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Garvinator
08-03-2014, 03:22 PM
http://en.chessbase.com/post/2014-candidates-preview-players-event-and-schedules

No thread up so far. So time to create one. Candidates tournament starts in five days. Poll attached, start voting. Winner of candidate tournament challenges Magnus Carlsen for the world title.

Kevin Bonham
08-03-2014, 04:23 PM
Didn't realise it was so close. Have put the mockers on Lev.

Saragossa
11-03-2014, 03:39 PM
Kramnik, Baby! Bring it home!

Agent Smith
11-03-2014, 08:31 PM
I'm wondering if Vishy would actually want to win this tournament even if he could.
Magnus gave him a bit of a mauling the last time.

Garvinator
11-03-2014, 08:44 PM
I'm wondering if Vishy would actually want to win this tournament even if he could.
Magnus gave him a bit of a mauling the last time.
The World Championship Match would also likely be held in Norway this time, instead of India.

Capablanca-Fan
12-03-2014, 12:02 AM
I'm wondering if Vishy would actually want to win this tournament even if he could.
Magnus gave him a bit of a mauling the last time.

Well, Botvinnik wanted a return match after Smyslov (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=54198)and Tal (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=54299) gave him a mauling, by 3 and 4 points respectively.

Qbert
12-03-2014, 11:00 AM
Aronian's play at Wijk Aan Zee seemed tailored to win this event

Adamski
13-03-2014, 06:32 AM
If Lev plays at his best he should win.

Ian Rout
13-03-2014, 04:30 PM
I didn't get around to voting on this but I maybe lean a little to Kramnik on the basis of winning more big events in his career.

An important point is that it's a tournament so players don't need to beat anyone in particular. If one of the six "outsiders" can, e.g., get +5 against the others and limit the damage to -1 against the Big Two that will be close to good enough. The first half of that equation is not ridiculous if the outsiders all think the same thing and are prepared to take risks against each other. On that basis Topalov in particular could be the best pick for a dark horse.

Goughfather
13-03-2014, 05:58 PM
Pity that Caruana and Nakamura aren't part of the tournament.

Kevin Bonham
13-03-2014, 06:54 PM
Round 1

Andreikin - Kramnik
Karjakin - Svidler
Mamedyarov - Topalov
Anand - Aronian

ER
13-03-2014, 08:23 PM
Good on you Jamie!

Moscow, 3 February 2014


Mr. Jamie Kenmure,


Dear Mr. Kenmure:

As you are aware, the FIDE Candidates’ Tournament is scheduled to be held in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia, from 11 March to 1 April 2014. This event is of great importance for the world-wide projection of the image of FIDE.

In this connection, I am writing to inform you that I have approved your appointment as Arbiter of the event.

I am counting very much on your acceptance and wish you every success in this crucial assignment.

Yours sincerely,


Kirsan Ilyumzhinov
President

Agent Smith
13-03-2014, 10:58 PM
http://www.chess.com/blog/smarterchess/candidates-tournament-2014-odds

Aronian (3.25)
Kramnik (4)
Topalov (6)
Anand (7.5)
Karjakin (9)
Mamedyarov (10)
Andreikin (15)
Svidler (15)

Kevin Bonham
13-03-2014, 11:06 PM
Bad start for Aronian, losing to Anand who was not supposed to be all that motivated!

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 O-O 8.h3 Bb7 9.d3 d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nbd2 Qd7 12.Nxe5 Nxe5 13.Rxe5 Nf6 14.Re1 Rae8 15.Nf3 Bd6 16.Be3 Re7 17.d4 Rfe8 18.c3 h6 19.Ne5 Bxe5 20.dxe5 Rxe5 21.Qxd7 Nxd7 22.Red1 Nf6 23.c4 c6 24.Rac1 R5e7 25.a4 bxc4 26.Bxc4 Nd5 27.Bc5 Re4 28.f3 R4e5 29.Kf2 Bc8 30.Bf1 R5e6 31.Rd3 Nf4 32.Rb3 Rd8 33.Be3 Nd5 34.Bd2 Nf6 35.Ba5 Rde8 36.Rb6 Re5 37.Bc3 Nd5 38.Bxe5 Nxb6 39.Bd4 Nxa4 40.Rxc6 Rd8 41.Rc4 Bd7 42.b3 Bb5 43.Rb4 Nb2 44.Bxb5 axb5 45.Ke3 Re8+ 46.Kd2 Rd8 47.Kc3 1-0

The curse of being tipped by me in a poll strikes again.

Desmond
14-03-2014, 06:19 AM
Congratulations Jamie!

lost
14-03-2014, 03:57 PM
Thank you to everyone in the chess community for there congratulations.

lost

Agent Smith
14-03-2014, 06:22 PM
I voted for Kramnik, but i'd like to see Lev or Karjakin win.
It's a long tournament - double round robin, 14 rounds - so fatigue will probably come into it.

Agent Smith
16-03-2014, 06:19 AM
Rest day tomorrow i think.
Anand is easily the oldest one here, and is leading. Kramnik lucky to escape with a draw in the 3rd round

1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 gm 45 IND 2.5 / 3 X . . = 1 . . 1 3063 +11 (+2 -0 =1)
2: Svidler, Peter 2758 gm 38 RUS 2.0 / 3 . X = . . 1 = . 2879 +5 (+1 -0 =2)
3: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 gm 39 RUS 2.0 / 3 . = X . . = 1 . 2869 +3 (+1 -0 =2)
4: Topalov, Veselin 2785 gm 39 BUL 1.5 / 3 = . . X = . . = 2785 +0 (+0 -0 =3)
5: Aronian, Levon 2830 gm 32 ARM 1.5 / 3 0 . . = X . . 1 2770 -3 (+1 -1 =1)
6: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 gm 24 RUS 1.0 / 3 . 0 = . . X = . 2645 -2 (+0 -1 =2)
7: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 gm 24 RUS 1.0 / 3 . = 0 . . = X . 2626 -6 (+0 -1 =2)
8: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 gm 29 AZE 0.5 / 3 0 . . = 0 . . X 2522 -8 (+0 -2 =1)

Capablanca-Fan
16-03-2014, 08:51 AM
Pity that Caruana and Nakamura aren't part of the tournament.

