc6
With the last pawn captured White has until move 154 to checkmate his opponent. The clock starts ticking.
104...Rd1 105. Rg6 Kf7 106. Rh6 Rg1 107. Kd5 Rg5+ 108. Kd4 Rg6 109. Rh1 Rg2 110. Ne4 Ra2 111. Rf1+ Ke7
112. Nc3 Rh2 113. Nd5+ Kd6 114. Rf6+ Kd7 115. Nf4 Rh1 116. Rg6 Rd1+ 117. Nd3 Ke7 118. Ra6 Kd7
119. Ke4 Ke7 120. Rc6 Kd7 Clearly White has made no progress and he calls it a day. 121. Rc1 Rxc1
122. Nxc1 1/2-1/2

Kevin Bonham
18-11-2014, 10:29 PM
Oh dear. Nigel Short on Carlsen's opening:

"Looks like a typical condom variation from Magnus: to be used once and thrown away"

(antichrist is banned from responding to this post)

antichrist
19-11-2014, 12:35 AM
Game 8 draw, with opposite coloured bishop I was hoping White could have chances with opposition

Kevin Bonham
19-11-2014, 06:54 AM
Chessbase have a different view from Short and think game 8 will be theoretically important.

MichaelBaron
19-11-2014, 09:51 AM
Theoretically it is indeed important...but very boring game :)

Afitz
20-11-2014, 11:11 AM
For those who might be interested and who have access to it, ICC's coverage of game 9 tonight features our very own GM David Smerdon doing the commentary with GM Larry Christensen from the USA.

ER
20-11-2014, 11:06 PM
Early handshake tonight!
Now three games remaining with Vishy having the white pieces twice.
Still no reason to remove certain over-optimistic predictions from the poll!

Kevin Bonham
20-11-2014, 11:06 PM
Most of the games this match have been exciting but tonight we had a very dull 17 move draw with only a few moves out of theory. Oh well.

MichaelBaron
20-11-2014, 11:46 PM
Pity..Carlsen got out-prepared :(

Garrett
21-11-2014, 07:16 AM
pretty much exactly what Vishy would have wanted is my guess.

antichrist
21-11-2014, 07:47 AM
pretty much exactly what Vishy would have wanted is my guess.

Now for a win off white, he only played 20ish moves last night so should still be fresh

Kevin Bonham
21-11-2014, 10:43 AM
Early handshake tonight!
Now three games remaining with Vishy having the white pieces twice.
Still no reason to remove certain over-optimistic predictions from the poll!

Well Carlsen +3 (6.5-3.5) has just gone. Interesting nobody voted for 6-6, Carlsen wins tiebreak.

Ian Rout
21-11-2014, 12:55 PM
Well Carlsen +3 (6.5-3.5) has just gone. Interesting nobody voted for 6-6, Carlsen wins tiebreak.
Even if I was allowed to change I think I'd stick with my choice (Carlsen 6.5-5.5).

I don't think the draw in Game 9 was a surprise, though the quickness of it may be. Three draws to take a 6-5 score into the last game should suit everybody:

- Carlsen then needs only a draw, and even in the worst case gets to play tie-breaks.

- Anand would have the clarity of knowing where he stands, have a licence to do whatever it takes, and Carlsen didn't too well at his previous high-stakes last-round nailbiter, and moreover Anand would have exceeded expectations by running so close.

- to Carlsen's manager a one-point or five-point win earn the same prize this time, but creating expectations of a competitive match in 2016 will help boost the prize pool.

Kevin Bonham
21-11-2014, 01:11 PM
There's some debate about whether Carlsen fell asleep during game 8 or just looked like he did.

MichaelBaron
21-11-2014, 02:01 PM
There's some debate about whether Carlsen fell asleep during game 8 or just looked like he did.

Some even argue that but pretending to be asleep, he tried to intimidate his opponent...doubt it though

Kevin Bonham
21-11-2014, 10:37 PM
Giri is criticising Carlsen's choice of opening for game 10 already.

MichaelBaron
22-11-2014, 12:04 AM
Queens are off but still plenty of play!

Kevin Bonham
22-11-2014, 12:45 AM
Queens are off but still plenty of play!

Yes, unbalanced and tricky game so far. If it stays complex time could become a factor for Vishy.

