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Kevin Bonham
28-09-2013, 09:52 PM
This is the final GP qualifier for the Candidates. The situation is that Topalov has won the GP and qualified. Either Grischuk or Caruana can become the other qualifier if they win the tournament outright. If neither does this, Mamedyarov qualifies.

The field is: Grischuk, Caruana, Wang Hao, Ponomariov, Dominguez, Nakamura, Gelfand, Giri, Ivanchuk, Bacrot, Fressinet, Tomashevsky. Karjakin was slated to appear but has withdrawn; he has qualified for the Candidates by rating.

Currently:

3.5/5 Gelfand
3 Nakamura, Caruana, Ivanchuk
2.5 Grischuk, Tomashevsky, Bacrot, Dominguez, Ponomariov
2 Wang Hao, Fressinet
1 Giri

Grischuk had a loss to Fressinet.

There are six rounds to go.

Max Illingworth
28-09-2013, 10:10 PM
I have to say, Gelfand has been performing very well lately. It's funny to think people were complaining about Gelfand taking the place of a higher-rated player (e.g. Caruana, Nakamura or Karjakin)in this year's Candidates, and now in next year's Candidates he may very well be one of the top few highest rated players not in the field. Of course he might still get the organiser's wild card - he would be a good choice.

Kevin Bonham
28-09-2013, 10:57 PM
Big events often bring out the best in Gelfand.

Kevin Bonham
29-09-2013, 07:56 PM
Caruana has won against Ivanchuk in round 6 after Ivanchuk unexpectedly resigned an inferior SCB endgame position. Caruana equal first with five to go.

Kevin Bonham
30-09-2013, 02:24 PM
Disaster for both potential Candidates in round 7 with Caruana blundering in the opening and losing queen for rook and pawn (nasty stuff!) and Grischuk losing to Gelfand.

5/7 Gelfand
4.5 Nakamura
4 Caruana
3.5 Tomashevsky, Bacrot, Dominguez, Ponomariov, Ivanchuk
3 Grischuk, Wang Hao, Fressinet
2 Giri

Caruana has white against Gelfand and a win will put him right back in contention for the outright while even a draw will make it very hard for him. Grischuk's situation is very difficult; his run home is not that hard but he probably needs to win the lot.

Agent Smith
30-09-2013, 08:19 PM
I wonder why Ivanchuk resigned. Perhaps he knows he odesnt have the staying power ?
[Event "FIDE GP Paris"]
[Site "Elancourt FRA"]
[Date "2013.09.28"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Caruana, F."]
[Black "Ivanchuk, V."]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2779"]
[BlackElo "2731"]
[ECO "C11"]
[EventDate "2013.09.22"]
[PlyCount "65"]
1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Nfd7 5.f4 c5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.Be3 Qb6 8.Na4 Qa5+
9.c3 c4 10.b4 Qc7 11.Be2 Be7 12.O-O O-O 13.Qc2 b5 14.Nc5 Nxc5 15.dxc5 a5
16.a3 Bd7 17.Nd4 Nxd4 18.Bxd4 axb4 19.axb4 Rxa1 20.Rxa1 Qb7 21.Qa2 Bc6
22.Qb1 f5 23.exf6 Bxf6 24.Qd1 Ra8 25.Rxa8+ Qxa8 26.Bg4 Bd7 27.h3 Qe8 28.Qd2
Qf7 29.Qe3 Bxd4 30.Qxd4 Qf6 31.Qxf6 gxf6 32.Kf2 Kf7 33.Ke3 1-0

Kevin Bonham
01-10-2013, 11:42 AM
Caruana won, which I expected while watching the game.

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. O-O Nge7 5. d4 cxd4 6. Nxd4 Qb6 7. Nxc6 bxc6 8. Bd3 Ng6 9. c4 Be7 10. Nc3 O-O 11. Rb1 Qc7 12. Be3 e5 13. g3 d6 14. b4 Be6 15. Qd2 Rac8 16. b5 Bd8 17. Rfc1 Qd7 18. bxc6 Rxc6 19. Nd5 Bb6 20. Nxb6 axb6 21. Bxb6 Ra8 22. Bf1 Qc8 23. Rb4 Nf8 24. a4 Nd7 25. a5 h6 26. h4 Kh7 27. Qe3 Nc5 28. f4 exf4 29. gxf4 f5 30. exf5 Bxf5 31. Re1 d5 32. cxd5 Rg6+ 33. Kf2 Nd7 34. h5 Rg4 35. Bh3 Nf6 36. Qc1 Qf8 37. Rc4 Qf7 38. Bxg4 Nxg4+ 39. Kg1 Qxh5 40. Qd2 Qh4 41. Re2 Rf8 42. Rc3 Qh5 43. d6 Rf6 44. d7 Rg6 45. Rg2 1-0

Grischuk also won, but so did Nakamura, because Ivanchuk managed to lose on time on move 55.