Indeed, why aren't they?

Bill Gletsos
16-03-2014, 04:15 PM
Indeed, why aren't they?They didn't qualify.

Qualifiers were determined as follows:

The top two finishers in the FIDE Grand Prix 2012–13 - Topalov & Mamedyarov
The top two finishers in the Chess World Cup 2013 - Kramnik & Andreikin
The next two highest rated players who played in the Chess World Cup 2013 or the FIDE Grand Prix 2012–13 (average FIDE rating on the 12 monthly lists from August 2012 to July 2013) - Aronian & Karjakin
Loser of the World Chess Championship 2013 match - Anand
Organizing committee's nominee (FIDE rating in July 2013 at least 2725) - Svidler

Agent Smith
18-03-2014, 06:47 AM
I like the line up and qualifying criteria.

Chess is a hard game to promote, so giving the promoters/organisers a wildcard of their choice seems very reasonable to me.

After Round 4 , Aronian is 2/2 with White now.
Kramnik threatened to bust Vishy up, but had to settle for a draw by repetition.


1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 gm 45 IND 3.0 / 4 X 1 = = . . 1 . 2982 +11 (+2 -0 =2)
2: Aronian, Levon 2830 gm 32 ARM 2.5 / 4 0 X . = 1 . 1 . 2862 +2 (+2 -1 =1)
3: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 gm 39 RUS 2.5 / 4 = . X . = 1 . = 2845 +3 (+1 -0 =3)
4: Topalov, Veselin 2785 gm 39 BUL 2.0 / 4 = = . X . = = . 2780 +0 (+0 -0 =4)
5: Svidler, Peter 2758 gm 38 RUS 2.0 / 4 . 0 = . X = . 1 2773 +1 (+1 -1 =2)
6: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 gm 24 RUS 1.5 / 4 . . 0 = = X . = 2672 -5 (+0 -1 =3)
7: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 gm 29 AZE 1.5 / 4 0 0 . = . . X 1 2686 -4 (+1 -2 =1)
8: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 gm 24 RUS 1.0 / 4 . . = . 0 = 0 X 2574 -6 (+0 -2 =2)

Kevin Bonham
18-03-2014, 12:11 PM
Posts moved

Most posts discussing qualifying criteria have been moved here:

http://www.chesschat.org/showthread.php?15270-FIDE-Candidates-qualifying-criteria&p=375761

Ian Rout
18-03-2014, 03:59 PM
After Round 4 , Aronian is 2/2 with White now.
Kramnik threatened to bust Vishy up, but had to settle for a draw by repetition.


1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 gm 45 IND 3.0 / 4 X 1 = = . . 1 . 2982 +11 (+2 -0 =2)
2: Aronian, Levon 2830 gm 32 ARM 2.5 / 4 0 X . = 1 . 1 . 2862 +2 (+2 -1 =1)
3: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 gm 39 RUS 2.5 / 4 = . X . = 1 . = 2845 +3 (+1 -0 =3)
4: Topalov, Veselin 2785 gm 39 BUL 2.0 / 4 = = . X . = = . 2780 +0 (+0 -0 =4)
5: Svidler, Peter 2758 gm 38 RUS 2.0 / 4 . 0 = . X = . 1 2773 +1 (+1 -1 =2)
6: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 gm 24 RUS 1.5 / 4 . . 0 = = X . = 2672 -5 (+0 -1 =3)
7: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 gm 29 AZE 1.5 / 4 0 0 . = . . X 1 2686 -4 (+1 -2 =1)
8: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 gm 24 RUS 1.0 / 4 . . = . 0 = 0 X 2574 -6 (+0 -2 =2)

An exceptionally trivial point (at this stage) is that Svidler and Mamedyarov are in fact 4th and 6th respectively on tie-break.

Agent Smith
18-03-2014, 05:55 PM
An exceptionally trivial point (at this stage) is that Svidler and Mamedyarov are in fact 4th and 6th respectively on tie-break.

Hmm - they are using victories ahead of S-B scores as the tiebreak. I should code that option into Scid vs. PC. Cheers.

Agent Smith
19-03-2014, 06:17 AM
Rtng Ti Age Nat Score (Tie) A A S K M T K A Perf Chg
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 gm 45 IND 3.5 / 5 8.25 X 1 . = 1 = . = 2922 +11 (+2 -0 =3)
2: Aronian, Levon 2830 gm 32 ARM 3.0 / 5 7.50 0 X 1 = 1 = . . 2843 +1 (+2 -1 =2)
3: Svidler, Peter 2758 gm 38 RUS 3.0 / 5 6.00 . 0 X = . 1 = 1 2847 +7 (+2 -1 =2)
4: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 gm 39 RUS 3.0 / 5 7.50 = = = X . . 1 = 2838 +4 (+1 -0 =4)
5: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 gm 29 AZE 2.0 / 5 3.50 0 0 . . X = = 1 2700 -4 (+1 -2 =2)
6: Topalov, Veselin 2785 gm 39 BUL 2.0 / 5 5.25 = = 0 . = X = . 2704 -6 (+0 -1 =4)
7: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 gm 24 RUS 2.0 / 5 4.25 . . = 0 = = X = 2687 -6 (+0 -1 =4)
8: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 gm 24 RUS 1.5 / 5 4.25 = . 0 = 0 . = X 2618 -6 (+0 -2 =3)

Tiebreaks are now on wins first ... but the crosstable at http://candidates2014.fide.com/standings/ seems at odds ?

Kramnik definitely missed a win in a complicated game.