Kevin Bonham
22-11-2014, 01:17 AM
Fizzed out pretty fast from there alas.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 Na6
8. Be2 c5 9. d5 e6 10. O-O exd5 11. exd5 Re8 12. Bg5 h6 13. Be3 Bf5 14.
Rad1 Ne4 15. Nxe4 Bxe4 16. Qc1 Qf6 17. Bxh6 Qxb2 18. Qxb2 Bxb2 19. Ng5 Bd4
20. Nxe4 Rxe4 21. Bf3 Re7 22. d6 Rd7 23. Bf4 Nb4 24. Rd2 Re8 25. Rc1 Re6
26. h4 Be5 27. Bxe5 Rxe5 28. Bxb7 Rxb7 29. d7 Nc6 30. d8=Q+ Nxd8 31. Rxd8+
Kg7 32. Rd2 1/2-1/2

Carlsen leads 5.5-4.5.

Capablanca-Fan
22-11-2014, 01:25 AM
Carlsen leads 5.5-4.5.
So my prediction Carlsen +3 (7-4) is off the table now.

ER
22-11-2014, 05:21 AM
So my prediction Carlsen +3 (7-4) is off the table now.

The Carlsen +3 (6.5-3.5) prediction should kindly exit the building as well!

Agent Smith
22-11-2014, 07:01 AM
Vishy is putting up a great fight in this WCC. Definitely out-prepared Magnus, and played solidly too.

Come on Magnus - a win will seal it now.

Agent Smith
22-11-2014, 07:23 AM
Rest day entertainment :) Walk through this game.
www.chess.com/forum/view/general/magnus-vs-anand-wcc-2014?page=104 (post 2063)

[Event "World Loser ship 2014"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0001.01.??"]
[Round "100"]
[White "Magnut Carlsohn"]
[Black "Wish-Weinachtsbaum Anand"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "866"]
[BlackElo "798"]
[FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]

1.h4 {the most accurate way of going straight into the "World War 2- Attack"} 1...h5 2.g4 g5 3.f4 f5 4.e4 e5 5.d4 d5 6.c4 c5 7.b4 b5 8.a4 a5 {until here they just played their preparatin moves really quickly. Worlds best engine " Computer-4-Impossible" gives black a slight advantage in this position, with which white is pretty happy.} 9.exf5 {?! going into the ww2 massacre} 9...dxc4 10.fxe5 cxd4 11.hxg5 axb4 12.gxh5 bxa4 {Magnut said in the press conference that he wasnt sure whether this is winning or completly losing for white. He explained that he thought YoLo before playing it.} 13.Kf2 Kd7 14.Kg2 Kc7 15.Kh2 Kb7 16.Ra3 Ka7 17.Rh3 Rh6 18.Bf4 Ra6 19.Bg3 Bc5 20.Qf3 Bb7 21.Nd2 Ne7 22.Bg2 Nbc6 23.Ne4 Nc8 24.Nf2 Nb6 25.Rh4 Bd6 26.Rh3 Bb8 27.Rh4 Qc7 28.Rh3 d3 29.h6 c3 30.g6 b3 31.f6 a3 32.e6 d2 33.g7 c2 34.h7 b2 35.f7 a2 36.e7 d1=N {?? a huge blunder. He could have just promoted to a queen because of the following line.}
( 36...d1=Q 37.e8=B c1=N 38.f8=B b1=R 39.g8=R a1=N 40.h8=N Qe2 41.Rg6 Qee7 42.Rd6 Qe1 43.Rd8 Nd5 44.Qe3+ Rab6 45.Rxd5 Nd3 46.Ra5+ Ba6 47.Bexc6 Rb5 48.Bc5 Qxf2 49.Nf7 Qxg1+ 50.Rxg1 Nc2 51.Qe8 Nf2 52.Bxb5 Ne3 53.Rxa6# {a forced checkmate line} )
37.e8=N c1=N 38.f8=N b1=N 39.g8=N a1=N 40.h8=N Ndc3 41.Nef6 Ncb3 42.Nfg6 Na3 43.Nh6 N1c2 44.N8f7 N2b4 45.Ng5 Ncb5 46.Nhg4 Nac4 47.Nf4 Nc5 48.N6h5 Bc8 49.N2d3 Qd8 50.Bf1 Kb7 51.Kg2 Kc7 52.Kf2 Kd7 53.Ke2 Ke8 54.Ke1 Bd6 55.Bf2 Bf8 56.Bd4 Nb8 57.Bb2 Ncd6 58.Bc1 Nf5 59.Qd1 Nh6 60.R3h2 Ng8 61.Ra2 R6a7 62.Ra1 Rh7 63.Nb2 Rh8 64.Nc4 Nc7 65.Nd2 N4c6 66.Nb1 N5e6 67.Nd3 Nce7 68.Ne3 N6d7 69.N5f3 Ng7 70.Ng3 Ngf5 71.Ne4 Ne6 72.Nd4 Nd6 {here white made a huge blunder} 73.Rh7 {??} 73...Rxh7 74.Ra7 {the last try but its hopeless} 74...Rxa7 75.Qh5+ Rxh5 76.Bh3 Rxh3 77.Ng2 Rxd3 78.Ne3 Rxd4 79.Nf3 Rxe4 80.Nc3 Rxe3+ 81.Kf1 Rxf3+ 82.Kg2 Rf1 83.Kg3 Rxc1 84.Ne2 Rcc7 85.Nf4 Kf7 86.Ne2 Nec5 87.Kg2 Ke6 88.Kf1 Bb7 89.Ke1 Be4 90.Kf2 Bg6 91.Ke3 Bf7 92.Kf2 Ngf6 93.Ke1 Ra5 94.Kd2 Nd3 95.Kd1 Rf5 96.Kd2 N3e5 97.Kd1 Rc5 98.Kd2 Rd5+ 99.Kc1 Qe8 100.Kb1 Nbc6 101.Nc3 Na7 102.Kb2 Nac6 103.Nb5 Nd8 104.Nc7# {A beautiful combination by Loser-champ Magnut Carlsohn!} 1-0