5.5 Nakamura
5 Caruana, Gelfand
4.5 Bacrot
4 Tomashevsky, Grischuk, Dominguez
3.5 Wang Hao, Fressinet, Ponomariov, Ivanchuk
2 Giri

Rest day tonight.

Kevin Bonham
03-10-2013, 09:00 AM
Every game in round nine was drawn. This eliminates Grischuk from contention for the Candidates qualifying spot since Gelfand and Nakamura have not yet played meaning Grischuk cannot finish outright first. Caruana needs at bare minimum 1.5/2, but more likely 2/2 and other results going his way.

Kevin Bonham
04-10-2013, 03:13 AM
Caruana won and Gelfand is about to beat Nakamura. Bacrot also won.

So Caruana and Gelfand lead Nakamura and Bacrot by half a point.

Key games:

Dominguez - Caruana
Gelfand - Ponomariov
Giri - Nakamura
Bacrot - Grischuk

If Caruana loses, Mamedyarov is the Candidate
If Caruana wins, Caruana is the Candidate provided Gelfand doesn't win
If Caruana draws, he needs Gelfand to lose and neither Nakamura nor Bacrot to win

A monster game for Caruana with black tomorrow night.

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2013, 12:15 AM
Forgot about the early last round start :wall:

Tuned in to find Caruana had just been held to a draw.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.O-O-O Be7 9.f3 b5 10.g4 Nxd4 11.Qxd4 Bb7 12.g5 Nh5 13.Rd2 Rc8 14.Bxb5 axb5 15.Nxb5 Qc6 16.Na7 Qc7 17.Nb5 Qc6 18.Na7 Qc7 19.Nb5 Qc6 -

Bacrot has also drawn so Caruana needs Gelfand to lose and Nakamura to not win.

Gelfand is currently OK.

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2013, 01:03 AM
Gelfand - Ponomariov draw so that's a tie for first between Gelfand and Caruana with Nakamura to join them if he wins (which he isn't really threatening to do right at the moment.)

Not enough for Caruana - Mamedyarov qualifies for the Candidates.

Agent Smith
05-10-2013, 05:04 AM
FIDE GP Paris
Elancourt FRA, 2013.09.22 - 2013.10.04
Average Rating: 2745 (Category 20)

Rtng Nat Score C G N B G D W P T I F G Perf Chg
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1: Caruana, Fabiano 2779 ITA 7.0 / 11 X 1 0 = = = = = 1 1 1 = 2844 +9 (+4 -1 =6)
2: Gelfand, Boris 2764 ISR 7.0 / 11 0 X 1 = 1 1 = = = = = 1 2846 +12 (+4 -1 =6)
3: Nakamura, Hikaru 2772 USA 6.5 / 11 1 0 X 1 = = = = = 1 = = 2808 +6 (+3 -1 =7)
4: Bacrot, Etienne 2723 FRA 6.5 / 11 = = 0 X = = = 1 = = 1 1 2813 +14 (+3 -1 =7)
5: Grischuk, Alexander 2785 RUS 5.5 / 11 = 0 = = X = = = = 1 0 1 2742 -7 (+2 -2 =7)
6: Dominguez Perez, Leinier 2757 CUB 5.5 / 11 = 0 = = = X = = = = = 1 2744 -2 (+1 -1 =9)
7: Wang, Hao 2736 CHN 5.0 / 11 = = = = = = X = = 0 = = 2710 -3 (+0 -1 =10)
8: Ponomariov, Ruslan 2756 UKR 5.0 / 11 = = = 0 = = = X = = = = 2709 -8 (+0 -1 =10)
9: Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2703 RUS 5.0 / 11 0 = = = = = = = X = = = 2713 +2 (+0 -1 =10)
10: Ivanchuk, Vassily 2731 UKR 5.0 / 11 0 = 0 = 0 = 1 = = X 1 = 2711 -2 (+2 -3 =6)
11: Fressinet, Laurent 2708 FRA 4.5 / 11 0 = = 0 1 = = = = 0 X = 2684 -3 (+1 -3 =7)
12: Giri, Anish 2737 NED 3.5 / 11 = 0 = 0 0 0 = = = = = X 2613 -18 (+0 -4 =7)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
66 games: +13 =46 -7

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2013, 07:59 AM
It doesn't look like Caruana had to take that repetition by any means. Perhaps the Candidates was not a big deal for him.