[Event "FIDE Candidates Tournament 2014"]
[Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"]
[Date "2014.03.18"]
[Round "5.2"]
[White "Kramnik, Vladimir"]
[Black "Aronian, Levon"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2787"]
[BlackElo "2830"]
[ECO "E10"]
[EventDate "2014.03.13"]
[PlyCount "120"]
[SourceDate "2014.01.04"]
[Annotator "Critter 1.6a 64-bit"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.e3 b6 5.Nc3 Bb7 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Bb5+ c6 8.Bd3 Be7 9.O-O O-O 10.b3 Nbd7 { Last book move (Elo2400) +0.17} 11.Bb2 {+0.25} 11...Re8 {+0.20} 12.Ne5 {+0.14} 12...Bd6 {+0.36} 13.f4 {+0.39} 13...c5 {+0.37} 14.Qf3 {+0.33} 14...cxd4 {+0.39} 15.exd4 {+0.39} 15...Bb4 {+0.62} 16.Ne2 {+0.16} 16...Ne4 {+0.16} 17.a3 {+0.11} 17...Bf8 {+0.19} 18.Rad1 {-0.02} 18...a6 {+0.04} 19.a4 {+0.00} 19...Rc8 {+0.00} 20.Qh5 {+0.08} 20...g6 {+0.07} 21.Qh3 {+0.07} 21...Ndf6 {+0.25} 22.f5 {+0.20} 22...g5 {+0.35} 23.Ng3 {+0.41} 23...b5 {+0.43} 24.axb5 {+0.48} 24...Qb6 {+0.35} 25.Kh1 {+0.59} 25...axb5 {+0.63} 26.Bxe4 {+0.64} 26...dxe4 {+0.61} 27.d5 {+0.57} 27...e3 {+0.58} 28.Ng4 {+0.76} 28...Nxg4 {+1.19} 29.Qxg4 {+0.83} 29...h6 {+0.85} 30.Ne4 {+0.93} 30...Rc2 {+0.93} 31.Nf6+ {+0.84} 31...Qxf6 {+0.91} 32.Bxf6 {+0.91} 32...e2 {+0.81} 33.Bxg5 $201 {+0.81} 33...Bxd5 $6 $16 {+2.31 / +0.81}
( 33...hxg5 34.Qxg5+ Kh7 35.Qh5+ Kg8 36.Qg4+ Kh8 37.f6 exd1=Q 38.Qh4+ Kg8 39.Rxd1 Ree2 40.Qg5+ Kh7 41.Qf5+ Kh8 42.Qh3+ Kg8 43.Qg4+ Kh8 44.Qg3 Rxg2 45.Qxg2 Rxg2 46.Kxg2 Bd6 47.Kf3 Bxh2 48.Ke4 Kg8 $14 )
34.Bxh6+ {+1.86} 34...Kh7 $201 {+1.93} 35.Bxf8 $6 $10 {+0.43 / +1.93}
( 35.Rg1 Bxh6
( 35...exd1=Q 36.Qxd1 )
36.Rde1 Bxb3 37.f6 Re5 38.Qd4 Re3 39.Qd7 Kg6 40.Qg4+ Kxf6 41.Rgf1+ exf1=Q+ 42.Rxf1+ Ke7 43.Qh4+ Kd7 44.Qxh6 )
35...exf1=Q+ {+0.43} 36.Rxf1 {+0.44} 36...Rxg2 {+0.44} 37.Qxg2 {+0.40} 37...Bxg2+ {+0.41} 38.Kxg2 {+0.41} 38...Rxf8 {+0.41} 39.Kf3 {+0.39} 39...Kg7 {+0.40} 40.Ke4 {+0.20} 40...Rh8 {+0.23} 41.Kd4 {+0.35} 41...Rc8 {+0.39} 42.Rf4 {+0.35} 42...Kf6 {+0.36} 43.h4 {+0.32} 43...Re8 {+0.48} 44.Kc5 {+0.55} 44...Re5+ {+0.67} 45.Kd6 {+0.35} 45...Re3 {+0.31} 46.Rb4 {+0.52} 46...Kxf5 {+0.44} 47.Rxb5+ {+0.44} 47...Kg4 {+0.44} 48.h5 {+0.08} 48...f5 49.h6 Rh3 50.Ke5 Rxh6 51.Rb4+ Kf3 52.Kxf5 Ke3 53.Ke5 Kd3 54.Rb8 Kc3 55.b4 Kc4 56.Rb7 Rh5+ 57.Kd6 Rh6+ 58.Kd7 Rh7+ 59.Kc6 Rxb7 60.Kxb7 Kxb4 1/2-1/2

Ian Rout
19-03-2014, 07:57 AM
Tiebreaks are now on wins first ... but the crosstable at http://candidates2014.fide.com/standings/ seems at odds ?

I think the issue is that the first tie-break is head-to-head - hence in the A/K/S "round robin" Kramnik is ahead of Svidler.

Adamski
19-03-2014, 10:39 PM
Good on you Jamie!

Moscow, 3 February 2014


Mr. Jamie Kenmure,


Dear Mr. Kenmure:

As you are aware, the FIDE Candidates’ Tournament is scheduled to be held in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia, from 11 March to 1 April 2014. This event is of great importance for the world-wide projection of the image of FIDE.

In this connection, I am writing to inform you that I have approved your appointment as Arbiter of the event.

I am counting very much on your acceptance and wish you every success in this crucial assignment.

Yours sincerely,


Kirsan Ilyumzhinov
President

Congratulations, Jamie! How many arbiters are there?

Kevin Bonham
19-03-2014, 11:31 PM
This would be rather painful for Kramnik:

Topalov, Veselin (2785) - Kramnik, Vladimir (2787)
FIDE Candidates 2014 Khanty-Mansiysk RUS (6.1), 2014.03.19

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 O-O 6.e3 Nbd7 7.c5 Nh5 8.Be5 c6 9.Bd3 g6 10.h4 f5 11.Bh2 b6 12.b4 f4 13.O-O a5 14.b5 bxc5 15.bxc6 Nb8 16.Bb5 Ba6 17.a4 Qc8 18.dxc5 Nxc6 19.Nxd5 exd5 20.Qxd5+ Kh8 21.Qxc6 Qxc6 22.Bxc6 Rac8 23.Bb5 Bxb5 24.axb5 Bxc5 25.Rxa5 fxe3 26.fxe3 Bxe3+ 27.Kh1 Rc2 28.Rb1 Rfc8 29.Raa1 Bb6 30.Be5+ Kg8 31.Ra6 Be3 32.b6 Rc1+ 33.Rxc1 Rxc1+ 34.Kh2 Rb1 35.g4 Bf4+ 36.Kg2 Bxe5 37.Nxe5 Nf4+ 38.Kf3 Ne6 39.b7 Rb3+ 40.Kf2 Rb2+ 41.Ke3 1-0

Svidler also lost, Anand drew, Aronian is trying to beat Andreikin in a rook ending that would move him up to equal leader.