antichrist
22-11-2014, 10:05 AM
Magnut Carlsohn (866) vs. Wish-Weinachtsbaum Anand (798)
World Loser ship 2014 | Round 100 | Jan 1 | 1-0

This result of the lone knight mating a whole army happened to me 30 years ago by a Polish amateur in the hills of Byron - lucky was outside comp but have never forgotten the lesson and the shame. Of course I actually appreciate.

Kevin Bonham
22-11-2014, 10:53 AM
If Carlsen wins tomorrow night with white then the most common prediction was correct; otherwise it is defeated. (I agree with Ian that Carlsen probably won't want to go too hard with white and risk losing when it is better to just go into the last game safe from immediate elimination and needing only a draw.)

antichrist
22-11-2014, 11:22 AM
If Carlsen wins tomorrow night with white then the most common prediction was correct; otherwise it is defeated. (I agree with Ian that Carlsen probably won't want to go too hard with white and risk losing when it is better to just go into the last game safe from immediate elimination and needing only a draw.)

Because Anand is making a fight out of it I hope he is rewarded with a play off - good for chess too.

Kevin Bonham
22-11-2014, 01:44 PM
Because Anand is making a fight out of it I hope he is rewarded with a play off - good for chess too.

Good and bad. It's not ideal to have world championships decided in blitz, if it should come to that.

MichaelBaron
23-11-2014, 12:36 AM
Somehow I feel that Carlsen will stay in control in the remaining 2 games

Ian Rout
23-11-2014, 10:58 AM
So you're Black facing Carlsen tonight and he plays 1.e4. If you play something risky and lose you miss out on the chance with White in Round 12. If you play something safe and make a slight but losing inaccuracy you end the match without ever giving yourself a chance. Do you play

Option A: 1..c5 and 2...d6 intending, if allowed, a Najdorf.

Option B: 1..c5, other (expand).

Option C: The Berlin again, going for a draw and not thinking of winning, as it's worked so far.

Option D: The Petroff, to avoid going to the well once too often but still looking to draw.

Option E: The Caro-Kann, mainly looking to draw but keeping the position more fluid with potential to play for a win if the chance arises.

Option F: Other (expand).

Option G: Not applicable, Carlsen won't play 1.e4.

MichaelBaron
23-11-2014, 11:04 AM
So you're Black facing Carlsen tonight and he plays 1.e4. If you play something risky and lose you miss out on the chance with White in Round 12. If you play something safe and make a slight but losing inaccuracy you end the match without ever giving yourself a chance. Do you play

Option A: 1..c5 and 2...d6 intending, if allowed, a Najdorf.