Agent Smith
05-10-2013, 02:26 PM
I wonder if the players were being bullish at all ?. Thats quite a lot of draws for a tournament with the Sofia rules.
66 games: +13 =46 -7
~ 70% draws

Anyway, Gelfand's 10th round win was a nice one, and got him equal first.

[Event "FIDE GP Paris"]
[Site "Elancourt FRA"]
[Date "2013.10.03"]
[Round "10.3"]
[White "Nakamura, Hikaru"]
[Black "Gelfand, Boris"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2772"]
[BlackElo "2764"]
[ECO "B90"]
[EventDate "2013.09.22"]
[PlyCount "82"]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 Ng4 7.Bc1 Nf6 8.Be3
Ng4 9.Bg5 h6 10.Bh4 g5 11.Bg3 Bg7 12.h3 Ne5 13.f3 Nbc6 14.Bf2 Be6 15.Qd2
Rc8 16.O-O-O Nxd4 17.Bxd4 Qa5 18.a3 O-O 19.h4 g4 20.Qf2 Rc6 21.f4 Rfc8 22.Qg3
( 22.fxe5 dxe5 23.Be3 Rxc3 24.bxc3
( 24.Bd3 R3c6 )
24...Qxa3+ 25.Kd2 Qxc3+ 26.Ke2 Bc4+ 27.Rd3 Qxc2+ 28.Ke1 )
22...Nd7 23.Bxg7 Kxg7 24.f5 Rxc3 25.bxc3 Qxa3+ 26.Kd2 Nf6 27.Qd3 Bc4 28.Qd4 d5 29.exd5 Bxd5 30.Rg1 Be4 31.Bd3 Qa5 32.Qb4 Qc7 33.Bxe4 a5 34.Qxb7
Qf4+ 35.Ke2 Rc7 36.Qb6 Nxe4 37.Qd4+ Kh7 38.c4
( 38.Rdf1 Nxc3+ 39.Qxc3 Qxf1+ 40.Rxf1 Rxc3 )
38...Rd7 39.Qe3
( 39.Qxd7 Qf2+ 40.Kd3 Nc5+ 41.Kc3 Nxd7 )
39...Ng3+ 40.Qxg3 Qxg3 41.Rxd7 Qe5+
( 41...Qe5+ 42.Kd2 Qxf5 43.Rd3 Qf2+ 44.Kc3 Qxg1 ) 0-1

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2013, 05:58 PM
Yes that was a very nice win.

Concerning Sofia rules it was very obvious (again) that players who feel so inclined will just tacitly or even openly agree to repeat moves to circumvent them. I think these contrived repetitions are a bigger pox on major events than short agreed draws.

Garvinator
05-10-2013, 08:23 PM
Nothing like repeating an opinion after almost two years without saying it. With garbage like this, how can chess ever be regarded at a serious sport? Or even gain meaningful long term sponsorship when rubbish like this is served up. Works a treat for the sponsors. Get the media interest when the title and qualification spots are on the line, expect that the players will show all their skill to try and qualify or win the title. What do they do? Play with not much more skill than the average weekend player can serve up.

And they expect sponsors to fork out serious cash in western countries compared to EPL, NFL, Champions League. They have got to be kidding. If you want serious cash GM's, how about turning up and putting on a fair dinkum show for ALL rounds first, not just the ones you can be bothered playing.

Kevin Bonham
05-10-2013, 08:33 PM
Of the 46 draws there were eight in under 30 moves and 19 in 30-40 moves. The anti-draw rules are just not working.

Garvinator
05-10-2013, 08:41 PM
Of the 46 draws there were eight in under 30 moves and 19 in 30-40 moves. The anti-draw rules are just not working.
In quite a lot of team sports, each player has written into their contract 'performance bonuses'. For each game the team wins, each player receives extra money. If the team loses, each player only receives the basic wage. Might be something some of these tournaments might need to consider. Offer a basic prizemoney amount and then offer large increases for games won.

Yes I am aware that some of the players receive large appearance fees that are more than the prize money alone, but both the Sofia, no draws before 30 moves and other measures are not working to encourage the top players to actually try and show their skill each and every game. You know, the thing they are being paid to do, sometimes quite handsomely. If I was the sponsor, I would be pissed off.