Capablanca-Fan
20-03-2014, 12:37 PM
[Event "FIDE Candidates Tournament 2014"]
[Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"]
[Date "2014.03.18"]
[Round "5.2"]
[White "Kramnik, Vladimir"]
[Black "Aronian, Levon"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2787"]
[BlackElo "2830"]
[ECO "E10"]
[EventDate "2014.03.13"]
[PlyCount "120"]
[SourceDate "2014.01.04"]
[Annotator "Critter 1.6a 64-bit"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.e3 b6 5.Nc3 Bb7 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Bb5+ c6 8.Bd3 Be7 9.O-O O-O 10.b3 Nbd7 { Last book move (Elo2400) +0.17} 11.Bb2 {+0.25} 11...Re8 {+0.20} 12.Ne5 {+0.14} 12...Bd6 {+0.36} 13.f4 {+0.39} 13...c5 {+0.37} 14.Qf3 {+0.33} 14...cxd4 {+0.39} 15.exd4 {+0.39} 15...Bb4 {+0.62} 16.Ne2 {+0.16} 16...Ne4 {+0.16} 17.a3 {+0.11} 17...Bf8 {+0.19} 18.Rad1 {-0.02} 18...a6 {+0.04} 19.a4 {+0.00} 19...Rc8 {+0.00} 20.Qh5 {+0.08} 20...g6 {+0.07} 21.Qh3 {+0.07} 21...Ndf6 {+0.25} 22.f5 {+0.20} 22...g5 {+0.35} 23.Ng3 {+0.41} 23...b5 {+0.43} 24.axb5 {+0.48} 24...Qb6 {+0.35} 25.Kh1 {+0.59} 25...axb5 {+0.63} 26.Bxe4 {+0.64} 26...dxe4 {+0.61} 27.d5 {+0.57} 27...e3 {+0.58} 28.Ng4 {+0.76} 28...Nxg4 {+1.19} 29.Qxg4 {+0.83} 29...h6 {+0.85} 30.Ne4 {+0.93} 30...Rc2 {+0.93} 31.Nf6+ {+0.84} 31...Qxf6 {+0.91} 32.Bxf6 {+0.91} 32...e2 {+0.81} 33.Bxg5 $201 {+0.81} 33...Bxd5 $6 $16 {+2.31 / +0.81}
[33...hxg5 34.Qxg5+ Kh7 35.Qh5+ Kg8 36.Qg4+ Kh8 37.f6 exd1=Q 38.Qh4+ Kg8 39.Rxd1 Ree2 40.Qg5+ Kh7 41.Qf5+ Kh8 42.Qh3+ Kg8 43.Qg4+ Kh8 44.Qg3 Rxg2 45.Qxg2 Rxg2 46.Kxg2 Bd6 47.Kf3 Bxh2 48.Ke4 Kg8]
34.Bxh6+ {+1.86} 34...Kh7 $201 {+1.93} 35.Bxf8 [35.Rg1 Bxh6
(35...exd1=Q 36.Qxd1)
36.Rde1 Bxb3 37.f6 Re5 38.Qd4 Re3 39.Qd7 Kg6 40.Qg4+ Kxf6 41.Rgf1+ exf1=Q+ 42.Rxf1+ Ke7 43.Qh4+ Kd7 44.Qxh6]
35...exf1=Q+ {+0.43} 36.Rxf1 {+0.44} 36...Rxg2 {+0.44} 37.Qxg2 {+0.40} 37...Bxg2+ {+0.41} 38.Kxg2 {+0.41} 38...Rxf8 {+0.41} 39.Kf3 {+0.39} 39...Kg7 {+0.40} 40.Ke4 {+0.20} 40...Rh8 {+0.23} 41.Kd4 {+0.35} 41...Rc8 {+0.39} 42.Rf4 {+0.35} 42...Kf6 {+0.36} 43.h4 {+0.32} 43...Re8 {+0.48} 44.Kc5 {+0.55} 44...Re5+ {+0.67} 45.Kd6 {+0.35} 45...Re3 {+0.31} 46.Rb4 {+0.52} 46...Kxf5 {+0.44} 47.Rxb5+ {+0.44} 47...Kg4 {+0.44} 48.h5 {+0.08} 48...f5 49.h6 Rh3 50.Ke5 Rxh6 51.Rb4+ Kf3 52.Kxf5 Ke3 53.Ke5 Kd3 54.Rb8 Kc3 55.b4 Kc4 56.Rb7 Rh5+ 57.Kd6 Rh6+ 58.Kd7 Rh7+ 59.Kc6 Rxb7 60.Kxb7 Kxb4 1/2-1/2

Agent Smith
20-03-2014, 03:25 PM
Rtng Ti Age Nat Score A A S M T K K A Perf Chg
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 gm 45 IND 4.0 / 6 X 1 . 1 = = = = 2897 +11 (+2 -0 =4)
2: Aronian, Levon 2830 gm 32 ARM 3.5 / 6 0 X 1 1 = = . = 2818 -1 (+2 -1 =3)
3: Svidler, Peter 2758 gm 38 RUS 3.0 / 6 . 0 X 0 1 = = 1 2772 +1 (+2 -2 =2)
4: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 gm 29 AZE 3.0 / 6 0 0 1 X = . = 1 2769 +1 (+2 -2 =2)
5: Topalov, Veselin 2785 gm 39 BUL 3.0 / 6 = = 0 = X 1 = . 2778 -1 (+1 -1 =4)
6: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 gm 39 RUS 3.0 / 6 = = = . 0 X 1 = 2769 -2 (+1 -1 =4)
7: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 gm 24 RUS 2.5 / 6 = . = = = 0 X = 2704 -5 (+0 -1 =5)
8: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 gm 24 RUS 2.0 / 6 = = 0 0 . = = X 2653 -4 (+0 -2 =4)


I think the issue is that the first tie-break is head-to-head - hence in the A/K/S "round robin" Kramnik is ahead of Svidler.