Option B: 1..c5, other (expand).

Option C: The Berlin again, going for a draw and not thinking of winning, as it's worked so far.

Option D: The Petroff, to avoid going to the well once too often but still looking to draw.

Option E: The Caro-Kann, mainly looking to draw but keeping the position more fluid with potential to play for a win if the chance arises.

Option F: Other (expand).

Option G: Not applicable, Carlsen won't play 1.e4.

either A or G

Garvinator
23-11-2014, 11:23 AM
For the history buffs of the last 30 years of 'modern' chess, even if Game 11 is drawn, all is not over for Anand, two players have managed to win the final game and draw the match. Kasparov v Karpov in 1987 and Kramnik v Leko in 2004. Both players who had to win had white and Anand will have white again. Interestingly no player has had black in that situation.

But in 1987 and in 2004, those final games were for the match, and the knowledge that winning the final game and drawing the match would retain the world championship for the champion. In this match, for Anand all it will do is send the match into rapid playoffs.

Kevin Bonham
23-11-2014, 01:24 PM
For the history buffs of the last 30 years of 'modern' chess, even if Game 11 is drawn, all is not over for Anand, two players have managed to win the final game and draw the match. Kasparov v Karpov in 1987 and Kramnik v Leko in 2004. Both players who had to win had white and Anand will have white again. Interestingly no player has had black in that situation.

Noting your "last 30 years" comment, I believe this is the full history of players who needed to win the last scheduled game to avoid losing the contest for the title:

Steinitz 1892 needed to beat Chigorin with white to take the match into overtime, and did. He later won the match.
Alekhine 1935 needed to beat Euwe with black to tie the match and retain his title. He only drew.
Bronstein 1951 needed to beat Botvinnik with white to win the match otherwise Botvinnik retained. He only drew.
Smyslov 1954 needed to beat Botvinnik with black to win the match otherwise Botvinnik retained. He only drew.
Karpov 1985 needed to beat Kasparov with white to tie the match and retain his title. He lost.
Kasparov 1987 needed to beat Karpov with white to tie the match and retain his title. He won.
Kramnik 2004 needed to beat Leko with white to tie the match and retain his title. He won.

So the players with white in this situation have 3/5 and those with black 0/2. However the winning whites were all incumbent champions; there is no case yet of a challenger winning the final game on demand.

Lasker 1910 needed to beat Schlechter to tie the match and did, but it is widely disputed whether losing the match by one point would have cost him the title.

Ian Rout
23-11-2014, 02:51 PM
However the winning whites were all incumbent champions; there is no case yet of a challenger winning the final game on demand.
Though even a win to the challenger would not prevent the champion's retention of the title, so the game was only about the optics rather than the title. This also meant that the champion was under less stress than now, and also could consider a more forward defence strategy, and on the other side the challenger might be feeling a little deflated. In the modern rules the equation is the same whether it's the champion or challenger who leads.

Maybe the comparison should be with cases where the challenger needed to win the penultimate game to keep the match alive, or last round games where scores were tied, so the challenger needed a win and the champion a draw.

Cases from Candidates' matches might also be relevant since the stakes were lower but comparable (as was the length).

Kevin Bonham
23-11-2014, 02:54 PM
Though even a win to the challenger would not prevent the champion's retention of the title, so the game was only about the optics rather than the title.

I made a mistake when I wrote "losing the match" in that post. I've edited it to "losing the contest for the title". There were some cases where the match went to a final game but the title was already determined.

Ian Rout
23-11-2014, 03:15 PM
I made a mistake when I wrote "losing the match" in that post. I've edited it to "losing the contest for the title". There were some cases where the match went to a final game but the title was already determined.
Yes, I wasn't fully paying attention, those were cases of winning for the title. Though I think my point about comparisons with second-last games (to earn a last-round "tie-breaker") stands.

Garrett
23-11-2014, 03:49 PM
I'll go for option C.

Chris_Wallis
23-11-2014, 04:21 PM
Another relevant precedent for the final game situation in the event that tonight's game is drawn would be Anand - Karpov, 1998, in which Anand won the 6th and final classical game to tie the score 3-3, but then lost the rapid playoff - though that was hardly a credible world championship.

ER
23-11-2014, 04:40 PM
the Berlin wall 1e5 e5 2Nf3 Nc6 3Bc5 Nf6 etc

Garvinator
23-11-2014, 05:21 PM
Lasker 1910 needed to beat Schlechter to tie the match and did, but it is widely disputed whether losing the match by one point would have cost him the title.
I did refer to modern chess for a reason, to take out the return match criteria, which in some of those matches that are mentioned, the return match criteria was contained.

In the 1910 match I have quoted, it is speculated in some quarters, although not confirmed, that Schlechter thought the match had to be won by two games to be concluded, so was still pressing for a win in the final game, and hence lost.

Kevin Bonham
23-11-2014, 05:37 PM
In the 1910 match I have quoted, it is speculated in some quarters, although not confirmed, that Schlechter thought the match had to be won by two games to be concluded, so was still pressing for a win in the final game, and hence lost.

Yes and there is also speculation about the title hinging on a return match in the case of a narrow margin. I doubt that the controversy about the conditons of that match will ever be settled. If it really was a two-point requirement then Schlecter (rather than Lasker) would be the one in the must-win situation in the last game.

Geelong Grizzle
23-11-2014, 06:50 PM
Option F - Don't wait for the last game! Hit him when he's least expecting it. The Sicisillyline is going nowhere. It's time for Vishy to rip out the Scandinavian. Trust me Vish - Carlo won't be expecting that. Whip out your pieces, avoid exchanges, castle opposite sides, and the point's in the bag!
Sometimes chess is such a simple game. :) :wall:

ER
23-11-2014, 07:23 PM
Trust me Vish - Carlo won't be expecting that not anymore!!! you should've messaged Vishy privately. now too late! :) :P

Ian Rout
23-11-2014, 08:40 PM
Answering my own question, after some thought I lean to Option D:


Option D: The Petroff, to avoid going to the well once too often but still looking to draw.

Anand must have a reserve safe opening and he doesn't need to worry about keeping it up his sleeve any more. The Berlin has been effective at GM level for some time but can it really be true that you can keep playing it against a prepared World Champion and draw every time? - if so then chess is halfway to being solved. And it's suggestive that after winning Game 2, Carlsen has not repeated 4.d3; this would not be the time to check out what he's been saving.

For a shock-and-awe option maybe the Schliemann. Not holding my breath, but I'd rate it more likely than the Scandinavian.

ER
23-11-2014, 10:04 PM
the Berlin wall 1e5 e5 2Nf3 Nc6 3Bc5 Nf6 etc

told you so, now watch and learn! ;) :)

ER
23-11-2014, 10:09 PM
I don't like this ... c5 business though!

Kevin Bonham
23-11-2014, 10:35 PM
14...Be6 and we have a new position for the first time; wouldn't be too surprised if it transposed back though.

antichrist
23-11-2014, 10:50 PM
Isn't Anand playing a shocker, like an amateur? Hope I am wrong

Geelong Grizzle
23-11-2014, 11:32 PM
Eh? What have you been sniffing? Move 19 and it's pretty well dead equal. Vishy will be happy with that.

Kevin Bonham
24-11-2014, 01:26 AM
Isn't Anand playing a shocker, like an amateur? Hope I am wrong

You rarely have a clue about these games because you try to analyse them using oversimplified principles suitable for 1500s-level hacking about but these guys are way above that and know a lot of the exceptions that can be made early in the game. If either of them lose it won't be for the reasons you say.

Anyway we have some excitement with Anand sacking the exchange, apparently unnecessarily if all he wanted was a draw. Perhaps he wants to risk and try for more!

Kevin Bonham
24-11-2014, 01:40 AM
Exchange sac not scrubbing up too well for Vishy at the moment!

ER
24-11-2014, 01:45 AM
at this stage and after Nxc7 I concede on behalf of GM Anand and congratulate World Champion Magnus Carlsen and his followers. time to bed. goodnight!
well time to bed anyway! :P