Ok - i thunked out how to calculate head-to-head on RR, and it tests ok on the Round 5 crosstable (below)
Two questions, is head-to-head always calculated on a mini round-robin ?
And when both head-to-head and total wins are used, will head-to-head always be the first used ?

Bill Gletsos
20-03-2014, 07:18 PM
[Event "FIDE Candidates Tournament 2014"]
[Site "Khanty-Mansiysk RUS"]
[Date "2014.03.18"]
[Round "5.2"]
[White "Kramnik, Vladimir"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2787"]
[BlackElo "2830"]
[ECO "E10"]
[EventDate "2014.03.13"]
[PlyCount "120"]
[SourceDate "2014.01.04"]
[Annotator "Critter 1.6a 64-bit"]
[b]removed pgn
The pgn at move 42 for black is displayed as f6 and not Kf6.

Garvinator
20-03-2014, 11:51 PM
Two questions, is head-to-head always calculated on a mini round-robin ? And when both head-to-head and total wins are used, will head-to-head always be the first used ?
Tie breaks in double round robins are unusual, and if there is a tie break it is usually Sonneborn - Berger System

So head to head and total wins are extremely rarely calculated as formal tie breaks, especially in a matter that will actually decide places to the extent that will decide how players will dictate their play. In the previous Candidates Tournament, Carlsen and Kramnik were tied for total score, tied for individual match score and Carlsen had recorded one more win, so he advanced to play Anand.

Ian Rout
21-03-2014, 09:04 AM
Two questions, is head-to-head always calculated on a mini round-robin ?
And when both head-to-head and total wins are used, will head-to-head always be the first used ?
On the first I believe so but there is an escape clause that it has to be possible, because in a Swiss some of the tied players may not have met. This creates an interpretation issue part-way through a round robin, as if they are still tied at the end the players will have met, but may not have done so yet.

On the second I would guess yes in the short term, but it's a matter of fashion. For instance S-B used to be the first tie-break. Of course the Candidates will be a powerful fashion leader.

Agent Smith
22-03-2014, 06:07 AM
Half way

1: Anand, Viswanathan 45 IND 4.5 / 7 X 1 = = 1 = = = (+2 -0 =5)
2: Aronian, Levon 32 ARM 4.5 / 7 0 X = 1 1 = = 1 (+3 -1 =3)
3: Kramnik, Vladimir 39 RUS 4.0 / 7 = = X = 1 = 0 1 (+2 -1 =4)
4: Svidler, Peter 38 RUS 3.5 / 7 = 0 = X 0 1 1 = (+2 -2 =3)
5: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 29 AZE 3.0 / 7 0 0 0 1 X 1 = = (+2 -3 =2)
6: Andreikin, Dmitry 24 RUS 3.0 / 7 = = = 0 0 X 1 = (+1 -2 =4)
7: Topalov, Veselin 39 BUL 3.0 / 7 = = 1 0 = 0 X = (+1 -2 =4)
8: Karjakin, Sergey 24 RUS 2.5 / 7 = 0 0 = = = = X (+0 -2 =5)

flushfyre
24-03-2014, 11:59 AM
Anand crushing now.

Why do they use head-to-head as a tiebreak here? Say Anand ends up tied with Aronian - if Anand has the better head-to-head then Aronian has the better score against other players - if anything, we should conclude from this alone that Aronian is better suited to playing Carlsen.

Craig_Hall
24-03-2014, 12:04 PM
So Anand beat Topalov in round 9 while Kramnik and Aronian self-destructed. Anand 6, Aronian 5, Kramnik, Karjakin, Memadeyarov 4.5, Svidler, Andreikin 4, Topalov 3.5. Anand has a better tie-break than Aronian (individual result and SB), so Aronian needs to outscore Anand by 1.5, with 5 rounds left.

A rematch is looking increasingly on the cards, even though there are exactly 0 votes for it :).

James Watson
24-03-2014, 12:27 PM
As much as I like Vishy and enjoyed having a Vishy-Magnus WC match, I've already seen that and was rather hoping to see Kramnik or Aronion challenge Carlson

Agent Smith
24-03-2014, 04:42 PM
Yeah - it's going to be a bit of a groundhog day. AFAIK They havent found a venue yet,
and may have to hold it in Kirsan's back yard beside the BBQ and boxes of tanning oil.

Because of Anands better head to head with Aronian, he effectively holds 1.5 over the field, and is probably home,
considering the solid chess he's been playing.


1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 45 IND 6.0 / 9 XX 1= =. =. 1. =. =. =1 2903 +17 (+3 -0 =6)
2: Aronian, Levon 2830 32 ARM 5.0 / 9 0= XX =. 1. 10 1. =. =. 2805 -4 (+3 -2 =4)
3: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 39 RUS 4.5 / 9 =. =. XX 10 1. =. == 0. 2761 -4 (+2 -2 =5)
4: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 24 RUS 4.5 / 9 =. 0. 01 XX =. =1 =. =. 2771 +1 (+2 -2 =5)
5: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 29 AZE 4.5 / 9 0. 01 0. =. XX 1. 1. == 2780 +4 (+3 -3 =3)
6: Svidler, Peter 2758 38 RUS 4.0 / 9 =. 0. =. =0 0. XX 1= 1. 2721 -5 (+2 -3 =4)
7: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 24 RUS 4.0 / 9 =. =. == =. 0. 0= XX 1. 2734 +4 (+1 -2 =6)
8: Topalov, Veselin 2785 39 BUL 3.5 / 9 =0 =. 1. =. == 0. 0. XX 2687 -13 (+1 -3 =5)

Rincewind
24-03-2014, 05:00 PM
I guess Aronian and Kramnik both have to play for wins as it is their only way to upset Anand's applecart. I like to think Kramnik still has it in him especially since he still has a game against Anand and a win in that would be a huge help.