Kevin Bonham
24-11-2014, 01:59 AM
Carlsen wins and retains his title 6.5-4.5. It seems that for once Anand's love of complications led him astray in this game since 27...Rb4 was unnecessary (though not necessarily bad by itself.) Or he may have just misjudged the position as more difficult than it was.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.h3 Bd7 10.Nc3 h6 11.b3 Kc8 12.Bb2 c5 13.Rad1 b6 14.Rfe1 Be6 15.Nd5 g5 16.c4 Kb7 17.Kh2 a5 18.a4 Ne7 19.g4 Ng6 20.Kg3 Be7 21.Nd2 Rhd8 22.Ne4 Bf8 23.Nef6 b5 24.Bc3 bxa4 25.bxa4 Kc6 26.Kf3 Rdb8 27.Ke4 Rb4 28.Bxb4 cxb4 29.Nh5 Kb7 30.f4 gxf4 31.Nhxf4 Nxf4 32.Nxf4 Bxc4 33.Rd7 Ra6 34.Nd5 Rc6 35.Rxf7 Bc5 36.Rxc7+ Rxc7 37.Nxc7 Kc6 38.Nb5 Bxb5 39.axb5+ Kxb5 40.e6 b3 41.Kd3 Be7 42.h4 a4 43.g5 hxg5 44.hxg5 a3 45.Kc3 1-0

pax
24-11-2014, 02:01 AM
Chesschat successfully predicts the margin!

Kevin Bonham
24-11-2014, 02:07 AM
Chesschat successfully predicts the margin!

Pretty amusing that that happened even despite needing a win in this game to do it.

Anand has said he saw ...Rb3 as about equal and that ...Rb4 was a bad gamble.

Capablanca-Fan
24-11-2014, 04:50 AM
Pretty amusing that that happened even despite needing a win in this game to do it.

Anand has said he saw ...Rb3 as about equal and that ...Rb4 was a bad gamble.

Seems strange not to take the equality with Black and play all-out with White the next game.

Agent Smith
24-11-2014, 06:05 AM
I think Magnus's recent settling for draws - to make Vishy having to force the issue - paid off.

Congrats to both of them. And lets hope to god Vishy doesnt win the next candidates. :)

Desmond
24-11-2014, 06:05 AM
Apparently despite losing the match Anand has performed above rating and will actually take a rating point off Carlsen for the match!

MichaelBaron
24-11-2014, 09:27 AM
Not a superconvincing effort but Carlsen overall...but somehow I feel that throughout the match he was in control

Igor_Goldenberg
24-11-2014, 10:37 AM
Carlsen had a "champions luck". In last two games that Anand lost he missed wining chances (especially in game 6!). Despite Anand playing this match much better then the previous one, Carlsen proved to simply be a better player.

Igor_Goldenberg
24-11-2014, 10:44 AM
Chesspro commentary suggested 26... Bg7 27.Nh5 Bh8 28.Ke4 Re8! 29.Nhf6 Rb8 with the idea of 30...Rb4.
The main point is that bishop should've gone to h8, threatening exchange on f6 to activate black's light-square bishop. Then black would've had strong initiative.

However, shouldve/wouldve does not cut out for determining the strongest player.

antichrist
24-11-2014, 10:57 AM
http://www.hindustantimes.com/sports-news/othersports/live-anand-vs-carlsen-world-chess-championship-game-11/article1-1289274.aspx

They have Anand even being slightly advantageous in some later stages before the exchange. Whereas for beginner hacks like myself a blocked in rook is deathknell.

flushfyre
24-11-2014, 11:51 AM
Is there an archive with all video feeds for the 11 rounds, including commentary by Svidler/Guramishvili/Nepomniachtchi? On the chess24 website I can only find whatever has been left there from last round.

Kevin Bonham
24-11-2014, 12:39 PM
I think Anand missing Carlsen's blunder in game 6 was the key point of the whole match. If Anand had seen that and won the game Carlsen would have been in a difficult place psychologically as well as being one point behind with six to play (instead of, as it turned out, one ahead.) That moment was most likely a two-point turnaround in the expected score from that game alone and perhaps even more in its influence on other games. So I'll remember the match as a closer one than the +2 scoreline indicates.

Capablanca-Fan
24-11-2014, 01:40 PM
I think Anand missing Carlsen's blunder in game 6 was the key point of the whole match. If Anand had seen that and won the game Carlsen would have been in a difficult place psychologically as well as being one point behind with six to play (instead of, as it turned out, one ahead.) That moment was most likely a two-point turnaround in the expected score from that game alone and perhaps even more in its influence on other games. So I'll remember the match as a closer one than the +2 scoreline indicates.

All the same, as MB said, this was a game where Carlsen made most of the running, and the double blunder made the game go back on its logical course.