Adamski
25-03-2014, 07:29 AM
I can only admire Anand for coming back so strongly after losing pretty badly to Magnus n the WC match.

Ian Rout
25-03-2014, 09:28 AM
I guess Aronian and Kramnik both have to play for wins as it is their only way to upset Anand's applecart. I like to think Kramnik still has it in him especially since he still has a game against Anand and a win in that would be a huge help.
In effect Anand could be considered 1.4 points ahead of both Kramnik and Aronian in that if Kramnik wins then either would be ahead of him (on points or tie-break) with another half-point gain. But it's not as simple as that. Karjakin and Mamedyarov are in the same position as Kramnik, a win vs Anand puts them less than 0.5 behind him after tie-break (Mamedyarov on more wins). So there are still five realistic outcomes (though the three others are mathematically possible).

Garvinator
25-03-2014, 11:17 PM
Kramnik's race is now run.

Agent Smith
26-03-2014, 07:38 AM
Rtng Age Nat Score An Ar Ka Ma Sv Kr An To Perf Chg
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 45 IND 6.5 / 10 XX 1= =. 1= =. =. =. =1 2886 +16 (+3 -0 =7)
2: Aronian, Levon 2830 32 ARM 5.5 / 10 0= XX 1. 10 1. =. =. == 2800 -5 (+3 -2 =5)
3: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 24 RUS 5.0 / 10 =. 0. XX =. =1 01 == =. 2765 -1 (+2 -2 =6)
4: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 29 AZE 5.0 / 10 0= 01 =. XX 1. 0. 1. == 2779 +4 (+3 -3 =4)
5: Svidler, Peter 2758 38 RUS 5.0 / 10 =. 0. =0 0. XX =1 1= 1. 2766 +2 (+3 -3 =4)
6: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 39 RUS 4.5 / 10 =. =. 10 1. =0 XX == 0. 2724 -9 (+2 -3 =5)
7: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 24 RUS 4.5 / 10 =. =. == 0. 0= == XX 1. 2740 +5 (+1 -2 =7)
8: Topalov, Veselin 2785 39 BUL 4.0 / 10 =0 == =. == 0. 1. 0. XX 2701 -12 (+1 -3 =6)

Desmond
26-03-2014, 06:54 PM
Didn't realise it was so close. Have put the mockers on Lev.
The trick is to pick the person you want to lose. ;)

ER
26-03-2014, 07:05 PM
The trick is to pick the person you want to lose. ;)

lol good excuse too! (particularly for wooden spoon champions! :P :)

Desmond
26-03-2014, 07:11 PM
lol good excuse too! (particularly for wooden spoon champions! :P :)Nah not me, I tend to follow the school of: he prolly won't win but if he does I'll look like a genius. ;)

ER
26-03-2014, 07:31 PM
Nah not me, I tend to follow the school of: he prolly won't win but if he does I'll look like a genius. ;)

I wish that strategy worked for the footy tipping competition
too! Bloody chess 's becoming more unpredictable than the Pies!

Agent Smith
27-03-2014, 06:07 AM
Three rounds left. I guess if Karjakin or Svidler can beat Vishy, it's vaguely possible they have a chance ?
Karjakin and Aronian still have to play again too. It'd be great if one of these guys could get up.


1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 45 IND 7.0 / 11 XX 1= =. 1= =. == =. =1 2879 +17 (+3 -0 =8)
2: Aronian, Levon 2830 32 ARM 6.0 / 11 0= XX 1. 10 1= =. =. == 2799 -6 (+3 -2 =6)
3: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 24 RUS 5.5 / 11 =. 0. XX =. =1 01 == == 2766 +0 (+2 -2 =7)
4: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 29 AZE 5.5 / 11 0= 01 =. XX 1. 0. 1= == 2772 +3 (+3 -3 =5)
5: Svidler, Peter 2758 38 RUS 5.5 / 11 =. 0= =0 0. XX =1 1= 1. 2772 +2 (+3 -3 =5)
6: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 39 RUS 5.0 / 11 == =. 10 1. =0 XX == 0. 2725 -10 (+2 -3 =6)
7: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 24 RUS 5.0 / 11 =. =. == 0= 0= == XX 1. 2738 +4 (+1 -2 =8)
8: Topalov, Veselin 2785 39 BUL 4.5 / 11 =0 == == == 0. 1. 0. XX 2707 -12 (+1 -3 =7)

Agent Smith
27-03-2014, 06:29 AM
http://www.chess.com/news/four-draws-in-round-11-candidates-anand-closer-to-victory-3622
https://twitter.com/search?q=%23Candidates2014&src=hash

Desmond
28-03-2014, 06:38 AM
Topalov beats Svidler to make the battle for the wooden spoon interesting - the bottom half are all on the same score!

Adamski
28-03-2014, 06:59 AM
A bit late but I now predict that Vishy will win.

lost
28-03-2014, 07:05 AM
Congratulations, Jamie! How many arbiters are there?

There is 3 Arbiters in total. One from Greece, one from Canada and myself.

lost

Agent Smith
28-03-2014, 08:03 AM
A bit late but I now predict that Vishy will win.