Agent Smith
24-11-2014, 01:59 PM
Rtng Ti Age Nat Score 12345678901 Perf Chg
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1: Carlsen, Magnus 2863 gm 24 NOR 6.5 / 11 =10==1====1 2857 -1 (+3 -1 =7)
2: Anand, Viswanathan 2792 gm 45 IND 4.5 / 11 =01==0====0 2798 +1 (+1 -3 =7)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
11 games: +4 -0 =7

Carlsen (6.5-4.5) : Adamski, Kevin Bonham, Max Illingworth, pax, Qbert, road runner, stevenaaus

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/11/24/norwegian-carlsen-world-chess-champ

The 23-year-old world number one beat India's Anand .... in two of 11 games of the competition, with the others ending in draws. [laugh]

"Overall, throughout the match, Carlsen played better than I did," Anand was quoted as saying by TASS.
"I tried, but the risk didn't work out. Carlsen didn't make a mistake. I had nothing left to do but take risks."


D*mn those facts are tricky things :)
http://www.thelocal.no/20141123/world-chess-champs-calsen-wins-title

On his way to the title, Carlsen beat Anand twice, lost once, and drew five times.

Kevin Bonham
24-11-2014, 02:05 PM
AAP again. Notoriously error-prone in my experience.

Adamski
25-11-2014, 07:14 AM
Congratulations to Magnus and all of us who correctly picked the margin.

Garvinator
25-11-2014, 09:20 AM
I think Anand missing Carlsen's blunder in game 6 was the key point of the whole match. If Anand had seen that and won the game Carlsen would have been in a difficult place psychologically as well as being one point behind with six to play (instead of, as it turned out, one ahead.) That moment was most likely a two-point turnaround in the expected score from that game alone and perhaps even more in its influence on other games. So I'll remember the match as a closer one than the +2 scoreline indicates.

I think in match 1, game 3 was a key turning point, Anand failing to take his chance there and grab an early lead. A 1-0 early lead as champion would have had a big effect on the course of the whole match. In the return match, game 6 was the key point. Even though others can key oh Carlsen was playing the better etc etc, chess is about taking those small opportunities when they exist. World Championships are won and lost on those. Had Anand found that critical, and what should have been easy to find variation, it would have been changed the whole course of the match.

Agent Smith
27-11-2014, 07:20 PM
https://chess24.com/en/read/news/caruana-on-carlsen-anand-and-much-more


[Re game 11] But how would you explain the move 27…Rb4?

Caruana - Well, that’s probably a move you’d like to make in blitz.

Why not make a draw in that game and take your chances in the final game, with the white pieces?

Caruana - Vishy probably didn’t believe in the possibility of beating Magnus in the deciding game. In fact the only time he managed to win in the match it occurred due to Carlsen choosing a terrible variation. In the remaining games he didn’t come close and, it seems, he didn’t really believe in his chances of succeeding in the final encounter.

Can you explain your streak in St. Louis? Changes in your personal life, or just one of those things that happens?

Caruana - I arrived there after the Tromsø Olympiad ill and with a broken computer, so I wasn’t expecting anything good. I’m not superstitious, but on the plane to the US the person next to me turned out to be the World Champion in some kind of cowboy sport. When I told him I was heading for a chess tournament he replied: “If you want you’ll win it!”

Agent Smith
29-11-2014, 04:42 PM
About his short draw with White in game 9, Carlsen -

Anand was well prepared with the black pieces. So it was not a shocker that in one of the games I would have to shut it down after the opening. It wasn’t my finest hour, clearly, but I thought after the opening I had to make an objective evaluation of the position and I didn’t think that I had much to play for and I decided to shut it down.
http://en.chessbase.com/post/carlsen-interview-after-the-match

Geelong Grizzle
30-11-2014, 08:55 PM
Translation: I'm fairly confident I can at least draw the last 3 games - Vishy just doesn't have the weapons to consistently trouble me.

MichaelBaron
04-12-2014, 09:41 AM
Carlsen revealed in his post-match interviews that he was sick during the 2nd part of the match. That possibly explains why he sometimes played well below his best.

antichrist
04-12-2014, 11:19 AM
Carlsen revealed in his post-match interviews that he was sick during the 2nd part of the match. That possibly explains why he sometimes played well below his best.

I agree here. I pointed him out to my better half and she thought what? that is the world champ flopping over everywhere