Haha - You've given me renewed hope that the earth will move and Aronian will get up.
Well - not really :) Congrats to Vishy for a great win.
Rest day today and with two rounds left, Vishy only needs to tie with Lev


1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 45 IND 7.5 / 12 XX 1= 1= =. =. == =1 == 2866 +17 (+3 -0 =9)
2: Aronian, Levon 2830 32 ARM 6.5 / 12 0= XX 10 1. 1= =. == == 2794 -6 (+3 -2 =7)
3: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 29 AZE 6.0 / 12 0= 01 XX == 1. 1= == 0. 2772 +4 (+3 -3 =6)
4: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 24 RUS 6.0 / 12 =. 0. == XX =1 == == 01 2766 +0 (+2 -2 =8)
5: Svidler, Peter 2758 38 RUS 5.5 / 12 =. 0= 0. =0 XX 1= 10 =1 2744 -1 (+3 -4 =5)
6: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 24 RUS 5.5 / 12 == =. 0= == 0= XX 1. == 2745 +6 (+1 -2 =9)
7: Topalov, Veselin 2785 39 BUL 5.5 / 12 =0 == == == 01 0. XX 1. 2742 -7 (+2 -3 =7)
8: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 39 RUS 5.5 / 12 == == 1. 10 =0 == 0. XX 2738 -8 (+2 -3 =7)

Jesper Norgaard
30-03-2014, 02:36 AM
Anand indeed has won, before the last round. He clinched it with a draw in a slightly inferior position against Karjakin, and since Aronian lost against Andreikin, his lead is now 1½ points over the field, impossible to overcome in the last round. Kramnik was a bit lucky when Topalov blundered in the endgame, and his win actually boosted him from last place to second place in the tournament, a clear indication of the extremely equal level between all candidates in this event. That's why Anand can win it with a mere +3 score over 13 rounds.

We will have a Carlsen-Anand clash again in November 2014, as I understand it the venue is not yet clear because bidders wanted to wait to know who the challenger would be before bidding on a match. Will Chennai put a good bid on the match? Will Tromsø? Time will tell.




Norgaard tiebreak Final Standing:
1 Anand,V 2770 *** 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ - ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ Norg: 112.1897 place : 1 8 Buch: 88.00 Berg: 50.25 Win: 0.029 ½10½½½½½½½½½11
3 Kramnik,V 2787 ½ ½ ½ ½ *** ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 - 1 0 Norg: 94.0607 place : 2 6½ Buch: 91.00 Berg: 42.50 Win: 0.025 010½00½½½½11½½
6 Andreikin,D 2709 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 - *** 0 ½ ½ ½ Norg: 94.0497 place : 3 6½ Buch: 91.00 Berg: 42.50 Win: 0.014 010½0½½½½½½1½½
8 Karjakin,S 2766 ½ ½ 0 - 0 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ *** Norg: 94.0160 place : 4 6½ Buch: 91.00 Berg: 42.00 Win: 0.016 ½½½1000½½½½1½½
2 Aronian,L 2830 0 ½ *** ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 1 - Norg: 93.9734 place : 5 6½ Buch: 91.00 Berg: 41.25 Win: 0.027 ½½½1000½½½110½
7 Mamedyarov,S 2757 0 ½ 0 1 0 - 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ *** ½ ½ Norg: 93.9734 place : 6 6½ Buch: 91.00 Berg: 41.25 Win: 0.027 ½½½1000½½½110½
4 Svidler,P 2758 ½ - 0 ½ ½ 1 *** 1 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 Norg: 87.9357 place : 7 6 Buch: 92.00 Berg: 38.75 Win: 0.025 01000½½½½½110½
5 Topalov,V 2785 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 0 1 *** 0 - ½ ½ ½ ½ Norg: 81.8711 place : 8 5½ Buch: 93.00 Berg: 36.00 Win: 0.014 01000½½½½½½10½

Double Round Robin (14 rounds) (Unplayed games: 0/112 = 0.00%)
Combined tiebreak Final Standing:
1 Anand,V 2770 *** 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ - ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 0.00 place : 1 score: 8 [Score]
7 Mamedyarov,S 2757 0 ½ 0 1 0 - 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ *** ½ 4.52 place : 2 score: 6½ [Direct Encounter]
3 Kramnik,V 2787 ½ ½ ½ ½ *** ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 - 1 4.02 3.00 place : 3 score: 6½ [Most Wins]
6 Andreikin,D 2709 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 - *** 0 ½ ½ 4.01 2.00 42.50 place : 4 score: 6½ [SB = Neustadtl = Berger]
8 Karjakin,S 2766 ½ ½ 0 - 0 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * 4.02 2.00 42.00 place : 5 score: 6½ [SB = Neustadtl = Berger]
2 Aronian,L 2830 0 ½ *** ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 1 3.53 place : 6 score: 6½ [Direct Encounter]
4 Svidler,P 2758 ½ - 0 ½ ½ 1 *** 1 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0.00 place : 7 score: 6 [Score]
5 Topalov,V 2785 ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 0 0 1 *** 0 - ½ ½ ½ 0.00 place : 8 score: 5½ [Score]


Combined statistics:
1. Direct Encounter
2. Most Wins
3. SB = Neustadtl = Berger


The tiebreaks are an uneven handfull, in my opinion Sonneborn-Berger (also called Neustadtl) makes most sense but is relegated to third criteria, Direct Encounter is not bad for defining a tournament winner, while Most Wins is just hopelessly indifferent for any tournament, besides being potentially indecisive in only dividing the score group to subgroups depending on the number of wins. But if a match with Carlsen will have a Rapid/Blitz/Armageddon playoff in the event of equal score after the last round, why on Earth not have the same rules for an eventual tiebreak for this tournament? Surely setting off an extra day for the candidates to finish that playoff would be both appreciated by world chess fans, as well as training the candidate to a playoff should it happen in the World Championship match.

ETA: Sorry, I had forgotten to include Andreikin's impressive win - corrected!

Agent Smith
30-03-2014, 06:25 AM
http://en.chessbase.com/Portals/4/files/news/2014/events/candidates/topalov13.jpg
[Event "FIDE Candidates 2014"]
[Site "Khanty-Mansiysk"]
[Date "2014.03.29"]
[Round "13.4"]
[White "Kramnik, Vladimir"]
[Black "Topalov, Veselin"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2787"]
[BlackElo "2785"]
[ECO "D43"]
[EventDate "2014.03.13"]
[Opening "QGD semi-Slav"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 d5 4.Nc3 c6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bxf6 Qxf6 7.e3 g6 8.Bd3 Bg7 9.O-O O-O 10.Ne5 c5 11.cxd5 cxd4 12.exd4 exd5 13.Re1 Be6 14.Bb5 Rd8 15.Rc1 a6 16.Ba4 Rd6 17.Qb3 b6 18.Ne2 b5 19.Qa3 Bf8 20.Bc2 Nc6 21.Qg3 Rc8 22.h4 Ne7 23.h5 g5 24.f4 Qg7 25.Rf1 f6 26.Ng4 Rdc6 27.Ne3 f5 28.fxg5 Qxg5 29.Qxg5+ hxg5 30.Bxf5 Nxf5 31.Rxc6 Rxc6 32.Nxf5 Rc2 33.Neg3 Rxb2 34.Re1 Bd7 35.Ne7+ Kf7 36.Nxd5 Bc6 37.Rf1+ Ke6 38.Ne3 Bg7 39.Ngf5 Bh8 40.h6 Be4 41.d5+ Kd7 42.Ng3 Bd3 43.Rf7+ Ke8 44.Rf3 Rxa2 45.Nef5 Rd2
(45...Bxf5 46.Nxf5 b4 47.Nd6+ Ke7 48.Nc8+ Ke8 49.Nd6+ Ke7 50.Nc4 Bd4+ 51.Kf1 Rc2 52.d6+ Ke6 53.Na5 Kxd6 54.Rd3 Ke5 55.h7 Rc1+ 56.Ke2 Rh1 57.Nc6+ Kd5 58.Nxd4 Rxh7 59.Nb3+ Kc4 60.Nd2+ Kc5 61.Re3 )
46.Ng7+ Ke7 47.d6+ Kxd6 48.Rf8 b4 49.Rxh8 b3 50.N7f5+ Bxf5 51.Nxf5+ Kc7 52.h7 b2 53.Rc8+ Kxc8 54.h8=Q+ Kd7 55.Qh7+
(55.Qh7+ Ke6 56.Ne3 Kf6 57.Qf5+ Ke7 58.Kf1 Ke8 59.Ke1 Rd6 60.Qe5+ Kf7 61.Qxb2 )
1-0

Garrett
30-03-2014, 07:58 AM
"my wife bought it for Christmas, what am I to do"

Kevin Bonham
30-03-2014, 09:11 AM
Another great triumph for a Chesschat tipping poll!

Kevin Bonham
30-03-2014, 09:44 AM
Andreikin's win against Aronian was nicely done:

[White "Andreikin, Dmitry"]
[Black "Aronian, Levon"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteTitle "GM"]
[BlackTitle "GM"]
[WhiteElo "2709"]
[BlackElo "2830"]
[ECO "A45"]
[Opening "Trompovsky attack (Ruth, Opovcensky opening)"]
[WhiteFideId "4158814"]
[BlackFideId "13300474"]
[EventDate "2014.03.13"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 g6 3. Bxf6 exf6 4. c4 Bb4+ 5. Nd2 c5 6. a3 Bxd2+ 7. Qxd2 cxd4
8. Nf3 Nc6 9. Nxd4 Nxd4 10. Qxd4 Qa5+ 11. b4 Qe5 12. O-O-O a5 13. b5 d6 14.
Qxe5+ dxe5 15. g3 Be6 16. Bg2 Bxc4 17. Bxb7 Rb8 18. Bc6+ Kf8 19. a4 Bb3 20. Kb2
Bxa4 21. Rd5 Ke7 22. Ka3 Bc2 23. Rd7+ Kf8 24. e4 a4 25. Rc1 Bb3 26. Bd5 Bxd5 27.
Rxd5 Kg7 28. Rc7 Rb6 29. Rc6 Rb7 30. Kxa4 Ra8+ 31. Ra6 Rc8 32. b6 Rc2 33. Kb5
Rxf2 34. Kc6 Re7 35. Raa5 Re6+ 36. Rd6 Re7 37. Rdd5 Re6+ 38. Kc7 Re7+ 39. Kc8
Re8+ 40. Kd7 Kf8 41. b7 Re7+ 42. Kc6 Re6+ 43. Kc7 Re7+ 44. Kb6 1-0

Jesper Norgaard
30-03-2014, 12:12 PM
Andreikin's win against Anand was nicely done:

... eh, against Aronian - perhaps you can correct your own post and delete me (this post) :)

Agent Smith
31-03-2014, 05:58 AM
Final

Rtng Age Nat Score An Ka Kr Ma An Ar Sv To Perf Chg
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1: Anand, Viswanathan 2770 45 IND 8.5 / 14 XX == == 1= == 1= == =1 2850 +15 (+3 -0 =11)
2: Karjakin, Sergey 2766 24 RUS 7.5 / 14 == XX 01 == == 01 =1 == 2799 +7 (+3 -2 =9)
3: Kramnik, Vladimir 2787 39 RUS 7.0 / 14 == 10 XX 1= == == =0 01 2767 -4 (+3 -3 =8)
4: Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2757 29 AZE 7.0 / 14 0= == 0= XX 1= 01 1= == 2772 +4 (+3 -3 =8)
5: Andreikin, Dmitry 2709 24 RUS 7.0 / 14 == == == 0= XX =1 0= 1= 2779 +14 (+2 -2 =10)
6: Aronian, Levon 2830 32 ARM 6.5 / 14 0= 10 == 10 =0 XX 1= == 2732 -20 (+3 -4 =7)
7: Svidler, Peter 2758 38 RUS 6.5 / 14 == =0 =1 0= 1= 0= XX 10 2743 -3 (+3 -4 =7)
8: Topalov, Veselin 2785 39 BUL 6.0 / 14 =0 == 10 == 0= == 01 XX 2718 -14 (+2 -4 =8)

Adamski
31-03-2014, 03:33 PM
In the end a poor performance by Lev and an excellent one by Vishy. I wonder who will be Vishy's seconds in November?